viral video

14 intriguing and mysterious examples of online movie marketing

While foraging around the internet I noticed a wonderful thing. The Blair Witch Project website is still live.

I assumed that much like all movie marketing websites that are more than two years old, it would have been shut down or repurposed as a DVD product page.

Then again, The Blair Witch Project website is far more important and era-defining than any other traditional movie homepage with simple links to trailers and cast & crew biographies. 

In 1999 I was beginning to use the internet for the first time and I was part of the gullible first-wave of audience members who truly believed that The Blair Witch Project was a genuine documentary. Thanks to its website fleshed out with fake news reports, interviews, a history of the Blair witch and stills from the evidence room.

Good digital video ads aren’t just TV spots on different devices

Brands invest a lot into creating TV ads so it’s not surprising that marketers want to get as much value as possible out of the content they’ve created by using them in digital advertising campaigns.

However, marketers are often repurposing and using TV ads online in pre-roll or mid-roll spots. The ads launch automatically without the device user having any choice in the matter and the TV ads are generally out of context with the content around the ads.  

Anyone watching on-demand TV content knows that this is a frustrating ad experience, and it’s even more of an intrusion on the smaller screens of tablets and smartphones.

A study from our R&D department shows that eight out of ten people are annoyed by ads which self-initiate on their handheld devices.

Consumers’ acceptance for interruptions on their digital devices is far lower than on TV, and the ad is considered a significant intrusion to their content consumption.

Start Me Up! A profile of TubeRank

Video content is an increasingly important part of any brands marketing mix. TubeRank aims to help agencies and brands make viral videos, with the ambition to make YouTube a better place full of better content.

I’ve been asking TubeRank founder Chris Quigley about the app and the company’s business model…

Three lessons from the TSA’s failed crisis response

The nude body scanners placed at American airports may or may not be completely useless, but the way the Transport Security Administration (TSA) has responded to one critic’s YouTube video (which has gone viral) is a case study in how not to deal with a social media crisis.

The TSA had little choice but to respond to the claims made by Jonathan Corbett, a vocal critic of the TSA and its nude body scanners.

In his video, which has racked up over 750,000 views in just a matter of days, Corbett explains how a simple technique can be used to defeat the scanners, and he successfully demonstrates the technique at an airport.