Staffing

ROI key to future mobile marketing investments: report

With billions of mobile devices in use by consumers around the world, and with those devices getting more and more capable every year, it’s no surprise that many industry observers believe the future of mobile marketing is bright.

How bright? Some have gone on to suggest that mobile ad spend will eventually overtake that of television. A bold prediction given that brands spend well over $100bn globally on television ads ever year — magnitudes of order more than they spend on mobile ads.

Should companies outsource content marketing?

The number of search queries for the term ‘content marketing’ has more than doubled in the past two years, reflecting an obvious fact: despite the fact that content marketing isn’t new, it’s of increasing interest to a growing number of companies.

Just how much interest is there? According to research by the Custom Content Council and ContentWise, marketers are increasing how much of their budgets they devote to content marketing and all told, 79% of marketers report moving into branded content “at a moderate or aggressive pace.”

10 reasons why outbound telemarketing programs fail

Before the advent of the internet and mobile phones, if you wanted to “reach out and touch someone” it often meant picking up the telephone.

Today, despite the fact that we have more ways to communicate than ever, many companies continue to pick up the phone in hopes that the person they’re reaching out and touching will eventually become a customer. In fact, although it may be one of the least sexy marketing channels, telemarketing is for some companies still one of the most effective direct marketing techniques employed.

Sorry AdAge: Permlancing is not the new agency model

A recent Ad Age article proclaimed that freelancers are a happy and well paid lot, and that they’re a hot new trend on Madison Avenue.

However, when you scratch the surface of their research, it’s clear that permanent freelancing brings as much instability to agencies as those stepping-up for extended temporary work. 

A reality that’s easy for employed agency execs, and writers, to overlook.