Viacom

Viacom & DirecTV take their fight online

Popular Viacom channels, including MTV, Comedy Central, Nickelodeon and more, have been dropped from the DirecTV network after negotiations broke down over a contract renewal.

Neither company is looking very good as they each try to control the narrative and paint one another in a negative light. How could these companies be so insensitive that they would choose to seperate viewers from the programs they love?

Perfect 10 sues Tumblr for copyright infringment

Publishing platform Tumblr’s twenty-something CEO is fast learning that running a fast-growing company can be a tough job.

Last month, after telling AdAge that an advertising business model would be a “a complete last resort”, David Karp, perhaps pressured by investors, announced that his company would begin selling ads.

Court reinstates Viacom lawsuit against YouTube

Google has taken YouTube to new heights since it acquired the popular online video service in 2006 for $1.65bn. And in 2010, it looked like the search giant would be able to continue to grow YouTube without worrying about the billion-dollar lawsuit media conglomerate Viacom had filed against it.

That lawsuit, which alleged that YouTube and Google were responsible for copyright infringement of Viacom content, was thrown out of court on the grounds that YouTube was protected by the safe harbor provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA).

YouTube wins one for user generated content in Viacom lawsuit

YouTube won a major round in the copyright wars this week when Judge Louis Stanton threw out Viacom’s $1 billion lawsuit against the video giant.

The ruling noted that online companies must remove known copyright infringements from their sites, but they do not have to police for such things themselves. The result is not only good for YouTube, it’s important for any small company depending on user generated content.

Viacom has ‘smoking gun’ evidence in YouTube lawsuit: report

According to Google CEO Eric Schmidt, Google willingly paid a $1bn premium to acquire YouTube back in 2006. And if Viacom has its way, he’ll soon be paying another $1bn ‘premium’.

In the search giant’s legal battle with the media giant over copyright infringement, Viacom has fired a potentially devastating salvo: it claims it has evidence that YouTube employees were uploading copyrighted content without authorization.