Verizon

Verizon wants customers to give up their data for targeted ads, and it’s willing to pay

Thanks to acquisitions exceeding $100bn in recent years, the largest internet service providers (ISPs) in the US are set to become some of the most dominant digital ad players.

But while there has been significant concern that the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) roll-back of consumer broadband privacy rules raises the possibility that ISPs could use their treasure troves of data without customers’ permission, the largest ISP in the US appears to be taking a more cautious approach than it might legally have to when it comes to exploiting customer data.

What is net neutrality and how does its latest setback affect marketers?

Net neutrality, or challenges to it, hit the news again last week when a US federal appeals court took the side of Verizon and ruled against parts of the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC’s) net neutrality rules. 

I thought I’d take the opportunity to detail what net neutrality is, what the arguments for and against are, how it has been flouted in the past and what this latest ruling could mean for the internet and marketers in particular.

Firstly, let’s look at last week’s ruling. You can read the court transcript here, it makes for good reading on the issue.

Five examples of QR code campaigns that actually worked

QR codes often get slated for being ugly and unpopular with consumers, but they still frequently crop up on ads and billboards so marketers must still see some potential in these little pixelated squares.

Often the problem with QR codes is that they are badly implemented, while it’s all too easy to find examples of codes that are impossible to scan.

However, when marketers take care over the user experience, the technology can be put to good use, with Toyota being a notable example.

Having previously highlighted six examples of QR code campaigns that actually worked I thought it would be worth trawling the internet to see if any new case studies had cropped up.