stock options

Seven Silicon Valley benefits and perks your company might want to avoid

When it comes to building a successful business, many companies, digital and otherwise, look to Silicon Valley for cues. And why shouldn’t they? The region has been a source of incredible innovation for decades and in the past has produced some of the most successful companies in the world in recent years.

But what has worked in Silicon Valley isn’t guaranteed to work outside of Silicon Valley, and when it comes to employee benefits and perks, companies should think carefully about what Silicon Valley innovations they adopt.

Zynga stomps on Silicon Valley tradition: report

Joining a young startup that goes on to become big is the stereotypical Silicon
Valley ‘dream.’ And for employees lucky enough to have joined companies
like Google, YouTube, Facebook and Groupon early on, dreams do come
true.

Thank the Silicon Valley-originated practice of granting equity to
employees for that. To attract the best and brightest, most technology
startups have little choice but to give their employees an ownership
stake in the companies they’re helping build.

It’s the Silicon Valley
tradition that has become a standard, and for the employees who join
startups that go on to do great things, equity can be the basis for
fortunes large and small.

Startups: money can’t buy love, or usage

With the hottest startups raising big money from investors, and founders and early employees of some of the most successful cashing out some of their equity to the tune of millions, it’s no surprise that so many entrepreneurs and wannabe entrepreneurs are taking the plunge and starting companies that they hope could be the next big thing.

Building a successful company, of course, is tough, and the odds aren’t favorable. Despite the hot market, a growing number of observers believe that we may be in the midst of a bubble which may not be as big as the first, but which could still create significant pain for entrepreneurs and the startup investment community.

There’s nothing wrong with liquidity

Are Facebook employees who took advantage of the ability to cash out
some of their stock holdings as part of a tender offer from investor
Digital Sky Technologies “mercenaries“?

Controversial BusinessWeek tech reporter Sarah Lacy thinks they are.
The reason: they’re giving up too soon. Lacy believes the $100m tender
offer, which is giving some employees the ability to sell up to 25% of
their Facebook stock at a $6.5bn valuation, will prove to be a
steal for Digital Sky Technologies.