xbox live

Will Microsoft beat Apple and Google to make Connected TV work?

Microsoft and Comcast recently announced that Xbox Live users will now be able to stream on-demand Comcast Xfinity content through their gaming consoles. It’s been insinuated by some that Microsoft is making some form of payment to Comcast for the deal.

This doesn’t seem outlandish. The 20 million paying Xbox Live users (out of 66 million Xbox 360 units sold) now spend slightly more time streaming content than they do playing video games. Microsoft will keep stoking this trend, pushing its hardware further into the profitable mainstream of entertainment content consumption.

But, will the Xbox grow up to become a more dominant mode of delivery?

Could the future of Xbox Live be ‘g-commerce’?

Microsoft will tomorrow release an update to its Xbox 360 console that will allow users to use it to watch TV.

This will position the Xbox as an all-in-one entertainment hub for the living room, incorporating games, movies, TV, music and sports.

A key feature is the integration of Kinect, which adds voice search to the entertainment experience – with Windows Phones available to use as a controller.

Kinect could be Microsoft’s ticket to addressable advertising on your TV

Kinect living roomWith movies from Netflix, games from ESPN, music from Last.fm, and status updates from
Twitter, Microsoft has evolved the Xbox 360 into a premium content
delivery device, not just a game console. Now, with its new Kinect
motion-controller system, the company has the means to turn the Xbox 360
into a hyper-targeted ad platform.

After all, Kinect can recognize
different users by their faces.