tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/behavioural-targeting Latest Behavioural targeting content from Econsultancy 2016-09-19T15:40:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68301 2016-09-19T15:40:00+01:00 2016-09-19T15:40:00+01:00 Instant messaging: An introduction to the future of communication Blake Cahill <p>For those of you that don’t know – I’ll assume you must have been trapped on a desert island for the past few years – instant messaging (IM) is a catch-all name for a range of different services that primarily provide users with the opportunity to engage in real-time communication.</p> <p>Typically led by text conversation, messengers often also provide a range of additional functionality that varies wildly from provider to provider.</p> <p>This additional functionality has, on some platforms, led to them being considered as full-blown social media networks, on a par with Facebook, Twitter and other platforms.</p> <p>In 2015, mobile phone messaging apps were used by 1.4bn consumers and eMarketer predicts that, by 2018, the number of chat app users worldwide will reach 2bn, representing 80% of smartphone users worldwide.</p> <p>In a nutshell, it’s only a matter of time before everyone and their granny, in practically every country on the planet, are using IM.</p> <h3>So who are the Big Players?</h3> <p><strong>WhatsApp</strong></p> <p>Owned by Zuckerbeg &amp; Co. and with over 1bn users, most of which are tech savvy millennials, WhatsApp is the clear front-runner in the IM community and the only truly global IM service with any significant uptake in all continents around the world.</p> <p>Offering text chat, voice recording, media sharing, group broadcasts and a robust network, you would surely bet your house on this IM giant being the one to pave the way for the future of IM [insert smiley face emoticon].</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0004/4627/whatsapp-facebook-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="whatsapp" width="300"></p> <p><strong>Facebook Messenger</strong></p> <p>Formed from the online chat function of the social network, Facebook Messenger has made real inroads in the EMEA and US regions with over 800m users.</p> <p>However it’s clear that with certain restrictions in places such as Asia, its move out of these two markets and into the APAC region will be a tough one to tackle. </p> <p><strong>WeChat</strong></p> <p>With 650m users, primarily in the APAC region, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67490-10-things-you-didn-t-know-about-wechat/">WeChat</a> is, significantly, dominant in the Chinese market offering users the chance to chat in a ‘walkie talkie’ style conversation, as well as other typical features such as group chats and video calls.</p> <p>WeChat is also a social network and an extendable transactional platform. It gives its users the opportunity to shop, talk to brands, order taxis (its ‘Didi Dache’ service is essentially China’s Uber) and read the news.</p> <p>WeChat is also the only social platform 80% of Chinese millennials use every day.</p> <p><em>WePay</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/1483/wepay.png" alt="wepay" width="615"></p> <p><strong>kik</strong></p> <p>With over 240m users, kik has its biggest presence in the US with an impressive 42% of US users being between 16-24 years old.</p> <p>It’s a promising start, however kik has seen very little uptake out of the US and it’s still dwarfed by the progress of WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger for the moment at least.</p> <p><strong>Others?</strong></p> <p>Though there are some exceptions to this global picture – KakaoTalk is the most popular chat app in South Korea, for example, while Line dominates in Japan, Thailand and Taiwan – there’s no doubt that it’s Facebook that’s winning the race so far.</p> <p>And before you say, “but what about Snapchat?!”, though this service is doing some serious business with teens in the UK and USA (over 40% use it), one a global level it’s still early days with only 7% market penetration.</p> <h3>The future of IM</h3> <p>With the landscape of IM changing and its scope reaching all aspects of the user's life, both personal and professional, it’s clear to see that IM offers real opportunities for businesses to get involved – but how will this play out? </p> <p>Firstly, IM is not a place to advertise, it’s a place for marketing. It gives us a powerful new space for brands to change the way consumers think about retail and customer service.</p> <p>The promise of IM is that if offers a near perfect form of personal, intimate, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67767-will-conversational-marketing-become-a-reality-in-2016/">direct link between brands and customers</a>.</p> <p>Facebook Messenger has already started to make real inroads in expanding the capabilities of its own IM platform, recently announcing the introduction of so-called <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/">chatbots</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7478/kiksephora-blog-flyer.png" alt="sephora chatbot" width="300"></p> <p>Similar (but arguably less advanced AI) has been prevalent in WeChat and other channels previously, but inclusion in Facebook Messenger is likely to see increased quality of functionality.</p> <p>Chatbots will offer the ability for businesses to create bespoke responses based on natural language input. </p> <p>As the use and complexity of chatbots expand, users will find themselves being able to order goods simply by messaging the brand – as users of WeChat are already doing – receive tailored news updates based around your interest and even control connected smart devices.</p> <p>The future of commerce and customer service could well be a hybrid of IM as it steadily becomes our primary way to interact with companies, buy things, provide service and build loyalty.</p> <p>As the big players (and the many smaller innovators) continue to expand and develop the platforms’ potential, it’s safe to say we’re only at the beginning of what looks to be a long and interesting road.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68236 2016-09-14T11:00:00+01:00 2016-09-14T11:00:00+01:00 Three big problems with marketing automation rules (and how to solve them) Andrew Davies <h3>Is marketing automation delivering?</h3> <p>As marketers, we live in a world where the number of choices that we have to make to deliver the right message to the right person at the right time is increasing exponentially.</p> <p>Marketing has moved from mass advertising where you sent one message to everyone, to segments where messages are sent to a limited number of people, to now having to understand individual <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/understanding-the-customer-journey/">customer journeys</a>.</p> <p>Marketing automation has emerged as a supposed panacea to this problem, yet despite years of propaganda from vendors promising the world, many B2B enterprises that have bought <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/marketing-automation-best-practices">marketing automation</a> are finding that it is not quite the silver bullet they expected. </p> <p>The Annuitas 2015 B2B Enterprise survey of over 100 B2B enterprise marketers from organizations with annual revenues that exceed $250m revealed that only 2.8% of respondents believed demand generation campaigns achieve their goals.</p> <p>Similarly, Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census-2016/">Email Marketing Industry census</a> surfaced that only 7% of respondents deemed their in-house automated campaigns to be “very successful”. </p> <p>The truth is that even if you avoid marketing automation mistakes (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67250-seven-avoidable-marketing-automation-mistakes/">such as these</a>), you are still lumbered with the task of using marketing automation rules and decision logic to select and deliver campaign messages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9143/Screen_Shot_2016-09-14_at_09.19.22.png" alt="marketing automation success" width="615" height="518"></p> <h3>Three big problems with marketing automation rules</h3> <p>At the heart of all marketing automation technology and outputs are the rules used to tell the marketing automation platform which content or message to select and send to which particular contacts in your database.</p> <p>This structure necessarily leads to three big problems for B2B organisations:</p> <p><strong>1) Marketing automation rules cannot cope with complex buyer journeys</strong></p> <p>All marketing automation relies on preset logic (“If this X happens then do Y”, “if X does not happen, then do Z”) and traditional purchase-funnel theory to architect marketing campaigns and trigger communications.</p> <p>The problem is that the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66322-do-companies-understand-the-customer-journey/">B2B buyer journey is much more complex</a> than marketing automation vendors would have you believe. </p> <p><strong>2) Rules cannot adapt to changing contexts</strong></p> <p>The nature of marketing automation rules is that once they have been activated they remain active until you manually deactivate them.</p> <p>This mean that they are not adaptive and they cannot learn from a campaign’s results, only repeat them.</p> <p>Sure, you can create a rule that says: IF [Marketing Automation score] [increases] [+5] THEN [remove from] [LISTNAME] AND [add to] [NEW LISTNAME], but rules cannot cope with the reality that prospects are continually evolving in their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67121-the-lead-data-hierarchy-for-busy-sales-people-savvy-b2b-marketers/">interests and needs</a>, not just their sales stage or marketing automation score. </p> <p><strong>3) Marketing automation rules mean more - not less - staff</strong> </p> <p>As counterintuitive as it sounds, marketing automation often means having to bring on more – not less – staff.</p> <p>As well as a marketing manager, a database manager, a demand gen exec, a content strategist, you will most likely need a marketing technologist who is able to help you get the most out of your new system.</p> <p>All of these people have input into creating the rules that are used and the cost of hiring will ultimately prolong the time it takes to see positive ROI on your marketing automation purchase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9141/marketing_automation_complexity.jpg" alt="complexity of marketing automation" width="615"></p> <p>As soon as you begin to understand the three big problems with marketing automation rules, it all becomes clear why <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66882-how-to-fix-the-50bn-problem-in-b2b-content-marketing/">60% of content in B2B organisations is wasted </a>and why one of the biggest issues in demand generation is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63400-interest-abandonment-coming-to-a-purchase-funnel-near-you/">interest abandonment.</a></p> <h3>What are the solutions to the marketing automation rules problem? </h3> <p>As the co-founder of a B2B technology company, and having spent the past few years refining our demand generation process, I know just how powerful a good marketing automation system and practice can be - but I am also cognisant of the above problems.</p> <p>This has led us to try the following solutions:</p> <p><strong>Create more rules

</strong></p> <p>It’s true - one way to address the problem of imperfect marketing automation rules is to create more marketing automation rules to try and meet every kind of conceivable customer journey, context or need. </p> <p>However, you can only create so many rules. It is perhaps feasible when an organisation has a limited product portfolio or few content assets, but when you are a high-volume publisher with a wide variety of products and customer types (such as a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67419-how-to-make-content-marketing-easy-for-wealth-asset-managers/">wealth and asset management firm</a>) this is impossible.</p> <p>The problem is that although the number of choices is increasing, the number of rules that we can make (to make the decisions to govern those choices that we can create) is very limited. </p> <p><strong>Hire more people

</strong></p> <p>We can only create so many rules whilst retaining the same number of marketers before the Law of Diminishing Returns kicks in.</p> <p>The next option then is to increase the number of rules and increase the number of marketing staff to create and manage these rules.</p> <p>The problem here is that number of available marketers is finite and the number of marketers that one can afford is even more finite, so CMOs that are on a hiring spree will still ultimately be faced with this fundamental gap between the number of choices they need to make and the number of marketing automation rules that their team can can create to make those choices. 

</p> <p><strong>No More Rules - use predictive machine-learning

</strong></p> <p>This leaves us with a third option - eschewing marketing automation rules altogether by turning to predictive, machine-learning technologies that use algorithms to make decisions, rather than rules.</p> <p>Although some marketers may baulk at the idea of turning over marketing decisions to artificial intelligence, it is becoming an<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/"> increasingly common and accepted practice</a>.</p> <p>The benefit of using predictive machine-learning is that it can learn from new information and quickly decide what the next best action is for an optimal outcome.</p> <p>Machine learning is well-suited to environments where CMOs face complex buyer journeys, constantly evolving user profiles and myriad pieces of content that need to be categorised and structured before being served across multiple channels.</p> <p>Better yet, these technologies can be integrated <em>with</em> your marketing automation platform. </p> <p>Rather than relying on restrictive rules-based logic, a ‘no more rules’ approach adapts to the unique signals and interactions of each buyer and automatically decides the best message, content or product to send to them.</p> <p>It’s an approach that saves both the prohibitive operational costs of hiring more staff and time-intensive stress of having to create rules that can govern every scenario in the ever-complex B2B buyer journey.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67965 2016-06-20T10:57:29+01:00 2016-06-20T10:57:29+01:00 Emojis gone wild: Twitter unveils emoji targeting Patricio Robles <p>Marketers can access emoji targeting through six of Twitter's ad partners - AdParlor, Amobee, HYFN, Perion, SocialCode and 4C.</p> <p><a href="https://blog.twitter.com/2016/introducing-emoji-targeting">According to</a> Twitter product manager Neil Shah, 110bn emojis have been tweeted since 2014, and that is apparently a gold mine for marketers...</p> <blockquote> <p>This new feature uses emoji activity as a signal of a person’s mood or mindset — unlocking unique opportunities for marketers.</p> </blockquote> <p>Shah suggested that Twitter's new targeting feature can be used to "connect with people based on their expressed sentiment," "target people who Tweet food emojis," and "reach people based on their passions."</p> <h3>A late April Fool's joke?</h3> <p>While there often is an association between emojis and sentiment, the latter two use cases presented by Shah beg the question: is Twitter playing a late April Fool's joke on marketers?</p> <p>Many brands are <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66547-three-ways-brands-are-using-emojis">embracing emojis</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67177-taco-bell-is-making-great-use-of-the-taco-emoji-it-lobbied-for">some with success</a> and others <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67469-house-of-fraser-s-emojinal-campaign-massive-fail-or-marketing-genius">perhaps not as much success</a>.</p> <p>But using them to drive targeting decisions appears, on the surface, to be a real stretch and makes about as much sense as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66455-10-things-we-loved-on-the-internet-this-week-3">the Great Econsultancy Emoji Marketing Buster</a>.</p> <p>After all, <strong>just because a user tweets a pizza emoji doesn't mean she has the urge to buy a pizza,</strong> and just because a user tweets a soccer ball emoji doesn't mean she's passionate about soccer.</p> <p><strong><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6183/emojitweet-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="437"></strong></p> <p>Obviously, it's possible that emoji targeting will sort of work some of the time – stranger, crazier things have happened.</p> <p>But brands already struggling to deal with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats">widespread use of ad blockers</a>, understand things like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">programmatic</a>, etc. probably won't find emoji targeting to be a particularly compelling use of their time and resources.</p> <p>Instead, they shouldn't be surprised if this feature eventually <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67887-twitter-ditches-its-buy-button-puts-focus-on-retargeting">goes the way of Twitter's Buy button</a>. </p> <p>And with <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2016/06/06/is-snapchat-threatening-twitter/">Snapchat reportedly surpassing Twitter in daily active users</a> and <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-twitter-instagram-advertising-idUSKCN0YW05X">Instagram proving to be more popular than Twitter among agencies</a>, the launch of emoji targeting might cause some marketers to question if Twitter's ad business has totally jumped the shark.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67840 2016-05-23T14:29:29+01:00 2016-05-23T14:29:29+01:00 Highly targeted online ads don't work: Stanford researchers Patricio Robles <p>Eilene Zimmerman <a href="http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/pedro-gardete-real-price-cheap-talk">explains</a>...</p> <blockquote> <p>In this case, the researchers were looking at cheap talk in retail, for example, an ad promising 'Lowest Prices in Town'.</p> <p>That can be credible when it’s used to draw in appropriate customers; in this case, those who are price sensitive.</p> </blockquote> <p>At the same time...</p> <blockquote> <p>They found that the most personalized ads were less effective because consumers worried they were being exploited.</p> <p>For example, says [Stanford Graduate School of Business professor Pedro Gardete], someone looking for a prom dress 'might get an ad from a retailer saying, "We have a wide selection of prom dresses! Click on this link!" The consumer clicks, and it turns out the retailer has dresses for all occasions but not specifically proms,' says Gardete.</p> <p>Those kinds of ads frustrate consumers and eventually become meaningless to them.</p> </blockquote> <p>Based on this, Gardete suggests that businesses might adopt a "less is more" approach in which less information is collected, information collection is more transparent, and targeting is used more sparingly. </p> <h3>Theory versus reality</h3> <p>While there's no doubt that a growing number of consumers are concerned about their privacy and how marketers are using information to track and target them, given the continued level of interest and investment in targeting tech and targeted ad offerings, does the researchers' model actually reflect reality?</p> <p>Obviously, a hypothetical retailer falsely promoting that it has a wide selection of prom dresses when it doesn't isn't likely to see good results, <strong>but this isn't how most experienced digital marketers are operating.</strong></p> <p>Instead, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64099-what-is-retargeting-and-why-do-you-need-it/">retargeting</a> (and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/10194-the-roi-of-personalisation-infographic">personalisation</a>) are widely seen to drive ROI in the real world.</p> <p>As an example, AdRoll, a performance marketing platform provider, detailed <a href="https://www.adroll.com/sites/default/files/resources/pdf/case-study/AdRoll%20Case%20Study%20-%20Chubbies.pdf">in a case study</a> (PDF) how one apparel retailer used retargeting to deliver a 10.5x average ROI, 13% conversion lift and 33% lower CPA than average for other apparel retailers.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64980-put-your-email-list-to-work-facebook-custom-audiences">Facebook Custom and Lookalike Audiences</a> have delivered similarly impressive results.</p> <p>Crowdfunding platform Tilt <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/success/tilt">doubled</a> its conversion rate using Custom Audiences, and lowered its mobile cost per install by 30% using Lookalike Audiences.</p> <p>And Hospitality giant MGM <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/success/mgm-resorts-international">realized</a> a greater than 5x return on spend using Custom Audiences.</p> <p>Needless to say, any specific marketer's mileage will vary, but on the whole, marketers are becoming more and more adept at targeting consumers online and doing so to good effect. </p> <p>That doesn't mean that marketers should rely on targeted ads exclusively, and the Stanford research is a reminder that targeted ads need to deliver what they promise to consumers.</p> <p>But targeted ads are here to stay because they work well enough of the time, even if <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67830-young-users-aren-t-fans-of-targeted-social-ads-report/">many consumers say they don't like them</a>.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67835 2016-05-19T11:21:14+01:00 2016-05-19T11:21:14+01:00 Bringing data into creativity in a programmatic world Glen Calvert <p>Data isn’t sexy, consequently, it isn’t loved by brand advertisers. In their minds, data is the preserve of the far less noble direct marketing realm.</p> <p>The idea of putting data at the core of campaigns, which the direct marketer does, is an anathema to the brand advertiser.</p> <p>A neat illustration of this thinking is through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/personalisation-enhancing-the-customer-experience/">personalised advertising</a>. Brand marketers can’t deny that they’d like to connect with us all individually.</p> <p>The “Share a Coke” campaign in which cans and bottles were personalised was a huge brand success.</p> <p>Around 1,000 name variations were available on shelves and over 500,000 available through the online store.</p> <p>So, why do brand advertisers seem reticent to deploy personalisation techniques online – a media tailor-made for such activity due to data?</p> <p>Why do we so rarely see good examples of this type of campaign in the digital environment?</p> <h3><strong>Falling in love with data?</strong></h3> <p>The answer to the previous question is branding’s lack of love for data. However, this mind-set could be changing due to a couple of factors.</p> <p>Brands love TV because it’s a wonderful platform to tell stories at scale.</p> <p>In comparison, online platforms for telling good brand stories at scale using data and creative have been more constrained.</p> <p>With smaller screen sizes and more limited ad ‘real estate’, brand banner advertising is more of a challenge.</p> <p>However, the skills and appetite for meeting this challenge and using data efficiently are increasing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4847/share-a-coke.jpg" alt="Share a Coke Bottles" width="460" height="330"></p> <p>This improvement in the banner format is combining with a growth in other branding-type formats in display advertising, such as video and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-do-you-need-it/">native advertising</a>.</p> <p>The IAB’s latest <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67746-10-action-packed-digital-marketing-stats-from-this-week" target="_blank">digital ad spend figures</a> showed both video and native spend grew around 50% last year to account for nearly half of display ad spend.</p> <p>These two parallel developments in display prove its increasing allure as a branding medium - FMCG advertisers, historically considered the least relevant in regards to online ads, are now the dominant spender on display, accounting for nearly £1 in every £5.</p> <p>We’re seeing this increasing willingness to embrace data manifested by clients taking control of their data destiny.</p> <p>A number of high profile brands are taking on long-term software contracts with data management platforms (DMPs), showing the appetite clients have to both control and exploit the data opportunity.</p> <h3><strong>Programmatic plumbing</strong></h3> <p>Alongside the rise in online branding formats, the other factor changing mind-sets among brand advertisers, rather surprisingly, could be <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/">programmatic</a>.</p> <p>Something originally seen as even less sexy than data.</p> <p>The “plumbing”, or logistics, side of programmatic is becoming less of an obstacle to using data and creative to tell a good brand story.</p> <p>The amount of heavy-lifting required is reducing in terms of time, resources and money among agencies and vendors to connect the data, the creative and the inventory.</p> <p>Consequently, there’s a growing sense of enthusiasm about take-up among brands.</p> <p>So, as programmatic matures, many of these growing pains are less pronounced.</p> <p>As the plumbing between creative, data and buying becomes more automated, it means the industry can move more towards programmatic as a creative solution.</p> <h3><strong>Programmatic as creative</strong></h3> <p>In turn, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67554-2016-the-year-of-programmatic-creative/" target="_blank">programmatic creative</a> has become more advanced and more flexible, without compromising scale and automation, to meet the specific creative requirements and nuances that advertisers have for being able to tell their brand story.</p> <p>Programmatic creative is now flexible and advanced enough to insert dynamic and personalised elements into online ads to enable the idea of “mass personalisation”, which was essentially what the big idea “Share of Coke” brand campaign was shooting for.</p> <p>These developments hopefully thaw the relationship between brand marketers and data, particularly as they open up exciting and innovative brand campaign ideas that can be brought to life in this brave new world.</p> <p>Take, for example, Netflix’s campaign to promote the addition of all ten seasons of Friends to its library.</p> <p>Conceived by Ogilvy Paris, it’s a pre-roll video campaign that responds dynamically to videos watched on YouTube by inserting a clip from Friends that relates to the video topic searched for.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/K_3uKmLFHRI?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Essentially, it uses data to relate Friends to almost anything you search for on YouTube.</p> <p>What will be your big brand idea this year that comes alive through data?</p> <p><em>To learn more on this topic, book yourself onto Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">Programmatic Training Course</a>.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4093 2016-04-12T12:23:00+01:00 2016-04-12T12:23:00+01:00 People-Based Advertising in North America <h2>Overview</h2> <p>The <strong>People-Based Advertising</strong> report, produced in collaboration with <strong><a title="Signal" href="http://www.signal.co/">Signal</a></strong>, is based on a survey of more than 350 brand marketers and media buyers in <strong>North America</strong>. It explores the hypothesis that smarter, data-driven, people-based display advertising is an important alternative to the legacy model that is failing the online ecosystem.</p> <p>With the unpleasant realities of ad blocking, fraud and viewability concerns weighing on marketers' minds, this report explores whether smarter, data-driven, people-based display advertising is a viable important alternative to the legacy model that is failing the online ecosystem.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>What are the issues with display keeping advertisers up at night?</li> <li>How are companies managing the data governance issues created by the relative marketing dominance of brands such as Google, Facebook and Twitter?</li> <li>How important is the process of onboarding in the future that advertisers envision?</li> <li>Are consumers likely to be less compliant in the future about the use of their data in addressable media?</li> </ul> <h2>Who should read this report?</h2> <p>The report is essential reading for both in-house marketers and agency professionals based in North America, as well as those outside the region who want to understand how people-based advertising is evolving in these countries.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4052 2016-03-22T09:49:00+00:00 2016-03-22T09:49:00+00:00 People-Based Advertising in Australia <h2>Overview</h2> <p>The <strong>People-Based Advertising</strong> report, produced in collaboration with <strong><a title="Signal" href="http://www.signal.co/">Signal</a></strong>, is based on a survey of more than 350 brand marketers and media buyers in <strong>Australia</strong>. It explores the hypothesis that smarter, data-driven, people-based display advertising is an important alternative to the legacy model that is failing the online ecosystem. </p> <p>With the unpleasant relalities of ad blocking, fraud and viewability concerns weighing on marketers' minds, this report explores the hypothesis that smarter, data-driven, people-based display advertising is an important alternative to the legacy model that is failing the online ecosystem.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>What are the issues with display keeping advertisers up at night?</li> <li>What premium are brands willing to pay for people-based advertising?</li> <li>How are companies managing the data governance issues created by the relative marketing dominance of brands such as Google, Facebook and Twitter?</li> <li>How important is the process of onboarding in the future that advertisers envision?</li> <li>Are consumers likely to be less compliant in the future about the use of their data in addressable media?</li> </ul> <h2>Who should read this report?</h2> <p>The report is essential reading for both in-house marketers and agency professionals based in Australia or North America, as well as those outside the region who want to understand how people-based advertising is evolving in these countries.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67654 2016-03-16T14:25:45+00:00 2016-03-16T14:25:45+00:00 Google courts enterprise marketers with launch of Analytics 360 Suite Patricio Robles <p>To do all of this, the search giant has combined six products into a single platform:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Audience Center 360</strong>, a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-role-of-dmps-in-the-era-of-data-driven-advertising">data management platform</a> (DMP).</li> <li> <strong>Optimize 360</strong>, a website testing and personalization solution.</li> <li> <strong>Data Studio 360</strong>, a data and visualization tool that can be used to analyze data collected by all of the Google Analytics 360 products.</li> <li> <strong>Tag Manager 360</strong>, which is based on Google's existing tag management solution.</li> <li> <strong>Analytics 360</strong>, the professional analytics solution that Google previously offered under the name GA Premium.</li> <li> <strong>Attribution 360</strong>, an attribution platform that marketers can use to evaluate the performance of their campaigns across channels.</li> </ul> <p>Google says that Analytics 360 Suite has been several years in the making, and was developed based on feedback it received from enterprise marketers, many of whom complained that their existing marketing analytics tools were not meeting their needs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/3052/blog_images__62_-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="392"></p> <h3>Integration, integration, integration</h3> <p>Google believes it is delivering on those needs, and early customers like L'Oreal Canada, which says it has doubled anticipated revenue with Google's new offering, are already singing Analytics 360 Suite's praises.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ETGsJfYb-gw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p><strong>But Google's secret sauce might not be breadth or depth, but rather integration.</strong></p> <p>Audience Center 360 offers native integration with DoubleClick and over 50 third-party data providers.</p> <p>Tag Manager 360 plays nicely with a variety of third-party vendors, including Turn, comScore, Criteo and Marin Software.</p> <p>Attribution 360 is capable of distributing data to DSPs and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/rtb-buyers-guide/">RTBs</a>, can pull in data automatically from DoubleClick Campaign Manager, and offers an Offline Conversion Connector to help marketers attribute in-store sales to digital campaigns.</p> <p>Analytics 360 works with all Google ad products, and can be used to create remarketing lists that are automatically available in AdWords and DoubleClick Bid Manager.</p> <p>Because many marketers are already so heavily invested in Google's ad-related services, all of the integrations Analytics 360 Suite offers could give Google an edge when trying to win over marketers who are currently using competing solutions from a variety of vendors, some of whom only provide one or two of the functions in Analytics 360 Suite.</p> <p>That makes Analytics 360 Suite a threat to many companies, including Adobe, which offers a DMP, Adobe Audience Manager, and Tableau, which offers a business intelligence data visualization solution.</p> <p>Analytics 360 Suite likely won't be cheap – reports suggest pricing will be in the six-figure range – but if Google can lure enough enterprise customers with a one-stop shop proposition, it could prove to be one of Google's most important product launches in some time.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67554 2016-03-01T15:48:00+00:00 2016-03-01T15:48:00+00:00 2016: the year of programmatic creative? Glen Calvert <p>However, far less attention has been paid to the innovative element of this automated buying and selling of digital media – the creative.</p> <p>And herein lies the seed to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67574-has-programmatic-advertising-killed-creativity-in-marketing/">merging of programmatic and creative</a>; which is the next wave of disruption and innovation to impact the digital ad industry – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/events/creative-programmatic/">programmatic creative</a>.</p> <h3>So, what is programmatic creative?</h3> <p>The software powered, automated, algorithmic approach to media buying, enabling pinpoint accuracy of people-based targeting with advanced optimisation is half the story.</p> <p>Programmatic creative is the enabling of intelligent creative, where each person is exposed to a brand’s message that adapts, changes and is personalised to them, regardless of the device or site they’re on.</p> <p>Programmatic creative enables the content of an ad to be programmatically manipulated so it’s more relevant and personal to the person it’s being served to, with a continuous feedback loop for optimisation.</p> <p>The same application of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64743-predictive-analytics-machine-learning-and-the-future-of-personalization/">machine learning algorithms</a> to decide who to target, when and on what site, will be applied to the creative messaging as well.</p> <p><strong><em>How will Programmatic Advertising impact the role of marketing professionals?</em></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k93THhdXIIw?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>Programmatic creative optimisation enables the ad elements to adapt from various data points – such as the user’s previous surfing behaviour, their location, the time of day etc. – to change the message, font or colour in an ad.</p> <p>Programmatic creative also (and more interestingly) utilises user-specific data to enhance the messages themselves for that very individual.</p> <p>For example, showing the exact product they may like, and changing the price and offer based on who they are.</p> <p>In short, programmatic creative enables the intelligent manipulation of the creative based on what you know about that cookie ID, and the automated use of live data inside the creative so it’s increasingly personalised for the individual.</p> <p>It’s important not to confuse programmatic creative with serving dynamic ads via programmatic channels or dynamic creative optimisation.</p> <p>Programmatic creative goes beyond serving dynamic ads programmatically, it has the potential to adapt messages to individuals in real time on an on-going basis for true one-on-one communication, compared to delivering dynamic creative that is served to user segments that are predefined by the marketer.</p> <p>The critical benefit of programmatic creative is that it’ll be the only way to truly 'talk' to millions of people individually, and reach that previously mythical land for advertisers of "mass personalisation."</p> <h3>The ramifications</h3> <p>Software that can automatically build ads, optimise and personalise them, will have significant ramifications on the entire advertising value chain. It means traditional owners of marketing communications need to be prepared.</p> <p><strong><em>Has Programmatic Advertising killed creativity in marketing? </em></strong></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7fEj3_hG5mc?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>It’s not going to be easy. It’s a pretty well-known fact that creatives – the people designing the ad – don’t talk with the programmatic delivery teams and, therefore, don’t know if their work was effective or not.</p> <p>Some of the blame for this lies with marketers who could do more to teach creatives how their work is impacted by programmatic media plans, and the potential benefits ad tech provides without impinging on the creative process.</p> <p>Much of the focus of start-ups and innovation with digital advertising has been focused in the infrastructure, the plumbing hidden beneath that no one sees. However, with the increasing need to thwart <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">the threat of ad blocking</a>, 2016 will see much more focus on how technology can impact what we actually see, that which is delivered to consumers.</p> <p>Relevance and usefulness, without overstepping the delicate privacy line, is the key to a viable and successful online ad model.</p> <p>The impact on our industry will be huge and creative agencies should be the first to be prepared.</p> <p><strong><em>Tickets are currently on sale for Econsultancy and Marketing Week’s <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> conference.</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>The event takes place in London on September 21st.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67590 2016-02-29T15:06:37+00:00 2016-02-29T15:06:37+00:00 Can targeted social ads help pharma overcome drug pricing controversy? Patricio Robles <p>As <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/drug-industry-launches-ad-campaign-aimed-at-lawmakers-1454885145">detailed by</a> the Wall Street Journal, as part of PhRMA's multi-million dollar spend this year, the organization will be relying heavily on social channels like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn for the digital portion of the campaign.</p> <p>The goal: counter ongoing public outrage over drug prices with the pharma industry's perspective in an effort to avoid or limit action that could harm pharma companies.</p> <p>According to the Wall Street Journal, the ads will try to put a human face on the industry:</p> <blockquote> <p>Many of the ads feature patients who have been helped by new medicines, and company scientists working on drug development. Others highlight the financial assistance companies provide to the poor and uninsured, through copay assistance and free-drug programs.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Smart targeting</h3> <p>The most interesting aspect of PhRMA's digital campaign is that it won't be attempting to win the hearts and minds of the general population.</p> <p>That is an impossible undertaking, as PhRMA board member and Celgene Corp CEO Robert Hugin told attendees at the JP Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco in January.</p> <p>Instead, PhRMA plans to use the targeting tools offered by social channels to<strong> target its digital ads specifically to influential individuals, </strong>namely politicians and analysts who impact healthcare policy.</p> <p>Those targeting tools are increasingly powerful. For example, on Facebook, advertisers can target their ads to users in specific locations, like Washington DC.</p> <p>Combined with Facebook's ability to target using demographics, interests and behaviors, and it's likely that an organization like PhRMA could have quite a bit of success reaching a relatively small group of influencers with just a handful of thoughtful filters.</p> <p>For even greater accuracy, PhRMA could even employ <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64980-put-your-email-list-to-work-facebook-custom-audiences">Custom Audiences</a> and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65505-lookalike-audiences-the-next-big-thing-in-marketing">Lookalike Audiences</a> to deliver ads to specific individuals already known to the organization, and people who are similar to them.</p> <p>Obviously, given the controversy over how drug companies price their medications, it's improbable that a highly-targeted digital campaign alone would be sufficient.</p> <p>But combined with ads in other channels and direct lobbying/outreach, PhRMA's digital ads could play an important role in helping the organization reach political and policy influencers.</p> <p>Most importantly, they show how the increasingly sophisticated targeting capabilities of large social platforms like Facebook are changing the game for marketers who need to reach small and very specific groups of users within the largest online crowds.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic read, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-study-organizing-marketing-in-the-digital-age/">Healthcare Study: Organizing Marketing in the Digital Age</a>, which was published in partnership with Ogilvy CommonHealth Worldwide.</em></p>