Tim Cook

Apple shows chinks in the armor with Maps fiasco

Apple just won a billion-dollar lawsuit against its biggest competitor, Samsung. The iPhone 5 is selling well, despite overzealous analyst expectations. The company could, at some point in the not-too-distant future, be the world’s first to be valued at one trillion dollars.

It can be easy to forget that Apple isn’t perfect, but the high-flying company seems to be trying its best to remind us in the wake of its Maps fiasco.

Apple planning to shake up the tablet market later this year: report

With the iPad, Apple single-handedly created today’s multi-billion dollar tablet market, and continues to be its most dominant player.

But that doesn’t mean that Apple is the only company cashing in on the devices that have changed the face of computing. If you want a new iPad, you’ll need to shell out $499 — a price too steep for many consumers.

Is the press treating Apple differently without Steve Jobs?

Apple isn’t the same company without Steve Jobs at the helm, but that’s easy to forget when looking at the company’s financial performance since its co-founder and chief visionary passed last year.

Despite questions about Apple’s ability to thrive long-term without Jobs, consumers continue to snap up the company’s latest and greatest products at remarkable, record-breaking rates.

Apple’s biggest announcement ever? A dividend

When it comes to announcements, few companies create as much excitement and command as much attention as Apple. And for good reason: most of the time, Apple’s announcement involve new products that consumers can’t wait to get their hands on.

But a different kind of announcement today might arguably be the company’s biggest ever.

Will Apple’s new high-street hire change the way we buy Apple products?

Few CEOs have it as good as Apple’s Tim Cook. Just look at his company’s performance in the first quarter of his tenure.

But as strong as Apple is currently, Cook can’t sit back and hope that the company Steve Jobs took to new heights will run itself. He’ll have to make tough decisions, and put his mark on the company’s operations.

He’s doing just that with his first big hire.