supermarkets

10 supermarkets with 10 very different email opt-in/opt out strategies

In this post we examine the hotchpotch of opt-in and opt-out methods deployed by the leading supermarkets in the UK and globally used to obtain customer consent to add them to their email marketing lists during registration and checkout.

As retailers reassess their consent strategy, it would be prudent to examine the methods used by competitors, ideally incorporating customer feedback and testing, to adopt the best approach.

Five questions raised by the Amazon & Morrisons grocery deal

The deal that will see Amazon supplied wholesale fresh produce by Morrisons has fascinated the media.

Could Amazon Pantry’s entry to fresh online groceries in the UK shake up the already volatile supermarket landscape?

Here are five questions raised by the deal.

Do supermarkets know what online customers want?

What kinds of features are web users looking for from grocery shopping sites? 

We’ve looked at the big UK supermarket websites to see how they cater for the needs of customers. 

This is based on insights from a recent survey by retail marketing firm Savvy, which questioned more than 1,000 shoppers about their online grocery preferences. 

Amazon muscles in on supermarkets’ search rankings

A recent study found that Tesco was the most visible supermarket website in mobile searches on Google UK. 

This may come as no surprise, since Tesco dominates the grocery market in general. What is surprising though, is how much Amazon has muscled in on this market. 

14 cracking UX features of online supermarkets

Picking which online supermarket you prefer to park your trolley in can be based on little more than which supermarket you regularly visit in the real world.

It’s the one you’re used to, the one you’ve got a loyalty card with, it’s also probably the one that’s closest to your home.

We sometimes forget that we needn’t be beholden to such boundaries when we’re shopping online for groceries. We have the whole of the nation’s biggest food retailers to choose from and each has their own particular conveniences.

You’re decision on which ecommerce store to shop with may purely come down to which offers the cheapest products, reasonable delivery charges and the availability of a convenient delivery window.

However if all these things are moot, it may also come down to which offers the best user experience.

This post is not meant to definitively suggest which supermarket out of Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Waitrose or Morrisons is the best, it’s just meant to highlight various UX features and tools that make for a great customer experience, features that other ecommerce site designers could learn from.

How SEO helps Tesco to dominate the online grocery market

Tesco is the clear winner in the online grocery market, in fact it takes almost 50p of every £1 spent on food shopping on the internet. 

This virtual monopoly is set to continue not just because of spending on fulfilment, dark stores, distribution, stock and offline marketing but due to its online visibility through organic search and a very visible well-structured website. 

Do big retailers need to create social value to succeed?

The high street debate is one that attracts much comment on the Econsultancy blog.

Feelings run high when it comes to ensuring the survival of stores in our towns. The situation has yet to crystallise, though it’s clear there are business models that aren’t best suited to bricks and mortar any more. 

Alongside the trend towards experiential retail (shops doing more than simply selling stuff that consumers can buy cheaper online), a trend towards creating social value in the community may be emerging. 

High street vacancy rates are steady in the UK at 14% in 2013 and independent stores such as cafes are on the increase. Part of the reason for this is social and local. 

Most of us still value our retail centres as places to take a ‘humanity bath’, meeting people outside of the office, the church/mosque/synagogue and your neighbourhood. 

But what else can big retailers do to engender a closer community? Does every store have to get involved? What about digital technology, can it play a part at a community level?

The RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) has released a report detailing the business case for socially aware retail. The report includes the results of six months of research with three ASDA stores. 

Whilst most of the findings are relevant mainly for larger focal points, chiefly supermarkets, here’s what I gleaned…

A list of 10 retail mobile apps that customers love

I’ve been thinking a lot about mobile apps in retail recently. I’ve been thinking about which retailers need an app and whether in fact we’re seeing a bit of a backlash against the app, fuelled by mobile optimised and responsive websites.

Retail apps still have their place in a mobile optimised world, but they’re increasingly characterised as devices for customer retention. Loyalty programmes and coupons keep regular customers feeling loved.

Of course, there are still some successful shopping apps, too, often for retailers big or pervasive enough to demand smartphone real estate (supermarkets, Amazon and the like).

So, here you go, here are 10 apps that I think have made a difference for customers in retail.

Agree? Disagree? Tell me in the comments.

A halloween of spookily augmented reality at Asda

When I was a kid, riding trolleys down supermarket aisles and giving my twin brother beats in public were the symptoms of my boredom at the local Tesco or Asda.

That was before ‘retail-tainment’ involved the smartphone or tablet.

The supermarket is the perfect crucible for ‘retail-tainment’. Outside of big cities, supermarkets are captive markets, often entailing a long visit with the family, and competing with rival stores on a weekly basis.

Winning the battle to keep kids obedient or event interested in store would be a boon for any supermarket chain.

At the moment, there are supermarkets such as Asda that are synonymous with family, but none that have mastered retailtainment. More apps and in-store challenges with rewards will provide an effective antidote to the rogue use of toys by children that then abandon them in the bakery aisle.

Asda is using Zappar to offer kids the chance to be greeted by Sir Spook in 400 of its stores. Combined with some physical events, pumpkin carving and the like, they’re aiming to be the family supermarket at Halloween.