tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/ad-networks Latest Ad networks content from Econsultancy 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69184 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 Five successful brands on YouTube: From Adidas to Sarson's vinegar Nikki Gilliland <p>Google recently recognised a number of brands who are using YouTube to<a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/intl/en-gb/collections/2017-winners-of-youtube-works-for-brands.html" target="_blank"> deliver exceptional results</a>. So, building on this, here’s a bit of a deep dive into some of those mentioned and more on why they’ve succeeded. </p> <h3>Sarson’s Vinegar</h3> <p>Sarson’s is certainly not the most recognisable brand, and neither is vinegar the most exciting product. In recognition of the public’s dwindling interest, the brand decided to launch a video marketing campaign to target a younger audience – with the aim of showing them that vinegar is not just something you put on your fish and chips.</p> <p>Looking at what younger people were searching for on YouTube in relation to the product, Sarson's found recipes, home cooking and ‘pickling’ in particular to be the biggest trends. On the back of this discovery, they decided to create a series of recipe videos to showcase how vinegar can be used in different ways, such as for sauerkraut, pickled beetroot, and even as an ingredient in cocktails.</p> <p>Sarson’s targeted users based on their demographic, as well as people searching for specific keywords. The brand served short-form content to these users initially, before delivering longer videos to anyone who engaged.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ic62hHcD_F4?list=PLjRELKmqLCAJl97luZvHSM11PezqM-7nj&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The approach certainly worked - the campaign generated 4m views in 2016, and a growth of 541% on inbound website traffic compared to 2015. It not only succeeded in changing brand perceptions – showing the product in a new light to those already aware of it – but it also opened it up to a whole new audience, making younger people aware of the brand and its potential role in cooking.</p> <p>Since the initial campaign, Sarson’s has further built on this interest from food lovers with a series of recipes inspired by <a href="http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/">Great British Chefs</a>. By recognising a demand for content and delivering it, Sarson's has managed to successfully tap into a new audience and increase its digital presence.</p> <h3>Adidas </h3> <p>Adidas is a brand that has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68860-four-ways-nostalgia-can-help-to-boost-your-marketing-efforts/" target="_blank">tapping into nostalgia</a> and the transformative <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69086-how-adidas-uses-digital-to-enable-powerful-experiences/" target="_blank">power of sport</a> to deliver in both high-fashion and sporting arenas. </p> <p>As the official sponsor of the Champions League, Adidas Football wanted to build on the interest of football fans, turning their love of the game into love and long-term loyalty for the brand. Its target demographic was football-obsessed teens of around 14 to 20 years of age – those who typically use social channels like YouTube to consume media. </p> <p>But what type of content does this demographic desire?</p> <p>Adidas recognised that a lot of football content on traditional TV channels can be quite dry, usually involving serious analysis and commentary about upcoming or past games. In contrast to this, the brand decided to create Adidas ‘Gamedayplus’ - a series of fun and purely entertaining videos featuring big name football clubs and players. Examples include Suarez taking the ‘first touch challenge’ or David Silva testing his target practice. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S081lUbP4t0?list=PLfl6xCUNPx0pMXW-s8CuhXcMDvqWA6aSp&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With an existing and highly active audience of young users already searching for football content, Adidas Football managed to draw in 315,000 new subscribers as a result of the campaign. The channel also saw a 65% increase in organic views, with users typically watching for longer without clicking away. </p> <p>By tapping into the ‘always on’ digital mind-set of young consumers, Adidas is a great example of how to deliver the type of content that’s perfectly suited to both the channel and its audience.</p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>While brands like Adidas use YouTube to target a specific demographic, others, like Tesco, use it to build trust and drive purchases across a large and varied audience.</p> <p>Tesco has traditionally focused on capturing consumer attention with seasonal campaigns, often centred around popular cultural events like Christmas and Halloween. However, with trust in the brand dwindling in recent years, transferring this strategy to YouTube has allowed Tesco to experiment with short form video content, aiming to deliver real value on the promise of ‘every little helps’.</p> <p>Its ‘Spookermarket’ series was the first example of this, involving a video that captured the reaction of customers as Tesco staff played out Halloween-related pranks. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yqWeuBJfxsQ?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The video went on to become one of the top ten ads of 2015 - a result that also helped to spur on the rest of the campaign. Using its light-hearted nature to capture initial attention, Tesco then served more in-depth and helpful videos to users, including a jack-o-lantern tutorial and other Halloween-related ‘how-to’ content. This staggered approach ensured the campaign’s impact would be much bigger, with consistent content rolled out to reach consumers over time.</p> <p>One reason Tesco has been so successful on YouTube appears to be this considered approach - one that uses data to shape future marketing efforts. Taking into account the type of videos that customers engage with the most, it is able to create content on this basis, delivering value and a real reason for viewers to invest in the brand.</p> <p>With a 9% uplift in purchase intent from its YouTube TrueView Shoppable ads, it is clear that Tesco’s strategy is doing more than just build trust.</p> <h3>Halifax</h3> <p>Another brand that has used helpful content to drive brand awareness is Halifax bank. However, it has also used YouTube to help differentiate itself from competitors. </p> <p>With its series of short, simple and easy to understand ‘jargon buster’ videos, it aimed to deliver a campaign that was both large in scale and hugely valuable for customers, ultimately drawing them away from other banks.</p> <p>Halifax used YouTube’s TrueView platform - meaning ads would play in-stream or alongside related content - in order to gain mass reach. To build momentum, each video followed a distinct and recognisable formula. It involved a single question – such as ‘What’s a lump sum?’ and ‘What’s an ISA?’ – which was then explained in under 30 seconds using both visuals and audible commentary. </p> <p>Its simplicity was key. Nielsen analysis of the campaign found the videos scored 100% for the metric 'easy to understand' and generated a 31% uplift in brand consideration for those who were exposed to the campaign.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XHlKXKFNn9s?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>One reason I also like this example is that is clearly designed for YouTube. While a lot of brands are guilty of adapting or tweaking campaigns to a particular channel, the best results occur when videos or ads are first created with the medium in mind.</p> <p>In the case of Halifax, its short, snappy, and super simple explanations of confusing subjects are perfectly suited to viewer behaviour. It does not disrupt the user, and is both interesting and succinct enough to convey a memorable message. </p> <h3>EE </h3> <p>YouTube has become synonymous with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69161-micro-influencers-how-to-find-the-right-fit-for-your-brand/" target="_blank">social influencers</a>, and as a result, many brands have generated interest from influencer partnerships. EE is a brand that has used this approach on a massive scale, drawing on the combined reach of multiple influencers for a single campaign.</p> <p>The Wembley Cup 2016 was EE's second mini-football tournament involving YouTubers against former FIFA Legends, and culminating in a final at Wembley Stadium.</p> <p>So, why did it choose influencers and not mainstream celebrities? Like previous examples, it wanted to reach a specific demographic, with the aim of becoming the number one provider for a young age range. With this age bracket already highly engaged with influencers on YouTube, EE recognised the potential of creating a campaign that could capitalise on this existing interest.</p> <p>The results were impressive, with the series amassing 40m views and 1.5m watching the live final. In addition, 20,000 people filled the stadium to watch. What’s more, there was a 36% increase in brand search terms following the campaign, with EE succeeding in its aim of becoming the number one choice for young mobile users.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZrL1DTZoLW4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With a focus on episodic content, EE is also a great example of how to reach an increasingly elusive audience. As young people turn away from TV and towards online media, the sheer amount of content out there means it is even harder for brands to create campaigns that resonate. For its 2016 series, EE deliberately involved the digital audience, allowing them to have a say in picking the team and choosing substitutions. </p> <p>Combined with episodic content, this meant EE was able to hook in viewers from the outset and create deeper levels of emotional engagement.</p> <h3>Ingredients for success</h3> <p>So, let’s recap on what we can learn from the aforementioned brand campaigns.</p> <p><strong>Drawing on data:</strong> Whether it’s using search data to inform targeting or using watch times to shape future strategy, it’s vital for brands to consider metrics when creating YouTube campaigns. Brands that do, like Tesco, are far more likely to succeed. Solutions like Google’s DoubleClick allow brands to delve below surface data (such as basic clicks) to gain a much more in-depth picture of how ads and videos impact user behaviour. </p> <p><strong>Finding a niche:</strong> One problem for brands on YouTube is saturation. Take recipes, for instance, where endless channels compete on the same subject matter. In this instance, it is important to create a point of difference based on the brand, finding out how to create content that people are really interested in. I mean, who knew pickling was so big?</p> <p><strong>Creating campaigns specifically for the channel:</strong> Like Halifax’s super short and concise finance videos, the best YouTube campaigns are specifically designed to cater to the digital audience. Taking into consideration the context of the user and what else they’re doing online at that moment, other than watching an ad, can be incredibly powerful.</p> <p><strong>Using episodic content:</strong> Lastly, the campaigns from Adidas and EE show how episodic content can build engagement and brand loyalty over time. Both brands have since gone on to repeat the same formula, with viewers clearly hooked and ready for more.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69143 2017-06-02T12:33:26+01:00 2017-06-02T12:33:26+01:00 10 intriguing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>71% of Brits think voice will be used in daily tasks in 10 years</h3> <p>According a consumer survey by Wiraya and YouGov, 71% of consumers think voice will be used for one or more daily tasks by 2027, while 26% of Brits already interact with day-to-day technology using voice activation.</p> <p>Helen Mirren was voted the voice people would most want to hear on automated calls, closely followed by Ewan McGregor, and then Tom Hardy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6516/Voice.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="421"></p> <h3>C-Suite executives rank customer experience as top priority</h3> <p>Calabrio has <a href="http://learn.calabrio.com/dl-customer-experience-era-intl/" target="_blank">released a report</a> that reveals customer experience is now a top priority for US and UK business executives – ranked above sales and revenue as a primary concern for 2017.</p> <p>52% of senior leaders now view customer experience as the most important way of differentiating their brand. Further findings suggest it’s not that easy, however, with the biggest obstacles being achieving a single customer view and integrating customer data.</p> <p>29% of C-Suite execs are still unsure of the number of devices customers are using to complete a purchase, and only one in three believe that customers are connecting with brands using more than two devices.</p> <h3>Only half of consumers know how to block ads on mobile</h3> <p>Despite more than 80% of the people surveyed owning a mobile device, just 15% of them block ads on their mobile devices, compared to 68% blocking ads on their laptops.</p> <p>This is according to a <a href="http://insight.globalwebindex.net/mobile-ad-blocking-2017" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex study</a>, which delved into the reasons why the US and EU are way behind Asia when it comes to the uptake of mobile ad blocking. </p> <p>Results show that users are unaware they can block ads on mobile devices, with just 48% of device owners currently aware of the possibility. It’s clear that many are still frustrated with online advertising, as one in three mobile users feel they see too many ads when browsing, and almost 50% have a desire to block all ads on their mobile devices.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6510/mobile_ad_blocking.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="420"></p> <h3>70% of audiences want social media companies to tackle fake news</h3> <p>Research by the7stars has revealed that just 20% of UK news audiences feel confident that the news they are reading is real, and 70% want social media companies to take more responsibility for tackling fake news.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 Brits, 45% said that it’s difficult to understand what is fake news and what isn’t. Just 7% said they felt Facebook and Twitter are doing enough to protect them from fake news.</p> <p>Only 10% of respondents said they trust news shared by friends on social media, with 45% saying they would not trust a shared news article.</p> <h3>Champions League engages more fans on social than FA Cup</h3> <p>Ahead of this year’s Champions League Final, Adobe has revealed how fans have been engaging with football's biggest competitions on social media.</p> <p>Taking into account over 27.8m mentions of the Champions League and FA Cup, stats show that the Champions League has been dominating, garnering over 22m social mentions – an average of 2.4m mentions a month. </p> <p>In contrast, the FA Cup generated just over 5.8m social mentions during its tournament phase, with an average of almost 900,000 mentions a month.</p> <p>This appears to be due to the Champions League’s international presence, with 84% of mentions coming from outside of the UK, compared to 63% coming from abroad for the FA Cup.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/UCLfinal?src=hash">#UCLfinal</a> Festival in Cardiff Bay:</p> <p>Sunshine ✅<br>Floating pitch ✅<br>Ultimate Champions Match ✅</p> <p>Details: <a href="https://t.co/WPHOv0QOZb">https://t.co/WPHOv0QOZb</a> <a href="https://t.co/OnycoUM95S">pic.twitter.com/OnycoUM95S</a></p> — Champions League (@ChampionsLeague) <a href="https://twitter.com/ChampionsLeague/status/870292999967842304">June 1, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Biggest UK mortgage companies are delivering poor online experience</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://dock9.com/latest/press-release-uk-mortgage-giants-failing-customers-online-says-research" target="_blank">new research</a> by Dock9, three of the UK’s biggest mortgage providers are ranked worst in terms of online customer experience.</p> <p>In a study of the best and worst online experiences for 19 major mortgage intermediaries, high street and specialist lenders – Santander, Nationwide, and Natwest finished bottom of the pile. Barclays, Lloyds, and TSB were ranked top.</p> <p>Overall, it found 53% of companies are failing to design websites fully suited to mobile and tablet devices. 65% are only partially or not responsive at all, meaning customers have a much longer journey than necessary. </p> <h3>72% of marketers fail GDPR consent test </h3> <p>A test conducted by <a href="https://uk.mailjet.com/blog/guide/gdpr-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> found that 72% of UK marketers either cannot answer, or incorrectly list the necessary conditions to meet GDPR requirements for ‘opt-in’ consent.</p> <p>With less than a year to go, just 17% of respondents have taken all of the recommended steps towards GDPR compliance. The reason could be that many marketers wrongly believe that the fine for non-compliance is €5.2m, when it is in fact €20m, or 4% of their global revenue.</p> <p>This is not the only area of confusion - 64% also assume GDPR means they must ensure individuals are able to opt-out easily, while 32% of UK marketing professionals believe they will be able to automate processing of location data without ‘opt-in consent’.</p> <p>For a handy breakdown of the GDPR, head on over to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69119-gdpr-needn-t-be-a-bombshell-for-customer-focused-marketers/" target="_blank">Ben's article</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6511/GDPR.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="394"></p> <h3>90% of UK consumers have unsubscribed from retail communications in the past year</h3> <p>New research by Engage Hub has revealed that 90% of UK consumers have unsubscribed from communications from retailers in the past 12 months, with 46% saying it is due to an onslaught of messages from brands.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,500 consumers, one third of respondents said they were unhappy with the frequency of offers or updates they receive. 24% say they receive something at least once a day, while 15% say they receive even more.</p> <p>Alongside the frequency of communication - irrelevancy is also a problem. 24% of respondents said they have unsubscribed from a retailer due the messages being highly irrelevant to them.</p> <h3>Stock in UK supermarkets declines 5.7%</h3> <p>A study by <a href="https://www.iriworldwide.com/en-GB/insights/Publications/Launching-a-new-product" target="_blank">IRIR</a> has found a 5.7% decline in the amount of products UK supermarkets are stocking in stores. From February 2016 to February 2017, there was an average of 930 fewer products available to shoppers in their local supermarket.</p> <p>During the same period, there was a decline of 8.4% in new branded items, with sales of new products also down by 6.5%. </p> <p>As well as fewer branded products being launched, supermarkets are also struggling to gain sufficient distribution, with only one in every seven new products achieving more than 75% distribution across the major UK supermarkets.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6509/distribution.JPG" alt="" width="738" height="388"></p> <h3>Budgets for experiential marketing predicted to rise</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.freeman.com/news/press-releases/new-research-from-freeman-and-ssi-confirms-brand-experiences-matter-to-marketers-and-theyre-willing-to-pay-for-them" target="_blank">Freeman</a>, one in three global marketers expect to allocate up to half of their budget to experiential marketing in the next three years. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 CMOs in the US, Europe, and Asia, 59% of respondents agree that brand experiences have the ability to create stronger relationships with audiences. As a result, 51% say they plan to spend between a fifth and a half of their budget on experiential in the next three years.</p> <p>Currently, 42% of marketers in Asia are using sensory interaction as a means of creating personalised experiences, compared to 28% in the US and just 13% in Europe. 31% of Asian companies are using virtual reality, compared to just 7%-9% elsewhere.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69072 2017-05-11T13:20:00+01:00 2017-05-11T13:20:00+01:00 Why DMPs must be deeply integrated in tomorrow's marketing stack Chris O'Hara <p>This is a fast-moving trend in which companies are licensing large enterprise stacks and using systems integrators to manage all marketing—not just online advertising.</p> <p>As detailed in Ad Age (<a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/market/308666/">Marketing clouds loom</a>), the days of turning to an agency trade desk or demand side platform (DSP) to manage the “digital” portions of advertising are fading rapidly as marketers are intent on having technology that covers more than just advertising.</p> <h3>Building consumer data platforms</h3> <p>A few years ago, a good “stack” might have been a connected DMP, DSP and ad server. A really good stack would feature a viewability vendor and start a dynamic creative optimization (DCO). The focus then was on optimizing for the world of programmatic buying and getting the most out of digital advertising as consumers’ attention shifted online, to mobile and social, rather than television. </p> <p>Fast forward a few years, and the conversations we are having with marketers are vastly different. As <a href="https://adexchanger.com/data-exchanges/dmp-adoption-rise-challenges-remain/">reported in AdExchanger</a>, more than 40% of enterprise marketers license a DMP, and another 20% will do so within the next 12 months. DMP owners and those in the market for one are increasingly talking about more than just optimizing digital ads. They want to know how to put email marketing, customer service and commerce data inside their systems. They also want data to flow from their systems to their own data lakes.</p> <p>Many are undertaking the process of building internal consumer data platforms (CDPs), which can house all of their first-party data assets—both known and pseudonymous user data. </p> <p>We are moving beyond ad tech. Quickly. </p> <p>Today, when those in the market are considering licensing a “DMP” they are often thinking about “data management” more broadly. Yes, they need a DMP for its identity infrastructure, ability to connect to dozens of different execution systems and its analytical capabilities. But they also need a DMP to align with the systems they use to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68639-how-crm-and-a-dmp-can-combine-to-give-a-360-degree-view-of-the-customer/">manage their CRM data</a>, email data, commerce systems, and marketing automation tools.</p> <p>Data-driven marketing no longer lives in isolation. After I acquire a “luxury sedan intender” online, I want to retarget her—but I also want to show her a red sedan on my website, e-mail her an offer to come to the dealership, serve her an SMS message when she gets within range of the dealership to give her a test drive incentive, and capture her e-mail address when she signs up to talk to a salesperson. All of that needs to work together.</p> <h3>Personalization demands adtech and martech come together </h3> <p>We live in a world that demands Netflix and Amazon-like instant gratification at all times. It’s nearly inconceivable to a Millennial or Generation Z if a brand somehow forgets that they are a loyal customer because they have so many choices and different brands that they can switch to when they have a bad experience.</p> <p>This is a world that requires adtech and martech to come together to provide personalized experiences—not simply to create more advertising lift, but as the price of admission for customer loyalty. </p> <p>So, when I am asked, what is the future of DMPs, I say that the idea of licensing something called a “DMP” will not exist in a few years.</p> <p>DMPs will be completely integrated into<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68952-a-recipe-for-the-martech-layer-cake/"> larger stacks</a> that offer a layer of data management (for both known and unknown data) for the “right person;” an orchestration layer of connected execution systems that seek to answer the “right message, right time” quandary; and an artificial intelligence layer, which is the brains of the operation trying to figure out how to stitch billions of individual data points together to put it all together in real time.</p> <p>DMPs will never be the same, but only in the sense that they are so important that tomorrow’s enterprise marketing stacks cannot survive without integrating them completely, and deeply.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69026 2017-05-03T10:00:38+01:00 2017-05-03T10:00:38+01:00 Why online publishers are launching wedding verticals Nikki Gilliland <p>Now it appears publishers want a slice of the cake too. Many more are launching wedding-related content to engage users, with some even expanding into the world of commerce to increase revenue. </p> <p>Here’s just a few examples, as well the reasons why it’s proving to be a profitable move.</p> <h3>Cosmopolitan</h3> <p>According to data, 10% of all engaged Americans have visited Cosmo.com. Up until recently, Cosmo has consistently written about the topic, choosing to ramp up activity ahead of and during the summer months when readers are most likely to attend events.</p> <p>After seeing an increase in traffic to this bridal content, the publisher decided to launch it as an official vertical all year round, giving ‘Weddings’ a dedicated category on the main site alongside ‘Style’, ‘Beauty’, ‘Love’ and ‘Video’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5616/Cosmo_weddings.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="330"></p> <p>For Cosmo, the aim is to meet the obvious demand for wedding content, as well as draw in readers who would otherwise turn to standalone wedding publications like Brides. </p> <p>To ensure it doesn't alienate anyone who <em>isn't </em>getting married, the new vertical will offer a range of wedding-related content, including articles about bachelorette parties, as part of a wider <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68384-how-cosmopolitan-reinvented-itself-became-the-number-one-women-s-magazine-in-the-uk/" target="_blank">strategy to reach a millennial audience</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5615/Cosmo_insta.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="483"></p> <h3>InStyle</h3> <p>Last year, InStyle expanded its online presence from just fashion to include the verticals of home, entertaining and, you guessed it – weddings. It was partly done to help engage a wider demographic (which is naturally interested in a more varied subject matter), but also to increase the potential for advertising revenue.</p> <p>InStyle readers reportedly purchase an average of seven items based solely on ads. That’s more than any other competitor, even the likes of Vogue which famously includes a hefty amount of advertising. Adding weddings into the mix is only likely to increase this spend, especially when you consider the fact that InStyle has the highest number of readers with an annual household income of more than $100,000.</p> <p>With the average American wedding <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/02/03/wedding-cost-spending-usa-average/" target="_blank">said to cost $35,329</a>, this type of content is bound to appeal to InStyle’s more affluent demographic. What’s more, it aligns with the publication’s decision to become more of a luxury lifestyle title rather than a straightforward fashion mag.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5617/InStyle_weddings.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="707"></p> <h3>The Knot</h3> <p>While the aforementioned publishers use wedding content to increase readership and ad revenue, rival bridal site The Knot has ventured deeper into the world of commerce.</p> <p>In 2015, it acquired event marketplace Gigmasters in order to allow users to search and book venues, photographers, planners, hairdressers and more. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5618/The_Knot.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="519"></p> <p>By fusing content with commerce in this way, its aim is to reach users at every stage of the wedding process. From providing initial inspiration to help with finding a photographer and inviting guests – even a honeymoon when the wedding is over – the idea is that there’s no need for users to seek help or advice anywhere else.</p> <p>With its own retail component, The Knot also allows users to directly shop the items featured in its print and online magazine.  </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">You'll love these little white dresses from <a href="https://twitter.com/Macys">@Macys</a>! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ad?src=hash">#ad</a> <a href="https://t.co/7iVweMaZdD">https://t.co/7iVweMaZdD</a> <a href="https://t.co/Bcy2LB4Q6b">pic.twitter.com/Bcy2LB4Q6b</a></p> — The Knot (@theknot) <a href="https://twitter.com/theknot/status/855053727257985024">April 20, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Brides</h3> <p>Another publisher that has dipped its toes (or should that be fingers) into commerce is Brides – Conde Nast’s popular wedding title. Instead of an online marketplace on its own site however, it has partnered with a number of other retailers to launch products that have the Brides brand stamp of approval. </p> <p>These include a line of engagement rings called ‘In Love by Brides’ sold at Walmart, ‘Modern Bride Jewelry’ for JCPenney, plus a custom stationery line called ‘Brides Fine Wedding Papers’ sold in a number of US stores.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5619/In_Love_By_Brides.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="505"></p> <p>Using data to delve into the interests of readers, Brides discovered that a large proportion were interested in more affordable or budget-friendly weddings.</p> <p>By partnering with retailers like Walmart it has been able to deliver this, offering readers the chance to invest in more than just content.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68121-why-i-love-the-pool-and-its-refreshing-approach-to-publishing/" target="_blank">Why I love The Pool and its refreshing approach to publishing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67494-five-ways-the-new-york-times-is-innovating-its-publishing-model/" target="_blank">Five ways The New York Times is innovating its publishing model</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67312-are-publishers-in-a-losing-battle-with-content-distribution-platforms/" target="_blank">Are publishers in a losing battle with content distribution platforms?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69032 2017-04-26T11:09:00+01:00 2017-04-26T11:09:00+01:00 Lastminute.com partners with Spotify to target music-loving travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>The ‘Music Makes You Travel’ campaign is set to run from now until December – here’s a breakdown of what it involves.</p> <h4>Music linked to destinations</h4> <p><a href="http://www.lastminute.com/">Lastminute.com</a> has teamed up with Spotify to produce a series of interactive maps, playlists and podcasts – each one linked to 10 different destinations.</p> <p>The content can be found on a dedicated <a href="http://music.lastminute.com/?_ga=1.256337419.1462185020.1493024027" target="_blank">online hub</a>, with ads also running on both Lastminute.com’s main site and the Spotify platform. </p> <p>Each city is broken down by area, with playlists bringing to life the distinct sounds of each one. For instance, East London’s playlist includes songs by local artists like Dizzee Rascal and Katy B. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5667/Lastminute_maps.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <p>Meanwhile, the map highlights musical hotspots such as Rough Trade East – a popular record store in Shoreditch.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5666/Rough_Trade.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="567"></p> <p>Alongside this, the campaign will include a series of podcasts, with each one featuring an international artist giving insight into the music scene of their home city.</p> <h4>Driving online conversions</h4> <p>Not only does the campaign tap into the way that music transports us to another place, but it emphasises how music accompanies us wherever we go. From listening to music on the plane to discovering live music venues on holiday, we engage with music in key moments of the travel journey.</p> <p>Due to its highly emotive nature, Lastminute.com is hoping that music will prompt Spotify users – those who are typically young and of an adventurous mindset - to browse and ultimately convert online. </p> <h4>Bringing brand audiences together</h4> <p>So, what’s in it for Spotify? </p> <p>According to data, a large percentage of lastminute.com consumers are also Spotify users, meaning the collaboration appears to be a win-win for both brands. </p> <p>The partnership will also see <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68077-why-lastminute-com-is-taking-control-of-its-ad-inventory/" target="_blank">The Travel People</a> – Lastminute’s ad sales group – run campaigns for Spotify across its network. Meanwhile, the company will also delve into first- and third-party data to offer insight for advertisers based on listener’s music tastes.</p> <p>Playlists relating to travel are hugely popular on the platform. We’ve already seen other travel brands such as Lonely Planet using Spotify in this way, creating travel-themed playlists to take listeners on a musical journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5668/Lonely_Planet.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="668"></p> <p>With Spotify now reaching 50m paying users, it presents a massive opportunity for brands to reach a highly active audience.</p> <h4>Offering personalisation and discovery</h4> <p>The size and scope of Spotify’s audience is not the only draw for lastminute.com. The opportunity to serve <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalised</a> and interactive content to users is key, ramping up levels of brand engagement.</p> <p>Users can select what type of genres they are interested in to find related venues and events, with prompts to find out more on the destination’s main landing page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5665/Personalisation.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="616"></p> <p>Naturally, this also encourages activity of social, with the ability to embed and share playlists aligning with the campaign’s aim to reach a young and travel-hungry audience.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68626-three-reasons-to-appreciate-spotify-s-latest-data-driven-ad-campaign/" target="_blank">Three reasons to appreciate Spotify’s latest data-driven ad campaign</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/6180-five-tips-for-promoting-brands-on-spotify/" target="_blank">Five tips for promoting brands on Spotify</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68916 2017-03-30T15:15:00+01:00 2017-03-30T15:15:00+01:00 Is cost-per-offline-visit the future of mobile advertising? Patricio Robles <p>Location-based adtech firm xAd thinks so. xAd, which uses a proprietary platform to "[automate] geo-boundaries around key places and points of interest" and says it delivers ads to 500m users each month, recently <a href="http://www.xad.com/press-releases/xad-pushes-industry-forward-introducing-first-market-cost-per-visit-model-guaranteeing-offline-visits/">announced</a> a new pay-per-visit ad offering in the US that will allow advertisers to pay for ads only when they drive consumers through the doors of their stores.</p> <p>According to the company, "This new model represents a major shift in accountability from the buyer to partner solution, bringing improved transparency and accountability to the advertising industry.</p> <p>"With the advent of fake news and some of the industry's most plaguing questions surrounding 'the quality and efficacy of served impressions,' xAd's move toward a more advanced performance-based model takes the complexity out of having to navigate industry pitfalls like viewability and ad fraud."</p> <p>The pay-per-visit offering features third-party verification of visits through Placed, a location measurement firm, and xAd says that The Home Depot and Applebee's have signed on as launch partners. xAd isn't revealing how much advertisers will pay for each visit; its website states that pricing "varies by industry."</p> <h3>Is the location marketing era finally upon us?</h3> <p>Some, like UM Worldwide's US digital head Joshua Lowcock, thinks pay-per-visit could be as important a development as pay per click was. "The difference is, there are no accidental clicks when it comes to foot traffic. If a brand's focus is to drive store visits, you should be able to pay for those visits. Now you can align strategy directly to investment, creating an efficient, powerful buying model, one I believe can really cement location as a strategic must for marketers," he said.</p> <p>Indeed, location looks like it will soon be a strategic must for marketers as more and more companies decide to offer up the location technologies they've developed to marketers.</p> <p>For example, Foursquare, which now describes itself as a "technology company that uses location intelligence to build meaningful consumer experiences and business solutions," <a href="https://medium.com/foursquare-direct/on-announcing-foursquares-pilgrim-sdk-cb3f6ab9cfa8#.3wadm7oau">just announced</a> that it is opening up a software development kit that will allow developers to incorporate Pilgrim, its core technology platform behind its Places database, stop detection, and snap-to-place awareness, into their apps.</p> <p>And <a href="https://medium.com/foursquare-direct/introducing-foursquare-analytics-a-dynamic-foot-traffic-dashboard-for-brands-9ce60aa93b42#.acdd9c2r7">it's launching</a> Foursquare Analytics, a "dynamic foot traffic dashboard for brands" that is currently being used by brands including Taco Bell, TGI Fridays, H&amp;M, Lowe's and Equinox.</p> <p>The timing for a golden era of location marketing couldn't come soon enough for retailers with physical locations. Thanks in large part to changing consumer behavior driven by the Amazonification of commerce, <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2017/03/22/retailers-closing-stores-sears-kmart-jcpenney-macys-mcsports-gandermountian/99492180/">a growing number of retailers</a> are downsizing and fighting for survival.</p> <p>While solutions like xAd Cost Per Visit and Foursquare Analytics alone won't save them, having better insights into consumer behavior, the ability to target consumers at the right place and time when they're on the go, and the option to pay for ads only when they drive visits to their stores could help give retailers that jump on the location marketing bandwagon quickly enough a fighting chance.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67418-what-is-location-based-advertising-why-is-it-the-next-big-thing/"><em>What is location-based advertising &amp; why is it the next big thing?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66171-six-useful-mobile-marketing-case-studies/"><em>Six useful mobile marketing case studies</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68909 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 10 spellbinding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Advertisers predicted to be defrauded by $16.4bn in 2017</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.campaignbrief.com/2017/03/16/Ad%20Fraud_Report_The%26Partnership_mSIX_Adloox.pdf" target="_blank">report by The&amp;Partnership</a> suggests that the global cost of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68067-is-ad-fraud-the-21st-century-drug-trade/">advertising fraud</a> could have been significantly under-reported up until this point.</p> <p>While fraud is believed to cost advertisers $7.2bn globally each year, the real cost of ad fraud may have been as high as $12.48bn in 2016 (accounting for almost 20% of the $66bn spent on digital advertising).</p> <p>If advertising fraud continues to evolve at its current rate, this figure could potentially rise to $16.4bn in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4775/Ad_Fraud.jpeg" alt="" width="760" height="427"></p> <h3>A third of Brits would rather read a blog than a book</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">New research from Affilinet has found that one in three people in the UK say they read more online than they do in print.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In a survey of over 2,600 Brits, 32% confessed tospending more time reading online, with cookery, diet and nutrition recipes being the most likely category to search for.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">When asked about the reasons why, 61% said they prefer blogs because they are ‘cheaper’ than buying books, 58% stated that they are ‘more convenient’ and 49% said they ‘prefer short-form content rather than full books’.</p> <h3>42% of marketers agree that email relevance is hit and miss</h3> <p>A <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/customers-want-relevance-marketers-need-content" target="_blank">DMA infographic</a> has highlighted how marketers are failing to create relevant emails, with 42% saying ‘some’ are relevant to the recipient at best. This is despite the fact that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67734-three-key-charts-from-our-2016-email-marketing-census/">the medium remains an effective channel</a>, with email ROI increasing from £29.64 to £30.01 in the past year.</p> <p>DMA also suggests that one of the biggest stumbling blocks is a lack of content, with one in four marketers citing this as a major problem.</p> <p>As shown below, other issues preventing effective email is said to be a lack of strategy, a lack of data and data siloes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4776/DMA_email.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="539"></p> <h3>Poor communication results in nearly a quarter of missed deliveries</h3> <p>Research from Engage Hub has revealed that a lack of communication from delivery companies is the main reason UK consumers miss scheduled deliveries, with 23% of consumers saying poor communication has caused them to miss a delivery in the past 12 months.</p> <p>Other reasons include a parcel not arriving at the specified time and having no ability to reschedule the delivery time.</p> <p>When asked about the most important elements of the delivery process, 49% of UK consumers cited clear confirmation regarding delivery time, while 30% said updates from the delivery company in the event of any changes.</p> <h3>Top three searched-for luxury brands see 63.5% of online visits</h3> <p>In terms of the online market share, Hitwise has revealed that Michael Kors, Ralph Lauren and Coach are the most searched-for luxury brands.</p> <p>In fact, these three brands take 63.5% of the share of online visits to the luxury apparel industry as a whole. </p> <p>Meanwhile, data shows that Versace, Tom Ford and Yves Saint Laurent are a hit with millennials, as a large portion of their traffic is currently driven by consumers aged 18 to 34.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4777/Hitwise.jpg" alt="" width="703" height="390"></p> <h3>UK shoppers rate retail experiences as average</h3> <p>According to a <a href="http://www.zetaglobal-uk.com/linking-brand-digital-sophistication-with-customer-demands-whitepaper/?utm_source=media&amp;utm_campaign=cct_whitepaper_lpr&amp;utm_medium=pr" target="_blank">new report by Zeta Global</a>, only 40% of UK shoppers think their favourite retailers provide a good or great customer experience.</p> <p>This comes from a study of 3,000 UK adults, which also found that 48% of respondents considered their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68839-the-10-principles-for-creating-amazing-online-retail-experiences/">retail experience</a> to be merely ‘average’. Meanwhile, a further 11% believe that their favourite shops provide poor service.</p> <p>From this, it is clear that personalisation presents a huge opportunity for retailers to capture consumer loyalty, with almost two-fifths of shoppers saying they would be inclined to shop around if they received a personalised service.</p> <h3>Emotional context could make digital ads 40% more effective</h3> <p><a href="https://yahoo.tumblr.com/post/158393152734/emotional-context-could-make-digital-ads-40-more" target="_blank">According to Yahoo</a>, the emotional state of consumers can dramatically impact how receptive they are to advertising.</p> <p>With US and UK consumers reportedly feeling ‘upbeat’ 46% of the time, this is a key window for advertisers, with people said to be 40% more receptive to digital ads when they are in this mood.</p> <p>The study also found that when consumers are upbeat, they are 30% more likely to engage with native video content than when they are in any other emotional state. </p> <p>Lastly, consumers are 28% more likely to engage with content marketing and 21% more likely to engage with direct marketing when feeling happy.</p> <h3>Majority of marketers haven’t got to grips with mobile</h3> <p><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6yVMKaNCUz6Qm9xMWxIcGpsZW8/view" target="_blank">A new report</a> by Mobile Marketing Association and RadiumOne has revealed that the majority of marketers are failing to tap into the way consumers use their mobiles.</p> <p>From interviews with over 300 senior marketers, two-thirds admitted that they’re not confident they've identified the most critical signals in their customers’ journey.</p> <p>What’s more, 61% aren’t fully confident in their ability to find new profitable customers, and 58% are not fully confident in their re-engagement efforts to prevent customer churn. </p> <p>In terms of the most valuable data, 29% of marketers cite content sharing from apps, 28% cite mobile site visits and 27% cite app installs as the best signals for improving mobile branding. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4779/MMA_report.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="236"></p> <h3>25 to 34 year olds 65% more likely to search for bank accounts</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that people aged between 25 to 32 are 65% more likely to search for a savings account than any other demographic. What’s more, men in this age group are 60% more likely to be saving compared to women.</p> <p>From an audience of 8.3m 25 to 34 years old consumers in the UK searching to switch banks, Hitwise suggests that the most popular banks to visit are Santander and Halifax, followed by Lloyds and Natwest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4780/Hitwise_2.jpg" alt="" width="599" height="376"></p> <h3>BMW drivers are the biggest retail spenders of any car owner</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www2.viantinc.com/anatomy-of-an-auto-shopper-uk" target="_blank">study by Viant</a> has delved into the purchase habits and behaviour of major car brand owners in the UK. </p> <p>The report states that Fiat is the most popular car brand for millennials, with this age group 18% more likely to drive hatchbacks than non-millennials. BMW drivers are said to be the biggest retail spenders, being 54% more likely to shop at John Lewis and 2.3 times more likely to shop in Selfridges than Ford drivers.</p> <p>Lastly, Ford drivers reportedly spent £2,157 on flights over a period of six months, with their preferred airline being Emirates.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3132 2017-03-10T08:09:36+00:00 2017-03-10T08:09:36+00:00 Masterclass in Lead Generation - Singapore <p>B2B (Business-to-business) brands are increasingly turning to digital marketing tactics to generate leads, build demand, grow opportunities, engage prospects, and retain customers. As B2B marketing is significantly different from B2C marketing, this workshop aims to specifically address the unique issues and challenges faced by B2B marketers on digital platforms and social media.</p> <p>This 2-day intensive workshop explores how digital marketing can help B2B companies to fill the sales funnel with qualified leads, engage prospects in the buying journey, nurture leads, integrate with sales efforts and measure results.</p> <p><a href="http://www.clickacademyasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/masterclass-in-lead-generation-2017.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to find out more about the course.</a></p>