Windows Phone

Amazon planning to roll out its own Android smartphone: report

When Amazon entered the tablet space, there were more than a few skeptics. But launching the Kindle Fire made sense: Amazon is one of the world’s most efficient retailers, is flush with cash, has significant technical chops and brings a content ecosystem that few other companies can rival.

With all that, it’s no surprise that Amazon has found some success with the Kindle Fire, which is now the most popular Android-based tablet in the world.

Verizon courts Microsoft, but will it snub Android?

While it may take a quarter or two to figure out just how well Nokia and AT&T’s launch of the Lumia 900 did or didn’t go, the device which both companies have bet big on has brought the kind of attention to Windows Phone that Microsoft was certainly hoping for.

That apparently has AT&T’s biggest rival, Verizon, taking note.

Microsoft, Nokia hope to woo Windows Phone developers with $24m

Microsoft operates one of the richest software businesses in the world, but that doesn’t mean the company always finds it easy to get its way.

In the mobile space, the Redmond giant has arguably developed a respectable mobile OS, but by in large, iOS and Android are getting most of the love from developers.

Nokia prepping its own iPad competitor

Today, Apple thoroughly dominates the tablet space, and a couple of other pseudo-competitors (Amazon and Barnes & Noble) arguably are successfully extending the tablet market by targeting individuals who aren’t as likely to buy an iPad.

Put another way: despite the efforts of companies like RIM and Samsung, only one non-content-oriented device maker sells a ton of tablets.

Microsoft takes Nokia partnership beyond Windows Phone

In an effort to compete in the mobile space, Microsoft teamed up with Nokia last year. In a deal reportedly worth billions of dollars, Nokia agreed to “adopt Windows Phone as its principal smartphone strategy” and “help drive the future of Windows Phone.”

From Microsoft’s perspective, the arrangement was ideal. Without such a partnership, the software giant likely would have had to make an acquisition a la Google.

So is Microsoft’s strategy working?