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Social media fast food fight: McDonalds vs KFC

Writing his memoir, ‘Goodbye To All That’, Robert Graves reminded himself that ‘people like reading about food and drink’; so I’ve decided to write about burgers and fried chicken, alongside social media (always adds flavour).

I want to investigate the idea that most people see BIG corporate Twitter accounts as some kind of barefaced shill, only followed by the devout.

I looked at KFC and McDonald’s tweets from October 2012, to see how they do it. This is by no means an exhaustive audit, nor is it scientific. I also add that I’m a pescetarian of six weeks, and following these feeds has been somewhat of a coping mechanism.

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How do consumers feel about brands on Twitter?

Many companies are under the impression that opinion about brands on Twitter is mostly negative, but a new survey conducted by Econsultancy (and supported by Toluna) shows evidence to the contrary.

The Twitter for Business Guide, published earlier this week, includes findings from consumer research, which indicates that a higher proportion of consumers have conveyed positive, rather than negative feedback on the social platform. 

Twitter for business: the experts’ view

Earlier this year, Twitter celebrated its 5th anniversary. The social platform now has 200m users, generates over 200m tweets and handles over 1.6bn search queries per day. 

Twitter is now undoubtedly popular and many businesses use the site as a tool for marketing, PR, branding, engagement, customer service, and much more.

Despite this, companies still face barriers to getting the most value from the microblogging site, which is why Econsultancy has produced its first guide to Twitter for Business

If your business isn’t using Twitter yet, it’s worth considering the value it offers for your organisation. I’ve been talking to a number of experts about best practice on the platform, including business benefits, tips and pitfalls, and how to measure success. 

Twitter DM autoresponders: 15 tips and 40+ examples

Twitter DM autoresponders: 15 tips and 40+ examplesTwitter autoresponders are used to automatically send a direct message
to new followers. All too often they are lame, and perceived as spammy.

Auto messages are problematic, not least because even when they include
elements of the ‘personal’ (“how can I help you today?” / “tell me more
about yourself”) they’re clearly robotic. And people don’t respond to
robots, they respond to people. This is ‘social’ media after all.

I don’t use them, nor have we configured our Econsultancy
Twitter account to send automated messages, but we’ve been wondering
whether they can be used in a positive way. As such I have been doing a little research in this area. And I’d love to hear your feedback…

Is Twitter preparing for a trademark crackdown?

As far as companies go, Twitter is pretty laid back. When it comes to legal issues, Twitter has been anything but aggressive.

The creators of popular applications like Twitteriffic and TweetDeck have never, to my knowledge, been threatened by Twitter over trademark abuse. Twitter even promotes them on its apps page.

16 bitchin’ commands and shortcuts for Twitter

Keyboard shortcuts for TwitterBack in the day, whenever I was unsure about the meaning of a word, I would leaf through a battered old Oxford English Dictionary. Will Self, although he doesn’t know it, probably caused the most indirect wear and tear of all my favourite writers.

My trusty tome was subsequently usurped by online dictionaries, but they too – at least for me – were soon been replaced by Google’s rather lovely ‘define:’ command. 

The ‘define:keyword’ command is surely the quickest way of finding out the meaning or spelling of a word, since Google typically returns a result in less than half a second. Try it. It’s highly useful.

I love a shortcut, and regularly make use of a range of keyboard shortcuts on Twitter. There are more of them than you might imagine. As such I have aggregated a bunch of commands to provide you with one handy cut-out-and-keep / ‘bookmark on Delicious’ guide. 

Tweet. tweettweet. ReTweeting by the numbers

retweetSocial and viral media expert Dan Zarella has posted the results of a fascinating study: the numbers and semantics behind getting Twitter followers to ReTweet tweets, thereby amplifying and expanding upon messaging by using Twitter’s built-in viral aspects.

Few marketers will be surprised by the fact that a simple call-to-action matters. A lot. Simply adding the phrase “please retweet” just plain works much of the time.

Zarella’s semantic analysis of what gets ReTweeted reveals the following:

  • Timely content is often ReTweeted
  • Freebies are popular
  • Tweeting about Twitter is effective
  • So are lists
  • People like to ReTweet blog posts (he doesn’t specify if this refers the original tweeter’s own blog, but irregardless – Twitter users are also highly active in the blogosphere.)

Oh, and don’t forget to mind your manners. Requesting a Retweent politely and remembering to say “please” ups the ReTweeting odds by nearly a 6X factor.