usability

Five UX lessons retailers can take from Screwfix.com

Screwfix has recently upgraded to a responsive website.

Looking through the site, it occurred to me how much ecommerce retailers in other sectors can learn from hardware retailers that have been traditionally catalogue-based.

Here are a few features worth considering.

How Tinder has changed ecommerce

Through its fun, intuitive and frankly addictive user interface, Tinder’s simple “swipe right for yes, left for no” approach has earned it a place on mobile home-screens around the world – not to mention a valuation of $1.35bn. 

As the popularity (and controversy) of Tinder has grown, many brands have started to copy the brand’s simplistic yes-no interface for their own apps.

This has kicked off a UX and design phenomena rapidly becoming known as ‘Tinderisation’.

Why does Chinese web design look so ‘busy’? Part two

We recently did a brief analysis about why Chinese websites look ‘busy’ to people who are used to Western design.

What was originally intended as a light-hearted post to point out the difference between Chinese and Western sites inspired debate both on our site and off.

How The British Library handles information architecture & ecommerce

In some ways, the notion that an institution like the British Library has to market itself at all is fairly new. 

Indeed, my step father wrote a paper on exactly that topic (marketing is a family affair, you know).

But not only does the British Library have to create ‘customer value’, it has to do so online, casting as wide a net as possible and relying on its website to engage and even convert(!).

With the aid of analysis from its brilliant blog, let’s have a look at the British Library’s improvements to website information architecture.