Web 2.0

words-adjectives-copywriting

Why digital marketers should avoid the latest buzzword gold rush

Every year or so, there’s a new buzzword that marketers flock to like gold in them there hills.

And yet the only people who make money from it are those selling pickaxes and gold pans.  

You should read this blog if you’ve grown tired of all the buzzwords rolling around digital marketing these days.  

I’ve been in the game for a while, and I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. 

I’m not here to make friends, I’m here to speak the truth…

Instagram gives Twitter a taste of its own medicine

Twitter wants to be a media company, and its efforts to become one have created a lot of collateral damage.

That’s not at all surprising: when the company was positioned as a communications platform with an open API, developers flocked to take advantage of the connately-flowing river of data that Twitter produces. But many of those developers, as well as companies like LinkedIn, had to be cut off as Twitter’s desire to be a media company realistically requires it to control the user experience, and how its content is displayed, in consumer channels.

Five lessons learned from Digg’s rise and fall

Social news site Digg was once one of the most popular services on the internet. An early social media darling, Digg and its founder, Kevin Rose, were the subject of numerous high-profile articles, including an embarrassing (and not-entirely-accurate) BusinessWeek cover piece with the headline How This Kid Made $60 Million In 18 Months.

It wasn’t just the media lavishing attention on Digg: investors poured big money — some $45m in total — into the company. 

But what goes up often comes down and as it turned out for Digg, the company’s future was not going to be nearly as bright as its early years. Yesterday, the company’s assets, including the code for the Digg site itself and its domain, were sold to New York-based development firm Betaworks for a reported $500,000.

Can YouTube’s founders make leftovers Delicious?

Social media may be alive and well, but some of the most prominent web properties that rose during ‘Web 2.0‘ have seen better days.

From Digg to Delicious, if the rise and fall of companies that were supposed to change the web, if not the world, reminds us of anything, it’s this: the consumer internet market evolves rapidly, and can be as brutal to the losers as it is rewarding to the winners.

But can a Web 2.0 has-been be brought back to life by a couple of entrepreneurs who built one of its biggest winners? Steve Chen and Chad Hurley, who founded YouTube, hope so.