tmall

China’s Singles’ Day: Can Western brands take advantage?

Alibaba is this year referring to Singles’ Day as the ‘11.11 Global Shopping Festival’.

That’s a pretty clear statement of intent, with the online retailer aiming to create a worldwide event.

It also hints at the growing trend of international, cross-border purchases by Chinese consumers, particularly the middle classes.

ASOS.cn front page

Five reasons ASOS is pulling out of China

ASOS is calling time on its Chinese adventure.

It will still serve Chinese customers through its global website and ship clothes from Europe, but its local warehouse and 60 Shanghai-based staff will go.

Here are five reasons ASOS pulled the plug.

10+ of the best APAC digital marketing stats from February 2016

29 Days later and it’s time for another stats roundup from the Asia Pacific region.

February’s roundup includes LINE, WePay, mobile and programmatic advertising in Australia, virtual reality in China, print (!), Japanese ad spend, Tmall, social media use and more.

16+ APAC digital marketing stats from July 2015

I’m jumping the gun slightly this month, but as it’s almost the end of July I’m going to go ahead and roundup the best digital marketing stats we’ve seen in the past 30 days or so.

This time it includes the tablet market in Vietnam, Amazon’s investment in India, CX in Australia, Walmart’s ecommerce plans in China, and a whole lot more.

How Western brands can break into China: the experts’ view

China. We all know it’s a huge market and that it will be part of our business efforts in the future.  

But at our recent Digital Outlook 2015 event I think even the most savvy were surprised at the scale of the Chinese market – and how different it is to the West.

Brand pages on online marketplaces: A good idea, badly executed

If you were wise enough to setup an online marketplace in the early days of the internet and also had great business chops, you might have been a very rich person by now.

Some of the world’s biggest ecommerce companies are those that don’t actually sell any of their own products, or rely to a large extent on third-party sellers.

Amazon is the most obvious example, while eBay has also taken great pains to rebrand as a marketplace rather than an auction site (try saying that eBay is an auction site in a blog post and see how long it takes for the PRs to knock on your door).

Similarly, in the UK Play.com shifted from being an ecommerce site to an “online trading platform” after being bought out by Rakuten, a Japanese tech company that is best known for its Rakuten Ichiba marketplace.