tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/advertising Latest Advertising content from Econsultancy 2016-07-27T15:05:03+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68120 2016-07-27T15:05:03+01:00 2016-07-27T15:05:03+01:00 As TV ads lose their sway, pharma marketers need to adapt Patricio Robles <h3>"Ask your doctor if [drug name] is right for you."</h3> <p>As Rocco Albano, the VP of strategy and partnerships at Razorfish Health, <a href="http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/280323/does-pharma-have-a-problem-with-ask-your-doctor.html">observes</a>, this call-to-action that pharma marketers have relied on for years makes perfect sense.</p> <p>It's easier for marketers to gain broad reach to consumers than it is to physicians, and physicians are the only ones who can prescribe their drugs to patients.</p> <p>But with consumer trust of pharma companies on the decline and increased calls for tighter regulation of pharma ads on the rise, it's no surprise that 30 and 60-second ads are persuading fewer and fewer consumers.</p> <p>Even so, pharma marketers continue to pour big bucks into television ads. As Albano notes, pharma marketers have increased spending on the medium by nearly a quarter this year, and nine prescription drugs alone are on pace to account for $100m of spend each.</p> <p>Ironically, despite the fact that pharma ads are not convincing consumers to talk to their doctors, the spend is justified by the internet. Albano explains...</p> <blockquote> <p>Another big reason TV advertising is still a key sales driver for pharma is the Internet. The vast majority of people exposed to a prescription drug TV ad that may be relevant to them will use the Internet first and foremost to get questions answered about a treatment before asking their doctor. </p> </blockquote> <p>Unfortunately for pharma marketers, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67653-millennials-open-to-pharma-ads-but-pharma-not-delivering-on-ux">they're not delivering on UX</a>, so when consumers turn to the internet, they're more likely to use and trust information published by third parties, including WebMD and health systems like the Mayo Clinic.</p> <p>That means that pharma marketers are largely missing out on the opportunity to interact with consumers throughout their journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3047/healthstudy.jpg" alt="" width="356" height="153"></p> <h3>Is an even bigger challenge looming?</h3> <p>Pharma marketers could find themselves facing an even bigger challenge in the future.</p> <p><a href="https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/94/2016/03/STAT-Harvard-Poll-Mar-2016-Prescription-Painkillers.pdf">A STAT-Harvard survey</a> conducted earlier this year found that one in three Americans blame doctors for national opioid epidemic, suggesting that physicians themselves risk losing the trust of patients as it relates to how and why they prescribe medication.</p> <p>And physicians themselves are increasingly wary of pharma companies, as evidenced by the fact that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67227-ban-on-consumer-ads-could-make-pharma-s-digital-shortcomings-more-costly">the American Medical Association supports a ban</a> on direct-to-consumer ads that pitch prescription drugs.</p> <p>Since they're the only ones capable of prescribing prescription medications, this dynamic presents an obvious threat to pharma companies. So how can they address it?</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67747-pharma-marketers-should-use-storytelling-to-improve-the-industry-s-reputation">Better storytelling</a> could be key to helping the pharma industry restore its reputation, but ultimately, pharma marketers will need to change the way that they interact with consumers and physicians. That <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67131-pharma-s-mobile-social-efforts-aren-t-as-healthy-as-they-should-be/">could include tapping their proprietary data to supply physicians with information they're interested in</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4886/pharmadata.png" alt="" width="481" height="326"></p> <p>They should also look to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67831-electronic-health-records-ehrs-could-help-pharma-marketers-reach-doctors">electronic health records (EHRs)</a>, which are a channel through which pharma marketers have the opportunity to reach doctors at the point of care.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68102 2016-07-27T14:02:00+01:00 2016-07-27T14:02:00+01:00 Why there should be more plaudits for digital audits Chris Bishop <p>Those at the top of organisations don’t feel they have the strategic sweep to justify the time and effort required to commission them.</p> <p>Audits are viewed at times as a little “too tactical” or only done once every blue moon by agencies aiming to impress for your business, only to then collect dust on top of Econsultancy buyers guides print outs or even your old New Media Age magazines (<strong>Ed</strong>: We let this lie, but only to show we have a sense of humour).</p> <p>For the in-house Head of Ecommerce, requesting a digital audit might sound dangerously like a turkey voting for Christmas. </p> <h3>Are we selling audits wrongly?</h3> <p>Or is it the slightly cheesy marketing of website or marketing auditors themselves that is putting people off?</p> <p>All that tired ‘digital health check’ stuff might be the kind of foot in the door tactic that make brands feel suspicious of then giving access to their precious AdWords account, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67171-what-is-affiliate-marketing-why-do-you-need-it/">affiliate network</a> or analytics suite.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7503/healthcheck.jpeg" alt="health check" width="275" height="183"></p> <h3>How important are digital audits anyway?</h3> <p>In reality, though, digital audits are absolutely vital. And third party objective auditing ensures that you’re not marking your own home work or ignoring long term problems.</p> <p>Proper auditing, UX testing and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67473-seven-conversion-rate-optimization-trends-to-take-advantage-of-in-2016/">CRO analysis</a> means you can elongate the lifetime and effectiveness of your website and digital media activity, in a way that can be done on any budget.</p> <p>Your digital real estate is often an expensive investment - you’ve got to maintain it properly to get results.</p> <h3>Regular servicing is vital</h3> <p>Think of that shiny new website you’ve just spent months developing as a new car you’ve just acquired.</p> <p>To start off with, it’s the envy of everyone who sees it. After-sales support is pretty good and you can see years of trouble free motoring ahead of you. Before you know it, though, your warranty is up and you’re on your own.</p> <p>As the car ages, small problems become big problems. It performs less effectively. You’re paying for petrol, but it’s becoming less and less economical to run. There are so many things going wrong with it you don’t know where to start. Eventually the car's value is so diminished you might as well scrap it and buy a new one.</p> <p>It’s the same with websites and digital marketing campaigns. They can’t be left to look after themselves – and even the mechanic themselves might need some fine tuning or training themselves.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7504/service-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="car service" width="380"></p> <h3>What a digital audit can do for you </h3> <p>Audits can show you how to balance your budget more effectively through action and prioritisation. They can identify common issues like plateaus in activity and drop offs in acquisition; all the elements that reduce profitability. </p> <h3>The Lessons of the Audit</h3> <p>Constantly learn, constantly improve, constantly trade! A timely and constructive audit will help you:</p> <ul> <li>Keep up to date with the latest channel trends - Google changes, new publishers in affiliate, new platform or techniques for social. </li> <li>Use competitor analysis to keep your enemies close! It’s crucial to analyse and understand market share/spend and its consequences for your brand. </li> <li>Help you (re)define your goals.</li> <li>Confirm your objectives or KPIs so you can measure success.</li> <li>Understand new opportunities.</li> <li>Benchmark improvements or conversely measure areas of decline.</li> <li>Ensure corporate compliance – its best practice to have someone external “rubber stamp” your activity.</li> <li>Encourage serendipity – the uncovering of that nugget of information that transforms your understanding and makes the commercial difference.</li> </ul> <h3>Should you take the plunge?</h3> <p>Regular and skilled digital auditing is a detailed and never ending task.  It can transform the effectiveness of your digital advertising, website and budget.  </p> <p>Is it sexy? It’s showing your website a lot of love and attention. It’s optimizing and maximizing your marketing profitability and performance. Sounds pretty sexy to me.</p> <p><em>More on auditing:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68031-answering-the-key-question-of-content-auditing-where-do-i-start/">Answering the key question of content auditing - where do I start?</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68101 2016-07-26T12:19:00+01:00 2016-07-26T12:19:00+01:00 Snapchat Bitmoji: What does it mean for brands and marketers? Nikki Gilliland <h3>Bit-what?</h3> <p>If you're unaware, Bitmoji essentially allows users to create a virtual version of themselves - sort of like a personalised emoji, but bigger and more cartoon-like.</p> <p>This image then becomes part of customised sketches, ranging from personal greetings to pop-culture references.</p> <p>It’s all very silly, but also hugely addictive and surprisingly effective.</p> <p>When there are no words to express a hangover or that TGIF feeling, a Bitmoji says it all.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7304/bitmoji-20160721121256.png" alt="" width="200" height="200"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7305/IMG_2170.JPG" alt="" width="200" height="200"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7306/bitmoji-20160721121342.png" alt="" width="200" height="200"></p> <h3>How will it work?</h3> <p>To use Bitmoji in Snapchat, the app needs to be downloaded separately.</p> <p>Once the settings are linked, users can then add personalised stickers to snaps and send them through the app's chat platform.</p> <p>With the recent overhaul of the latter, users can now send images, audio, video and photos in a continuous conversation without needing to switch tabs.</p> <p>Snapchat are surely hoping that Bitmoji will play a big part in this, especially as users often ignore or fail to realise that the platform has a chat feature.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bf5SGWriJy0?wmode=transparent" width="500" height="281"></iframe></p> <h3>How can brands use it?</h3> <p>With consumers spending <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68062-mobile-marketing-strategy-four-key-charts-from-our-latest-research/" target="_blank">more time on mobile devices</a> than ever before, social media has become awash with branded content. </p> <p>While Snapchat’s Discover and Stories features already allow brands to connect with fans, Bitmoji will provide yet another way for this to happen, specifically appealing to a millennial market who already use the app in every day conversations.</p> <p>Bitmoji will allow brands to create unique animated sketches that advertise their particular products or services, similar to sponsored Snapchat Lenses which saw the likes of Pepsi Max and Taco Bell create their own filters.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Get a mind blowing taste of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PepsiMaxCherry?src=hash">#PepsiMaxCherry</a> with our Snapchat lens for today only! Send your snaps to PepsiMaxUK! <a href="https://t.co/X3S8T8rrbM">https://t.co/X3S8T8rrbM</a></p> — Pepsi Max (@PepsiMaxUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/PepsiMaxUK/status/698657671147159552">February 13, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Unlike other forms of online content, the biggest benefit of Bitmoji is that it enables the infiltration of ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/" target="_blank">dark social</a>’ – i.e. private messages and conversations.</p> <p>With <a href="http://info.radiumone.com/rs/radiumone/images/RadiumOne_DarkSocial.pdf">74% of all online sharing activity occurring in this space</a>, it presents a mammoth opportunity for marketers.</p> <h3>What are the challenges?</h3> <p>We’ve already seen the likes of Pixar and HBO create personalised Bitmojis, released in celebration of new movies and TV series.</p> <p>Similarly, clothing designers such as Steve Madden and Michael Kors have featured on ‘Bitmoji Fashion’ – the feature that allows users to personalise their avatars with a particular outfit.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FSteveMaddenShoes%2Fposts%2F10153409980547869&amp;width=500" width="500" height="633"></iframe></p> <p>While there is clear opportunity for fashion and entertainment brands, the challenge might be for industries that do not have a natural tie-in or affinity with the platform. </p> <p>Sure, users might be inclined to send a Bitmoji of themselves as a particular movie character – however it remains to be seen whether product-focused brands (like Starbucks and Coca Cola) are able to evoke the same sense of fun and spontaneity. </p> <p>Having forked out such a big sum, Snapchat is certainly hoping so.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68078 2016-07-25T09:57:47+01:00 2016-07-25T09:57:47+01:00 Automated video: considerations for publishers and advertisers Patricio Robles <p>Consumers love video and advertisers can't get enough video ad inventory. As a result, publishers and media companies are increasingly doing whatever they can t<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67958-if-video-is-the-future-of-the-internet-here-s-what-brands-need-to-know">o embrace video</a>.</p> <p>Historically, video production has been a costly undertaking. After all, creating compelling, high-quality video is far more involved than creating compelling, high-quality written content or photography.</p> <p>To address the consumer and advertiser demand for video while at the same time avoiding breaking the bank, publishers have turned to technology that is capable of churning out video content in a highly-automated fashion.</p> <h3>Wochit and Wibbitz</h3> <p>As <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/11/business/media/as-online-video-surges-publishers-turn-to-automation.html?_r=0">detailed by</a> the New York Times, two companies, Wochit and Wibbitz, have come to take an early lead in the automated video production space.</p> <p>A wide range of publishers are making these companies' tools a big part of their online video strategies. One of those publishers is Tronc, formerly Tribune Publishing, which has newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and Orlando Sentinel in its portfolio.</p> <p>Tronc chairman Michael W. Ferro Jr. told the New York Times' John Herrman that his company is currently producing a "couple hundred" videos each day, but sees that number increasingly substantially. "We think we need to be doing 2,000 videos a day," he said.</p> <p>Such volume is probably impossible without automated video, and as automated video becomes a bigger and bigger source of video on the web, here's what publishers and advertisers should keep in mind.</p> <h3>How it works</h3> <p>Automated video platforms like Wochit and Wibbitz analyze input text content (eg. for a news story) and identify images and video clips that are related, typically from stock and video photography services.</p> <p>Through partnerships, Wochit and Wibbitz offer human voice narration, but fully-automated computer-generated voice-overs can also be used.</p> <p>Wochit and Wibbitz can also automatically caption the videos they assemble, important for creating videos that are suited for social channels that have <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67442-how-to-create-facebook-video-ads-that-cater-for-silent-autoplay">silent autoplay</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7283/automatedvideo-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="265"></p> <p>For publishers that don't trust Wochit and Wibbitz to produce production-ready videos in a totally automated fashion, publishers have the flexibility to make their own edits and add their own content to videos before publishing. </p> <h3>Limitations</h3> <p>While adoption of automated video is growing significantly – major publishers that are clients of Wochit and Wibbitz include Hearst, Gannett, Time, CBS Interactive, Bonnier and The Huffington Post – automated video is not without its limitations. While consumers love video, they still have expectations around quality and it's hard to meet those expectations in a fully-automated fashion. </p> <p>According to USA Today's Chris Pirrone...</p> <blockquote> <p>The data came back very quickly that text-to-video alone, if you don't touch it, consumers can quickly recognize it is not a high-quality product.</p> </blockquote> <p>Even Wochit and Wibbitz agree: their tools are best used in conjunction with a human touch.</p> <p>But even with that human touch, publishers and advertisers need to recognize that the most compelling kinds of videos, which are emotional and tell powerful stories, are probably not going to come from an automated video platform any time soon.</p> <p>So video automation tools, while a potential contributor to the online video ecosystem, aren't a panacea and shouldn't be relied on too heavily.</p> <h3>Supply and demand</h3> <p>A bigger consideration for publishers and advertisers is the fact that automated video is going to change the supply and demand dynamics in the online video market.</p> <p>Since the beginning of the year, Wochit's clients have doubled the number of videos they're producing using the company's technology. That figure now stands at 30,000 videos a month.</p> <p>While consumers love video, <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/internet-habits-are-bad-news-for-digital-media-2016-7">attention is finite</a> and the growing number of videos will make it harder for publishers to stand out. At worst, video in some content categories could be completely commoditized to the point that it isn't a point of differentiation with consumers and prices for ads drops significantly.</p> <p>At the same time, if the rise of automated video comes at the expense of truly original video, demand for original video content, including longer-form content, could increase as it becomes less common, benefiting publishers that continue to invest in its production and making it more expensive for advertisers looking to market their wares through non-commoditized video content.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>The limitations of automated video, combined with the possible supply and demand effects, mean that adoption of automated video on a larger scale presents risks for both publishers and advertisers.</p> <p>For publishers, too much reliance on automated video could backfire, reducing the quality of the video content portfolios. Eventually, that could threaten a publishers' brands and leave them with audiences and ad inventory that are less valuable.</p> <p>For this reason, publishers should be strategic about how much of the video content mix they create using automated video tools. Specifically, they should consider focusing their use of automated video on channels for which this kind of content might be better suited, such as social platforms, where silent autoplay means short, captioned video content is more acceptable.</p> <p>For advertisers, the risk is that the ad inventory created by automated video won't be as high in value, and might even become of limited value if publishers oversaturate the market.</p> <p>For this reason, advertisers should recognize that video ad inventory is not all the same and make sure that they're not paying a premium for inventory that is not premium.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68105 2016-07-22T12:44:54+01:00 2016-07-22T12:44:54+01:00 The week's news in digital (in five minutes) Ben Davis <h3>Google AMP for ads</h3> <p>Google's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67567-four-things-you-need-to-know-about-google-accelerated-mobile-pages-amp/">Accelerated Mobile Pages</a> initiative <a href="https://www.ampproject.org/docs/reference/amp-ad.html">now includes ads</a>, speeding up their delivery (see below) and using less user data.</p> <p>Of course, video ads are not yet included this effort and remain an issue for mobile loading.</p> <p>Google has also brought AMP to landing pages and in further news from DoubleClick, dynamic native-format ads are now available programmatically.</p> <p><em>AMP for ads. Image <a href="https://amphtml.wordpress.com/2016/07/19/but-what-about-the-ads/">via Malte Ubl</a>, AMP tech lead</em></p> <p><img src="https://amphtml.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/a4a_good3g_v02-1.gif?w=1320" alt="amp for ads" width="615"></p> <h3>Pokémon GO gets McDonald's Japan sponsorship</h3> <p>McDonald's Japan will be the first paying sponsor of Pokémon GO.</p> <p>3,000 restaurants will (ironically?) become gyms, allowing Pokémon trainers to battle.</p> <p>Further reading: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68060-what-brands-can-learn-from-nintendo-s-digital-transformation-and-pokemon-go/">What can brands learn from Nintendo's digital transformation and Pokémon GO?</a></p> <h3>Google Cloud Natural Language API</h3> <p>Sticking with Google product updates, the search beast has unveiled its <a href="https://cloudplatform.googleblog.com/2016/07/the-latest-for-Cloud-customers-machine-learning-and-west-coast-expansion.html">Cloud Natural Language API</a>.</p> <p>The blog post reveals 'Cloud Natural Language lets you easily reveal the structure and meaning of your text in a variety of languages, with initial support for English, Spanish and Japanese.'</p> <p>It can be used for sentiment analysis, entity recognition and sentiment analysis.</p> <h3>Snapchat debuts more fun features</h3> <p>Bitmoji (built from the acquisition of BitStrips) allows you to create an emoji of yourself, combining the two obsessions of young people.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bf5SGWriJy0?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>The other new feature, Face Paint Lens, lets users create realtime overlays.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Demi via Snapchat (theddlovato) <a href="https://t.co/1esdp2DBk1">pic.twitter.com/1esdp2DBk1</a></p> — Demi Lovato News (@justcatchmedemi) <a href="https://twitter.com/justcatchmedemi/status/755991079527321600">July 21, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Facebook Messenger hits 1bn monthly active users</h3> <p>Boom, Facebook Messenger catches up with WhatsApp. </p> <h3>Daily Mail post-Brexit bounce</h3> <p><a href="https://next.ft.com/content/81e933f4-4f21-11e6-88c5-db83e98a590a">The FT reports</a> Daily Mail digital ad revenues have risen 19% in the three weeks since the Brexit vote. </p> <p>It has also seen an 8% drop in newspaper advertising, leading to 1% rise in ad revenue overall.</p> <h3>Are you verified?</h3> <p>Any person or brand can now apply for the little blue tick on Twitter.</p> <p>If you want to know more, here's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68098-twitter-announces-application-process-for-verified-accounts-what-marketers-need-to-know/">everything you need to know about a successful application</a>.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">wanted to see what would happen if i used new Twitter Verification process. Answer: NO <a href="https://t.co/h3T2kggzD1">pic.twitter.com/h3T2kggzD1</a></p> — Hunter Walk (@hunterwalk) <a href="https://twitter.com/hunterwalk/status/755836108953444352">July 20, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Facebook's Snapchat copy is killed</h3> <p><a href="https://techcrunch.com/2016/07/21/facebook-quick-updates/">A fascinating post from Techcrunch</a>. Facebook has been trialling a Snapchat-like feature, but is not furthering its development at this time.</p> <h3>NBA content for Twitter</h3> <p>Twitter, already set to broadcast Thursday night football, is bringing more sports content, with a weekly pre-game NBA show that will be streamed live.</p> <p>Another NBA show stream is also in development but not yet announced.</p> <h3>Ninth Measurement and Analytics Report release</h3> <p>Econsultancy's Measurement and Analytics Report 2016, in association with Lynchpin, reveals some fascinating insights into the data landscape amongst companies and agencies.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68095-measurement-and-analytics-report-2016-four-key-challenges-in-dealing-with-data/">Here's a summary</a> to whet your appetite.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7259/documented_strategy.PNG" alt="chart from analytics report" width="615"></p> <h3>Festival of Marketing agenda announced</h3> <p>A whopping 200 speakers over 12 stages, including Wozniak and Sorrell.</p> <p>What more could you want in London in Autumn as a marketer? <a href="http://www.festivalofmarketing.com/agenda">See the agenda here</a>.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68044 2016-07-21T13:20:15+01:00 2016-07-21T13:20:15+01:00 Millennials don't hate advertising: It's all about the value exchange Dale Lovell <p>To paraphrase the singer Estelle, ‘<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IylQeTYkA3A">1980 was the year that God made me</a>’ (well, I was born in March, 1980, so technically, I was ‘made’ in 1979). And as if to prove my millennial credentials: my undergraduate year was the first intake that had to pay university tuition fees in the UK.</p> <p>My 19-year-old student nephew is also a millennial. We sit pretty much at either ends of the millennial age-range. Our lives are completely different.</p> <p>I’m a daily commuter, run a business, have a mortgage, a wife and young child. I have early nights, Ocado deliveries and weekend trips to the park. He has all day drinking sessions, exams, girlfriends, lie-ins and all-night parties.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7308/ocado.jpeg" alt="ocado" width="275" height="183"></p> <p>But apparently we are the same homogenous marketing demographic? What he likes, I like; what I want, he wants. It’s not quite so simple, is it?</p> <p>Which is why more and more marketers <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/05/18/mark-ritson-the-seven-unmistakable-signs-of-a-shit-brand-consultant/">grit their teeth at mere mention of the word millennial</a>. And I largely agree with them. </p> <p>We are not a homogenous mass of similar tastes, views and actions. But there are certainly traits shared between this age group and how they consume digital media and what they expect from advertisers.</p> <p>So whether you love, like or loathe the term millennial – for the purposes of this post I am going to refer to this age group as ‘millennials.’ Sorry about that.</p> <h3>The millennial value exchange</h3> <p>Digital advertising is increasingly judged on the ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/value-exchange-from-data/">value exchange</a>’. But what does the phrase ‘value exchange’ actually mean? </p> <p>In it’s simplest form this: both the brand and the consumer need to get something out of the advertising message exchange or interaction.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67954-what-is-non-linear-advertising-how-can-it-help-publishers/">Traditionally, marketing messages have been delivered to captive audiences</a> – TV, print, radio, cinema – where there is very little perceived value exchange. In these scenarios consumers are at the mercy of what the advertiser wants them to see. It’s a one-way street. </p> <p>Millennials don’t work like that. They expect the value exchange to be present. Their time is precious. In exchange for their time interacting with your brand they expect something in return. They expect a brand to entertain them. Or to offer them information they find interesting. </p> <h3>This doesn’t mean that millennials hate advertising</h3> <p>Provided that the ‘value exchange’ is there, millennials are happy to engage. An Adyoulike study of 1,000 UK adults aged 18-33 in 2015 found that over half of UK millennials (57%) will happily visit online content that appeals to them even if it has been obviously paid for or sponsored. </p> <p>Millennials do not expect a brand to hammer them with the hard sell, or even worse – boring ads filled with irrelevant messaging, delivered in formats that are intrusive and annoying. That’s never been cool, but it really really isn’t any more. It’s digital brand suicide.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7309/Screen_Shot_2016-07-21_at_12.44.59.png" alt="adyoulike infographic" width="615" height="317"></p> <h3>All demographic groups are changing their behaviour to advertising</h3> <p>But whether you are a millennial or not, it’s worth noting that we’ve all changed how we use technology, consume media and engage with advertisers. It’s just that the younger generation act this way en-masse, and have been ‘early-adopters’ of this new view point.</p> <p>Baby boomers are fickler in their media consumption than they were ten or fifteen years ago, for example, because, well, they can be: like the rest of us they have far more options and demands on their precious time than they did a generation ago.</p> <p>A Nielsen study published in March 2015 found that 25% of baby boomers regularly watch video programming on a mobile device and over half of baby boomer respondents said they use electronic devices to listen to music and take or share photos.</p> <p>Our own research shows that they engage with native adverts too. So all age groups (apart from perhaps the very old) use social media; they multi-screen; they watch videos on YouTube; they skip ads - who would have thought it? - just like millennials. </p> <h3>There is no captive audience</h3> <p>Digital has changed the ‘captive’ audience forever. Marketers need to ‘earn’ the right to advertise to everyone in this hyper-connected, always on world, where content is currency and customer attention is easily lost at the swipe of a finger or click of a mouse.</p> <p>It’s not just millennials. Whatever the demographic, consumers expect more from advertisers. </p> <p>As digital marketers it’s time that we all start to think this way for everyone and every campaign, not just for those buzzwordy, hard-to-define millennial-types. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68086 2016-07-20T12:30:00+01:00 2016-07-20T12:30:00+01:00 Ads on premium sites drive 67% greater brand lift Patricio Robles <p>comScore came to this conclusion after looking at data from sites owned by publishers that are members of Digital Content Next (DCN), a trade organization that consists of brand publishers that have direct relationships with the consumers they serve, such as The New York Times and Condé Nast.</p> <p>As <a href="http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Blog/Premium-Publishers-Drive-Much-Higher-Brand-Lift-Particularly-Mid-Funnel">detailed by</a> comScore's Andrew Lipsman...</p> <blockquote> <p>One of the key findings from the research demonstrated that ads appearing on DCN premium publishers were significantly more effective in driving brand lift. While some of this effect was due to higher ad viewability on premium sites, the more significant driver was the halo effect of appearing on these sites. </p> </blockquote> <p>Overall, sites operated by DCN members delivered 67% higher average brand lift.</p> <p>Mid-funnel, where favorability, consideration and intent to recommend are established, the lift was even more pronounced, with DCN publishers delivering three times the lift as their non-premium counterparts.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7164/halo_effect_graphic2_reference-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="413"></p> <p>According to Lipsman, "This outsized mid-funnel performance is of particular significance for the large consumer brands that drive the majority of digital ad spending.</p> <p>"These brands will tend to have already established high brand awareness and therefore prefer to focus more on influencing how consumers feel about the brand so that they are more likely to purchase that brand when they are in the market to do so."</p> <p>In addition to the "halo effect" of high-quality content, the outsize performance of ads on premium sites can partially be attributed to higher viewability rates (50% compared to 45%) and lower levels of illegitimate traffic.<br></p> <h3>Implications for programmatic</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic">The rise of programmatic</a> has been fueled, in part, by the notion that advertisers can more easily target audiences they want to reach at scale.</p> <p>In many cases, programmatic also creates arbitrage opportunities for advertisers in which they can reach audiences similar in composition to those they would have to pay higher rates to reach if they purchased premium inventory.</p> <p>comScore's data, however, suggests that it's not quite that simple.</p> <p>Instead, there appears to be a relationship between the quality of the site on which ads appear and the lift advertisers can expect to see from those ads. In other words, performance is not just about audiences, it's about where those audiences are reached. </p> <p>Should this change views about programmatic? Not necessarily. Audience-based media buying still makes sense, and just because ads on premium sites deliver higher lift doesn't mean that premium inventory is uniquely capable of delivering healthy ROI.</p> <p>Different campaigns have different goals, and even for those brand advertisers that highly value the kind of mid-funnel lift comScore observed, there is only so much premium inventory available.</p> <p>But comScore's research does suggest that advertisers would also be wise to consider looking for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62028-programmatic-premium-is-not-about-bidding">premium programmatic</a> opportunities, such as those offered by <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66226-prominent-news-publishers-band-together-to-sell-ads">private exchanges</a>, to ensure that they're tapping into the apparent advantages of premium inventory.</p> <p><strong>For more on programmatic, why not attend our <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> conference in London.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68085 2016-07-20T09:55:32+01:00 2016-07-20T09:55:32+01:00 Four reasons Ghostbusters experiential marketing has been so successful Nikki Gilliland <h3>Element of surprise</h3> <p>Commuting in London can be a dramatic experience, and yet funnily enough, you don’t often expect to see a giant marshmallow casually breaking through the ground. </p> <p>With research finding that <a href="http://www.ccnl.emory.edu/Publicity/MSNBC.HTM" target="_blank">unexpected events can result in more pleasure responses</a> in the brain, brands are increasingly searching for ways to ‘surprise’ and ‘delight’ consumers.</p> <p>By catching travellers off guard, the Ghostbusters campaign had great impact. With no prior knowledge of the installation or how long it would be there for, people couldn’t help but be drawn into the excitement. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">A massive overnight install for the team last night, with just 5 hours the guys did well! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ghostbusterswaterloo?src=hash">#ghostbusterswaterloo</a> <a href="https://t.co/pvDOQorFYJ">pic.twitter.com/pvDOQorFYJ</a></p> — Wild Creations (@wild_creations) <a href="https://twitter.com/wild_creations/status/752577798309572608">July 11, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Instagram-worthy</h3> <p>Before its release on July 11th, social media was awash with people criticising the film, eventually leading the YouTube trailer to become the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2016/may/02/ghostbusters-trailer-most-disliked-in-youtube-history" target="_blank">most disliked of all tim</a>e.</p> <p>The response to the actual movie has been a lot more favourable, yet Sony naturally wanted to do something to counteract the condemnation.</p> <p>By creating something inherently shareable, the Ghostbusters installation succeeded in creating a positive buzz online.</p> <p>Using the hashtag #ghostbusterswaterloo, passers-by documented it on a variety of social media platforms, sharing their aforementioned surprise and delight with friends and followers alike.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7153/ghostbusters_instagram.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="634"></p> <h3>Emotional resonance </h3> <p>By giving fans an immersive or interactive experience, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66431-six-inspiring-new-examples-of-experiential-marketing/" target="_blank">experiential marketing</a> has the power to stir up positive emotions, in turn making the consumer feel closer to the brand.</p> <p>One emotion that the Ghostbusters campaign evoked was nostalgia.</p> <p>Instead of promoting new or unfamiliar aspects of the movie, it used the iconic and beloved image of the Marshmallow Man.</p> <p>This meant that despite any assumptions or ill-feelings towards the new movie, even cynical passers-by would be likely to engage.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="und" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/IAintAfraidOfNoGhosts?src=hash">#IAintAfraidOfNoGhosts</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Ghostbusters?src=hash">#Ghostbusters</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ReallySilly?src=hash">#ReallySilly</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ghostbusterswaterloo?src=hash">#ghostbusterswaterloo</a> <a href="https://t.co/HLZ8ZaYP6g">pic.twitter.com/HLZ8ZaYP6g</a></p> — Reda Maher (@Reda_Maher_LDN) <a href="https://twitter.com/Reda_Maher_LDN/status/753917652611969029">July 15, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Buyer opportunity</h3> <p>As well as being a great spectacle, the Ghostbusters installation at Waterloo also included a clever consumer tie-in, with Forbidden Planet running a retail unit nearby.</p> <p>Built to look like a New York subway station, the pop-up shop allowed consumers to buy limited edition Odeon tickets and a whole host of souvenirs.</p> <p>Aiming to capitalise on real-time excitement, it allowed Sony to help drive sales as well as just build excitement. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ghostbusterswaterloo?src=hash">#ghostbusterswaterloo</a> booth is now open from 8am to 8pm - for all your <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Ghostbusters?src=hash">#Ghostbusters</a> goodies! <a href="https://t.co/ikJdMnxcvH">pic.twitter.com/ikJdMnxcvH</a></p> — Forbidden Planet (@ForbiddenPlanet) <a href="https://twitter.com/ForbiddenPlanet/status/753881966731268096">July 15, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>With this disruptive campaign, Sony shows that there's no need to be afraid of female leads <em>or</em> experiential marketing.</p> <p>(Oh and ghosts, let's not forget them.)</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68068 2016-07-18T15:06:00+01:00 2016-07-18T15:06:00+01:00 Four ways brands are marketing through dating services Patricio Robles <h3>Match.com and Starbucks</h3> <p>The coffee shop is a common location for first dates, so when Match.com announced a "Meet Me at Starbucks" feature in 2015, it made sense.</p> <p><a href="http://blog.match.com/match-starbucks-the-perfect-blend/">The tie-up</a>, which continues to this day, allows Match.com users to invite each other to Starbucks for a date.</p> <p>Users can also display a Starbucks badge on their profiles, highlighting their affinity for the coffee chain and making it easier for them to connect with other Starbucks aficionados.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6988/matchstarbucks-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="267"></p> <p>The Match.com/Starbucks relationship has also been used in joint promotions by both companies.</p> <p>While it's not known how much foot traffic Starbucks has seen as a result of its Match.com integration, Match.com says it knows of hundreds of couples who connected on its service and met in person for the first time at Starbucks.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6989/starbuckspromo-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="360" height="506"></p> <h3>Tinder Branded Profiles</h3> <p>Mobile dating app Tinder, which is especially popular with younger singles, has embraced native advertising like no other dating service. Its branded profiles, for instance, allow companies to set up profiles to promote their wares to Tinder users.</p> <p>For example, FOX created a Tinder profile for Mindy Kaling, an American comedian and actress, to promote her television show, The Mindy Project.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6991/mindy_project_tinder-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="229"></p> <p>When users match with a branded profile by swiping right, a marketing message can be sent. While <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2014/02/07/fox-and-mindy-push-limits-of-native-advertising.html">some suggest that this pushes the limits</a> of what is acceptable, other networks and movie studios have created branded profiles for fictional characters.</p> <h3>Tinder Promotions</h3> <p>Tinder has also worked with brands to run more conventional and less controversial promotions. For instance, pizza chain Domino's teamed up with Tinder to offer discounts and the chance to win free food.</p> <p>Other brands using Tinder to connect with singles in a similar fashion include Bud Light, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66288-bud-light-turns-to-dating-app-tinder-for-whatever-usa-campaign">which integrated Tinder into its Whatever USA campaign last year</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6992/dominostinder-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="314"></p> <h3>Happn Branded Profiles</h3> <p>Happn, a dating app designed to help daters connect with people they have crossed paths with in real life, has its own branded profiles, which function similarly to those on Tinder.</p> <p>While Happn's audience is smaller than Tinder's, the company has snagged advertisers like Fiat, which used branded profiles to promote the launch of the Fiat 500.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6993/fiathappn.png" alt="" width="314" height="471"></p> <p>Happn has also run branded profile campaigns for a number of charities, including Equality Now and Plan UK.</p> <p><a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/1389738/advertising-dating-app-happn-ngos-brand-romance">According to</a> Happn exec Marie Cosnard, charity campaigns have experienced "very strong engagement" with branded profiles and their campaigns are a good match for the app.</p> <p>"When NGOs are fighting for a cause that’s linked to human relationships, such campaigns make people think about other types of relationship," she stated.</p> <p><em>Other dating-inspired articles:</em></p> <ul> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67563-how-tinder-has-changed-ecommerce/">How Tinder has changed ecommerce</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67600-missguided-launches-tinder-inspired-app-experience-review/">Missguided launches Tinder inspired app experience: review</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66086-four-product-marketing-reasons-why-tinder-got-really-really-big/">Four product marketing reasons why Tinder got really, really big</a> </li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68077 2016-07-18T11:28:00+01:00 2016-07-18T11:28:00+01:00 Why Lastminute.com is taking control of its ad inventory Ben Davis <p>I caught up with Alessandra Di Lorenzo, Chief Advertising Officer at lastminute.com group, to find out.</p> <h3>First-party data</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">I asked Alessandra how the group's approach to advertising was changing with <a href="http://travelpeople.lastminute.com/en/">The Travel People</a>.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">The focus it seems is partly on utilising first-party data to a greater degree, ensuring relevance.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">"We're giving brands access to a highly lucrative travel audience – who are young, affluent and already in a spending mindset – right across Europe, while our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67674-what-are-first-second-and-third-party-data/">first–party data</a> means we can target by passion, not just demographics.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">"With [that first party data], we know what consumers are thinking at every stage of the customer journey, right from initial research all the way through to booking and going on a trip, and beyond."</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Essentially, the company knows when a user has been searching for holidays and reading content about Dubai, for example, and this information and intent is incredibly valuable.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">But it seems that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/">programmatic technology</a> plays a vital part, too.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Alessandra explains:</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">"Our programmatic technologies mean we can combine that first-party data with other audience trends, and tap into those in real-time.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">"And using our smart extension tools, brands can target consumers with relevant ads both on and offsite, every step of the way."</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><em>via The Travel People</em></p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7110/Screen_Shot_2016-07-14_at_14.33.45.png" alt="travelpeopl" width="500"></p> <h3>Optimising relevance and revenue </h3> <p>The Travel People sells a range of ad formats across the Lastminute.com group.</p> <p>This ranges from display ads to email, custom content (native) to events and social.</p> <p>Fairly obviously, a lot of The Travel People's advertisers are from the travel sector - flight operators, hotel chains etc.</p> <p>So how does the company ensure advertising (particularly what might be called trade promotion) doesn't negatively impact conversion or lifetime value? i.e. distracting the user from buying what they really want.</p> <p>"Our new proposition and profiling capabilities ensure that the ad content we show our customers is relevant and enhances the travel experience." Alessandra says.</p> <p>"We want to give our customers the best possible experience, while protecting our core business too."</p> <p>What's particularly interesting is that The Travel People does indeed take heed of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65435-what-is-customer-lifetime-value-clv-and-why-do-you-need-to-measure-it/">customer lifetime value</a>.</p> <p>"Our technologies also enable us to recognize customers based on their lifetime value, and we can use this to customize the advertising experience accordingly."</p> <p>So, maximising ad revenue, user experience and lifetime value are not mutually exclusive endeavours.</p> <h3>Display formats are still effective</h3> <p>When I asked Alessandra which advertising format was growing quickest, she singled out one that some may think of as old fashioned. </p> <p>"Brands want ads that are high impact and have high viewability. The formats we are offering are very much doing that – especially our double MPU above the fold."</p> <p>However, taking a pragmatic approach, she sees change in advertising being more about finding a balance between formats. </p> <p>"Display ad formats are already an effective way of getting high brand exposure.</p> <p>"But we’re going to see more and more integrated editorial- and content-rich solutions and these will complement, rather than replace, display advertising. </p> <p>"I believe these solutions are the future, and we’ll be looking to add them to our offering soon."</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7113/Screen_Shot_2016-07-14_at_14.39.39.png" alt="display ads lastminute" width="615" height="335"></p> <h3>Clear labelling</h3> <p>With advertising within an aggregator, the potential to mislead customers is high.</p> <p>"We are in the process of marking up our ads to make sure they are easily recognizable," Alessandra said.</p> <p>Getting to the crux of the debate, she continued, "<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67083-is-native-advertising-sustainable">Native</a> is really effective because it gives context to the advertising, but it’s important to make it very clear when it is from a third party."</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7111/Screen_Shot_2016-07-14_at_14.35.50.png" alt="lastminute" width="615" height="203"></p> <h3>Mobile</h3> <p>I finished by asking what was next for lastminute.com group - where are the untapped channels for generating ad revenue?</p> <p>"As the most frequently used device, mobile has to be next – but not in its current format." Alessandra said.</p> <p>"The whole advertising sector is still trying to replicate the digital desktop way of advertising on mobile, which doesn’t particularly work.</p> <p>"Mobile is a hugely untapped channel for generating ad revenue, so it’s time for the big agencies and advertisers to start giving it more recognition in their budgets."</p> <p><em><strong>July is Data Month at Econsultancy, so be sure to check out <a href="https://hello.econsultancy.com/datamonth/?utm_source=econsultancy&amp;utm_medium=blog&amp;utm_campaign=econblog">our latest reports and blog posts</a>.</strong></em></p>