tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/ad-networks Latest Ad networks content from Econsultancy 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69032 2017-04-26T11:09:39+01:00 2017-04-26T11:09:39+01:00 Lastminute.com partners with Spotify to target music-loving travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>The ‘Music Makes You Travel’ campaign is set to run from now until December – here’s a breakdown of what it involves.</p> <h4>Music linked to destinations</h4> <p>Lastminute.com has teamed up with Spotify to produce a series of interactive maps, playlists and podcasts – each one linked to 10 different destinations.</p> <p>The content can be found on a dedicated <a href="http://music.lastminute.com/?_ga=1.256337419.1462185020.1493024027" target="_blank">online hub</a>, with ads also running on both Lastminute.com’s main site and the Spotify platform. </p> <p>Each city is broken down by area, with playlists bringing to life the distinct sounds of each one. For instance, East London’s playlist includes songs by local artists like Dizzee Rascal and Katy B. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5667/Lastminute_maps.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <p>Meanwhile, the map highlights musical hotspots such as Rough Trade East – a popular record store in Shoreditch.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5666/Rough_Trade.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="567"></p> <p>Alongside this, the campaign will include a series of podcasts, with each one featuring an international artist giving insight into the music scene of their home city.</p> <h4>Driving online conversions</h4> <p>Not only does the campaign tap into the way that music transports us to another place, but it emphasises how music accompanies us wherever we go. From listening to music on the plane to discovering live music venues on holiday, we engage with music in key moments of the travel journey.</p> <p>Due to its highly emotive nature, Lastminute.com is hoping that music will prompt Spotify users – those who are typically young and of an adventurous mindset - to browse and ultimately convert online. </p> <h4>Bringing brand audiences together</h4> <p>So, what’s in it for Spotify? </p> <p>According to data, a large percentage of lastminute.com consumers are also Spotify users, meaning the collaboration appears to be a win-win for both brands. </p> <p>The partnership will also see <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68077-why-lastminute-com-is-taking-control-of-its-ad-inventory/" target="_blank">The Travel People</a> – Lastminute’s ad sales group – run campaigns for Spotify across its network. Meanwhile, the company will also delve into first- and third-party data to offer insight for advertisers based on listener’s music tastes.</p> <p>Playlists relating to travel are hugely popular on the platform. We’ve already seen other travel brands such as Lonely Planet using Spotify in this way, creating travel-themed playlists to take listeners on a musical journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5668/Lonely_Planet.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="668"></p> <p>With Spotify now reaching 50m paying users, it presents a massive opportunity for brands to reach a highly active audience.</p> <h4>Offering personalisation and discovery</h4> <p>The size and scope of Spotify’s audience is not the only draw for lastminute.com. The opportunity to serve <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalised</a> and interactive content to users is key, ramping up levels of brand engagement.</p> <p>Users can select what type of genres they are interested in to find related venues and events, with prompts to find out more on the destination’s main landing page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5665/Personalisation.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="616"></p> <p>Naturally, this also encourages activity of social, with the ability to embed and share playlists aligning with the campaign’s aim to reach a young and travel-hungry audience.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68626-three-reasons-to-appreciate-spotify-s-latest-data-driven-ad-campaign/" target="_blank">Three reasons to appreciate Spotify’s latest data-driven ad campaign</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/6180-five-tips-for-promoting-brands-on-spotify/" target="_blank">Five tips for promoting brands on Spotify</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68916 2017-03-30T15:15:00+01:00 2017-03-30T15:15:00+01:00 Is cost-per-offline-visit the future of mobile advertising? Patricio Robles <p>Location-based adtech firm xAd thinks so. xAd, which uses a proprietary platform to "[automate] geo-boundaries around key places and points of interest" and says it delivers ads to 500m users each month, recently <a href="http://www.xad.com/press-releases/xad-pushes-industry-forward-introducing-first-market-cost-per-visit-model-guaranteeing-offline-visits/">announced</a> a new pay-per-visit ad offering in the US that will allow advertisers to pay for ads only when they drive consumers through the doors of their stores.</p> <p>According to the company, "This new model represents a major shift in accountability from the buyer to partner solution, bringing improved transparency and accountability to the advertising industry.</p> <p>"With the advent of fake news and some of the industry's most plaguing questions surrounding 'the quality and efficacy of served impressions,' xAd's move toward a more advanced performance-based model takes the complexity out of having to navigate industry pitfalls like viewability and ad fraud."</p> <p>The pay-per-visit offering features third-party verification of visits through Placed, a location measurement firm, and xAd says that The Home Depot and Applebee's have signed on as launch partners. xAd isn't revealing how much advertisers will pay for each visit; its website states that pricing "varies by industry."</p> <h3>Is the location marketing era finally upon us?</h3> <p>Some, like UM Worldwide's US digital head Joshua Lowcock, thinks pay-per-visit could be as important a development as pay per click was. "The difference is, there are no accidental clicks when it comes to foot traffic. If a brand's focus is to drive store visits, you should be able to pay for those visits. Now you can align strategy directly to investment, creating an efficient, powerful buying model, one I believe can really cement location as a strategic must for marketers," he said.</p> <p>Indeed, location looks like it will soon be a strategic must for marketers as more and more companies decide to offer up the location technologies they've developed to marketers.</p> <p>For example, Foursquare, which now describes itself as a "technology company that uses location intelligence to build meaningful consumer experiences and business solutions," <a href="https://medium.com/foursquare-direct/on-announcing-foursquares-pilgrim-sdk-cb3f6ab9cfa8#.3wadm7oau">just announced</a> that it is opening up a software development kit that will allow developers to incorporate Pilgrim, its core technology platform behind its Places database, stop detection, and snap-to-place awareness, into their apps.</p> <p>And <a href="https://medium.com/foursquare-direct/introducing-foursquare-analytics-a-dynamic-foot-traffic-dashboard-for-brands-9ce60aa93b42#.acdd9c2r7">it's launching</a> Foursquare Analytics, a "dynamic foot traffic dashboard for brands" that is currently being used by brands including Taco Bell, TGI Fridays, H&amp;M, Lowe's and Equinox.</p> <p>The timing for a golden era of location marketing couldn't come soon enough for retailers with physical locations. Thanks in large part to changing consumer behavior driven by the Amazonification of commerce, <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2017/03/22/retailers-closing-stores-sears-kmart-jcpenney-macys-mcsports-gandermountian/99492180/">a growing number of retailers</a> are downsizing and fighting for survival.</p> <p>While solutions like xAd Cost Per Visit and Foursquare Analytics alone won't save them, having better insights into consumer behavior, the ability to target consumers at the right place and time when they're on the go, and the option to pay for ads only when they drive visits to their stores could help give retailers that jump on the location marketing bandwagon quickly enough a fighting chance.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67418-what-is-location-based-advertising-why-is-it-the-next-big-thing/"><em>What is location-based advertising &amp; why is it the next big thing?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66171-six-useful-mobile-marketing-case-studies/"><em>Six useful mobile marketing case studies</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68909 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 10 spellbinding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Advertisers predicted to be defrauded by $16.4bn in 2017</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.campaignbrief.com/2017/03/16/Ad%20Fraud_Report_The%26Partnership_mSIX_Adloox.pdf" target="_blank">report by The&amp;Partnership</a> suggests that the global cost of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68067-is-ad-fraud-the-21st-century-drug-trade/">advertising fraud</a> could have been significantly under-reported up until this point.</p> <p>While fraud is believed to cost advertisers $7.2bn globally each year, the real cost of ad fraud may have been as high as $12.48bn in 2016 (accounting for almost 20% of the $66bn spent on digital advertising).</p> <p>If advertising fraud continues to evolve at its current rate, this figure could potentially rise to $16.4bn in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4775/Ad_Fraud.jpeg" alt="" width="760" height="427"></p> <h3>A third of Brits would rather read a blog than a book</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">New research from Affilinet has found that one in three people in the UK say they read more online than they do in print.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In a survey of over 2,600 Brits, 32% confessed tospending more time reading online, with cookery, diet and nutrition recipes being the most likely category to search for.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">When asked about the reasons why, 61% said they prefer blogs because they are ‘cheaper’ than buying books, 58% stated that they are ‘more convenient’ and 49% said they ‘prefer short-form content rather than full books’.</p> <h3>42% of marketers agree that email relevance is hit and miss</h3> <p>A <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/customers-want-relevance-marketers-need-content" target="_blank">DMA infographic</a> has highlighted how marketers are failing to create relevant emails, with 42% saying ‘some’ are relevant to the recipient at best. This is despite the fact that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67734-three-key-charts-from-our-2016-email-marketing-census/">the medium remains an effective channel</a>, with email ROI increasing from £29.64 to £30.01 in the past year.</p> <p>DMA also suggests that one of the biggest stumbling blocks is a lack of content, with one in four marketers citing this as a major problem.</p> <p>As shown below, other issues preventing effective email is said to be a lack of strategy, a lack of data and data siloes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4776/DMA_email.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="539"></p> <h3>Poor communication results in nearly a quarter of missed deliveries</h3> <p>Research from Engage Hub has revealed that a lack of communication from delivery companies is the main reason UK consumers miss scheduled deliveries, with 23% of consumers saying poor communication has caused them to miss a delivery in the past 12 months.</p> <p>Other reasons include a parcel not arriving at the specified time and having no ability to reschedule the delivery time.</p> <p>When asked about the most important elements of the delivery process, 49% of UK consumers cited clear confirmation regarding delivery time, while 30% said updates from the delivery company in the event of any changes.</p> <h3>Top three searched-for luxury brands see 63.5% of online visits</h3> <p>In terms of the online market share, Hitwise has revealed that Michael Kors, Ralph Lauren and Coach are the most searched-for luxury brands.</p> <p>In fact, these three brands take 63.5% of the share of online visits to the luxury apparel industry as a whole. </p> <p>Meanwhile, data shows that Versace, Tom Ford and Yves Saint Laurent are a hit with millennials, as a large portion of their traffic is currently driven by consumers aged 18 to 34.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4777/Hitwise.jpg" alt="" width="703" height="390"></p> <h3>UK shoppers rate retail experiences as average</h3> <p>According to a <a href="http://www.zetaglobal-uk.com/linking-brand-digital-sophistication-with-customer-demands-whitepaper/?utm_source=media&amp;utm_campaign=cct_whitepaper_lpr&amp;utm_medium=pr" target="_blank">new report by Zeta Global</a>, only 40% of UK shoppers think their favourite retailers provide a good or great customer experience.</p> <p>This comes from a study of 3,000 UK adults, which also found that 48% of respondents considered their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68839-the-10-principles-for-creating-amazing-online-retail-experiences/">retail experience</a> to be merely ‘average’. Meanwhile, a further 11% believe that their favourite shops provide poor service.</p> <p>From this, it is clear that personalisation presents a huge opportunity for retailers to capture consumer loyalty, with almost two-fifths of shoppers saying they would be inclined to shop around if they received a personalised service.</p> <h3>Emotional context could make digital ads 40% more effective</h3> <p><a href="https://yahoo.tumblr.com/post/158393152734/emotional-context-could-make-digital-ads-40-more" target="_blank">According to Yahoo</a>, the emotional state of consumers can dramatically impact how receptive they are to advertising.</p> <p>With US and UK consumers reportedly feeling ‘upbeat’ 46% of the time, this is a key window for advertisers, with people said to be 40% more receptive to digital ads when they are in this mood.</p> <p>The study also found that when consumers are upbeat, they are 30% more likely to engage with native video content than when they are in any other emotional state. </p> <p>Lastly, consumers are 28% more likely to engage with content marketing and 21% more likely to engage with direct marketing when feeling happy.</p> <h3>Majority of marketers haven’t got to grips with mobile</h3> <p><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6yVMKaNCUz6Qm9xMWxIcGpsZW8/view" target="_blank">A new report</a> by Mobile Marketing Association and RadiumOne has revealed that the majority of marketers are failing to tap into the way consumers use their mobiles.</p> <p>From interviews with over 300 senior marketers, two-thirds admitted that they’re not confident they've identified the most critical signals in their customers’ journey.</p> <p>What’s more, 61% aren’t fully confident in their ability to find new profitable customers, and 58% are not fully confident in their re-engagement efforts to prevent customer churn. </p> <p>In terms of the most valuable data, 29% of marketers cite content sharing from apps, 28% cite mobile site visits and 27% cite app installs as the best signals for improving mobile branding. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4779/MMA_report.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="236"></p> <h3>25 to 34 year olds 65% more likely to search for bank accounts</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that people aged between 25 to 32 are 65% more likely to search for a savings account than any other demographic. What’s more, men in this age group are 60% more likely to be saving compared to women.</p> <p>From an audience of 8.3m 25 to 34 years old consumers in the UK searching to switch banks, Hitwise suggests that the most popular banks to visit are Santander and Halifax, followed by Lloyds and Natwest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4780/Hitwise_2.jpg" alt="" width="599" height="376"></p> <h3>BMW drivers are the biggest retail spenders of any car owner</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www2.viantinc.com/anatomy-of-an-auto-shopper-uk" target="_blank">study by Viant</a> has delved into the purchase habits and behaviour of major car brand owners in the UK. </p> <p>The report states that Fiat is the most popular car brand for millennials, with this age group 18% more likely to drive hatchbacks than non-millennials. BMW drivers are said to be the biggest retail spenders, being 54% more likely to shop at John Lewis and 2.3 times more likely to shop in Selfridges than Ford drivers.</p> <p>Lastly, Ford drivers reportedly spent £2,157 on flights over a period of six months, with their preferred airline being Emirates.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3132 2017-03-10T08:09:36+00:00 2017-03-10T08:09:36+00:00 Masterclass in Lead Generation - Singapore <p>B2B (Business-to-business) brands are increasingly turning to digital marketing tactics to generate leads, build demand, grow opportunities, engage prospects, and retain customers. As B2B marketing is significantly different from B2C marketing, this workshop aims to specifically address the unique issues and challenges faced by B2B marketers on digital platforms and social media.</p> <p>This 2-day intensive workshop explores how digital marketing can help B2B companies to fill the sales funnel with qualified leads, engage prospects in the buying journey, nurture leads, integrate with sales efforts and measure results.</p> <p><a href="http://www.clickacademyasia.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/masterclass-in-lead-generation-2017.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to find out more about the course.</a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68852 2017-03-01T01:00:00+00:00 2017-03-01T01:00:00+00:00 Five ways marketers can use analytics to combat ad fraud Jeff Rajeck <p>Fortunately, advertising data has also never been more available. Google, Facebook, and other ad platforms offer hundreds of ways to divide up their reports into segments and countless metrics for us to see how well various segments are performing.</p> <p>So with how important and available ad data is, it is quite puzzling that there is so much fraud in digital advertising and how little is apparently being done about it.</p> <p>Figures on the actual size of advertising fraud vary widely. Some claim that <a href="http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/294527/groupm-marketers-ignore-ai-at-their-peril-ad-fra.html">only 2% of ads are fraudulent</a> while The Association of National Advertisers estimates that $7.2b was lost globally to nonhuman traffic in 2016. Ad fraud researcher Dr Augustine Fou, however, thinks the problem is even worse and estimates that <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/augustinefou/state-of-digital-ad-fraud-2017-by-augustine-fou">$31b of the $70b in digital advertising spend buys fraudulent ads</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4247/ad-fraud.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="618"></p> <p>Regardless of the total size of the market, tales of the extent of ad fraud operations are breathtaking. Methbot, an ad fraud network busted in December 2016, had over 500,000 IP addresses and was consuming 300m impressions daily, <a href="https://krebsonsecurity.com/2016/12/report-3-5m-in-ad-fraud-daily-from-methbot/">costing advertisers up to $5m per day</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4248/methbot.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="534"></p> <p>That one operation can make millions of dollars per day on ad fraud makes the situation seem hopeless. <strong>What can a brand do to combat ad fraud, especially one with a marketing department which already has resource and budget constraints?</strong></p> <p>Fortunately, there are a few things even the most thrifty marketing departments can do to verify the traffic that they get from ads by using simple web analytics, five of which are detailed below. Armed with that information, brands can then shift their spending away from fraudulent ad networks and reward platforms which deliver real people to their site.</p> <p>Before we start, though, <strong>Econsultancy is running a Mastering Analytics training course in Singapore on Thursday March 9th</strong>. This course will cover ad analytics and many other topics. You can <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/advanced-mastering-analytics-training-singapore/">find out more and sign up here</a>.</p> <h3>Quick overview of ad fraud</h3> <p>There are <a href="http://www.fipp.com/news/insightnews/what-are-the-nine-types-of-digital-ad-fraud">many different types of ad fraud</a>, but it fundamentally involves taking payment for ads and then either putting it on a spam site or not showing it at all.</p> <p>The fraudster then uses bots to click on the non-existent or spam site ads so that marketers believe that they are getting results from the ads they are paying for. The end result is that the traffic which comes to a site from ad fraud is worthless and, therefore, should be detected and stopped.</p> <h3>Getting started combatting ad fraud</h3> <p>The first thing marketers need to do to combat ad fraud is to make sure that all ads are <a href="https://ga-dev-tools.appspot.com/campaign-url-builder/">tagged correctly with campaign 'utm' variables</a>. This will help marketers separate out paid traffic from organic traffic in their web analytics tool.</p> <p>Google Analytics is used for the examples below, but note that these metrics are also available on other web analytics platforms, too.</p> <h3>1. Look at referring domains</h3> <p>One of the easiest ways to spot ad fraud is to look at the referring domain for site visitors. To do so, first <a href="https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/3124493?hl=en">segment paid traffic with an advanced segment</a> so that the dashboard only shows paid traffic.</p> <p>Then, with the paid traffic segment activated, go to Acquisition/All Traffic/Referrals to see the source of all of the traffic.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4249/suspicious-domains.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="488"></p> <p>Should the sites be totally different than the usual referral sites, it is likely that you are paying for ads which are appearing on spam sites and the traffic is probably from bots.</p> <h3>2. Review user metrics</h3> <p>Checking referring sites is not enough, however. More sophisticated ad fraudsters know how to fake the referrer string and make the bot traffic appear that it is coming from legitimate sites. In these cases, another way of discovering bot traffic is to look at other user metrics such as bounce rate, time on site, and pages per visit.</p> <p>Should any of these metrics be significantly different than normal web traffic (see 00:00:05 vs 00:02:24 average visit duration below), then your traffic is most likely from bots, not people.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4250/bot-visit-duration.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="364"></p> <h3>3. Implement scroll events</h3> <p>User metrics, too, can be compromised by more intelligent bots which stay on a site for a random time, click links, and view two or three pages during a session. One way to distinguish bots like this from 'real' traffic is to implement scroll events.</p> <p><a href="http://scrolldepth.parsnip.io/">Scroll Depth</a> is one of many JavaScript scripts which, when put on a page that uses Google Analytics, will send an event to Google each time a user hits a certain scroll point (25%, 50%, 75%, 100%).  </p> <p>The result is an events report which shows how many visitors from a particular ad campaign are scrolling on your pages. To see the total number of events, go to Behavior/Events/Overview.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4251/scroll-depth.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="347"></p> <p>Real traffic will have some scrolling, but most bots will not trigger the scroll script and never trigger a scroll event, thereby outing themselves as fake traffic.</p> <h3>4. Use more 'people-based' marketing</h3> <p>Of course, there are bots which fake referrals, click around your site and scroll making it almost impossible to distinguish them from real traffic. In order to filter out the most sophisticated bot traffic, it is necessary to use 'people-based' marketing.  </p> <p>People-based marketing, available on both Facebook and Google, is a feature which lets marketers upload their customer details and create a 'custom audience'.  This audience is matched to data held by the platform and then ads are only shown to these 'real' people.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4252/adwords-people-based-marketing.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="416"></p> <p>The platforms also let marketers create 'lookalike' audiences based on these users which are more likely to be real people than anonymous web users.</p> <p>While this may seem an extreme solution to the problem to some organisations, it is becoming accepted as an effective way to combat ad fraud.</p> <h3>5. Create 'real people' segments</h3> <p>Finally, if a marketer does create custom audiences using customer details, they can then create 'real people' segments in their web analytics program. Then, once the segment has a significant amount of data, marketers can compare the user metrics from the 'real people' segment with user metrics from other channels.</p> <p>This will allow you to see whether visitors from the other channel behave like people or not. Bots may be able to simulate real user behaviour to some extent, but it is unlikely they will be able to match the 'metric fingerprint' of users on the site.</p> <h3>So...</h3> <p>Ad fraud is a problem and as marketers are so reliant on ad data for their campaigns it is time to crack down on it. The analytical methods to discern real traffic from bot traffic are not difficult to implement. With a bit of work you should be able to review the outcomes and derive some action points.</p> <p>Therefore, there is little reason for any site, big or small, to avoid using these techniques and continue wasting money on fraudulent ads.</p> <p><strong><em>Econsultancy is running a Mastering Analytics training course in Singapore on Thursday March 9th. This course will cover ad analytics and many other topics. You can <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/advanced-mastering-analytics-training-singapore/">find out more and sign up here</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68751 2017-01-27T14:56:00+00:00 2017-01-27T14:56:00+00:00 10 superb digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week we're covering news about cart abandonment, adspend, dodgy ads, and lots more. Don't forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even further info.</p> <h3>76% of marketers see ad blocking as a positive</h3> <p>According to a survey by YouGov and the Chartered Institute of Marketing, the majority of marketers believe that ad blocking will be a positive for the industry, encouraging better practice and greater levels of creativity.</p> <p>On the other hand, 38% of respondents believe that it could lead to a decline in online marketing.</p> <p>Other key stats from the research include the key areas of focus for the year ahead, with 42% of marketers citing personalisation, 37% citing data-driven marketing and 31% saying influencer marketing.</p> <h3>Emojis generate 17% more interaction on Instagram</h3> <p>A new study by Quintly has revealed that emojis result in 17% higher interaction when used on Instagram.</p> <p>From analysis of 22,000 profiles and 6.2m posts, those which included emojis were found to have a 2.07 interaction rate compared to 1.77 for those without.</p> <p>Other findings include the most popular emojis of 2016, with the most-used being the camera emoji, followed by the ‘OK’ hand signal and the pink hearts. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3441/Quintly.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="369"></p> <h3>43% of marketers still experimenting with influencer marketing</h3> <p>According to Altimeter’s Traackr report, 71% of marketers rate influencer marketing as a strategic or highly strategic area of marketing.</p> <p>However, 43% of those that agree are still experimenting with the practice, and 28% are only involving influencers at campaign level.</p> <p>The report also found the influencer budgets are still small compared to other areas of focus, but a shift in prioritisation means that 55% of marketers plan to spend more on influencers in 2017.</p> <h3>Trump’s inauguration generates 15m social media engagements</h3> <p>4C has revealed how social media users reacted to Donald Trump’s inauguration.</p> <p>The day’s event saw over 15m engagements across Facebook and Twitter, with the new President generating over 5m of them.</p> <p>Engagement peaked for the inauguration when the Obamas met the Trumps at the White House – a moment that’s now famous for Michelle Obama’s awkward reaction towards <em>that</em> Tiffany box.</p> <p>While the #inauguration hashtag generated 2.6m engagements on the day itself, the #womensmarch hashtag drew 7.3m engagements the day after.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3443/Trump.PNG" alt="" width="653" height="439"></p> <h3>Google removes 80m misleading ads in 2016</h3> <p>Google’s Bad Ads report has revealed that 80m bad ads were removed in 2016 for deceiving, misleading or shocking users with false information or clickbait headlines.</p> <p>Similarly, Google also took down 7m bad ads for intentionally trying to scam consumers or deliberately trying to trick its detection systems.</p> <p>In 2016, 1.7bn ads were removed overall, which is double the amount of ads removed the year previous.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3444/Google_Ads.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="339"></p> <h3>82% of customers over 55 feel undervalued</h3> <p>A new study by ICLP has found that customers over the age of 55 often feel overlooked, with 82% saying that retailers do not understand their needs.</p> <p>Consequently, 95% of over 55s would consider abandoning their favourite retailers in favour of others.</p> <p>ICLP’s survey also discovered what would make this demographic more loyal. The results found stronger reward programmes, communication and reliability to be the top three factors.</p> <h3>Adding touch to mobile ads increases engagement</h3> <p>In a study of 1,137 Android users, IPG Media Lab discovered that capitalising on consumer’s sense of touch during mobile video ads can produce a 50% uplift in brand favourability.</p> <p>While a standard video ad achieved happiness and excitement levels of 37% and 30% in consumers, video ads with touch-enabled elements resulted in rates of 44% and 38% respectively.</p> <p>This also resulted in a halo effect, with a 6% increase in positive brand perception overall.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3447/Touch.JPG" alt="" width="513" height="303"></p> <h3>Global cart abandonment rates up 2.4%</h3> <p>SalesCycle’s <a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/post/remarketing-report-q4-2016/" target="_blank">Remarketing Report</a> details the latest global cart abandonment stats. It shows that global cart abandonment rates were 76.8% in Q4 2016, a figure up 2.4% on the previous quarter. </p> <p>In terms of industry, fashion cart abandonment remains the lowest at 67.4%. Meanwhile, utilities is the highest, with an abandonment rate of 84.4%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3446/Abandonment_rates.JPG" alt="" width="710" height="502"></p> <h3>58% of B2B buyers distrust vendor claims</h3> <p><a href="https://vendors.trustradius.com/b2b-buying-disconnect/" target="_blank">Research from TrustRadius</a> has found that tech vendors are failing to keep up with expectations, as nearly 60% of B2B buyers cite vendor-provided materials as the least trustworthy source.</p> <p>Despite many feeling sceptical over claims, buyers still acknowledge that vendors play a significant role in the purchasing process, with 62% saying they help answer questions, facilitate basic demos, and provide technical support.</p> <p>Additionally, the report found product demos and free trials to be the best and most trustworthy resources for buyers.</p> <h3>UK adspend increases following Brexit</h3> <p>According to the latest figures from the Advertising Association, UK adspend increased 4.2% in the quarter following Brexit.</p> <p>This news comes on the back of a Deloitte survey which found that 22% of advertising businesses have lost contracts since last June, and 62% believe the decision has negatively affected their business.</p> <p>On the other hand, the survey also found that 23% see Brexit as an opportunity for growth, and as a result, 8% plan to increase investment in the UK. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68704 2017-01-13T13:27:41+00:00 2017-01-13T13:27:41+00:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>You’ll find news on content marketing formats, abandonment emails, customer retention and social media. Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more.</p> <h3>72% of marketers value data analysis over social media skills</h3> <p>According to a new report by BlueVenn, 72% of marketers consider data analysis to be the most important skill to acquire in the next two years.</p> <p>From speaking to over 200 marketers in the US and UK, BlueVenn found that understanding customer data is considered far more vital than the likes of social media and web development, with just 65% and 31% of respondents citing these respectively.</p> <p>This appears to be an especially common view in larger businesses, where a lack of tools and access to technologies is the biggest barrier.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3043/BlueVenn.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="475"></p> <h3>Abandonment emails sent after one-hour boost conversion</h3> <p>New stats from SaleCycle show that the best time to reconnect with shoppers is one hour after they’ve abandoned their basket.</p> <p>From the conversion rates of 500 global brands, an average conversion of 6.33% was seen after one hour, compared with just 3.14% when sent before one hour and 3.41% one to two hours after.</p> <p>As well as timing, research also found that personalisation is a big factor in email success, with subject names that include the customer name seeing the highest open-rate.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3048/Email_time.JPG" alt="" width="314" height="522"></p> <h3>Two-thirds of UK consumers willing to use robots for banking</h3> <p>‘Robo-advisors’ is not a term we’ll be adopting any time soon, however, according to new research from Accenture more of us will be willing to accept the concept in future.</p> <p>Apparently, it refers to the robots used to offer financial or banking advice in place of real-life humans. And according to a survey of UK consumers, 68% are willing to use them.</p> <p>The reasons behind the demand for this type of technology is speed and convenience, with 40% citing this factor for using it. Lastly, 25% see the impartiality of robo-advice as a key attraction, with this figure rising to almost one third in those over 65.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3047/Robots.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="397"></p> <h3>Instagram Stories grows to 150m daily users</h3> <p>Despite initial reservations from users, Instagram Stories continues to grow, with the feature adding 50m more daily users since October.</p> <p>According to other recent stats, a third of the most-viewed stories come from businesses, and one in five stories on Instagram result in a direct message. </p> <p>Lastly, 70% of video views are reportedly played with the sound on (though this does not include Live Stories).</p> <h3>Original data is the best-performing type of content marketing</h3> <p>A survey by Clutch has uncovered the types of content that marketers believe leads to greater success.</p> <p>17% of respondents said that infographics perform the best, while 18% cited research or original data – both trumped other formats like blog posts and video.</p> <p>In terms of promotion, 85% of content marketers cited paid distribution, such as social media, PPC and native ads as the most effective tactic, over-and-above organic efforts. This reflects the strategies of most marketing agencies, with 71% using paid distribution tactics most frequently.</p> <h3>Nearly 20% of online retailers lost out to rivals over Christmas</h3> <p>According to the latest JDA/Centiro report, many retailers failed to meet the growing consumer demand for convenience during the 2016 Christmas period.</p> <p>19% of online Christmas customers shopped at alternative retailers due to stock unavailability and delivery time constraints.</p> <p>While use of click-and-collect services has somewhat plateaued, it is mostly seen as a way of avoiding delivery charges, with 53% of consumers recently using it for this reason.</p> <p>The report also found that many people suffered problems with click and collect last Christmas, with long waiting times due to a lack of staff having a negative impact on the experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3045/Click_and_Collect.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="571"></p> <h3>Valentine’s Day presents big opportunity for retailers</h3> <p>With Black Friday and Christmas out of the way, many retailers are turning their attention towards the next big holiday.</p> <p>According to stats from Bing, Valentine’s Day presents a huge opportunity, after an estimated $19.7bn was spent last year (and an average of $146 per person).</p> <p>However, it’s not just humans that can expect a gift or two. $681m was reportedly spent on pets for Valentine’s Day last year, giving pet retailers a good reason to get on board in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3046/Valentines_Day.jpg" alt="" width="483" height="229"></p> <h3>Instagram most important platform for marketers</h3> <p>In more Instagram-related stats, it’s been revealed as the platform marketers will invest the most in this year.</p> <p>Research from Greenlight shows that 70% will focus on Instagram, while 40% of marketers will invest in Twitter. </p> <p>Interestingly, older marketers are placing less importance on social platforms, with 50% of professionals who are over the age of 50 reporting no plans to invest in Instagram and 58% saying the same for Snapchat. </p> <h3>Generation Z bored by standard digital ads</h3> <p>According to a study by Kantar Millward Brown, generation Z (i.e. consumers aged between 16-19) have high expectations when it comes to digital advertising, preferring ads that allow them to interact or make a decision.</p> <p>When it comes to ads that prompt viewers to vote, generation Z reported a positivity score of 31%, compared to just 25% from generation Y. </p> <p>Generation Z were also found to actively dislike invasive ad formats like non-skippable pre-rolls. However, interruption appears to be a big bugbear for all age ranges, with the majority of people installing ad blockers due to this reason.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3044/AdReaction.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="399"></p> <h3>Customer retention is down 7% globally</h3> <p>From a global study of more than 24,000 consumers across nine industry sectors, Verint and IDC has found that customer retention dropped by 7% last year.</p> <p>Overall, this appears to be down to consumers who prefer using digital-based companies displaying less brand loyalty than those who engage with businesses on a human and one-to-one level.</p> <p>49% of digital customers have been with providers for more than three years compared with 57% who prefer to go in-store.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68686 2017-01-06T14:40:18+00:00 2017-01-06T14:40:18+00:00 10 stirring digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s dose includes news about the internet of things, TV ads, and entertainment sales.</p> <p>Don’t forget – you can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more.</p> <h3>Holiday shopping generates $91.7bn in online sales </h3> <p>Adobe has revealed the total number of online sales from the Christmas period.</p> <p>November 1st to December 31st generated $91.7bn in online sales - an 11% increase year-on-year.</p> <p>Mobile brought in $28.43bn in revenue, which is a 23% increase from 2015. Figures also show that mobile drove 50% of visits and 31% of purchases.</p> <p>While there was an increase in sales, shipping costs were down, going from an average of $2.60 in 2015 to $2.50 in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2866/Holiday_spend.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="411"></p> <h3>Older consumers prefer rational marketing</h3> <p>A new study by the Journal of Advertising Research has found that older consumers have a clear preference for rational rather than emotional ads.</p> <p>While 49.7% of audiences under 50 preferred a rational advertisement compared to 50.3% favouring an emotional ad, this was significantly increased among those over 50, with 63% preferring the rational example.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this should inform marketing activity, with logical and knowledge-based appeals being much more effective for prompting older consumers into action.</p> <h3>One in five digital leaders consider their organization digitally mature</h3> <p>Clearhead recently undertook a survey of 150 ecommerce executives, aiming to find out the state of digital maturity with organizations.</p> <p>The results showed that there is still a significant gap between the desire for personalization and the processes and capabilities necessary to execute it, with just one in five leaders considering their companies as ‘digitally mature’.</p> <p>What’s more, despite the obvious desire to be data-driven – with 81% of retailers having purchased or built the technology required for testing programs – just 17% of online retailers have a path to develop personalized experiences for customers.</p> <h3>36% of consumers unfamiliar with IoT</h3> <p>According to a new study by Yahoo, consumer understanding of the Internet of Things (IoT) is below par, with many in the dark as to what the term actually means.</p> <p>Despite 70% of consumers currently owning a connected device, 36% still don’t know what IoT is. </p> <p>However, it appears many are keen to learn, with 41% of survey respondents interested in expanding their knowledge of the subject. </p> <p>The group with the highest level of understanding is teens and millennials, with video games and consoles the most popular connected device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2867/IoT.JPG" alt="" width="493" height="407"></p> <h3>Increasing importance of customer service</h3> <p>Salesforce has released its latest <a href="http://salesforce.com/stateofservice" target="_blank">State of Service report</a>, delving into how service teams are responding to increasing customer demands.</p> <p>The most interesting stats from the research revolve around how collaboration within companies is key to delivering the best customer service. </p> <p>In fact, in a survey of more than 2,600 customer service professionals, 78% of respondents agreed that every employee is an agent of customer service. </p> <p>However, despite this level of recognition, there’s still room for improvement, with just 63% of service teams having a formal process in place to collaborate with sales.</p> <p>Alongside collaboration, service teams also recognise that a single 360-degree view of the customer can lead to greater productivity, with 79% agreeing that this helps to provide consistency and continuity in every customer interaction.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2870/Customer_Service.JPG" alt="" width="596" height="474"></p> <h3>One third of consumers actively choose to buy sustainable goods</h3> <p>A new study by Unilever has discovered how sustainability affects the purchases of 20,000 adults across five different countries.</p> <p>The results found that 33% now actively choose to buy from brands considered to be sustainable, while 21% would be more likely to choose brands that clearly promote sustainability credentials on packaging and in marketing.</p> <p>Consequently, Unilever predicts that the sustainable goods market is worth an average of £817bn in untapped sales.</p> <h3>'Personal assistants' is the top marketing search of 2016</h3> <p>Microsoft’s Bing Ads has released the top marketing-related searches of 2016.</p> <p>Due to greater advances in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/" target="_blank">chatbots</a> and virtual assistants like Alexa, Cortana and Amazon Echo, personal assistants and AI saw the biggest interest.</p> <p>The top five include:</p> <ol> <li>Personal Assistants/ Intelligent Agents</li> <li>Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality</li> <li>Search Marketing</li> <li>Artificial Intelligence </li> <li>Content Marketing</li> </ol> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2868/Bing_top_searches.jpg" alt="" width="537" height="268"></p> <h3>54% of consumers plan to buy a new smartphone this year</h3> <p>After a three-year low, an Accenture survey of 26,000 consumers has found that smartphone purchases are set to rise again this year.</p> <p>54% of the consumers surveyed said they plan to buy a smartphone in the next year - a figure up from 48% last year. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this demand is largely fuelled by better security, new functions and improved performance, with 51% of consumers planning to buy a new phone to access the newest and most innovative features and functions.</p> <p>Similarly, 45% of consumers cite inadequacy of their current device as motivation.</p> <p>While there is growing demand for smartphones, purchases of connected devices like smartwatches and fitness monitors are predicted to remain sluggish, mainly due to high prices and concerns about the privacy of personal data.</p> <h3>DFS dominates TV advertising over New Year</h3> <p>TVTY has analysed more than 80,000 TV spots from the Christmas and New Year period, revealing the brands that invested the most in the medium.</p> <p>Furniture company DFS came out on top with more than 1,200 spots over Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. </p> <p>With a further 900 messages on New Year’s Eve and Day, the brand totalled 2,159 TV broadcasts.</p> <p>Other dominant brands over New Year included Confused.com and Thomas Cook, which both aimed to capitalise on consumer interest in holidays and finance. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2869/TV_spots.jpg" alt="" width="226" height="467"></p> <h3>Digital entertainment overtaking physical sales</h3> <p>According to new figures from the Entertainment Retailers Association, digital sales of games, music and video are now overtaking physical sales in the UK.</p> <p>74% of game sales are digital, and 57% of music revenues are derived from digital services like downloads or streaming.</p> <p>In total, digital revenues jumped 23% to £1,309.3m in 2016.</p>