Taco Bell

Taco Bell is making great use of the taco emoji it lobbied for

In June, the Unicode Consortium added a taco emoji to the Unicode 8.0 standard, and last month, it became available to iOS users when Apple released iOS 9.1.

The debut of the taco emoji was a notable event not just for Mexican food lovers, but for Taco Bell, one of the largest Mexican food chains in the United States.

How marketers can drive engagement at every phase of the purchase cycle

It’s not just the moment of purchase that matters. To successfully build customer loyalty requires fresh marketing strategies at every phase of the purchase cycle: before, during, and after.

Before deciding to spend their hard-earned money with your brand, consumers receive countless messages that detail product announcements and ways to save money. To break through this noise, a streamlined and efficient engagement strategy is critical.

At the time of purchase, on the other hand, with consumers facing options from dozens of competitors, brands must change the shopping game to aid consumers in making an educated buying decision.

Finally, after a purchase is made, your brand has a choice of either allowing the customer to walk away in anonymity or continue the conversation by creating an identified and meaningful ongoing relationship.

Five examples of QR code campaigns that actually worked

QR codes often get slated for being ugly and unpopular with consumers, but they still frequently crop up on ads and billboards so marketers must still see some potential in these little pixelated squares.

Often the problem with QR codes is that they are badly implemented, while it’s all too easy to find examples of codes that are impossible to scan.

However, when marketers take care over the user experience, the technology can be put to good use, with Toyota being a notable example.

Having previously highlighted six examples of QR code campaigns that actually worked I thought it would be worth trawling the internet to see if any new case studies had cropped up.

Seven brands that have jumped on the Snapchat bandwagon

Despite Snapchat’s reputation as a seedy sexting platform, it recently secured $60 million in funding which values the company at around $800 million.

Though the smartphone app hasn’t published its user numbers, more than 200 million pictures and videos are shared over the platform on a daily basis.

For the uninitiated, Snapchat allows users to send images and videos to their friends, but once viewed the messages are then deleted forever after 10 seconds or fewer.

It’s the ultimate in short-term, throwaway messaging, so it’s no real surprise that it’s been used for illicit purposes, but it is a bit weird that brands have been looking to get involved.