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10 excellent video-embedded landing pages

Using video on a landing page can increase conversion by up to 86%.

This statistic comes from a study by EyeView on various ecommerce sites.

In the study, two different variations of the same website were built, with 50% of the traffic being directed to a landing page with an embedded video, the other 50% directed to a page without.

The website that achieved the largest conversion rate (86%) was an online tutoring service. This is clearly the type of company that would naturally benefit from a landing page video, as most of its content is likely to be delivered via that medium anyway. It’s a free ‘sampler’, a way to show how professional and useful your service is before the visitor has signed up for a subscription.

Video is one of the best and most persuasive of all visual tools as it’s capable of delivering large amounts of information quickly and succinctly. Especially if it’s about a new service or product.

How video marketing powers SEO

While there is plenty of disagreement among marketers as to the best method to improve your search rankings, there is one specific strategy that is sure to benefit your business. What’s the secret sauce? Believe it or not, leveraging your online videos is often key to increasing search rankings.

We all know that the search engines use social signals as a factor in their overall ranking algorithm, and as the role of social signals becomes increasingly important, so will the role of online video in your overall search and social strategy. 

Six key tactics for a successful viral video

viral-videoIf you can think of a relevant way to utilise video as part of your
marketing then there’s every reason you should.

Research shows that
audiences are extremely comfortable with the medium (YouTube alone makes
up almost a quarter of Google search queries), it’s cheap to
distribute, needn’t be expensive to produce and ranks highly in the SEO
stakes.

If you run things properly, then video can drive a huge volume
of traffic to your site.

Here are a few key practices to get you started…

Capitol Records could win its lawsuit against Vimeo. And still lose.

There are a lot of people who dislike the wave of lipdubbing that has swept the internet. And if you’re looking for someone to blame, Vimeo is a pretty good target. The online video portal helped launch the craze and hosts a plentiful library of user generated videos that feature individuals enthusiastically lipsynching to popular songs.

But someone has officially taken a stand against the practice of lipdubbing. Capitol Records has decided to sue the site for using its copyrighted content. They have legal grounds — Vimeo actively hosts and encourages its users to post videos that often infringe record label copyright. But Capitol Records could lose a lot of social capital by winning this lawsuit.

Blip.tv: It’s all about the distribution

A major inhibitor to video revenues online so far has been audience size. Despite advances in the quality, quantity and length of videos on the web, most people aren’t watching them. To date, 99% of all video viewing is still happening in front of television sets.

But online video network blip.tv is looking to get bring its content where the audiences are. Today the
company announced a partnership with YouTube, Tivo, Verizon and Vimeo
among others to get more of its content around the web and to
television sets.

The company has long been working to distribute its content across as many platforms as possible. And today’s announcement marks a big jump in the size of the company’s footprint. That strategy is the key to the success of blip — and the online video marketplace.

Barry Diller: The Internet’s free phase is coming to an end

Information may want to be free, but InterActiveCorp‘s chairman thinks we’re all going to be paying for it soon. Speaking at the second annual Advertising 2.0 conference in New York Wednesday, Barry Diller was emphatic that the free period of the Internet is coming to a close:

People will pay for content. They always have.”

The digital media chief disparages the idea that consumers
expect free content online, calling it “an accident of a historical moment that
will be corrected.”