virtual goods

Zynga reports record revenue in Q1, but big loss

Social gaming on Facebook may be past its prime, but don’t tell social gaming juggernaut Zynga that casual gaming is.

The company, which went public late last year, yesterday reported $321m in revenue in the first quarter of 2012 — its highest quarterly revenue figure ever. All told, bookings rose to $329m, up 15% year-over-year, while the $321m in revenue represented a more impressive 32% year-over-year increase.

Consumable goods dominate mobile games: report

While the business of virtual goods has probably been popularized most by social games such as Farmville, the mobile market for virtual goods has developed into a lucrative space for mobile games as well.

There’s a good reason for this: charging for a mobile game itself has become increasingly difficult for many game developers, and virtual goods offer one of the best ways to implement a freemium model.

According to mobile ad network Flurry, as of June 2011, well over half (65%) of the revenue for top-grossing games in Apple’s U.S. App Store was generated by freemium games. Just six months earlier, 61% of revenue was generated by paid games.

Zynga IPO filing: breaking all the rules, and winning because of it

The IPO market is alive! From Yandex to LinkedIn, some of the most
prominent consumer internet companies in recent memory have gone public
recently, and more are on the way.

One of the most intriguing filed to go public late last week. Zynga, the
social gaming juggernaut which is responsible for modern-day hits like
Farmville, plans to raise $1bn.

Google launches in-app payments for Android

Google has accomplished a lot in the mobile space thanks to its mobile operating system, Android, but when it comes to building a platform that developers want to develop for, Android still lags behind Apple.

Unlike Google, Apple has thrived at building an ecosystem in which consumers not only use applications, but purchase them.

Social gaming trends for 2011

Social gaming exploded last year. More consumers are now playing these sorts of games online, and brands (ranging from SMEs and local businesses to blue-chips and multinationals) are beginning to invest in this space.

The sector is now worth close to £1bn, and is expected to show further growth in 2011.

This post, which coincides with the launch of our Social Gaming Smart Pack, contains a brief overview of social gaming, why it’s important, and how it can be used for marketing.