Native advertising

Five ways The New York Times is innovating its publishing model

At the beginning of 2016 things are much rosier at The New York Times than they were two years ago.

Though print is still suffering, there seems to be a greater degree of parity between the incumbent’s digital know-how and that of new online-only upstarts.

The paywall is bearing fruit, social media platforms court its content and Google is trying to shine a light on longer form journalism.

The paper has shown itself again to be a restless experimenter across digital platforms and with new digital technology.

What advertisers need to know about the FTC’s new guidance on native ads

With ad blockers here to stay, publishers and advertisers have rushed to develop new ways of reaching consumers online.

One of the fastest-growing alternatives to traditional digital advertising is native advertising.

Some publishers now earn significant percentages of their revenue from native ads, and there’s no evidence that interest in and adoption of native ads will wane any time soon.

If anything, growth in the use of native ads will only accelerate in 2016.

Seven ways publishers are addressing ad blocking

For publishers, few topics are as pressing as the rise of ad blockers.

And for good reason: ad blockers are disrupting publishers’ ability to monetize their content through the model that was largely responsible for fueling the rise of online publishing in the first place.

Stats: how social media brought down The Sun paywall

On 30th November 2015 The Sun paywall will come crumbling down.

It’s fairly obvious why Rebekah Brooks made the decision; publishers are nothing without the reach of social media and this U-turn perhaps proves that subscription models need to be flexible, balanced carefully with (increasingly native) advertising revenue.

Pageviews are the oxygen that keeps every revenue flame burning. But rather than me harping on about advertising and social media, I thought I’d tell the story of The Sun paywall in statistics alone. Here we go…

Is native advertising sustainable?

There are many articles out there defining what native advertising is and what it should look like.

There are native formats (simply in-stream ads, like expanding video), sponsored content (shaped by the publisher), content syndication (related content promoted through platforms such as Outbrain) and advertorials (often written by the advertiser).

There are blurred lines between some of these formats but what they have in common is a terribly misleading descriptor. This sort of advertising is anything but native, it is invasive, lurid, and can only survive as such.