tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/behavioural-targeting Latest Behavioural targeting content from Econsultancy 2017-11-13T04:18:48+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3371 2017-11-13T04:18:48+00:00 2017-11-13T04:18:48+00:00 Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Marketing – Singapore <p>How soon do you need to prepare for artificial intelligence? Artificial intelligence is already here – it’s no longer a futuristic promise. And it’s been here for years. Companies should already be thinking about how they can automate many of their ordinary marketing processes. This is the basic step that every company should take to make themselves more efficient.</p> <p>In this course, we discuss why you should look beyond the hype while learning how to leverage the benefits that artificially intelligent machines can provide. Doing so will empower marketers to establish more personal and relevant interactions with customers, driving ROI and increasing revenue.</p> <p>Artificial Intelligence for Marketing (AIM) solutions can sift through huge data sets much faster than any human marketing team ever could, uncovering hidden insights into customer behaviour, identifying purchasing trends, and revealing critical data points.</p> <p>Ultimately, AIM actually gives marketers the valuable gift of time by automating back-end, complex tasks. It provides them with the freedom to focus on content, creative, and strategy to deliver those personalized customer interactions.But in the meantime, you should track the development of artificial intelligence in your industry.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3351 2017-11-10T08:38:09+00:00 2017-11-10T08:38:09+00:00 Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Marketing – Singapore <p>How soon do you need to prepare for artificial intelligence? Artificial intelligence is already here – it’s no longer a futuristic promise. And it’s been here for years. Companies should already be thinking about how they can automate many of their ordinary marketing processes. This is the basic step that every company should take to make themselves more efficient.</p> <p>In this course, we discuss why you should look beyond the hype while learning how to leverage the benefits that artificially intelligent machines can provide. Doing so will empower marketers to establish more personal and relevant interactions with customers, driving ROI and increasing revenue.</p> <p>Artificial Intelligence for Marketing (AIM) solutions can sift through huge data sets much faster than any human marketing team ever could, uncovering hidden insights into customer behaviour, identifying purchasing trends, and revealing critical data points.</p> <p>Ultimately, AIM actually gives marketers the valuable gift of time by automating back-end, complex tasks. It provides them with the freedom to focus on content, creative, and strategy to deliver those personalized customer interactions.But in the meantime, you should track the development of artificial intelligence in your industry.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69479 2017-10-09T14:30:00+01:00 2017-10-09T14:30:00+01:00 A beginner's guide to Facebook Custom Audiences Patricio Robles <p>Here's a look at the different Custom Audiences that Facebook allows marketers to create and some tips to get the most out of Custom Audiences.</p> <h3>Custom Audiences from your Customer File</h3> <p>As the name suggests, a Custom Audience from your Customer File allows marketers to target their existing customers by uploading a list of its customers. This list typically contains unique customer contact information, such as an email address or phone number, but can also include other attributes, such as name, ZIP code, age and date of birth.</p> <p>With this information, Facebook attempts to identify customers who have Facebook accounts so that they can be targeted.</p> <h3>Custom Audiences from your Website</h3> <p>Custom Audiences from your Website allow marketers to retarget Facebook ads to Facebook users who have visited and interacted with their websites. </p> <p>To start, the Facebook Pixel is added to a website, which allows Facebook to track users and match them to their Facebook accounts. To assist with matching, marketers have the option of configuring the Facebook Pixel to have access to information like the user's email address, where available.</p> <p>Once the Facebook Pixel is in place, marketers can create one or more Custom Audiences based on rules (and combinations of rules) that look at users' behavior on the website. For example, marketers can target users who have visited the website within the past X days, who have visited at a certain frequency or who visited specific pages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9439/18761933_133200927235063_2653394198052470784_n.png" alt="" width="523" height="495"></p> <p>Marketers can also target users based on events that were tracked by the Facebook Pixel. For example, a Custom Audience could be built for users who added a product to cart, abandoned their cart or completed a purchase.</p> <p>Custom Audiences from your Website is one of the most powerful tools in the Facebook marketer's toolbox. Retailers frequently use it to retarget users who previously demonstrated interest in specific products. Real estate agents use it to retarget to users whose website behavior suggests they might be interested in a specific property. Professional sports teams use it to target previous ticket buyers. And so on and so forth.</p> <h3>Custom Audiences from your Mobile App</h3> <p>Lots of companies have developed mobile apps, but mobile apps present numerous challenges for marketers. Specifically, acquiring app users can be a costly proposition and retention is notoriously difficult.</p> <p>To help marketers address these challenges, Facebook offers marketers the ability to retarget users of their mobile apps through Custom Audiences from your Mobile App. </p> <p>This functions a lot like Custom Audiences from your Website except that these Custom Audiences consist of users who have interacted with a marketer's native mobile app.</p> <p>Custom Audiences from your Mobile App takes advantage of Apple's IDFA (“identifier for advertisers”), Google's Android Advertising ID or Facebook's App User ID to match mobile app users to Facebook accounts.</p> <p>To help marketers create Custom Audiences that are meaningful, Facebook offers a set of standard app events that can be used to target users who have engaged with an app in a particular fashion. For example, standard app events offered to retailers include <em>Search</em>, <em>Add to Cart</em> and <em>Initiate Checkout</em>, while standard app events offered to game developers include <em>Completed Tutorial</em>, <em>Level Achieved</em> and <em>Achievement Unlocked</em>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9486/custom_audiences.png" alt="custom audiences" width="550"></p> <h3>Engagement Custom Audiences</h3> <p>While off-Facebook engagement is obviously important to many if not most marketers, many marketers are highly active on the world's largest social network and therefore might have reasons to target users based on how they interact with them on Facebook.</p> <p>To do that, Facebook offers Engagement Custom Audiences, which allows marketers to build Custom Audiences around on-Facebook interactions related to videos, lead forms, Pages, Canvases, events and Instagram business profile.</p> <p>Depending on the interaction type, Facebook offers marketers the ability to target users who have taken or haven't taken specific actions. For instance, when creating a Custom Audience for users who have interacted with a lead form, marketers can specify a specific lead form. They can also choose to specifically target users who interacted with it in the past X days and either submitted or didn't submit the form.</p> <h3>Custom Audiences from your Store Visits</h3> <p>Facebook's latest Custom Audience offering could prove to be one of its most interesting for businesses that have physical locations.</p> <p>As the name suggests, Custom Audiences from your Store Visits allows marketers to create Custom Audiences consisting of Facebook users who visited one or more of their physical locations. </p> <p>Facebook appears to automatically identify users based on its ability to track their physical movements through the Facebook App. As MarketingLand <a href="https://marketingland.com/facebook-tests-targeting-ads-people-visited-brands-brick-mortar-stores-221585">notes</a>, this is “the same method that Facebook has employed when targeting ads to people near an advertiser’s chosen location and when estimating how many store visits were driven by a brand’s Facebook campaign.”</p> <p>If eventually rolled out widely, Custom Audiences from your Store Visits will give lots of businesses – from local mom-and-pop shops to large, national retailers – the ability to connect the online and offline worlds and reach out to the people who have engaged with them in the real world.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9487/custom_store_visits.jpg" alt="store visits custom audiences" width="600"></p> <h3>Custom Audience Tips and Tricks</h3> <p>While Custom Audiences in all their forms have great potential, there are a number of ways that marketers can maximize the value they get from creating Custom Audiences. These include the use of:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Lookalike Audiences.</strong> Perhaps the biggest bonus to using Custom Audiences is that Facebook can use them to create audiences of users who are similar to the Custom Audiences. This gives marketers the ability to target ads to users who might be more interested in their products and services.</li> <li> <strong>Household Audiences.</strong> In addition to Lookalike Audiences, Facebook also gives marketers the ability to target individuals who it determines are members of the same household as Custom Audience users. This feature, which was unveiled this year, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/facebook-will-soon-let-brands-target-ads-at-entire-families-or-specific-people-within-households/">is pitched</a> by Facebook as a means to “[influence] across the family.”</li> <li> <strong>Targeting.</strong> When creating an ad campaign for a Custom Audience, Facebook offers the ability to further target members of the Custom Audience based on characteristics such as location, age, gender and interests. While marketers should be wary of over-targeting, highly-segmented campaigns based on Custom Audiences can be very powerful when used wisely.</li> </ul> <p>There are also a number of potential gotchas marketers employing Custom Audiences should be aware of. </p> <p>One of the biggest is the potential for overlap when targeting ads to multiple Custom Audiences. Fortunately, Facebook offers an Audience Overlap Tool for determining how much overlap there is between multiple audiences. Armed with this knowledge, marketers can make adjustments to ensure their campaigns aren't being negatively impacted.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9440/13910710_1060868077338367_721590579_n.png" alt="" width="562" height="277"></p> <p>Another caveat, particularly for smaller businesses, is that it can be more difficult to achieve the best results when dealing with very small Custom Audiences. In this case, it's important for marketers using Custom Audiences from your Customer File to ensure that they're uploading refreshed customer files frequently as their customer numbers grow. </p> <p>It can often be advantageous for marketers working with smaller Custom Audiences to look at using Lookalike and Household Audiences.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on paid social media, subscribers can download our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-social-media-advertising/">Paid Social Media Advertising Best Practice Guide</a>.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69437 2017-09-22T13:30:00+01:00 2017-09-22T13:30:00+01:00 What advertisers need to know about Safari's new anti-tracking feature Patricio Robles <p>Here's what advertisers need to know about the new feature and how it could affect their ability to target ads to consumers.</p> <h3>What is it?</h3> <p>As its name suggests, Intelligent Tracking Prevention is an anti-tracking feature that is designed to protect user privacy. Specifically, it “reduces cross-site tracking by further limiting cookies and other website data.”</p> <h3>How does it work?</h3> <p>Intelligent Tracking Prevention looks at the resources web pages load as well as how users interact with those pages. Interactions captured include taps, clicks, and text entries. </p> <p>The data Intelligent Tracking Prevention collects is put into buckets for each top-level domain (TLD) or TLD+1. It is then run through a machine learning model to determine whether the domain in question is capable of cross-site tracking. </p> <p>Apple WebKit engineer John Wilander <a href="https://webkit.org/blog/7675/intelligent-tracking-prevention/">explained</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>Out of the various statistics collected, three vectors turned out to have strong signal for classification based on current tracking practices: subresource under number of unique domains, sub frame under number of unique domains, and number of unique domains redirected to. </p> </blockquote> <h3>What does it do?</h3> <p>Once Intelligent Tracking Prevention detects cross-site tracking, it takes action to either keep or purge first-party cookies and website data based on a number of factors.</p> <p>For example, for the TLD example.com, if a user has not interacted with the website for 30 days, Intelligent Tracking Prevention will purge its cookies and website data. On the other hand, if the user does interact with the example.com website, it will allow its cookies to be used in a third-party context for 24 hours.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/9080/webkit-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="152"></p> <p>According to Wilander, “This means users only have long-term persistent cookies and website data from the sites they actually interact with and tracking data is removed proactively as they browse the web.”</p> <p>To ensure that users can stay logged into websites, partitioned cookie functionality has been added to WebKit. This allows for a website to keep its cookies beyond 24 hours for the purpose of keeping users signed in but not for cross-site tracking.</p> <h3>Why is the ad industry so upset?</h3> <p>The current version of Safari already blocks third-party cookies but as the ad industry sees it, the potential blocking of first-party cookies goes way too far.</p> <p>Six industry groups, including the Interactive Advertising Bureau, American Advertising Federation, the Association of National Advertisers, and the 4A's, penned <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/every-major-advertising-group-is-blasting-apple-for-blocking-cookies-in-the-safari-browser/">an open letter</a> to Apple “from the Digital Advertising Community.”</p> <p>In it, the groups argue that “Safari's new 'Intelligent Tracking Prevention' would change the rules by which cookies are set and recognized by browsers”, in turn disrupting the infrastructure of the digital economy. The letter explains that “Blocking cookies in this manner will drive a wedge between brands and their customers, and it will make advertising more generic and less timely and useful.”</p> <p>In practical terms, Intelligent Tracking Prevention will severely disrupt behavioral targeting and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64099-what-is-retargeting-and-why-do-you-need-it">retargeting</a>. While these forms of targeting are very popular with advertisers because of their efficacy, they are frequently the source of complaints from consumers and privacy advocates.</p> <h3>How has Apple responded?</h3> <p>Those user complaints seem to carry a lot of weight with Apple, which is refusing to give in to the ad industry's demands to rethink Intelligent Tracking Prevention.</p> <p>“Apple believes that people have a right to privacy – Safari was the first browser to block third-party cookies by default and Intelligent Tracking Prevention is a more advanced method for protecting user privacy,” the company stated. “The feature does not block ads or interfere with legitimate tracking on the sites that people actually click on and visit. Cookies for sites that you interact with function as designed, and ads placed by web publishers will appear normally.”</p> <h3>How is the ad industry likely to respond?</h3> <p>Of course, advertisers are unlikely to resign themselves to a new world in which cross-site tracking is difficult if not impossible in the most popular mobile browser.</p> <p>As privacy expert Alexander Hanff <a href="https://privacy-news.net/news_article/5936b50c178a907559b1e5f3">noted</a>, Intelligent Tracking Prevention can't thwart server-side tracking and now that Apple is taking aim at client-based cross-site tracking, “it is highly probable that Apple's new approach to tracking will only accelerate a move to these server side technologies from those who have yet to use them.”</p> <p>So even if Apple's move causes a lot of hand-waving, given the importance of cross-site tracking to the online advertising ecosystem, this almost certainly won't be the end of the story.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69422 2017-09-15T10:00:00+01:00 2017-09-15T10:00:00+01:00 Four brands that used student ambassadors to generate buzz on campus Nikki Gilliland <p>An increasing number of brands are looking to students to become ambassadors, with the aim of boosting awareness and driving engagement in university campuses and beyond.</p> <p>So, how do they do it, and what are the benefits? Here’s a bit more on the subject.</p> <h3>A lucrative market</h3> <p>Despite the majority of students relying on loans to get through university, research suggests that many will still spend their money on <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2017/01/05/nearly-third-students-waste-student-loans-shopping-sprees-drinking/" target="_blank">non-essential items</a> such as clothing and drinking. </p> <p>For brands, this presents a clear opportunity, especially considering that many students will be living away from home for the first time - also becoming financially independent, and forging brand affinities in categories such as finance, travel, and lifestyle.</p> <p>So, with many brands in the UK focusing on sales – promoting discounts and deals to capture student attention – many are failing to recognise that they could be building affinity based on defining moments. This means tapping into university ‘firsts’ such as learning how to cook, doing laundry, setting up household utilities, and so on. </p> <p>Meanwhile, brands also forget that students care about more than just money. According to a survey by Chegg, 88% of students said they are more responsive to brands that give back to the community, reflecting the fact that brands need to do more than just overtly sell their product.</p> <h3>The power of influence</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://searchengineland.com/88-consumers-trust-online-reviews-much-personal-recommendations-195803" target="_blank">research</a>, 88% of consumers now trust the opinions of influencers as much as they do their friends. Similarly, <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69161-micro-influencers-how-to-find-the-right-fit-for-your-brand">micro-influencers</a> – who have a smaller reach but a more authentic reputation – can generate four times the engagement of larger influencers.</p> <p>Why is this important? Essentially, brands are now recruiting students to act as micro-influencers in universities. Instead of faceless ads, students are advertising to other students, effectively building advocacy for the brand or its products on a more personal level.</p> <p>In this sense, brand ambassadors can also act as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66569-five-ways-to-use-social-proof-online" target="_blank">social proof</a>. This means that if a student sees one or a group of influential peers wearing a particular brand, there's a chance that they’ll want to follow the crowd. The hope is that this could also create a snowball effect, with students going home and influencing friends and family away from their university circle.</p> <h3>Gaining insight</h3> <p>Student ambassadors can also act as eyes and ears on the ground, gathering insight about students on behalf of a company – i.e. what they want from a brand as well as their general perceptions and opinions.</p> <p>One popular ambassador activity is to hand out product samples, which can be effective for gaining instant feedback. This one-to-one communication can enable brands to gather more meaningful insight. </p> <p>Another benefit is that student ambassadors will sound exactly like the people they’re trying to target, taking away the danger of <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/67886-word-on-the-street-four-tips-for-using-slang-in-marketing" target="_blank">cringey brand communications</a>.</p> <h3>Long-term loyalty</h3> <p>Another reason to use this strategy is the potential to instil long-term loyalty in student consumers. </p> <p>First, ambassadors themselves are likely to stay brand-loyal long after they leave university – this is because they tend to feel part of the businesses that they are representing. </p> <p>In turn, they can also help to generate long-term loyalty in others. Again, this is down to the fact that students tend to be forming opinions and brand affinities for the first time. So by creating relationships with students at such an important and influential stage in their life, brands can increase the likelihood of sustaining affinity until later on in life, or perhaps even benefit from sentimentality about student days.</p> <p>So which brands have succeeded with student ambassadors? Here are a few examples.</p> <h3>1. American Eagle Outfitters</h3> <p>US retailer American Eagle previously enlisted ambassadors to help new students settle into their dorms at universities across the US. Dubbed the ‘Move-In Crew’, the ambassadors were there to carry and unload boxes, but also took the opportunity to hand out special American Eagle merchandise such as water bottles, pens, and coupons. </p> <p>By doing a good deed, the idea was that American Eagle would stick in the minds of new students, also promoting it as more than just a corporate brand.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8973/AE.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="453"></p> <h3>2. Nestlé </h3> <p>As well as turning students into customers, brands also look to universities to target potential future employees. </p> <p>A few years ago, Nestlé was struggling to attract talent from US universities, specifically in the Midwest. As a result, it used an ambassador programme to generate buzz about Nestlé careers, using a combination of on-campus promotions and events to do so. </p> <p>Nestlé ‘street teams’ distributed Nestlé chocolates along with event information at business and engineering schools, simultaneously promoting happy hour nights and the company on social media.</p> <p>The initiative was a success, resulting in 600 student attendees per event and a 64% increase in annual applications to Nestlé jobs compared to the previous year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8974/Nestle_Academy.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="512"></p> <h3>3. Lucozade</h3> <p>Last year, Lucozade launched its first ever student ambassador campaign to help increase sales of its new Lucozade Zero drink.</p> <p>Recruiting students to be the face of the brand on university campuses across the UK, ambassadors were put in charge of ‘brand stations’, whereby students could taste samples of Lucozade and get involved with a ‘Hit Zero’ game.</p> <p>With 66 events held, more than 100,000 samples handed out, and 330 game winners, it was a successful example of how to increase exposure and build buzz about a new product.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8971/Lucozade_2.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="415"></p> <h3>4. Tinder</h3> <p>In its early days, <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68511-how-tinder-is-encouraging-millennials-to-make-more-meaningful-connections" target="_blank">Tinder</a> took a top-down approach to marketing, recruiting influential college ambassadors to promote the app to friends and fellow students. </p> <p>In fact, Tinder was first launched at the University of Southern California with a birthday party thrown for a co-founder’s brother and his friends (who were students at the time). In order to attend, guests had to download the app – a stipulation that resulted in the number of uses increasing to over 4,000 by the end of the week.</p> <p>From there, Tinder continued to capitalise on the highly social environment of university, recruiting ambassadors to continue promoting the app, often during fraternity parties and big college events.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8972/Tinder.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="392"></p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67550-student-com-the-website-set-to-revolutionise-student-accommodation/">Student.com: the website set to revolutionise student accommodation</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67550-student-com-the-website-set-to-revolutionise-student-accommodation/">How ASOS targeted students via ‘Blank Canvas’ competition</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69399 2017-09-13T11:00:00+01:00 2017-09-13T11:00:00+01:00 Why GDPR is great news for marketers and will create a more efficient data economy Daniel Gilbert <p dir="ltr">Why anyone whose business relies on personal data would be ungrateful for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/hello/gdpr-for-marketers/">the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation)</a> is a mystery to me: it is a huge step in the right direction, designed to benefit data holders and consumers alike. There are costs to becoming ready, and the potential risk of being fined for non-compliance – but these are short-term problems, which will soon be forgotten in the wake of a more transparent, efficient data economy.</p> <p>In relation to digital advertising, the new regulation will have a positive impact on the quality of the data used for targeting, the relevance of ads, and the attitude towards those ads on behalf of the consumer. Ultimately, GDPR will greatly enhance the performance of any digital marketing campaign.</p> <h3>Creepy vs. Relevant</h3> <p>Online advertising treads a fine line between being creepy and relevant. An oft-cited example comes from the US clothing store, <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/kashmirhill/2012/02/16/how-target-figured-out-a-teen-girl-was-pregnant-before-her-father-did/#1fb3a72f6668">Target</a>, which epitomises the current issue with targeted advertising. Using an algorithm to analyse the purchasing habits of its customers (based on data obtained from loyalty cards), Target was able to predict, amongst other things, when one of its shoppers became pregnant and adapt its marketing accordingly.</p> <p>On one occasion, Target sent a bundle of soon-to-be-a-mom-related coupons to a 16-year-old customer; her father sent an irate complaint, only to discover that Target, before even the daughter had realised it, was right.</p> <p>This is an extreme case of creepiness, yet this feeling and a number of other synonymous attitudes, are prevalent amongst recipients of targeted advertising. And underlying this sense of creepiness, is ultimately a lack of trust. According to the largest European consumer survey to date, <a href="http://ec.europa.eu/commfrontoffice/publicopinion/archives/ebs/ebs_359_en.pdf">the Special Eurobarometer 359 report</a> (2010), ‘70% of Europeans are concerned that their personal data held by companies may be used for a purpose other than that for which it was collected.’</p> <p>Furthermore, ‘Just over a quarter of social network users (26%) and even fewer online shoppers (18%) feel in complete control.’ <a href="https://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/about/presskits/b-state-of-privacy-report-2015.pdf">The Symantec State of Privacy Report</a> (2015) reports similar findings: ‘only 22% trusted "tech companies" to keep data completely secure and only 10% trusted social media organisations’. And, considering current practices, it’s not really that surprising that this is the case.</p> <p>As a result of this lack of trust, many consumers are resorting to either not sharing their data, or falsifying it. A report by the <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/05/20/americans-attitudes-about-privacy-security-and-surveillance/">Pew Research Center</a> (2013), found that ‘an estimated 86% of consumers in the US had falsified or misrepresented their personal information online’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8921/Pew_survey.png" alt="" width="700" height="590"></p> <p><em>Further stats from Pew Research</em></p> <p>In a report published earlier this month in the <a href="http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0267257X.2017.1348011">Journal of Marketing Management</a>, Girish Punj warns that ‘the trend towards the falsification of online information could be particularly detrimental for mobile commerce firms because they require accurate location-aware, real-time information on consumers for personalising communications and customising product offers’.</p> <p>In simple terms, the current relationship between advertisers and consumers is damaging to both parties. GDPR presents a massive step forward to repairing this relationship, and improving personal data quality.</p> <h3>Data transparency</h3> <p>Greater media transparency has become the number one priority of advertisers over the last couple of years, especially since the publication of the <a href="http://www.ana.net/content/show/id/industry-initiative-media-transparency-report">ANA K2 report in 2016</a>. What about transparency between advertiser and consumer?</p> <p>At the moment, internet users are heavily deterred from making an informed decision about whether to share their data, the potential consequences of such sharing, and what exactly is happening to their data once it has been submitted.  </p> <p>In the previously mentioned research by Symantec, ‘59% of respondents said that they only skim read the terms and conditions when buying products or services online’ and ‘14% said they never read the terms and conditions’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8922/symantec_stats.png" alt="" width="684" height="388"></p> <p>The Eurobarometer research found that ‘58% of respondents who use the internet usually read privacy statements’, but ‘24% of those who read them said that they did not fully understand what they are reading.’</p> <p>A study by the <a href="https://ico.org.uk/media/about-the-ico/documents/1431717/data-protection-rights-what-the-public-want-and-what-the-public-want-from-data-protection-authorities.pdf">ICO</a> (2015) found that a focus group’s ‘awareness of privacy notices was extremely limited’, and number of studies have criticised the lack of granularity in options, leading to consumers needing to make compromises, e.g. opting to share data in exchange for valuable information.</p> <h3>The positive impact of GDPR</h3> <p>If GDPR is able to achieve what it sets out to – ensuring data transparency, increasing individual control – then advertisers can expect a much improved relationship with their audience. A study by the <a href="http://www.twi-kreuzlingen.ch/uploads/tx_cal/media/TWI-RPS-099-Schudy-Utikal.pdf">Thurgau Institute of Economics</a> (2015) concludes that ‘transparency leads to an increase in the individual’s willingness to share personal information as the individual is able to see and assess the collected information and the possible use of it’.</p> <p>Part of transparency is understanding the benefits of data sharing. A study by <a href="http://www.sciencewise-erc.org.uk/cms/assets/Uploads/SocialIntelligenceBigData.pdf">Sciencewise</a>, a UK government-funded programme, found ‘personal benefit to be the strongest incentive’ for those in favour of sharing personal information, yet, according to a study by <a href="https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/uk/Documents/deloitte-analytics/data-nation-2012-our-lives-in-data.pdf">Deloitte</a> (2012), ‘62% of consumers are not confident that sharing their data with companies or public sector bodies will result in better services or more relevant products’.</p> <p>The majority of internet users don’t believe in the benefits of an open data economy, but GDPR will help to make these benefits clearer. In terms of advertising, the main advantage will always be greater personalisation, along with the more indirect, general reward of a more efficient ad industry driving economic growth. Beyond this, there is the potential of data to be used for improving services, and generating a global network of information with incalculable social benefits.</p> <h3>We need to make GDPR work</h3> <p>GDPR, for all of the praise within this article, is imperfect. There are a number of foreseeable loopholes that may be exploited by data holders, potential limitations to the efficacy of the regulations in terms of empowering individuals to exercise their new rights, and a number of ambiguities that may lead to confusion when the law becomes implemented next year.</p> <p>A number of commentators are also questioning to what extent data holders/processors will fulfil <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69376-gdpr-requires-privacy-by-design-but-what-is-it-and-how-can-marketers-comply">the ‘privacy by design’ principle</a> that is so important to the success of the EU’s ambition. And, so long as businesses are convinced that non-transparent data practices are to their advantage, there is plenty of reason to be pessimistic about GDPR: perhaps, despite all this anticipation, it will actually have very little impact?</p> <p>The answer depends on all of us. Not since AdWords has there been a better opportunity for improving the transparency of advertising, and for aligning the interests of consumers with the objectives of businesses. It is up to all of us on the other side of the screen to use GDPR to make advertising better, and rejuvenate the digital world.</p> <p><em>For more resources on this topic, check out <a href="https://econsultancy.com/hello/gdpr-for-marketers/">Econsultancy's GDPR hub page</a> or sign up to our </em><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/training/courses/gdpr-data-driven-marketing">GDPR &amp; Data-Driven Marketing Training</a>.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69410 2017-09-11T14:01:00+01:00 2017-09-11T14:01:00+01:00 Verizon wants customers to give up their data for targeted ads, and it's willing to pay Patricio Robles <p>As The Wall Street Journal <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/verizon-wants-to-build-an-advertising-juggernaut-it-needs-your-data-first-1504603801">detailed</a> on Monday, Verizon has launched a new program called <a href="https://www.verizonwireless.com/rewards/verizon-up/">Verizon Up</a> that offers users rewards like free music, Uber rides, sports gear, coffee and discounts on new phones. There are also "amazing once-in-a-lifetime experiences and front-row tickets" to concerts, movies and sporting events.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8822/verizonupreward.png" alt="" width="517" height="368"></p> <p>Verizon boasts that "no points or levels [are] required" in its new rewards program. For every $300 spent on a Verizon Wireless monthly bill, customers receive one credit.</p> <p>Oh, and there's one more thing: to participate in Verizon Up, customers have to opt into Verizon Selects, a program that "uses information about your web browsing, app usage, device location, use of Verizon services and other information about you (such as your postal/email addresses, demographics, and interests) and shares information with Oath (formed by the combination of AOL and Yahoo)" to "personalize your experiences and make advertising you see more useful across the devices and services you use."</p> <p>In other words, to score rewards, Verizon customers have to allow Verizon to use the data it has about them to deliver targeted ads.</p> <h3>A new kind of truth in advertising?</h3> <p>Naturally, Verizon Up is going to have its critics, but the company believes it is actually being more transparent and honest with its customers than many other digital advertising players are with their users.</p> <p>Verizon's CMO, Diego Scotti, pointed to Google and Facebook, telling the Wall Street Journal, "Some of our competitors, they have exactly the same thing, it's just buried in the terms and conditions of the service. We are not hiding anything."</p> <p>It's not a bad point.</p> <p><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69381-the-google-facebook-duopoly-extends-to-mobile-apps-what-can-marketers-do">Google and Facebook</a> are under increasing scrutiny as their digital ad dominance grows. Both companies track users across the web and across devices. And in most cases, average users don't know when they're being tracked or how to control the data collected even when they have the ability to. In July, a judge in California dismissed a lawsuit against Facebook over its tracking of users even when logged out. Users don't have an expectation of privacy, the judge ruled.</p> <p>Google and Facebook, of course, offer a lot of value to users and the argument is that users allow these companies to collect data and advertise to them as payment for their otherwise free services. "If you're not paying for it, you're not the customer, you're the product" the saying goes.</p> <p>For years, some argued that users should be paid for their data as part of a so-called information market. As Vasant Dhar, a professor at New York University's Stern School of Business has <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2012/10/18/technology/social/facebook-should-pay-you/index.html">argued</a>, Facebook in particular would benefit by being more transparent given the amount and type of data it collects. "If users aren't making a conscious choice about what happens with their data, they end up feeling violated," he stated.</p> <p>But despite years of this kind of talk, there has been literally no movement on the part of advertising giants to compensate their users for their data. Even though its rewards are tied to dollar spend, Verizon Up is arguably one of the first major programs in which a major company is seeking to get customers to voluntarily give up their data for advertising purposes by giving them something of value in return other than access to a free service.</p> <p>Will it work? And will Verizon refuse to take and use valuable data from customers who don't sign up for Verizon Up?</p> <p>How those questions are answered could very well determine if a different future is possible for the digital advertising market.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69226 2017-07-06T10:43:30+01:00 2017-07-06T10:43:30+01:00 How Food52 successfully combines content and commerce Nikki Gilliland <p>So, how has it managed to create such dual success? Here’s an in-depth look into the publisher, and what others experimenting with commerce might be able to learn from it.</p> <h3>Fusing content and community</h3> <p>As former food editor of the New York Times, Food52’s CEO and co-founder, Amanda Hesser, undoubtedly knows a thing or two about food publishing. In 2009 she teamed up with freelance food writer and recipe tester, Merrill Stubbs, to create a food website aimed at 'home cooks'.</p> <p>More specifically, Food52 aims to reach an audience of home cooks who – alongside recipes – also care about food within a wider context, such as how it fits in with a modern lifestyle, its visual appeal, and how it makes people feel. </p> <p>In order to do this, instead of a straight-forward recipe hub or editorial website, Food52 uses a combination of professional articles and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67547-10-excellent-examples-of-user-generated-content-in-marketing-campaigns" target="_blank">user-generated content</a>. So, alongside feature articles, you’ll also find regular submissions from its 1m registered contributors, and even a site ‘hotline’ for people to find answers to any burning food-related questions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7240/Food52_Hotline.JPG" alt="" width="580" height="423"></p> <p>It is the site’s highly-engaged community that first allowed Food52 to venture into commerce. When the site launched, it did so with the aim of crowdsourcing a cookbook based on user submissions. Since then, it has created a number of cookbooks in this way, with each one including a competition element (with recipes voted for by fellow readers). </p> <p>In doing so, it has been able to capitalise on the contributions of its enthusiastic audience, as well as foster a real sense of community online. Contests are a regular feature throughout the year, too, with users voting for various categories such as ‘best weeknight recipe’ and ‘best thanksgiving leftover recipe’. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7241/Recipe_contests.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="443"></p> <h3>A seamless experience</h3> <p>Alongside this sense of community, Food52’s dedication to creating a seamless user experience has enabled it to expand into ecommerce <em>without</em> alienating its audience. </p> <p>Instead of using content purely as a vehicle to drive sales it treats the two verticals equally. It aims to be the ultimate foodie destination, meaning that - whether the user’s aim is to find a lamb recipe or a carving knife – they will be able to find what they’re looking for somewhere on the site. </p> <p>Product recommendations (usually found at the bottom of recipes) feel natural rather than forced, with the publisher only selling items that fit in with the brand’s wider ethos.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7242/Product_recommendations.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="677"></p> <p>Similarly, regardless of whether Food52 is promoting a product or a recipe, its priority is to always provide the user with inspiration – and high quality across the board. This stretches to the site’s signature photography and design, too. </p> <p>Both the content and commerce verticals are photographed in the Food52 studio, which ensures consistency in what the publisher calls the ‘Food52 aesthetic’. This usually means beautifully understated and minimalistic photography, often with a vintage-inspired edge.</p> <p>Together with design, Food52 uses storytelling elements to naturally integrate retail, as well as to create its own ‘point of view’. In doing so, it does not necessarily aim to compete with large competitors, but to provide extra value for consumers. Unlike the purely functional style of Amazon, for instance, Food52 uses emotive and immersive elements to draw in the audience.</p> <p>Each merchant selling on the site has their own page, including detail such as where they’re from and their motivations.</p> <p>With a third of all products sold being exclusive or one-off designs – Food52’s curated approach is certainly part of its appeal. By promoting the handcrafted nature of items and the small scale of merchants selling on the site, it feels far more 'artisan' than a big brand ecommerce site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7243/One_of_a_kind_products.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="500"></p> <p>This image is portrayed everywhere on the site – even extending to the FAQ page, where the first two questions focus on the publisher’s ‘food as lifestyle’ approach.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7244/FAQ.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="430"></p> <h3>Relevant and natural advertising</h3> <p>Food52’s online shop is not its only source of revenue – it also makes money through display advertising and sponsored content.</p> <p>However, it also treats this in the same way as it does shoppable items, ensuring that it is both relevant and valuable for users. Again, the publisher does this by putting as much of an emphasis on quality as it would its regular editorial features or recipes. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7245/Sponsored_content.JPG" alt="" width="640" height="459"></p> <p>There’s no obvious difference in quality between sponsored or non-sponsored content, which means that it could even pass by unnoticed. </p> <p>Food52’s CEO, Amanda Hesser, has previously said that the publisher decides whether or not it accepts a brand deal based on a single question – would it do it with or without an advertiser? If the answer is yes, then this clearly signifies a natural partnership, and one that the audience would want to hear about. So, even if brand involvement <em>is</em> obvious, Food52’s reputation for quality means that users are perhaps more than willing to accept it.</p> <h3>Strong social presence</h3> <p>Unsurprisingly, social media is another huge area of interest for advertisers, with sponsored content on Food52’s various channels often being part of the package. </p> <p>Food52 has partnered with a number of big brands including Annie’s Mac &amp; Cheese and Simply Organic Foods in the past. And just like branded content on the website, these social posts tend to be just as well received as regular ones, mainly due to the way they seamlessly blend in with the rest of the content on Food52’s channels.</p> <p>Instagram is one place where Food52 has particularly flourished – perhaps unsurprising considering that food is one of the most <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67856-four-delicious-examples-of-food-drink-brands-on-instagram/" target="_blank">popular topics on the platform</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7246/Food52_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="418"></p> <p>That being said, other publishers show that the topic itself is not always enough. </p> <p>One of Food52’s biggest competitors, AllRecipes - which generates a huge amount of visitors on its main website - has a mere 280,000 followers on Instagram. Perhaps this can be put down to AllRecipes aiming to be a sort of social hub in its own right, however, it certainly highlights Food52’s success on the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7247/AllRecipes.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="435"></p> <p>The publisher experiments with various types of social media content, capitalising on user-generated posts as well as other mediums like video and livestreaming. Interaction with followers is also another key to social success, with Food52 encouraging comments and replying to questions across Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ffood52%2Fvideos%2F10154761571104016%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <p>Let’s not forget its use of Pinterest either – especially how Food52 has even incorporated similar features from the discovery site into its own. Users can ‘like’ products and recipes to add them to new or existing ‘Collections’. In turn, this data also allows the publisher to discover what readers are looking for and enjoying, which it uses to inform future content and commerce sales. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7248/Collections.JPG" alt="" width="580" height="490"></p> <p>Using a combination of beautiful design, quality content, and focus on delivering value for its community, Food52 is a great example of how to fuse two very different verticals.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66438-how-should-ecommerce-brands-be-using-content/" target="_blank">How should ecommerce brands be using content?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69026-why-online-publishers-are-launching-wedding-verticals/" target="_blank">Why online publishers are launching wedding verticals</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69058-how-millennial-entrepreneurs-are-disrupting-retail-and-ecommerce/" target="_blank"><em>How millennial entrepreneurs are disrupting retail and ecomm</em>erce</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69178 2017-06-16T11:58:58+01:00 2017-06-16T11:58:58+01:00 Facebook adds value optimization to ad bidding & Lookalike Audiences Patricio Robles <p>This week, Facebook <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/news/new-tools-to-get-more-value-from-your-campaigns">announced</a> two new tools that marketers advertising on the world's largest social network will want to take a look at: value optimization and value-based Lookalike Audiences.</p> <p>Both rely on the Facebook Pixel and are designed to help marketers reach Facebook users who are likely to spend more money with them.</p> <p>As Facebook explained in its announcement:</p> <blockquote> <p>Value optimization works by using the purchase values sent from the Facebook pixel to estimate how much a person may spend with your business over a seven-day period. The ad's bid is then automatically adjusted based on this estimation, allowing campaigns to deliver ads to people likely to spend more with your business at a low cost.</p> </blockquote> <p>Value optimization is somewhat similar to Google's <a href="https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/6268632?hl=en">Target CPA bidding</a>, which allows advertisers using AdWords automated bidding to let Google's technology work on their behalf to minimize their cost per acquisition (CPA). To use Target CPA bidding, marketers must use Google's conversion tracking. </p> <h3>Value-based Lookalike Audiences</h3> <p>Facebook is also extending its value optimization algorithms to Lookalike Audiences, one of the most powerful tools Facebook offers marketers.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65505-lookalike-audiences-the-next-big-thing-in-marketing/">Lookalike Audiences</a> allow marketers using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64980-put-your-email-list-to-work-facebook-custom-audiences">Custom Audiences</a> to target Facebook users that Facebook determines are similar to their Custom Audiences. The performance delivered by Lookalike Audience targeting can be impressive. For example, according to Facebook, one ecommerce marketer realized a 56% lower CPA and 94% lower cost per checkout using Lookalike Audiences.</p> <p>Unfortunately, working with Custom and Lookalike Audiences is not always efficient. More sophisticated marketers, realizing that not all of their users or customers are as valuable as others, frequently segment their customers into multiple Custom Audiences. For obvious reasons, this can be a tedious task.</p> <p>Now, that step can be eliminated in some cases as Facebook is giving marketers the ability to create value-based Lookalike Audiences so they don't have to perform this segmentation on their own. Facebook explained:</p> <blockquote> <p>With this enhancement, advertisers are no longer limited to creating small groups of audiences based on their spend or LTV prior to creating a Custom Audience. Now, they can include a value column to their entire customer list, which Facebook can use to create an additional weighted signal for people most likely to make a purchase after seeing your ad. </p> </blockquote> <h3>Worth experimenting with?</h3> <p>For marketers that have already implemented the Facebook Pixel on their properties, value optimization and value-based Lookalike Audiences are potentially significant offerings that many marketers will probably find worthwhile to experiment with.</p> <p>However, Facebook's methodology for estimating how much customers might spend with a business over a short period of time is a black box, something that some marketers might be a little wary of given <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68332-should-marketers-be-more-concerned-about-facebook-s-video-metrics-faux-pas/">Facebook's recent string of metrics faux pas</a>. Despite this, offering marketers tools for identifying and targeting their most valuable users is a no-brainer for Facebook and it's all but certain the company will continue to add similar offerings well into the future.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69113 2017-05-25T14:42:14+01:00 2017-05-25T14:42:14+01:00 Delivering data-driven content marketing for the travel industry Ray Jenkin <p dir="ltr">Paid media opportunities for content marketing are now truly scalable with programmatic delivery of content through existing ad formats and native placements. As marketers shift from talking at customers to speaking with them, the time is ripe to use data and content to add value to the consumer's purchase journey by finding them at the most relevant time and tailoring the content to them so it is informative and engaging.</p> <p dir="ltr">It is exciting to see the likes of <a href="http://www.thomson.co.uk/blog/">Thomson</a> and <a href="https://contently.com/strategist/2015/11/05/were-a-media-company-now-inside-marriotts-incredible-money-making-content-studio/">Marriott</a> who are executing this across paid, owned and earned channels. This article will focus specifically on how brands can better activate their content utilising data across paid media channels. </p> <h3 dir="ltr">Understand your audience, then shape your content and targeting</h3> <p dir="ltr">With the abundance of data available from social and paid media channels, the opportunity to uncover strong insights about your audience, in near real time, has never been greater. By understanding the primary travel-led concerns and motivations of your audiences you can quickly develop and adjust content to address these concerns.</p> <p dir="ltr">In addition to tackling your audience's questions effectively, you should also use this information to shape audience targeting strategies and paid media activation of that content, finding defining moments in the consumer journey and matching the most relevant content to these audience behaviours.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">Data allows you to listen and act: don’t just broadcast</h3> <p dir="ltr">Balance the message you would like to share with the needs and wants of your audience. Travel brands run the risk of using the content channel as another broadcast tactic, pushing use of their app or overly touting their offers. Be cautious not to alienate your audience.</p> <p dir="ltr">Utilise the data-driven insights you uncover to create a balanced editorial strategy that weaves your key commercial messages with useful and valuable content that addresses consumer needs.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6375/thomson_blog.png" alt="" width="700" height="487"></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Thomson's blog</em></p> <h3 dir="ltr">Be relevant at all the stages of the consumer’s journey</h3> <p dir="ltr">Using data enables you to really match content with the consumer at pivotal touch points. Much like over-broadcasting, mismatching content at the wrong times will lead to consumers ignoring you.</p> <p dir="ltr">For example, if you are building out content that elevates travel inspiration be sure you can activate those audiences at that stage of their journey, by looking at some of the behavioural triggers such as browsing travel photos, writing travel blogs or search terms around broader travel-related terms.    </p> <p dir="ltr">Also, make sure the shape, structure and features of your content reflect the relevant point in the consumer’s journey. For example, consider travel inspiration as a period where consumers are looking for validation and affirmation of the travel desires. With that in mind is your content shareable? Is it rich in visual elements to capture the imagination? Paid media activation now allows for far more variety in content than in recent previous years so leverage these opportunities to make the content more relevant.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">Go beyond where your audiences are to find what your audiences are doing</h3> <p dir="ltr">Naturally, context is a valuable part of your content strategy. Make sure you are aligning your paid content with relevant contextual environments such as travel comparison, OTA’s, and travel magazines.</p> <p dir="ltr">Granular data access for audience targeting can help you reach those relevant consumers at other pivotal touch points. For example those sharing content with friends and family on social channels, those searching with specific search terms or consumers browsing hard to reach travel inspiration environments can be identified through more sophisticated audience targeting solutions and also found programmatically in other non-travel environments where the opportunity to deliver them paid content is available.   </p> <h3 dir="ltr">Harness the power of the crowd</h3> <p dir="ltr">According to research undertaken by Edelman, 70% of global consumers say <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/">online consumer reviews</a> are the second-most trusted form of advertising, and Trip Barometer uncovered that 93% of travellers said their booking decisions are impacted by online reviews.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67547-10-excellent-examples-of-user-generated-content-in-marketing-campaigns/">User-generated content</a> can be powerful. Consider how this impacts both content production and also existing traditional paid media strategies. Look at how you can marry this content with audiences engaging with review-led content to create stronger resonance with your brand.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">Go further than the written word - 66% of all travellers watch videos online when researching </h3> <p dir="ltr">The plethora of paid media options available programmatically has increased significantly in the last few months. Leverage these to get a range of content in front of relevant audiences.</p> <p dir="ltr">From video placements of various lengths and <a href="https://vimeo.com/155542137">f</a><a href="https://vimeo.com/155542137">ormats</a>, to <a href="https://flixel.com/cinemagraph/51r5jmmylwommtwzwt12/">cinemagraph native formats</a> to get engaging imagery in front of audiences, the possibilities to make the right content fit at the right stage have never been greater. With programmatic access to these formats now reaching meaningful scale, you can combine data and placement to truly get the most relevant content in front of the most relevant audiences.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong><em>For more on this topic see:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/"><em>10 examples of great travel marketing campaigns</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68871-how-travel-brands-are-capitalising-on-youtube-adventure-search-trend/"><em>How travel brands are capitalising on YouTube adventure search trend</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68678-the-impact-of-artificial-intelligence-on-the-travel-industry/"><em>The impact of artificial intelligence on the travel industry</em></a></li> </ul>