Spotify

Spotify UX vs. Apple Music UX: How do they compare?

As a music lover in 2018, it is almost impossible to avoid streaming services and their neatly priced subscriptions.

There are two major players that account for 110 million subscribers globally and make up 32% of the US market for music purchases – Apple (15%) and Spotify (17%). As such, it only makes sense to pit the two streaming app giants against one another to see who reigns supreme in terms of having a superior UX.

Five of the all-time best brand tie-ups, including Starbucks, O2 & Zoolander

Last week saw three of the strangest brand tie-ups for a while.

The first was that Nike Starbucks shoe, retailing at $100, the second, a strained Wayne Rooney cameo (see below) in an X-Men adventure (and some blue-faced mascots at a United game), the third, green and red Angry Birds burger buns at McDonald’s.

This got me thinking – what are the best brand tie-ups of the past few years?

Six things that make a good subscription service

In my right hand I have a mug of Brazilian coffee (Fruit and Nut Espresso).

The coffee was delivered through my letter box yesterday, courtesy of Pact Coffee, one of many coffee subscription services.

However, Pact doesn’t like to think of itself as a subscription service. Its founder, Stephen Rapoport, believes many subscription services work for the business but not for the customer.

So, if the model is often abused, just what makes a good subscription service?

What is service design & who uses it?

Service and product design are in the ascendancy, becoming increasingly important within marketing and engineering departments.

Ashley Friedlein makes the claim in his trends for 2016, citing the number of consultancies and systems integrators that have made design acquisitions (see this Wired article for how IBM is beefing up its design creds).

Service design follows naturally from a focus on customer experience (as a central tenet of that dreaded term, digital transformation).

Atmospheric marketing: Riding the tidal wave of IoT data

The tide may already have turned towards big data, but the waves are about to get a whole lot bigger. 

From watches and wearables, to beacons and smart home systems, connected devices are expected to exceed 38bn by 2020, and each one will generate valuable data about what consumers think and how they behave.