typography

UX trends in 2015: the experts’ view

Never mind content, it seems the customer is (quite rightly) king these days. 

User experience (UX) has been one of the most widely discussed marketing topics this year as brands increasingly realise the importance of providing a high quality experience online across all touch points. 

Picture this: web design is no longer 95% typography

A decade and a half ago Jakob Nielsen announced to the world that people don’t actually read websites in a linear way. Instead, they prefer to skim read, scanning the page to find what they’re looking for. 

As such, content creators were advised to format articles in a way that encourages readers to avoid reaching for the back button. This meant using bullet points, meaningful sub-headers, and highlighting key phrases / words in bold. 

Roll things forward a few years, and Oliver Reichenstein published an article that contains one of my favourite quotes: “Web Design is 95% Typography.”

In his article he says: “A great web designer knows how to work with text not just as content, he treats text as a user interface.” This still resonates so strongly with me, as a creator of content, as somebody who is deeply interested in web design, and as a heavy web user. 

But does the 95% quote still stand up? I fear that recent design trends have stomped all over text and typography, and that pictures have deposed words.