VoIP

Microsoft may make WebRTC a part of Skype’s future

In the next couple of years, firing up a phone call or video chat with a friend on the opposite side of the world may not require you to launch Skype, Google Chat or one of the many programs that let individuals connect over the internet. Instead, you’ll be able to communicate with voice and video using nothing more than your web browser.

If and when that day comes, you’ll thank technologies WebRTC, which enable real-time communication between browsers. Originally developed by Google and currently supported only in development builds of Google’s Chrome browser, companies like VOIP provider Voxeo are demonstrating WebRTC’s nifty capabilities and providing a preview of what the future might look like for web-based communication.

Skype attacks social networking in new ads

Skype may be the most popular consumer VOIP service in the world, but it faces numerous challenges, not the least of which is getting consumers to want to connect with their friends and family using voice.

So how can Skype convince consumers that there’s still no more powerful and effective a way to communicate than with a phone call? The possible answer: remind the world that social networking and texting is a lame way to reach out and touch someone.

Voxeo Labs brings voice calls to the browser without plugins

Thanks to the growth of VOIP, more and more phone calls are being routed through the internet, and telephony-as-a-service platforms like Twilio are giving developers new opportunities to do interesting things with Alexander Graham Bell’s invention.

Today, it’s possible to talk to a friend on the other side of the globe using desktop programs like Skype, or to click a button on a website and conduct a phone call in the browser with a merchant thousands of miles away.

Twilio brings Voice APIs to the U.K.

APIs are a big part of the internet ecosystem today. From Facebook and Twitter to Google and Salesforce, if you name a prominent internet company today, chances are that it offers APIs to its customers and third party developers.

And for good reason: allowing others to create new products and services on top of yours can be a highly effective way to build value.

But while APIs are, for most companies, an add-on, a few companies are based almost entirely on their APIs. One of the most prominent that falls into that category is a company called Twilio, which offers APIs that allow its customers to build voice, VOIP and SMS applications.

Skype tries for world domination with SkypeKit

According to one report, peer-to-peer VoIP provider Skype is the largest carrier of international voice calls. But the company think it’s just getting started as the company looks to expand its large footprint by turning “every connected device” into a communications device that can run Skype.

How will it to that? Easy: make it possible for Skype to find its way into all of the devices that were once ‘offline‘ but that are now being connected to the internet.