Wall Street

Facebook beats Wall Street’s lowered expectations

Facebook has facilitated billions of ‘likes’, but getting Wall Street to like the business of running the world’s largest social network has been difficult.

The company’s disastrous IPO sent investors fleeing and Facebook’s stock is still well off its debut price.

But with a laser-like focus on monetization, Mark Zuckerberg and company gave Wall Street reason to rethink Facebook’s prospects after delivering better-than-expected third quarter results yesterday.

Wall Street marketers take responsibility for poor reputation

Communications and marketing executives at 150 US-based financial firms have admitted that the responsibility for poor reputation lies with them, according to the 2012 Makovsky Wall Street Reputation Study.

96% of the group said that they invite negative public perception by their actions or inactions, while negative public perception topped the list of challenges these firms must overcome in the next year.

Millennial Media files for IPO

The window for going public is open for today’s most attractive technology and digital media companies, even if Wall Street has been relatively cool to new tech issues.

Yesterday, mobile ad network operator Millennial Media announced that it is joining the IPO fray, filing its S-1 in the U.S. to go public.

Five reasons Wall Street is cold to tech IPOs

We may be in a bubble, but you wouldn’t necessarily know it considering the latest generation of internet IPOs.

Groupon’s stock is trading below its first day closing price, Zynga’s stock closed below its issue price when it debuted last week and the market didn’t seem too excited about the spin-off of TripAdvisor from Expedia.

So what gives? If everyone knows that the internet is the real deal, why aren’t these new issues selling like hotcakes? Here are five reasons.

Is diversification overrated?

Which company would you rather own stock in: Google or Yahoo? Chances are, like most people, you’d respond ‘Google‘. And for good reason: by just about every measure, Google is by far the better company.

But that isn’t stopping Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz from giving some advice to the search giant. Last week, she told BBC News that Google needs to diversify its business. “Google is going to have a problem because Google is only known for search … it is only half our business; it’s 99.9 [percent] of their business. Google has to grow a company the size of Yahoo every year to be interesting,” she said.