tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/ad-networks Latest Ad networks content from Econsultancy 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69351 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 10 superior digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>59% of Instagram Stories leads to a shopping cart</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://klear.com/blog/instagram-stories-conversion/" target="_blank">Klear</a> shows that 59% of brands' Instagram Stories link to a shopping cart or shoppable page.</p> <p>In contrast, just 23% of brands link their Stories to other social platforms, while 10% link to a blog post.</p> <p>Klear also found that 36% of brand Instagram Stories involve some form of product promotion, making it the most popular type of post. 22% of Stories involve an 'insider look' at the brand, and 14% involve an influencer takeover.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8341/Klear.JPG" alt="" width="705" height="476"></p> <h3>42% of all US business trips extended for leisure</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="https://info.advertising.expedia.com/custom-research-bleisure-travel-market?utm_campaign=2016+Bleisure+Custom+Research&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-95eaQxjOzd1Wm5VMuR1rk8GpeXcXmlEqI5VyE4c0E936EhBaZ413dK_VHQxo3mDwsC1QszbOJw10YgbY-rQbFF3Yc6ZeBPe57BpU9teRl92GzRveM&amp;_hsmi=40388954&amp;utm_content=40388954&amp;utm_source=hs_automation&amp;hsCtaTracking=71e4538a-6c18-405f-9307-1eba7186fefa%7C7e4357af-3125-4efe-831c-afc5ee46c7c9" target="_blank">Expedia Media Solutions</a> has highlighted the growing trend for ‘bleisure’ trips – i.e. travel that combines both business and leisure.</p> <p>It has found that 42% of all business trips within the US are extended for leisure, with this increasing to 52% when employees have to travel overseas for work. Expedia also suggests that trips to attend conferences and conventions are more likely to turn into leisure trips, as opposed to travel for client meetings or presentations.</p> <p>Lastly, it found that the leisure portion of a trip can often equal or exceed the length of the business portion, making ‘bleisure’ trips much longer than a typical business trip.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8332/Expedia_stat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="284"></p> <h3>55% of consumers prefer shopping direct from brands than retailers</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://astoundcommerce.com/us/2017/08/15/global-brand-research/" target="_blank">Astound Commerce</a> has found that over half of consumers prefer visiting a brand or manufacturer’s website rather than shopping from multi-brand retailers. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 consumers, 54% said they would turn to brands over retailers for more comprehensive product information, improved customer service, better value and more chance of personalisation. </p> <p>45% of millennials said they expect a more engaging, holistic experience on a brand’s website than a retailer’s, while 59% of shoppers would visit a physical store to seek out the full brand experience they don’t believe they can get online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8335/Astound.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="325"></p> <h3>UK sees surge in search interest for electric cars</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise suggests that there has been a surge of interest in electric cars in the UK, following on from the launch of Tesla’s ‘Model 3’ car.</p> <p>In July, there was a 345% increase in searches for the new ‘Tesla Model 3’, as well as a 346% increase in people searching for ‘electric cars’ in general. This comes on the back of the news that there has been a 10.3% drop in new car sales and an increase in used cars sales in 2017.</p> <p>Hitwise also found that people aged 18-24 were the demographic most likely to be searching for ‘Tesla’, and the third most-asked question to be: “What electric cars are available in the UK?”</p> <h3>Transparency now a pressing priority for brands</h3> <p>In light of last year’s Media Transparency report by the ANA, a large number of global brands are in the midst of making changes to their media governance practices.</p> <p>In a survey of global marketers in 35 multinational companies, the World Federation of Advertisers found transparency to be a top priority for 47% of brands, while 51% said it is rising up the list. </p> <p>Brand safety is also a hot topic, with 70% saying it has escalated as a priority in the last 12 months. As a result, 74% have suspended investment in ad networks where they felt there was an unnecessary risk to their brands. Meanwhile, 89% are also limiting or plan to limit investment in ad networks that do not allow use of third-party verification.</p> <h3>Global cart abandonment increases 1.3% on previous quarter</h3> <p><a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/stats/the-remarketing-report-q2-2017/" target="_blank">SaleCycle</a> has released its Remarketing Report for Q2 2017, highlighting key cart abandonment stats from April to June.</p> <p>It shows that the global cart abandonment rate for Q2 was 76.9%, which is up 1.3% on the previous quarter. Meanwhile, the average retail conversion rate was 3.29%.</p> <p>In terms of sectors, gaming websites had the lowest abandonment rates at 67.4%, while finance had the highest at 83.7%. This was closely followed by non-profit – a sector which faces ongoing challenges in optimising online conversions. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8333/SalesCycle.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="420"></p> <h3>88% of consumers value speed of delivery over choice of brand</h3> <p>A <a href="https://info.salmon.com/buying-tomorrow-report" target="_blank">new report</a> by Salmon has revealed that 88% of consumers see the speed of delivery as more important than the brand being ordered. Additionally, it found that modern-day consumers also like to shop in new ways, with 45% currently using a digital assistant like Alexa or Google Home to do so.</p> <p>Other stats from the report include the fact that almost a quarter of consumers make all their purchases online, while 37% of total online spend is now done through Amazon.</p> <p>Lastly, it is clear that consumers are becoming more digitally obsessed than ever before, with 57% believing they are more digitally advanced than the retailers that serve them.</p> <h3>Searches for ‘make up’ increase over 200% in three years</h3> <p>According to research by <a href="https://www.pi-datametrics.com/resources/market-performance-reports/beauty/?mc_cid=af12c67cd5&amp;mc_eid=bdac343de4" target="_blank">PI Datametrics</a>, the UK beauty market saw a 76% increase in search volume growth from 2013 to 2016. The term ‘make up’ specifically has grown a whopping 203% in these three years.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this growth can be put down to the popularity of bloggers and vloggers within the category, plus the rise of visual social media and its influencers. With make-up sales being worth an estimated £1bn in the UK in 2017, the opportunity for retailers continues to grow.</p> <p>Interestingly, the report also revealed that the top four performers within the beauty market are all retailers (as opposed to make-up or beauty brands themselves), with Boots.com owning 9.1% of the entire market and competitor Superdrug owning 8.7%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8331/PI_Data.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="509"></p> <h3>77% of APAC mobile ads delivered via apps </h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://www.vpon.com/en/events/2017H1AsiaReport/index.html?utm_source=VPON_EN&amp;utm_medium=EN_PPR&amp;utm_term=TH&amp;vpadn_src=EN_PPR_TH" target="_blank">Vpon</a> has revealed that mobile advertising in Asia-Pacific heavily relies on apps, with 77% of such ads being delivered in-app, and just 23% via the mobile web.</p> <p>This figure rises to 90% in Indonesia, where app usage is at its highest. Similarly, 86% of ads are delivered via apps in India, while the same goes for 85% in Thailand and 82% in Malaysia.</p> <p>In contrast, countries in East Asia are leaning more towards mobile web, with China and Japan delivering just 34% and 33% of ads in apps respectively.</p> <h3>Private Eye is the UK’s most-read current affairs title</h3> <p>The Audit Bureau of Circulation (<a href="https://www.abc.org.uk/" target="_blank">ABC</a>) has named Private Eye as the most-read news and current affairs magazine in the UK, with a circulation of 249,927 per issue, and a growth of 8.6% year-on-year.</p> <p>For the same category, circulation of the Economist was up 5% in the UK to 248,196, while Prospect grew substantially with a rise of 37% to 44,545.</p> <p>In contrast to the popularity of some news titles, ABC noted a decline in women’s weekly magazines, which dropped almost 11% from the same period last year. Look magazine suffered a 35% drop in circulation to 58,561, while Now fell almost 21% to 84,588.</p> <p>Elsewhere, TV Choice was found to have the biggest readership in the UK overall, with a circulation of 1.2m.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our circulation is up 9% on this time last year, with an ABC of 249,927. Thanks to all of you for buying/subscribing!</p> — Private Eye Magazine (@PrivateEyeNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/PrivateEyeNews/status/895621655615086593">August 10, 2017</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69331 2017-08-11T14:16:13+01:00 2017-08-11T14:16:13+01:00 10 stupendous digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Revenue from affiliate marketing increases 16% YoY</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><a href="http://info.conversantmedia.eu/download-the-cj-affiliate-holiday-report" target="_blank">CJ Affiliate</a> has revealed that revenue from affiliate marketing within global publishers and advertisers increased by 16% year-on-year in November/December 2016, with an average 4% increase in the number of orders.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">The US market saw revenue growth of 16%, partly due to strong growth in overall basket value. The UK market experienced the strongest year-on-year growth in orders, with a 12% increase.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In the UK, Black Friday and Cyber Monday saw levels of shopping demand to rival the US, with growth in orders increasing by 76% on Cyber Monday. The fact that UK retailers prepared for the holiday season earlier than in other markets also resulted in a stronger start to sales.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8212/CJ_Affiliate.JPG" alt="" width="697" height="536"></p> <h3>Thursday at 4pm found to be the ideal time to send an email</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In order to find out the worst and best times to send emails, <a href="https://www.getresponse.com/resources/reports/email-marketing-benchmarks.html" target="_blank">GetResponse</a> has analysed almost 2bn emails in 126 countries and across 19 industries.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">It found Thursday to be the best day, with emails shared seeing a 23.13% open rate and a 3.52% click through rate – the highest of any day of the week. Interestingly, it noted that the most emails are currently sent on Wednesday.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">4pm is apparently the best time of day to send emails, as messages sent at this time drove an open rate of 25.13% and a click-through rate of 3.82% - higher than any other time.</p> <h3>20% of global commercial email fails to reach the inbox</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In other email-related news, Return Path’s <a href="https://returnpath.com/downloads/2017-deliverability-benchmark-report/?sfdc=70137000000EUhC" target="_blank">2017 Deliverability Benchmark Report</a> has revealed that 20% of all commercial email is still being diverted to spam folders or being blocked.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">While deliverability has improved slightly on last year’s global rate of 79%, it means that a significant amount is still missing the mark. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">The US saw the lowest inbox placement of any country, with just 77% of messages reaching inboxes, while Canadian marketers achieved one of the highest inbox placement rates in this study, seeing an average of 90%.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Marketers in Europe generally exceeded the global inbox placement rate, with averages of 82% in France and Spain and 84% in the UK. </p> <h3>Half of firms avoid investing in new sales tech because of cost</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">A new study by <a href="https://files.sugarcrm.com/resources/analyst-reports/2017-SalesTech-Survey-Report.pdf" target="_blank">CITE Research</a> has found that 48% of businesses are putting off investing in technology for their sales teams because of concerns over cost.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">While 63% of UK companies still spend at least £1,200 on tech annually per sales employee – equipping them with technology like smart phones, laptops, CRM systems - 34% of respondents admit to being worried about the complexity of introducing new tech systems, and 20% are concerned about a lack of skills in using the tools.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Sixty three percent of firms are also worried about the cost and effort needed to keep systems up to date, while 69% are concerned about the need for training staff.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><em>"Why are you not yet using new technologies for your sales team?"</em></p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8211/Why_aren_t_you_investing_in_tech.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="373"></em></p> <h3>Mobile traffic to ecommerce sites grows 23% YoY</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><a href="https://www.demandware.com/shopping-index/" target="_blank">Salesforce’s Q2 17 Shopping Index</a> has highlighted how mobile continues to be a disruptive force in ecommerce, with the news that the global mobile traffic share has jumped 23% year-on-year to reach 57%. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In the UK, mobile phones saw the biggest increase in buying intent (buyers as opposed to 'active shoppers') with a growth of 48% year-on-year. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Eight percent of UK mobile traffic was driven solely by social apps such as Snapchat and Instagram – which is more than any other country globally.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8214/Global_buying_intent.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="321"></p> <h3>Marketers are failing to keep up with offline consumer needs</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">A survey of 153 senior marketers by CMO Council found that just 16% believe they are responsive to consumer needs outside of the digital space. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Less than one in five participants say they can make rapid alterations to products, experiences, services, and packaging based on demands.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">However, insight suggests that this is due to the increasingly focus placed on the digital realm, where 43% of brands saying they can respond to customer feedback about marketing campaigns in less than 24 hours online. </p> <h3>Brits spend over a quarter of time online on Facebook and Google</h3> <p>Verto Analytics has revealed that Google and Facebook account for one of every three and a half minutes Brits spend online. </p> <p>Analysis shows that British adults spend a total of 42.7m days a month across Google channels – including search, YouTube and Gmail – which is the equivalent of 17% of total UK internet time. </p> <p>Meanwhile, around 11% of time (or 28.4 million days) is spent on Facebook-owned platforms including WhatsApp and Instagram.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8210/Table_-_dominant_parent_co_s_by_time.PNG" alt="" width="511" height="534"></p> <h3>Brands are failing to reach women online</h3> <p>From analysis of 60,000 campaigns across 20 countries, <a href="http://www.nielsen.com/uk/en/insights/reports/2017/digital-ad-ratings-benchmarks-and-findings.html" target="_blank">Nielsen</a> has found that only half of UK online ad impressions targeting women actually reach them. </p> <p>In contrast, Nielsen noted a 62% success rate for campaigns targeting men. Just 22% of ad impressions reached women aged 18 to 34 compared with 33% reaching men of the same age.</p> <p>The overall hit rate for women in Europe is even lower than the UK, coming in at 46%. Just 45% of ad impressions reached women in Germany, and 49% in France.</p> <h3>Nine in 10 of Mum’s favourite sites offer poor mobile UX</h3> <p>There are nearly three million millennial mums in the UK, however new research by Equimedia has shown that many baby and parenting retailers are failing to deliver a positive mobile experience. This comes despite the fact that 94% of millennial mums are said to browse online primarily using their mobile.</p> <p>Equimedia found that 91% of the brand websites handpicked by mothers have poor mobile site speeds. What’s more, only two of the top brands listed in Babycentre’s recommended products list achieved a ‘good’ rating on mobile.</p> <p>With 40% of mums saying they would abandon a site if it takes more than three seconds to load – retailers are risking losing out on this valuable demographic.</p> <h3>Summer holidays sparks download surge on Amazon</h3> <p>School’s out for summer in Britain, which means many people are turning to Amazon to cure their August boredom.</p> <p>Hitwise has found that a massive 14.7m transactions took place on Amazon’s site last week – mirroring the number of transactions made during Prime Day. Meanwhile, there was a 13% increase in visits to Netflix.com from the weekend to Wednesday, and an 8% increase in visits to BBC’s iPlayer.</p> <p>Thankfully, it appears Brits aren’t just spending their summer glued to the telly – three of the top search terms across the whole of Amazon includes ‘books’ and ‘kindle books’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8213/Hitwise_Amazon.JPG" alt="" width="648" height="200"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69313 2017-08-04T10:26:00+01:00 2017-08-04T10:26:00+01:00 10 thrilling digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Users spend nearly 30 minutes on Instagram every day</h3> <p>Thanks to the popularity of Instagram Stories, which is now a year old, <a href="http://blog.instagram.com/post/163728483085/170802-storiesbirthday" target="_blank">Instagram</a> has revealed that people are spending more time on the platform overall.</p> <p>Users under the age of 25 are said to spend more than 32mins a day on Instagram. Similarly, users aged 25 and older use the app for more than 24mins a day.</p> <p>Stories has 250m daily users, with teenagers consuming four times more stories and producing six times more stories than non-teens.</p> <p>Brands have also been quick to see the value of Instagram Stories – 51% of monthly active businesses have posted a story in the last 28 days.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Celebrating one year of Instagram Stories <a href="https://t.co/GTJaFW7KdW">https://t.co/GTJaFW7KdW</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/892748576195043329">August 2, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marketers willing to pay Facebook influencers £75k per post</h3> <p>Research by Rakuten Marketing has revealed that UK marketers are willing to pay influencers more than £75,000 for a single Facebook post mentioning their brand. This figure rises depending on the industry, with premium fashion marketers saying they’d be willing to pay up to £160,000 per post. </p> <p>Earnings also differ by platform, as celebrity influencers on Facebook are said to earn an average of 12% more than their YouTube peers. And while Snapchat is ranked fifth in terms of earnings, marketers still say they are willing to pay stars as much as £53,000 per Snap.</p> <p>This news comes despite the fact that 86% of marketers admit they aren’t entirely sure how influencer fees are calculated, and 38% cannot tell whether a campaign drives sales.</p> <h3>Brands must offer more to build loyalty with younger customers</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://thoughtleadership.ricoh-europe.com/uk/triple-r/digital-innovation-key-for-smes-pursuing-customer-relationship-excellence/" target="_blank">Ricoh UK</a> has highlighted the generational differences when it comes to attitudes about customer service.</p> <p>Research found that older age groups are less forgiving to brands, with 62% of those aged over 55 saying they would be prepared to walk away from a brand with a laborious sales process compared to 43% of those aged 16-24.</p> <p>Meanwhile, younger customers expect far more information at the consideration stage and post-sales interaction – 43% of those aged 16-24 rated third party reviews and recommendations as the factor that impresses them most, compared to only 20% of people aged 55+.</p> <p>Out of all age groups, 55% of customers say they would abandon a purchase if they found the process difficult.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8088/Capture.JPG" alt="" width="473" height="197"></p> <h3>Brands send more holiday-themed emails despite lower open rates </h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.yeslifecyclemarketing.com/who-we-are/news-and-events/news/study-q4-2016-holiday-themed-emails-may-produce-lower-open-rates" target="_blank">study</a> by Yes Lifecycle Marketing, which involved the analysis of almost 8bn emails sent in Q4 2016, found that holiday-themed emails generated a 14.6% lower open rate than standard emails.</p> <p>Despite this, brands sent 14.5% more emails to subscribers during the period, with 55% of all brands partaking in holiday-themed campaigns. </p> <p>The research also suggests that customers do not particularly value discounts in holiday-themed emails. Emails that didn't include an offer achieved higher open rates than those that promised money off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8087/holiday_emails.JPG" alt="" width="738" height="226"></p> <h3>UK’s June heatwave sparked a 200% increase in Fitbit searches</h3> <p>It might feel like a distant memory now, but analysis by Summit has revealed how retailers benefited from the recent spell of hot weather in the UK.</p> <p>As temperatures reached 34.5 degrees this June, consumers purchased more goods relating to fitness and the great outdoors. Argos sold enough paddling pools to hold over 70m litres of water during the heatwave.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Fitbit searches saw a 200% increase in demand, and camping-related search terms increased by 86%, driving the biggest increase in demand in nine years. Lastly, searches for fishing equipment more than doubled, seeing a 193% increase, and demonstrating how changes in temperature can influence purchasing decisions.</p> <h3>Discounts on direct hotel bookings increase average order value</h3> <p>Research conducted by <a href="https://www.hotelchamp.com/blog/boost-direct-bookings-build-guest-relations/" target="_blank">Hotelchamp</a> has shown that discounts can result in higher conversion rate and average order value for direct hotel bookings.</p> <p>It found that hotels offering a 5% discount (rather than no discount) resulted in an 11% increase in conversion rate and a 12% increase in average booking value. When this was increased to a 10% discount, it found a 50% increase in conversion rate and an 11% increase in average booking value. </p> <p>So, despite offering a discount to guests in both instances, the average booking value always increased by over 10%, meaning that customers were naturally more inclined to purchase upsell features such as breakfast or a room upgrade.</p> <h3>A quarter of US consumers stop buying from brands due to political beliefs</h3> <p><a href="https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/knowledge/society/brand-risk-in-new-age-of-populism" target="_blank">Ipsos</a> has found that the political preferences of consumers have an increasing impact on their buying behaviour. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,016 US adults, it found that a quarter of American consumers have stopped using products and services due to boycotts or a company’s political leanings.</p> <p>The study also revealed that there has been an uptick in online search traffic for the term ‘boycott’ since Trump was officially elected in November 2016. Meanwhile, it found that the firms with the highest rate of consumer boycotts also registered the worst stock market performance between November 2016 and February 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8086/boycott.JPG" alt="" width="637" height="298"></p> <h3>UK ad viewability reaches highest level in over a year</h3> <p>According to analysis by <a href="https://www.meetrics.com/en/benchmarks-uk/" target="_blank">Meetrics</a>, UK ad viewability has risen for the first time in nine months.</p> <p>This appears to be due to a significant increase in the amount of banner ads that meet minimum requirements – rising from 47% to 51% of ads in the second quarter of 2017. This is the highest level since Q3 2016, when 54% of ads met the minimum standard. </p> <p>Despite this news, the UK is still lagging behind in viewability levels compared to elsewhere in Europe, where countries like Austria and France have an average of 69% and 58% respectively. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8089/meetrics.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="267"></p> <h3>UK consumers positive about personal job security</h3> <p>In a survey of 2,000 UK consumers, <a href="http://www.lloydsbankinggroup.com/media/economic-insight/economic-research-library/spending-power-report/" target="_blank">Lloyds</a> found that 64% of people were feeling positive about their personal financial situation in June – up from 63% in May and just two percentage points lower than in June of last year.</p> <p>Despite the value of the pound falling since then, UK consumers appear relatively unfazed when it comes to their own personal prospects, with 80% saying they feel optimistic about their own job security, and 53% saying they are positive about employment prospects nationally.</p> <p>Howoever, the survey did highlight some disparity between attitudes about personal finances and the national economy as a whole, with just 33% saying they feel good about the UK’s financial situation compared to 45% in June 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69296 2017-07-28T14:34:27+01:00 2017-07-28T14:34:27+01:00 10 superb digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go…</p> <h3>Only 25% of data is being used for real-time customer engagement</h3> <p>Despite 60% of UK organisations believing that real-time customer engagement can deliver a 10%-40% increase in revenue, those same organisations are collecting less than a third of relevant data on their customers.</p> <p>What’s more, just 25% of this dataset is being used in segmentation for real-time customer engagement.</p> <p>These stats come from SAS’s <a href="https://www.sas.com/en_gb/whitepapers/real-time-customer-experience-report.html" target="_blank">Age of Now</a> report, which also reveals how slow companies are to act. It says that only 16% of UK organisations can adjust their marketing communication in real-time based on customer behaviour.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7888/SAS.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="327"></p> <h3>42% of customers more impatient due to reliance on technology</h3> <p>A new survey by Fetch and YouGov suggests UK consumers are increasingly looking to new technology for functional purposes, with 81% of millennials being more receptive than older generations to try new tech in order to improve the speed at which they do things.</p> <p>42% of UK consumers now say they are more impatient today than they were five years ago, mainly due to an over-reliance on technology to complete everyday life activities.</p> <p>When it comes to food, 61% of Brits are unwilling to wait 45 minutes or more for a takeaway they ordered online or using an app. Similarly, 22% of consumers say they are only willing to wait between 11-15mins for a taxi service.</p> <h3>CPC costs reach an all-time high</h3> <p>iProspect has just released its <a href="https://www.iprospect.com/en/us/insights/povs/paid-search-trends-2017-q2/" target="_blank">Q2 report</a>, which includes in-depth analysis of data from more than 1,800 AdWords accounts.</p> <p>It has revealed that CPC costs continued to rise in Q2, reaching their highest recorded levels since 2014. Despite this, iProspect found year-on-year impressions and clicks declined 16% and 27.5% respectively, as advertisers were forced to pay more per click while dealing with diminishing budgets.</p> <p>Elsewhere, it found mobile CPC to be on the rise, increasing 17% from Q1 to Q2 of this year and 52% year-on-year. Similarly, mobile click share increased 22% year-on-year. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7890/iProspect.JPG" alt="" width="743" height="547"></p> <h3>Over 60% of SMB’s attribute half or more of sales to Amazon</h3> <p>In a survey of 503 small- to mid-size retailers, NetElixir found that 60% of respondents attribute 50% or more of their ecommerce sales to Amazon. Interestingly, 26.6% are seeing a 50/50 split from their website vs. marketplaces like Amazon and eBay.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why SMBs are choosing to sell on Amazon, 52% said that the potential for increased sales volume is the biggest benefit, 32.6% said increased brand exposure and 11.3% noted solid infrastructure. Conversely, 45% cited lower margins as the biggest downside.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What was the biggest benefit and downside of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Amazon?src=hash">#Amazon</a>? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/webinar?src=hash">#webinar</a> <a href="https://t.co/OhOnUZG67Z">pic.twitter.com/OhOnUZG67Z</a></p> — NetElixir (@NetElixir) <a href="https://twitter.com/NetElixir/status/890292060938543105">July 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>UK advertising spend grows 1.3% YoY in Q1 2017</h3> <p>WARC’s latest <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">Expenditure Report</a> has revealed that overall ad spend grew 1.3% to reach £5.318bn in Q1 2017. But despite being the 15th consecutive quarter of growth, it was actually the slowest rate seen in four years.</p> <p>This growth also occurred despite a 6.2% decline in total television advertising spend – TV’s first fall since 2009. However, it is forecast to recover next year with 2.5% growth in 2018.</p> <p>Meanwhile, online ad spend grew 10.1% year-on-year, and mobile growth was recorded at an impressive 36.2%.</p> <h3>Retailers wrongly assume that customers value speed over free shipping</h3> <p>According to a new report by <a href="http://www2.temando.com/l/86602/2017-07-10/4g564b" target="_blank">Temando</a>, 86% of UK shoppers prefer free delivery over fast delivery. However, the majority of retailers’ surveyed wrongly assume that customers place greater value on a fast shipping service.</p> <p>As a result of this misconception, many retailers are failing to respond to customer demands, with just 27% offering free standard shipping every day. Even worse, almost a quarter of retailers admit that that they don't use free shipping as a promotional tool.</p> <p>With 58% of shoppers stating that they’d shop more if free shipping was offered, many online retailers are still missing a trick.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7889/Tamando.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="439"></p> <h3>Usage of connected TV’s predicted to grow 10.1% in the US this year</h3> <p>Emarketer says that usage of connected TVs will continue to surge in 2017, with 168.1m Americans predicted to use an internet-connected television this year – up 10.1% on 2016.</p> <p>In terms of brands, it predicts that 38.9m Americans will use a Roku device at least once a month – 19.3% more than in 2016. Meanwhile, 36.9m will use a ChromeCast and 35.8m will use an Amazon Fire TV. Just 21.3m users are expected to use an Apple TV.</p> <h3>AI predicted to create over 2.5m jobs in the next 15 years</h3> <p>PwC has estimated that by 2030, 30% of British jobs will be lost to automation. On the back of this, <a href="https://joblift.co.uk/Press/artificial-intelligence-and-automation-potential-job-creation-will-fill-only-19-of-the-hole-left-by-robotic-job-replacement" target="_blank">Joblift</a> has further analysed the situation, comparing potential job creation with jobs lost.</p> <p>Research shows that 136,939 jobs dealing with AI and automation have been posted in the last 12 months, and jobs in this field have increased by an average of 0.06% each month.</p> <p>On this basis, calculations suggest that over the next 15 years, AI, automation and robotics will create 2,535,009 new jobs in total. However, by 2031, 13,375,363 jobs will be at risk from automation, meaning that newly created roles would be able to fill only 19% of the jobs lost.</p> <h3>John Lewis tops UK brand health rankings</h3> <p>John Lewis has ranked first in YouGov’s BrandIndex list of UK brand ‘health’. The ranking is based on consumer perceptions of a brand’s quality, value, impression, satisfaction, reputation and whether consumers would recommend the brand to others.</p> <p>BBC iPlayer comes in at number two on the list, followed by Sony and Marks &amp; Spencer. In contrast to these older, more heritage-based brands, the global list was topped by younger tech brands like Google, YouTube, and Facebook. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7892/Brand_health.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="291"></p> <h3>Cause-related ads generate more views &amp; engagement</h3> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/advertising-channels/video/cause-related-marketing-purpose-driven-ads/" target="_blank">Pixability</a> has revealed that the number of cause-related ads created by the top 100 global brands has increased four times over the past five years.</p> <p>Women’s empowerment accounted for 24% of these ads, making it the top featured issue. Meanwhile, 17% of ads were related to the topic of community aid and 14% were about sustainability.</p> <p>Pixability also found that the average number of views for cause-driven videos was almost 1m more than for those not related to a particular cause. The engagement rate was also 0.31% for cause-related ads compared to 0.29% for the rest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7891/Cause_related_ads.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="384"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69245 2017-07-13T12:33:56+01:00 2017-07-13T12:33:56+01:00 Native ads gain as advertisers seek brand safety away from programmatic Patricio Robles <p>It was the first such boycott to hit Google in the search giant's near 20-year history, and not surprisingly, the company was quick to respond, acknowledging that it has a brand safety problem and promising, among other things, new tools and controls that will enable advertisers to minimize the risk that their ads appear next to offensive content.</p> <p>But Google clearly wasn't able to put the cat back into the bag and now there's evidence that brand safety concerns are having an impact on programmatic, which <a href="http://www.adweek.com/tv-video/programmatic-digital-display-ads-now-account-for-nearly-80-of-us-display-spending/">accounts for 80%</a> of all US digital display ad spend.</p> <p>According to ad sales intelligence provider MediaRadar's new Consumer Advertising Report, 5,000 fewer advertisers purchased programmatic ads in Q1 2017 than they did in Q1 2016, a 12% year-over-year drop.</p> <p>Todd Krizelman, MediaRadar's CEO, believes part of that drop can be attributed to brand safety concerns. "After years of growth, the decline in programmatic buyers is likely attributed to concerns around brand safety, especially given recent problems for companies like YouTube," <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/new-study-shows-that-the-number-of-native-ad-buyers-increased-by-74-in-just-one-year/">he stated</a>.</p> <h3>Programmatic's loss is native advertising's gain</h3> <p>While some advertisers appear to be pumping the brakes on programmatic, many are embracing native advertising. According to MediaRadar's report, the number of advertisers buying native ads hit 5,000 in the first quarter, a 74% year-over-year increase.</p> <p>Krizelman says that the growing popularity of native ads, which has seen its advertiser base triple since 2015, is easy to explain. "Advertisers will keep spending more on native because it outperforms traditional ad units. Audiences look at native ads more frequently than non-native, and buyers are investing accordingly," he told AdWeek.</p> <p>Despite the fact that there are still challenges associated with native, such as disclosure, the industry has made a lot of progress in addressing some of the earlier challenges that gave advertisers pause, such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64510-how-to-scale-native-advertising">scalability</a>. And <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68637-the-guardian-claims-impressive-results-from-new-native-ad-platform/">as publishers figure out which native ad formats deliver results</a>, expect to see more advertisers embrace native.</p> <h3>Don't count programmatic out</h3> <p><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69208-programmatic-has-become-problematic-here-s-what-marketers-can-do-about-it/">Programmatic does have its problems</a> and concerns over brand safety might be impacting its growth but there's no reason to believe that MediaRadar's data is indicative of a reversal in programmatic's fortunes. In fact, MediaRadar's Krizelman sees the programmatic space evolving more than declining.</p> <p>"This form of advertising is continuing to evolve as brands seek more control over where their ads are running," he stated. "We expect to see programmatic rise as more brands move to programmatic direct models."</p> <p>In addition to programmatic direct, there are initiatives <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69231-ads-txt-a-new-standard-for-fighting-inventory-spoofing-unauthorized-sellers-what-you-need-to-know">like Ads.txt</a> which are designed to increase transparency and weed out bad actors in the programmatic ecosystem, so while advertisers are clearly taking action to address brand safety, there's a good chance that ultimately, programmatic will emerge stronger and safer.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69236 2017-07-07T12:40:12+01:00 2017-07-07T12:40:12+01:00 10 superior digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go...</p> <h3>Mobile shopping ads presents growth opportunity for retailers</h3> <p>According to a new report by <a href="http://www.foundit.com/blog/mobile-shopping-search-retailers-biggest-opportunity-improve/" target="_blank">Foundit</a>, mobile clicks on Google Shopping ads represent the largest single source of visitors for online retailers, accounting for nearly 25% of all sessions across direct, paid and shopping search traffic.</p> <p>However, the report – which reviewed over 60m shopping sessions across leading retailers – also states that search is the worst channel for bounce rate, with users typically viewing just two and half pages before quitting.</p> <p>In terms of the difference in bounce rates between Google shopping on mobile and desktop, just 27% of sessions browse past the first page, compared with 38% on desktop. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7342/foundit.JPG" alt="" width="706" height="318"></p> <h3>TV sponsorship increases positive brand associations</h3> <p>According to a study by Thinkbox, brands that sponsor TV shows are able to improve brand health metrics – mainly thanks to the strong affinities viewers have with their favourite programs.</p> <p>Research found that there was a 53% increase in ‘personality fit’ between viewers of a TV show and the sponsoring brand when compared to non-viewers. In turn, viewers were far more likely to recommend the brand than those that didn’t watch the TV show. </p> <p>Meanwhile, when the sponsorship creative was a natural fit with the program, key brand health metrics for viewers were 5% higher than for non-viewers. </p> <h3>UK shoppers buy from just three online stores</h3> <p>According to a YouGov poll commissioned by Apptus, online fashion retailers are struggling to attract new and loyal customers.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,500 online shoppers, 62% of people were found to have a core group of favourite online retail stores – a figure that rises to 68% for women.</p> <p>Interestingly, younger shoppers appear more likely to stick to a narrow selection of sites, with 78% of 18-24 year olds and 70% of 25-34s staying loyal to a select few retailers.</p> <p>In order to tempt them away from their favourites, 66% of shoppers said that other retailers should offer greater value for money, while 48% said they should make it easy to find products they are looking for. In contrast, just 4% pointed to ‘lifestyle content’ as a means of grabbing their attention and building loyalty.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7346/online_payments.jpg" alt="" width="718" height="487"></p> <h3>North Dakota named the best US state to start a business</h3> <p><a href="https://wallethub.com/edu/best-states-to-start-a-business/36934/" target="_blank">WalletHub</a> has compared 50 US states across 20 key indicators to determine where startup businesses are most likely to succeed.</p> <p>It found New Jersey to be the worst, mainly due to high office space and labour costs as well as inaccessible financing.</p> <p>On the flip side, North Dakota was ranked the best, seeing the highest average growth in small businesses. The state also has the most startups per 100,000 residents – three times more than West Virginia, the state with the fewest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7341/Start-ups_US.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="311"></p> <h3>75% of users are searching on mobile more often due to voice technology</h3> <p>New research from Google shows that voice search is influencing user behaviour, with 75% of consumers saying that they now search on their mobiles more often because of the technology.  </p> <p>People who started using voice search in the last six months are said to be the most frequent users, with 42% now using it daily. In comparison, just 25% of people who started using voice search over four years ago use it as frequently.</p> <p>The research also found that both visual and text search remain popular, with 51% of respondents using the two interchangeably.</p> <h3>Cyber-attacks on UK businesses increase 52% in Q2</h3> <p>A new report by Beaming suggests that the number of cyber-attacks aimed at UK-based businesses increased by more than half in Q2 2017. This means that businesses saw almost 65,000 attacks in just three months – an increase of 52% from the previous quarter.</p> <p>68% of attacks targeted connected devices such as networked security cameras and building control systems. However, there was also a marked increase in attacks on company databases, with businesses experiencing an average of 105 attempts per day compared to just 14 in the first quarter.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7340/Cyber_attacks_UK.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="192"></p> <h3>Mobile traffic at an all-time high across Europe</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://www.slideshare.net/adobe/adi-2016-europe-best-of-the-best" target="_blank">report from Adobe</a> – which includes analysis of the top 20% of companies using Adobe Experience Cloud and a survey of over 5,000 consumers across Europe – suggests mobile traffic is increasing across Europe.</p> <p>It states that smartphones accounted for 31% of all European web visits in 2016 – an increase from 22% in 2015. In comparison, desktop accounted for 58% of browser traffic - down from 65% in 2015. For the top-performing companies, 41% of web traffic came from a smartphone in 2016, up from just 31% the previous year. </p> <p>Meanwhile, the report found that consumer expectations are driving mobile usage, with 57% preferring to use a smartphone over another device when completing tasks in 2016 – up from 51% in 2015.</p> <h3>Shoppers’ dual-screening habits present big opportunities for retailers</h3> <p>Data from eBay has revealed there was a huge spike in consumer spending during last summer’s sporting events, indicating the potential for retailers to tap into dual screening behaviour.</p> <p>On the final day of the Tour de France last year, searches for ‘Pinarello’ – the bike that Chris Froome rode – rose by 62% on eBay.co.uk. Meanwhile, searches for ‘cycling shorts’ and ‘road bike’ increased by 46% and 71% respectively.</p> <p>Similarly, in the two weeks of the Rio Olympic Games, searches for ‘running shoes’ rose by 66%, and interest in running watches jumped by 113%.</p> <h3>Uber gains more customers than any other US company in the past year</h3> <p>Despite the series of scandals that have plagued the company in the past year or so, Uber has made the largest customer gains since the first half of 2016. </p> <p>26% of all US millennials are said to have recently used the service, which has increased its <a href="http://www.brandindex.com/article/ride-sharing-brands-top-biggest-millennial-customer-gains-over-last-year" target="_blank">Adobe BrandIndex</a> ‘current customer score’ by 8.2 points.</p> <p>Other companies in the sharing economy have also grown, with Lyft – Uber’s biggest US rival – becoming the third biggest gainer, and Airbnb coming 12th in this list.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7343/uber.jpg" alt="" width="724" height="483"></p> <h3>Online consumers desire security over transaction speed</h3> <p><a href="https://mypinpad.com/consumer-trust-report/" target="_blank">New research</a> suggests that retailers who favour speed and convenience over security measures could be losing customer trust. This is because 67% of consumers surveyed said they are concerned about their online banking and shopping security, with one in four respondents being ‘very concerned’.</p> <p>In order to improve levels of trust, retailers must implement greater transparency around security practices, as well as increased security steps. </p> <p>40% of respondents said they would like to use cardholder PIN to authenticate online transactions, while 50% would like to use a combination of both PIN and biometrics. Only 2% of consumers believe transaction speed is more important than security.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69208 2017-07-03T02:00:00+01:00 2017-07-03T02:00:00+01:00 Programmatic has become problematic: Here's what marketers can do about it Jeff Rajeck <p>Yet programmatic has remained a very popular ad-buying strategy. The market has been growing at an <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/%EF%BB%BF%EF%BB%BF%EF%BB%BFprogrammatic-ads-grow-31-2017-ahead-channels/">average rate of 71% per year</a> for the past five years and is projected to be a $64bn dollar industry in 2018.</p> <p>At a recent Econsultancy event in Singapore, Digital Outlook 2017 Part 2 hosted by NTUC, Hari Shankar, MD at Escelis (the performance marketing brand of Havas Group) told attendees about a few of the current issues programmatic is facing and what marketers can do about them.</p> <p>Two of these are summarised as follows.</p> <h3>The 'machine problem' </h3> <p>Hari started by introducing the programmatic landscape, which can seem overwhelming and confusing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7100/1a.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> <p>But when programmatic is simplified down to how ads are served to web browsers, it is relatively straightforward. Publishers announce that they have an ad space to be filled and advertisers bid for the spot. The winning bid then serves the ad to the browser.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7101/2a.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="531"></p> <p>The 'machine problem' occurs due to how the bidding algorithms work. Instead of offering a free bidding market, programmatic buying auctions are held using a waterfall model. What this means is that while all advertisers can bid for the space, some bids take priority, even if they are not the highest bidder. </p> <p>In the case illustrated below, Partner #1 loses the bid because it is below the floor price set for the publisher, but Publisher #2, being above the floor price, wins the bid despite higher offers coming in from Partners #3 and #4.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7102/3a.png" alt="" width="321" height="371"></p> <p>Hari noted that this model creates an unfair advantage for large bidders, such as Google DoubleClick Bid Manager, as they are often at the top of the 'waterfall'. Publishers suffer too as they do not receive the highest bid for their ad space.</p> <p>Recently, however, a new technology called '<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68687-my-nightmare-trying-to-understand-header-bidding/">header bidding</a>' has emerged as a solution to the 'machine problem'. Instead of using the waterfall model, header bidding takes in bids from all ad partners at the same time and serves up the ad with the highest bid.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7103/4a.png" alt="" width="354" height="422"></p> <p>While some estimate that many large publishers, including MailOnline and CNN International, are implementing header bidding, not everyone is yet on board with the new technology.</p> <p>Regardless, marketers were advised to ensure that header bidding is on their programmatic roadmap and to lobby publishers to adopt the technology soon. Otherwise, brands will lose out on bids for quality ad space and will not be able to get their ads in front of the people they are targeting through their partner sites.</p> <h3>The 'people' problem</h3> <p>Another programmatic problem Hari brought up has more to do with people than algorithms.</p> <p>He noted that a lot of programmatic is still bought via agencies and trading desks which operate using an 'undisclosed' model. What this means is that many brands are buying ads programmatically through a third party which doesn't disclose the fees they are paying for their services.</p> <p>This might not be a problem if the fees were low enough to be negligible, but Hari drew attention to some recent data about the costs of programmatic ad buying.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7106/7.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> <p>Using <a href="http://www.ana.net/getfile/25070">data from the Association of National Advertisers, et al</a>, Hari stated that for 3.9 billion display ads, the volume-weighted average cost was $3.30 per thousand impressions (CPM). <em>Disclosed</em> fees from agencies, however added on a further $1.49 per CPM, a 45% premium.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7104/5b.png" alt="" width="800" height="230"></p> <p>The researchers concede that many of these costs may be worthwhile as they encompass such services as sophisticated targeting and buying against KPIs, but Hari's point was that if disclosed fees saw a 45% premium then undisclosed fees are likely to be much higher.</p> <p>The 'people problem' then leads to brands cutting back on spending by buying low-quality ad inventory which then results in issues with viewability, click fraud, and the brand safety problems currently plaguing programmatic buying.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7105/6.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> <h3>The solutions</h3> <p>Hari concluded by pointing out that if programmatic is going to succeed as a performance-based ad buying strategy, then brands need to take more control of the process.</p> <p>He makes three recommendations:</p> <h4>1) Set up a transparent model for programmatic buying</h4> <p>This could be one of three things: </p> <ul> <li>A fully-in house programmatic buying team, or</li> <li>Direct deals with DSP / RTB vendors, or</li> <li>Disclosed trading desk model with agency</li> </ul> <h4>2) Set up a strong tracking and optimization system</h4> <p>Hari advises that brands should use a single vendor for ad serving and web analytics and track display using multi-channel attribution. Additionally, marketers should integrate their customer data (CRM) with programmatic, ideally using a data management platform (DMP).</p> <h4>3) Test, learn, scale</h4> <p>Marketers should use tools like Optimize 360 for A/B testing and, using their transparent buying model, conduct more controlled buying such as programmatic direct, placement-led programmatic, and first-party tagged targeting. </p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank Hari Shankar, MD Asia Ecselis, Havas Media for his presentation as well as the delegates who took time out of their busy schedules to attend.</p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Singapore Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7107/8.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69184 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 Five successful brands on YouTube: From Adidas to Sarson's vinegar Nikki Gilliland <p>Google recently recognised a number of brands who are using YouTube to<a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/intl/en-gb/collections/2017-winners-of-youtube-works-for-brands.html" target="_blank"> deliver exceptional results</a>. So, building on this, here’s a bit of a deep dive into some of those mentioned and more on why they’ve succeeded. </p> <h3>Sarson’s Vinegar</h3> <p>Sarson’s is certainly not the most recognisable brand, and neither is vinegar the most exciting product. In recognition of the public’s dwindling interest, the brand decided to launch a video marketing campaign to target a younger audience – with the aim of showing them that vinegar is not just something you put on your fish and chips.</p> <p>Looking at what younger people were searching for on YouTube in relation to the product, Sarson's found recipes, home cooking and ‘pickling’ in particular to be the biggest trends. On the back of this discovery, they decided to create a series of recipe videos to showcase how vinegar can be used in different ways, such as for sauerkraut, pickled beetroot, and even as an ingredient in cocktails.</p> <p>Sarson’s targeted users based on their demographic, as well as people searching for specific keywords. The brand served short-form content to these users initially, before delivering longer videos to anyone who engaged.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ic62hHcD_F4?list=PLjRELKmqLCAJl97luZvHSM11PezqM-7nj&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The approach certainly worked - the campaign generated 4m views in 2016, and a growth of 541% on inbound website traffic compared to 2015. It not only succeeded in changing brand perceptions – showing the product in a new light to those already aware of it – but it also opened it up to a whole new audience, making younger people aware of the brand and its potential role in cooking.</p> <p>Since the initial campaign, Sarson’s has further built on this interest from food lovers with a series of recipes inspired by <a href="http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/">Great British Chefs</a>. By recognising a demand for content and delivering it, Sarson's has managed to successfully tap into a new audience and increase its digital presence.</p> <h3>Adidas </h3> <p>Adidas is a brand that has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68860-four-ways-nostalgia-can-help-to-boost-your-marketing-efforts/" target="_blank">tapping into nostalgia</a> and the transformative <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69086-how-adidas-uses-digital-to-enable-powerful-experiences/" target="_blank">power of sport</a> to deliver in both high-fashion and sporting arenas. </p> <p>As the official sponsor of the Champions League, Adidas Football wanted to build on the interest of football fans, turning their love of the game into love and long-term loyalty for the brand. Its target demographic was football-obsessed teens of around 14 to 20 years of age – those who typically use social channels like YouTube to consume media. </p> <p>But what type of content does this demographic desire?</p> <p>Adidas recognised that a lot of football content on traditional TV channels can be quite dry, usually involving serious analysis and commentary about upcoming or past games. In contrast to this, the brand decided to create Adidas ‘Gamedayplus’ - a series of fun and purely entertaining videos featuring big name football clubs and players. Examples include Suarez taking the ‘first touch challenge’ or David Silva testing his target practice. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S081lUbP4t0?list=PLfl6xCUNPx0pMXW-s8CuhXcMDvqWA6aSp&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With an existing and highly active audience of young users already searching for football content, Adidas Football managed to draw in 315,000 new subscribers as a result of the campaign. The channel also saw a 65% increase in organic views, with users typically watching for longer without clicking away. </p> <p>By tapping into the ‘always on’ digital mind-set of young consumers, Adidas is a great example of how to deliver the type of content that’s perfectly suited to both the channel and its audience.</p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>While brands like Adidas use YouTube to target a specific demographic, others, like Tesco, use it to build trust and drive purchases across a large and varied audience.</p> <p>Tesco has traditionally focused on capturing consumer attention with seasonal campaigns, often centred around popular cultural events like Christmas and Halloween. However, with trust in the brand dwindling in recent years, transferring this strategy to YouTube has allowed Tesco to experiment with short form video content, aiming to deliver real value on the promise of ‘every little helps’.</p> <p>Its ‘Spookermarket’ series was the first example of this, involving a video that captured the reaction of customers as Tesco staff played out Halloween-related pranks. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yqWeuBJfxsQ?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The video went on to become one of the top ten ads of 2015 - a result that also helped to spur on the rest of the campaign. Using its light-hearted nature to capture initial attention, Tesco then served more in-depth and helpful videos to users, including a jack-o-lantern tutorial and other Halloween-related ‘how-to’ content. This staggered approach ensured the campaign’s impact would be much bigger, with consistent content rolled out to reach consumers over time.</p> <p>One reason Tesco has been so successful on YouTube appears to be this considered approach - one that uses data to shape future marketing efforts. Taking into account the type of videos that customers engage with the most, it is able to create content on this basis, delivering value and a real reason for viewers to invest in the brand.</p> <p>With a 9% uplift in purchase intent from its YouTube TrueView Shoppable ads, it is clear that Tesco’s strategy is doing more than just build trust.</p> <h3>Halifax</h3> <p>Another brand that has used helpful content to drive brand awareness is Halifax bank. However, it has also used YouTube to help differentiate itself from competitors. </p> <p>With its series of short, simple and easy to understand ‘jargon buster’ videos, it aimed to deliver a campaign that was both large in scale and hugely valuable for customers, ultimately drawing them away from other banks.</p> <p>Halifax used YouTube’s TrueView platform - meaning ads would play in-stream or alongside related content - in order to gain mass reach. To build momentum, each video followed a distinct and recognisable formula. It involved a single question – such as ‘What’s a lump sum?’ and ‘What’s an ISA?’ – which was then explained in under 30 seconds using both visuals and audible commentary. </p> <p>Its simplicity was key. Nielsen analysis of the campaign found the videos scored 100% for the metric 'easy to understand' and generated a 31% uplift in brand consideration for those who were exposed to the campaign.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XHlKXKFNn9s?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>One reason I also like this example is that is clearly designed for YouTube. While a lot of brands are guilty of adapting or tweaking campaigns to a particular channel, the best results occur when videos or ads are first created with the medium in mind.</p> <p>In the case of Halifax, its short, snappy, and super simple explanations of confusing subjects are perfectly suited to viewer behaviour. It does not disrupt the user, and is both interesting and succinct enough to convey a memorable message. </p> <h3>EE </h3> <p>YouTube has become synonymous with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69161-micro-influencers-how-to-find-the-right-fit-for-your-brand/" target="_blank">social influencers</a>, and as a result, many brands have generated interest from influencer partnerships. EE is a brand that has used this approach on a massive scale, drawing on the combined reach of multiple influencers for a single campaign.</p> <p>The Wembley Cup 2016 was EE's second mini-football tournament involving YouTubers against former FIFA Legends, and culminating in a final at Wembley Stadium.</p> <p>So, why did it choose influencers and not mainstream celebrities? Like previous examples, it wanted to reach a specific demographic, with the aim of becoming the number one provider for a young age range. With this age bracket already highly engaged with influencers on YouTube, EE recognised the potential of creating a campaign that could capitalise on this existing interest.</p> <p>The results were impressive, with the series amassing 40m views and 1.5m watching the live final. In addition, 20,000 people filled the stadium to watch. What’s more, there was a 36% increase in brand search terms following the campaign, with EE succeeding in its aim of becoming the number one choice for young mobile users.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZrL1DTZoLW4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With a focus on episodic content, EE is also a great example of how to reach an increasingly elusive audience. As young people turn away from TV and towards online media, the sheer amount of content out there means it is even harder for brands to create campaigns that resonate. For its 2016 series, EE deliberately involved the digital audience, allowing them to have a say in picking the team and choosing substitutions. </p> <p>Combined with episodic content, this meant EE was able to hook in viewers from the outset and create deeper levels of emotional engagement.</p> <h3>Ingredients for success</h3> <p>So, let’s recap on what we can learn from the aforementioned brand campaigns.</p> <p><strong>Drawing on data:</strong> Whether it’s using search data to inform targeting or using watch times to shape future strategy, it’s vital for brands to consider metrics when creating YouTube campaigns. Brands that do, like Tesco, are far more likely to succeed. Solutions like Google’s DoubleClick allow brands to delve below surface data (such as basic clicks) to gain a much more in-depth picture of how ads and videos impact user behaviour. </p> <p><strong>Finding a niche:</strong> One problem for brands on YouTube is saturation. Take recipes, for instance, where endless channels compete on the same subject matter. In this instance, it is important to create a point of difference based on the brand, finding out how to create content that people are really interested in. I mean, who knew pickling was so big?</p> <p><strong>Creating campaigns specifically for the channel:</strong> Like Halifax’s super short and concise finance videos, the best YouTube campaigns are specifically designed to cater to the digital audience. Taking into consideration the context of the user and what else they’re doing online at that moment, other than watching an ad, can be incredibly powerful.</p> <p><strong>Using episodic content:</strong> Lastly, the campaigns from Adidas and EE show how episodic content can build engagement and brand loyalty over time. Both brands have since gone on to repeat the same formula, with viewers clearly hooked and ready for more.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69143 2017-06-02T12:33:26+01:00 2017-06-02T12:33:26+01:00 10 intriguing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>71% of Brits think voice will be used in daily tasks in 10 years</h3> <p>According a consumer survey by Wiraya and YouGov, 71% of consumers think voice will be used for one or more daily tasks by 2027, while 26% of Brits already interact with day-to-day technology using voice activation.</p> <p>Helen Mirren was voted the voice people would most want to hear on automated calls, closely followed by Ewan McGregor, and then Tom Hardy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6516/Voice.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="421"></p> <h3>C-Suite executives rank customer experience as top priority</h3> <p>Calabrio has <a href="http://learn.calabrio.com/dl-customer-experience-era-intl/" target="_blank">released a report</a> that reveals customer experience is now a top priority for US and UK business executives – ranked above sales and revenue as a primary concern for 2017.</p> <p>52% of senior leaders now view customer experience as the most important way of differentiating their brand. Further findings suggest it’s not that easy, however, with the biggest obstacles being achieving a single customer view and integrating customer data.</p> <p>29% of C-Suite execs are still unsure of the number of devices customers are using to complete a purchase, and only one in three believe that customers are connecting with brands using more than two devices.</p> <h3>Only half of consumers know how to block ads on mobile</h3> <p>Despite more than 80% of the people surveyed owning a mobile device, just 15% of them block ads on their mobile devices, compared to 68% blocking ads on their laptops.</p> <p>This is according to a <a href="http://insight.globalwebindex.net/mobile-ad-blocking-2017" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex study</a>, which delved into the reasons why the US and EU are way behind Asia when it comes to the uptake of mobile ad blocking. </p> <p>Results show that users are unaware they can block ads on mobile devices, with just 48% of device owners currently aware of the possibility. It’s clear that many are still frustrated with online advertising, as one in three mobile users feel they see too many ads when browsing, and almost 50% have a desire to block all ads on their mobile devices.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6510/mobile_ad_blocking.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="420"></p> <h3>70% of audiences want social media companies to tackle fake news</h3> <p>Research by the7stars has revealed that just 20% of UK news audiences feel confident that the news they are reading is real, and 70% want social media companies to take more responsibility for tackling fake news.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 Brits, 45% said that it’s difficult to understand what is fake news and what isn’t. Just 7% said they felt Facebook and Twitter are doing enough to protect them from fake news.</p> <p>Only 10% of respondents said they trust news shared by friends on social media, with 45% saying they would not trust a shared news article.</p> <h3>Champions League engages more fans on social than FA Cup</h3> <p>Ahead of this year’s Champions League Final, Adobe has revealed how fans have been engaging with football's biggest competitions on social media.</p> <p>Taking into account over 27.8m mentions of the Champions League and FA Cup, stats show that the Champions League has been dominating, garnering over 22m social mentions – an average of 2.4m mentions a month. </p> <p>In contrast, the FA Cup generated just over 5.8m social mentions during its tournament phase, with an average of almost 900,000 mentions a month.</p> <p>This appears to be due to the Champions League’s international presence, with 84% of mentions coming from outside of the UK, compared to 63% coming from abroad for the FA Cup.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/UCLfinal?src=hash">#UCLfinal</a> Festival in Cardiff Bay:</p> <p>Sunshine ✅<br>Floating pitch ✅<br>Ultimate Champions Match ✅</p> <p>Details: <a href="https://t.co/WPHOv0QOZb">https://t.co/WPHOv0QOZb</a> <a href="https://t.co/OnycoUM95S">pic.twitter.com/OnycoUM95S</a></p> — Champions League (@ChampionsLeague) <a href="https://twitter.com/ChampionsLeague/status/870292999967842304">June 1, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Biggest UK mortgage companies are delivering poor online experience</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://dock9.com/latest/press-release-uk-mortgage-giants-failing-customers-online-says-research" target="_blank">new research</a> by Dock9, three of the UK’s biggest mortgage providers are ranked worst in terms of online customer experience.</p> <p>In a study of the best and worst online experiences for 19 major mortgage intermediaries, high street and specialist lenders – Santander, Nationwide, and Natwest finished bottom of the pile. Barclays, Lloyds, and TSB were ranked top.</p> <p>Overall, it found 53% of companies are failing to design websites fully suited to mobile and tablet devices. 65% are only partially or not responsive at all, meaning customers have a much longer journey than necessary. </p> <h3>72% of marketers fail GDPR consent test </h3> <p>A test conducted by <a href="https://uk.mailjet.com/blog/guide/gdpr-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> found that 72% of UK marketers either cannot answer, or incorrectly list the necessary conditions to meet GDPR requirements for ‘opt-in’ consent.</p> <p>With less than a year to go, just 17% of respondents have taken all of the recommended steps towards GDPR compliance. The reason could be that many marketers wrongly believe that the fine for non-compliance is €5.2m, when it is in fact €20m, or 4% of their global revenue.</p> <p>This is not the only area of confusion - 64% also assume GDPR means they must ensure individuals are able to opt-out easily, while 32% of UK marketing professionals believe they will be able to automate processing of location data without ‘opt-in consent’.</p> <p>For a handy breakdown of the GDPR, head on over to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69119-gdpr-needn-t-be-a-bombshell-for-customer-focused-marketers/" target="_blank">Ben's article</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6511/GDPR.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="394"></p> <h3>90% of UK consumers have unsubscribed from retail communications in the past year</h3> <p>New research by Engage Hub has revealed that 90% of UK consumers have unsubscribed from communications from retailers in the past 12 months, with 46% saying it is due to an onslaught of messages from brands.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,500 consumers, one third of respondents said they were unhappy with the frequency of offers or updates they receive. 24% say they receive something at least once a day, while 15% say they receive even more.</p> <p>Alongside the frequency of communication - irrelevancy is also a problem. 24% of respondents said they have unsubscribed from a retailer due the messages being highly irrelevant to them.</p> <h3>Stock in UK supermarkets declines 5.7%</h3> <p>A study by <a href="https://www.iriworldwide.com/en-GB/insights/Publications/Launching-a-new-product" target="_blank">IRIR</a> has found a 5.7% decline in the amount of products UK supermarkets are stocking in stores. From February 2016 to February 2017, there was an average of 930 fewer products available to shoppers in their local supermarket.</p> <p>During the same period, there was a decline of 8.4% in new branded items, with sales of new products also down by 6.5%. </p> <p>As well as fewer branded products being launched, supermarkets are also struggling to gain sufficient distribution, with only one in every seven new products achieving more than 75% distribution across the major UK supermarkets.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6509/distribution.JPG" alt="" width="738" height="388"></p> <h3>Budgets for experiential marketing predicted to rise</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.freeman.com/news/press-releases/new-research-from-freeman-and-ssi-confirms-brand-experiences-matter-to-marketers-and-theyre-willing-to-pay-for-them" target="_blank">Freeman</a>, one in three global marketers expect to allocate up to half of their budget to experiential marketing in the next three years. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 CMOs in the US, Europe, and Asia, 59% of respondents agree that brand experiences have the ability to create stronger relationships with audiences. As a result, 51% say they plan to spend between a fifth and a half of their budget on experiential in the next three years.</p> <p>Currently, 42% of marketers in Asia are using sensory interaction as a means of creating personalised experiences, compared to 28% in the US and just 13% in Europe. 31% of Asian companies are using virtual reality, compared to just 7%-9% elsewhere.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69072 2017-05-11T13:20:00+01:00 2017-05-11T13:20:00+01:00 Why DMPs must be deeply integrated in tomorrow's marketing stack Chris O'Hara <p>This is a fast-moving trend in which companies are licensing large enterprise stacks and using systems integrators to manage all marketing—not just online advertising.</p> <p>As detailed in Ad Age (<a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/market/308666/">Marketing clouds loom</a>), the days of turning to an agency trade desk or demand side platform (DSP) to manage the “digital” portions of advertising are fading rapidly as marketers are intent on having technology that covers more than just advertising.</p> <h3>Building consumer data platforms</h3> <p>A few years ago, a good “stack” might have been a connected DMP, DSP and ad server. A really good stack would feature a viewability vendor and start a dynamic creative optimization (DCO). The focus then was on optimizing for the world of programmatic buying and getting the most out of digital advertising as consumers’ attention shifted online, to mobile and social, rather than television. </p> <p>Fast forward a few years, and the conversations we are having with marketers are vastly different. As <a href="https://adexchanger.com/data-exchanges/dmp-adoption-rise-challenges-remain/">reported in AdExchanger</a>, more than 40% of enterprise marketers license a DMP, and another 20% will do so within the next 12 months. DMP owners and those in the market for one are increasingly talking about more than just optimizing digital ads. They want to know how to put email marketing, customer service and commerce data inside their systems. They also want data to flow from their systems to their own data lakes.</p> <p>Many are undertaking the process of building internal consumer data platforms (CDPs), which can house all of their first-party data assets—both known and pseudonymous user data. </p> <p>We are moving beyond ad tech. Quickly. </p> <p>Today, when those in the market are considering licensing a “DMP” they are often thinking about “data management” more broadly. Yes, they need a DMP for its identity infrastructure, ability to connect to dozens of different execution systems and its analytical capabilities. But they also need a DMP to align with the systems they use to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68639-how-crm-and-a-dmp-can-combine-to-give-a-360-degree-view-of-the-customer/">manage their CRM data</a>, email data, commerce systems, and marketing automation tools.</p> <p>Data-driven marketing no longer lives in isolation. After I acquire a “luxury sedan intender” online, I want to retarget her—but I also want to show her a red sedan on my website, e-mail her an offer to come to the dealership, serve her an SMS message when she gets within range of the dealership to give her a test drive incentive, and capture her e-mail address when she signs up to talk to a salesperson. All of that needs to work together.</p> <h3>Personalization demands adtech and martech come together </h3> <p>We live in a world that demands Netflix and Amazon-like instant gratification at all times. It’s nearly inconceivable to a Millennial or Generation Z if a brand somehow forgets that they are a loyal customer because they have so many choices and different brands that they can switch to when they have a bad experience.</p> <p>This is a world that requires adtech and martech to come together to provide personalized experiences—not simply to create more advertising lift, but as the price of admission for customer loyalty. </p> <p>So, when I am asked, what is the future of DMPs, I say that the idea of licensing something called a “DMP” will not exist in a few years.</p> <p>DMPs will be completely integrated into<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68952-a-recipe-for-the-martech-layer-cake/"> larger stacks</a> that offer a layer of data management (for both known and unknown data) for the “right person;” an orchestration layer of connected execution systems that seek to answer the “right message, right time” quandary; and an artificial intelligence layer, which is the brains of the operation trying to figure out how to stitch billions of individual data points together to put it all together in real time.</p> <p>DMPs will never be the same, but only in the sense that they are so important that tomorrow’s enterprise marketing stacks cannot survive without integrating them completely, and deeply.</p>