television ads

Google aims to help advertisers capitalize on viral videos

At its digital Newfronts event last week, Google’s YouTube announced a new ad offering that it hopes will give advertisers the ability to take advantage of viral videos.

Breakout Videos is part of Google Preferred, which launched in 2014 and gives advertisers access to inventory from YouTube’s most popular channels and content creators.

Through Preferred Breakout Videos, advertisers can now capitalize in real time on inventory belonging to content that is gaining significant traction.

As Google matures, it spends more on traditional advertising

As the world’s leading search engine, it may not have problems getting consumers to turn to google.com when they need to find something online, but in an effort to promote its non-search offerings to the masses, Google has been increasingly turning to advertising mediums it once shunned, such as television, magazines and newspapers.

The tab in 2011: over $200m.

Google takes to the small screen to promote Google+

It’s not exactly surprising that the world’s most prominent online advertising company, Google, pretty much shunned television ads for the first decade of its existence.

After all, it helped pioneer an ad model that has shifted budget away from traditional forms of advertising.

But as the search giant has moved beyond search and search ads to launch new digital products, it has clearly accepted the notion that there’s a place for television advertising.

Mobile ads to surpass television ads?

Despite the rise of digital advertising, advertisers still spent over $130bn last year on television advertising. Of the tens of billions of dollars advertisers are spending on digital ads, a very small portion, perhaps as little as $1bn, is being spent on mobile ads.

But those figures aren’t stopping Razorfish’s Mobile Practice Lead, Paul Gelb, from making a bold prediction: “I think mobile ad spend will overtake television.” And he isn’t talking about decades from now; he believes mobile could surpass television in the coming years.