tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/checkout Latest Checkout content from Econsultancy 2017-01-13T11:35:44+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68588 2017-01-13T11:35:44+00:00 2017-01-13T11:35:44+00:00 Ecommerce, uncertainty and 500 working days until Brexit Philip Rooke <p>The posturing continues, but Article 50 is still expected to be invoked before the end of March. This will leave just two years before the UK has to leave the European Union. There are only around 500 working days in two years.</p> <p>So, while Theresa May and the Three Brexiteers are negotiating the UK’s exit from <a href="http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm">a market of over 600m internet users</a>, what should ecommerce companies spend their 500 days on, if they want to be thriving in 2019?</p> <p>Firstly, it’s time for some strategic thinking and action. What will the business look like in two years’ time?</p> <p>You can’t control the Brexit process, but some things are within your power, like your location, technology, profitability and logistics.</p> <h3>Location</h3> <p>So, should you stay or should you go? There’s been a lot of talk about tech companies moving to Berlin, Lisbon or another tech hotspot inside the EU, but physically moving a company is tough and kills as many companies as it saves.</p> <p>The financial cost of moving is high, but the human cost can be even higher. What happens if you move the job, but the person doing it doesn’t move? You may well lose the majority of your team and their knowledge along with it.</p> <p>Knowledge in your business is a valuable asset, don’t treat it lightly. Moving will absorb a half to three-quarters of your management time and make you less agile whilst you’re about it. It’s hard to be agile and move at the same time!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3031/brexit-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="314"></p> <p>That said, should you be looking at a physical presence in the EU? Successful expansion is all about getting the balance right between shipping somewhere and having a local knowledge and presence.</p> <p>We found that in the USA it was vital to have people who understood the market, but we do not necessarily need it in most EU countries. Strategic application of satellite teams inside the EU could balance Brexit and growth.</p> <p>This is especially relevant for ecommerce fulfilment, where being inside the EU makes delivery easier, with an open border from the Atlantic to the Baltic.</p> <h3>Technology</h3> <p>Is your technology fit-for-purpose? This is something you can control, so it would be a good idea to spend some of your 500 days reviewing and improving your technology.</p> <p>One of the mistakes we made some years back was to concentrate on new features rather than solving underlying issues with our technology. Once we addressed these issues, we were able to focus on new buying trends like mobile, local adaptability and supply chain management.</p> <p>If your ecommerce market is about to get smaller, now is a good time to make sure your technology is fully functional so you can become stronger in your smaller market, or better at cross border business.</p> <p>For Europeans, buying from a British firm was fine when the UK was part of the EU, now British ecommerce companies will need to be more adaptable to localisation and handling local issues. </p> <h3>Profitability</h3> <p>If your market is about to get smaller, then maybe this is a moment to focus on profitability, so you’re lean and ready when the exit comes? By cutting costs and improving processes you could still drive profits just in the UK.</p> <p>The British are very active online shoppers and the market is still busy; the economy grew by <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2016/10/27/uk-economy-grows-05pc-in-the-wake-of-brexit-vote-defying-recessi/">0.5% in the first quarter after the referendum</a>. The British are still buying things and they’re still going to do it online.</p> <p>So the question is, how to improve your profitability if scale is about to get harder?</p> <h3>Delivery</h3> <p>In the end, cross-border issues are mostly about delivery. Delivery companies will create services for UK companies so they can deliver into a Brexited EU. </p> <p>But they will take their time and this will be in the second half of your 500 working days. Of course, the cost of delivery will go up, so starting to optimise your shipping company spread and making sure you have the deals now will help when it comes to a post-Brexit deal.</p> <p>In the end Brexit may even be a benefit to the winners, because many UK companies take a soft approach to the rest of the EU.</p> <p>UK ecommerce firms will need to start looking at what they <em>can</em> control now, to be ready when the exit comes. And they may even end up in a better situation than those who don’t. </p> <p><em>Further reading on Brexit:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68001-how-will-brexit-impact-digital-businesses-and-marketers/"><em>How will Brexit impact digital businesses and marketers?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68108-brexit-and-the-digital-single-market-three-ways-forward/"><em>Brexit and the Digital Single Market: Three ways forward</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68003-ecommerce-in-the-uk-post-brexit-positives-negatives-opportunities/"><em>Ecommerce in the UK post-Brexit: Positives, negatives &amp; opportunities</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68683 2017-01-09T10:33:22+00:00 2017-01-09T10:33:22+00:00 What can marketers learn from Amazon Go's customer experience? Nikki Gilliland <p>Shoppers are simply required to scan smartphones as they enter, leaving Amazon’s “just walk out” technology to detect exactly what’s being taken and charge it to their Prime accounts.</p> <p>It’s one of the first ever examples of a truly seamless customer experience - a trend that’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68652-ecommerce-in-2017-what-do-the-experts-predict/" target="_blank">predicted to be big</a> in the world of ecommerce this year.</p> <p>So, what can we learn from the concept? </p> <p>Here’s a few factors for marketers to consider.</p> <h3>Getting out of the customer’s way</h3> <p>According to Amazon, the store uses a combination of “computer vision, deep learning algorithms and sensor fusion” to create a seamless experience for customers.</p> <p>The concept of walking into a store and out again without any interaction with employees or payments might sound alien – but it’s designed to make shopping as hassle-free as possible.</p> <p>It’s also the antithesis of many retail marketing strategies.</p> <p>Instead of interrupting customers as they use technology, or asking them to interact with the brand online (“like our Facebook page”), Amazon wants the technology to stay hidden (though you do need to have downloaded Amazon's app beforehand).</p> <p>From the success of companies like Uber and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68375-airbnb-how-its-customer-experience-is-revolutionising-the-travel-industry/" target="_blank">Airbnb</a>, it is obvious that customers crave this kind of hands-off approach. Likewise, they also favour utility and practicality over anything else. </p> <p>With brands that offer a value proposition based on ease and simplicity dominating their fields, Amazon Go aims to provide customers exactly that – without shouting about it.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NrmMk1Myrxc?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Avoiding over-personalisation</h3> <p>By keeping track of the customer’s every move, Amazon Go will enable the brand to deliver more data-driven marketing than ever before.</p> <p>As customers, we’re used to waiving the right to privacy online, with the knowledge that brands draw on our browsing and buying behaviour in order to deliver targeted messages.</p> <p>In fact, this is now an expectation, with consumers desiring <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68285-six-things-to-consider-when-implementing-personalisation/" target="_blank">greater personalisation</a> for an improved service. Think Spotify's curated playlists or Netflix's movie recommendations. </p> <p>For the first time ever, however, Amazon Go means consumers will waive their right to privacy while shopping in person. From what we put back on the shelf to the route we take while walking around the store – this information is all up for grabs.</p> <p>From a marketing perspective, this also means there is the temptation to over-egg personalisation to the point of being creepy. As a result, issues over consumer privacy could potentially be its downfall.</p> <p>Of course, retail stores have been attempting to track customers for a while, but past examples show that it’s not always accepted. US retailer Nordstrom was previously forced to stop using WiFi to monitor movement in physical stores due to uproar from customers. </p> <p>A few years down the line, will it be any different?</p> <p>Retailers do appear to be recognising that success lies in an intelligent and relevant use of data – not just blind targeting or technology for the sake of it.</p> <p>For Amazon Go, clever targeting executed in a non-intrusive way is the aim, but the question remains whether or not customers are ready and willing to accept it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2835/amazon_go.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>Altering brand perceptions</h3> <p>The Amazon Go experience does not simply end in-store. Data could be used to serve customers even more targeted offers and personalised recommendations on-site.</p> <p>This connection between the online and offline world is evidently another reason behind the ecommerce brand’s foray into retail. </p> <p>After all, a physical experience is often a much better way to create a human connection with customers - especially for a brand like Amazon, which doesn’t exactly offer the most emotionally engaging experience online.</p> <p>With a bricks-and-mortar store, it has the opportunity to break down customer expectations – namely that Amazon offers a single type of service – and reveal a completely new way of interacting with the brand.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Just finished my first trip to <a href="https://twitter.com/AmazonGoAmerica">@AmazonGoAmerica</a> !!! Looooved it!! Who's jealous??? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AmazonGo?src=hash">#AmazonGo</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Amazon?src=hash">#Amazon</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HappyAmazonian?src=hash">#HappyAmazonian</a> <a href="https://t.co/huRrtBUXHJ">pic.twitter.com/huRrtBUXHJ</a></p> — M (@ThusSpokeLadyM) <a href="https://twitter.com/ThusSpokeLadyM/status/808758908705587200">December 13, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>Amazon’s cashier-free store is by no means a guaranteed success.</p> <p>Currently available for Amazon employees and due to open to the public in the near future – it is an experiment that could easily be shelved. </p> <p>However, it’s certainly an exciting development for the future of retail, and gives marketers an insight into how a seamless experience could lead to greater engagement and satisfaction from consumers.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68647 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 10 smashing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup includes news about Instagram, online ads, IoT and much more. As always, be sure to check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight.</p> <p>On we go...</p> <h3>Growing recognition of emerging technologies</h3> <p>New research from Adobe has delved into how brands are using emerging technologies such as AR, VR, and AI in their Christmas marketing.</p> <p>While it seems largely limited to big brands, emerging technologies are increasingly being used by marketers to help grab the attention of consumers. </p> <p>Consumers are now cottoning on to its potential, too, with 68% agreeing that it provides brands with a competitive edge. Likewise, 32% of consumers also agree that it helps to drive customer loyalty to a brand, and 55% believe that it is useful in attracting potential customers.</p> <p>Finally, one fifth of marketers also believe VR will be the biggest trend of Christmas campaigns next year.</p> <h3>Instagram reaches 600m monthly users</h3> <p>Instagram has announced that it now has over 600m monthly active users, with 100m having joined in the past six months.</p> <p>This also means that the platform has doubled in size in just two years, increasing from 300m in 2014.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Today we’re proud to announce a community of more than 600 million. From all of us at Instagram, thank you. <a href="https://t.co/DqHwU0y2Lv">https://t.co/DqHwU0y2Lv</a> <a href="https://t.co/OUNyb08tNu">pic.twitter.com/OUNyb08tNu</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/809398925417443328">December 15, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Pre-Christmas discounts reach a new record</h3> <p>UK consumers are witnessing record discounts in the run-up to Christmas, according to analysis from Deloitte.</p> <p>Discounts are currently averaging 43.3%, a figure that’s 1.5% deeper than last year, and discounts are also set to rise to 54% by Christmas Eve.</p> <p>The high level of discounting is said to be due to a number of factors, including a successful Black Friday period, unseasonably warm weather and favourable economic conditions for consumers. </p> <p>However, insight suggests that it is also an indication of nervousness from retailers, particularly in how increasing inflation will affect consumer confidence and spending. </p> <h3>Nearly half of online ads miss target audience</h3> <p>Online advertising is missing the mark, according to new research from Nielsen.</p> <p>In a study of more than 44,000 campaigns across 17 countries, only 53% of ad impressions served in the UK were viewed by people of the intended age and gender.</p> <p>The accuracy of ads also varies between sectors, with travel marketers being the most likely to reach their desired audience, closely followed by entertainment.</p> <p>Demographics also appear to be a tricky factor, with campaigns focusing on those aged 25-44 reaching the audience just 38% of the time. </p> <p>Older consumers are said to be a little easier to reach, with success 44% of the time in campaigns targeting 18-34 year olds and 58% for 35-64 year olds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2486/Nielsen.png" alt="" width="400" height="395"></p> <h3>23% of consumers have bought a fake product online</h3> <p>New research by MarkMonitor has revealed that nearly a quarter of all online consumers have been duped by counterfeiting, with 23% unwillingly ordering a fake item.</p> <p>Surveying the percentage of people that were duped, MarkMonitor found that 71% said the experience had a negative impact on their perception of the genuine brand, with 59% being extra cautious when interacting with the company in future.</p> <p>Likewise, 12% said they wouldn’t buy from that brand again, and 29% complained to the company that owned the brand. </p> <p>Lastly, a very polite 32% took no action upon discovering they were duped.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2489/Counterfeit.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="447"></p> <h3>Eurovision is TV’s most-tweeted about event in 2016</h3> <p>Kantar Media has revealed what got us talking on social media in 2016, with data on the most-tweeted about television shows in 2016.</p> <p>The most-tweets in a minute occurred when Adele won a Brit award in February, generating 16,832 tweets in 60 seconds.</p> <p>In terms of the top broadcasts, everyone went gaga for Eurovision, with the program resulting in 1.6m tweets and 246,000 unique authors overall.</p> <p>Entertainment has been the most-tweeted about genre, accounting for almost half of tweets sent. However, current affairs saw a significant increase, accounting for almost a quarter of TV related tweets. </p> <h3>Abandonment rates drop during Black Friday sales</h3> <p>Data from SaleCycle has shown that abandonment rates dropped on Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year, with shoppers keen to follow through with their bargain hunting.</p> <p>While abandonment rates for the rest of the year averaged out at 75%, they dropped to 67% on Black Friday and 70% on Cyber Monday. </p> <p>However, there was also a 312% increase in abandonment emails sent, due to the greater volume of traffic on retailer websites.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2487/Black_Friday_stats.JPG" alt="" width="440" height="315"></p> <h3>‘Fitness buffs’ 25% more likely to buy on mobile</h3> <p>Hitwise, a division of Connexity, has examined the shopping behaviour of consumers who typically purchase or visit websites for athletic apparel, fitness trackers or workout equipment.</p> <p>It has found that this demographic is strongly dependent on mobile, with 25% of fitness buffs more likely to purchase a product advertised on their mobile.</p> <p>Likewise, this group places a deep trust in social media reviews, being 95% more likely to pay attention to the opinions of other consumers and 94% more likely to follow their favourite brands or companies on social platforms.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2493/fitness_buffs.jpg" alt="" width="459" height="348"></p> <h3>34% of consumers say extended delivery dates would prompt purchase</h3> <p>With Christmas nearing ever closer, Astound Commerce’s latest report revealed how logistics factors will play a role in purchase decisions during the holidays.</p> <p>According to survey results, 35% of consumers say extended shipping dates would cause them to make a purchase from a particular retailer this Christmas. </p> <p>The option for in-store pick-up is also a big draw, with 34% also citing this factor.</p> <p>Lastly, the study also found that technology is of growing importance for consumers, with 81% saying that technology to help locate products in-store would be desirable.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2490/Delivery.JPG" alt="" width="578" height="268"></p> <h3>A fifth of businesses to embrace the Internet of Things</h3> <p>Big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) are expected to add <a href="http://www.sas.com/en_gb/news/press-releases/2016/february/bi-data-internet-of-things-economy.html" target="_blank">£322bn to the UK economy</a> from 2015 to 2020.</p> <p>Now, research from SAS has predicted that a fifth of businesses are planning to adopt IoT to address customer demand and drive overall engagement.</p> <p>In a study of 75 large European organisations, 36% of respondents said that IoT will have a positive impact on end-user experiences if fully embraced.</p> <p>What’s more, 29% believe it would drive them to produce higher quality hardware and services, and one in 10 cited concerns about losing market share as the biggest risk of not embracing IoT.</p> <p>Despite concerns over the time required for IoT implementation, 37% of organisations are said to be responding to these challenges - and to the persistent skills shortage - by collaborating with external technology vendors.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68590 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 10 dazzling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup is unashamedly festive, with news about Christmas shopping, social media conversation, consumer trust and more.</p> <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more trusty insight.</p> <h3>85% of UK consumers to buy half of their Christmas gifts online</h3> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68587-black-friday-cyber-monday-2016-ecommerce-stats-bonanza/" target="_blank">Black Friday and Cyber Monday</a> out of the way, Tryzens has revealed that the majority of UK consumers will shop for Christmas online this year.</p> <p>A survey found that 85% of UK consumers will buy at least half their gifts online, while 56% will shop via their smartphones and tablets.</p> <p>22% of people are also reported to have started their Christmas shopping in October and 33% in November.</p> <p>Lastly, a very eager 5% started way back in January 2016.</p> <h3>Over 50% of top UK sites use at least one content recommendation engine</h3> <p>The New Yorker recently stopped using <a href="http://www.8ms.com/2014/02/20/rise-content-recommendation-engines/" target="_blank">content recommendation engines</a> – or monetization platforms known for their 'Around the Web' suggestions – due to allegations that they potentially support questionable content.</p> <p>However, SimilarTech has found that they are in widespread use both in the UK and US.</p> <p>Over 50% of top media sites in the UK use one or more them, and 75 out of 100 biggest online publications do the same.</p> <p>In fact, going against the assumption that they are going out of favour, the number of sites using content recommendation engines appears to be growing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1992/Number-of-Sites-Using-Taboola-and-Outbrain---Top-10k-sites.png" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>Christmas conversation hits social peak on 1st December</h3> <p>New insight from Carat UK suggests we’re less excited about Christmas this year, with a 5% decrease of Christmas mentions on Twitter.</p> <p>However, while figures suggest that 45% of people start to feel excited about Christmas ahead of December, it only become socially acceptable to start posting from 1st December, demonstrated by the fact that Christmas tweets increased by a whopping 65% on the same day last year.</p> <p>As a result of the collective excitement on 1st December people start planning which gifts to buy people, though 46% of shoppers are said to leave present buying to the second half of the month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1991/Social_Christmas.JPG" alt="" width="710" height="385"></p> <h3>Delivery options to determine choice of retailers</h3> <p>According to Shutl, retailers need to rely on more than reputation to ensure sales this Christmas.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,070 online shoppers, 95% said they would consider going to another retailer if a site couldn’t offer a delivery that suited their needs. Likewise, 41% said they’d definitely shop elsewhere if the last mile delivery wasn’t right for them.</p> <p>With 42% of shoppers having higher online delivery expectations than in 2015, the pressure for retailers is on.</p> <h3>Married male millennials are the most engaged consumers, apparently</h3> <p>A study by Affinion has delved into the engagement levels of consumers all over the world.</p> <p>In a Customer Engagement Score of between one and 100, millennials were found to have the highest.</p> <p>Those that were married also reported higher engagement levels, with an average score of 67 compared with 64 in singletons.</p> <p>Likewise, males are the most engaged gender, reporting a stronger bond with their banks and mobile phone providers.</p> <h3>M&amp;S named as the UK’s favourite Christmas shop</h3> <p>New research from Rakuten Marketing has revealed that Marks &amp; Spencer is officially the nation’s favourite Christmas shop, with nearly a third of Brits planning to spend the most there this December.</p> <p>In second position is Boots, and despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68484-the-top-10-most-shared-christmas-ads-of-all-time" target="_blank">strong advertising presence at this time of year,</a> John Lewis comes in third.</p> <p>The survey found that just 27% of British consumers make gift purchase decisions based on a brand’s Christmas TV ad campaign. Instead, 33% say they use retailer websites to source information, and 31% say recommendations from family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1994/M_S.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>31% of shoppers abandon baskets due to complicated payment processes</h3> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK adults, PPRO Group has discovered that online merchants are failing to offer customers their preferred payment option, resulting in 31% of consumers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">abandoning purchases at the checkout</a>.</p> <p>The survey also found that, this Christmas, 61% of consumers will be buying gifts online at home while watching TV, while 13% will shop from their smartphones while lying in bed.</p> <p>Bad news for employers - 17% also admit they will be buying their Christmas gifts online while at work.</p> <h3>UK sees higher online conversation rates than US </h3> <p>The Ecommerce Quarterly report from Monetate has revealed that UK retailers are faring better when it comes to online conversions.</p> <p>It found that the UK is converting more than the US for the second year in a row, taking into account figures from both 2015 and 2016.</p> <p>What’s more, while add-to-basket rates have dropped in the US, the UK’s has steadily increased. </p> <p>Average order value also saw month-on-month improvement in the UK throughout the last year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1993/Monetate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="142"></p> <h3>User-generated content results in greater consumer trust</h3> <p>A new report by Olapic has found that user-generated images are much more likely to generate consumer trust than those created by marketers.</p> <p>In a survey of more than 4,500 active social media users in the US and Europe, 46% of people said they would place trust in user generated content, with just 27% saying they’d trust content created by brands. Only 5% said they would trust straight-forward advertising. </p> <p>In terms of the preferred forms of user generated content, 52% cited photos as the best, ahead of 27% for video and 12% for written content.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1995/Starbucks_UGC.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="479"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68530 2016-11-16T11:20:00+00:00 2016-11-16T11:20:00+00:00 Eight features to appreciate on Hunter’s revamped ecommerce site Nikki Gilliland <p>And for more on this topic check out our range of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/ecommerce/">ecommerce training courses</a>.</p> <h3>1. Creative curated shop</h3> <p>While <a href="http://www.hunterboots.com/">the homepage</a> for Hunter is attractive, the 'Core Concept' hub is most impressive in terms of design.</p> <p>Cleverly integrating the brand's latest campaign hashtag, #rainstartsplay, it uses integrated video and GIF features to promote its new range of weatherproof clothing and footwear.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1483/Core_concept.JPG" alt="" width="746" height="524"></p> <p>Its block colour scheme and large visuals allow for a more enjoyable browsing experience than the regular product pages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1484/Explore_the_collection.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="334"></p> <p>What's more, it gives the user an overview of the entire range, instead of leaving them to search through various categories.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1485/Colour_pallette_2.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="470"></p> <h3>2. Editorial-style content</h3> <p>Alongside the Core Concept hub, Hunter nicely promotes its blog-style content in the 'Discover' section.</p> <p>In fact, its prominent positioning on the site makes it feel less like a brand blog, and more like an integrated magazine.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1486/Discover.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="396"></p> <p>While the content subtly shows off the Hunter products, it also includes a nice variety of features including topics like photography and sport.</p> <p>I particularly like its 'Everyday Pioneers' series.</p> <p>Using an inspirational approach based around the boot's technical engineering, it promotes the durability of the product instead of its visual style.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kzmdNHpkWZw?list=PLVSqeLqwLyM2JAuxqHmnwqWUZRXFD17e3&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>3. High quality product imagery</h3> <p>Moving onto the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63462-ecommerce-product-pages-where-to-place-30-elements-and-why/" target="_blank">product pages</a> - the high quality imagery definitely stand out as one of the site's best features.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1487/Images.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="808"></p> <p>With an average of six large images as well as a 360-degree video, it gives the user an excellent indication of how the product looks in real life.</p> <p>Since including more photography, specifically showing how far up the boots reach on calves, the site has seen<strong> a 10% increase in add-to-bags as well as a drop in returns.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1488/Boot_scale.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="763"></p> <h3>4. Up-front estimated delivery info</h3> <p>A small but significant feature I like on the product pages is this indication of estimated delivery.</p> <p>While many retailers leave this information to the checkout or choose to highlight the price, including the estimated date gives the customer a sense of reassurance and urgency.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1489/Hunter_estimated_delivery.JPG" alt="" width="558" height="679"></p> <p>Telling the customer that they could have the boots they're currently looking at within two days acts as a great call-to-action.</p> <h3>5. Cross-selling</h3> <p>Another newly improved feature on the product pages is the inclusion of related items.</p> <p>It might be unusual for consumers to buy more than one item at a time - Hunter is a premium-priced product after all.</p> <p>However, I think the inclusion of care products is worth highlighting here.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1490/Hunter_cross_sell.JPG" alt="" width="519" height="597"></p> <p>Again, when spending on a luxury item, customers are likely to be willing to buy extra to keep them in good condition.</p> <p>Consequently, these products could do with being promoted even more prominently. </p> <h3>6. Detailed sizing info</h3> <p>I recently wrote about how <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68477-how-six-online-retailers-are-combatting-wrong-size-returns" target="_blank">retailers are attempting to reduce the amount of wrong-size returns</a>.</p> <p>Hunter also appears to be focused on this, nicely including a comprehensive size guide on each product page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1491/Size_Guide.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="602"></p> <p>The FAQ section is pleasingly comprehensive, too - it highlights the fact that sizes differ and urges the customer to check.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1492/Hunter_FAQ.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="418"></p> <h3>7. Guest checkout</h3> <p>Hunter's previous checkout option was a little misleading, making customers think they needed to create an account in order to checkout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1493/Previous_checkout.jpg" alt="" width="556" height="296"></p> <p>Now, it has been tweaked to be clearer, removing the previous step asking if the customer has a password.</p> <p>It's still not entirely clear-cut that a guest checkout is possible - however the site has since seen <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">basket abandonment</a> reduce from 15% to 9%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1494/Email_Checkout.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="505"></p> <p>The friendly copy is also a nice touch, with the 'if you wish' sign-off reflecting a sense of flexibility.</p> <h3>8. Email reminders</h3> <p>Lastly, while it is not a feature on the ecommerce site itself, Hunter's dedication to reducing basket abandoment <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64167-basket-abandonment-emails-why-you-should-be-sending-them/" target="_blank">also extends to its email strategy</a>.</p> <p>After my visit to Hunter boots, I received an email the same evening reminding me that there was something in my basket.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1495/Hunter_email.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>With an increasing number of shoppers browsing around before they commit to buy, this is a nice little nudge to return and make the final purchase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1496/Hunter_email_2.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <h3>Final points</h3> <p>Hunter's newly improved site offers an enjoyable user experience overall. But there could still be improvements. </p> <p>Though the press release said the updated site had customer reviews, I failed to find any. Similarly, the checkout process could be made even simpler.</p> <p>However, with its bold design and great attention to detail, it is generally quite impressive.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68491 2016-11-04T12:14:00+00:00 2016-11-04T12:14:00+00:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the ever reliable <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you want more of the same.</p> <p>Now, on with the show…</p> <h3>Two weeks before Christmas is prime time for UK advertisers </h3> <p>According to AppNexus’s latest whitepaper, UK advertisers could make big savings on ad spend by focusing on the two weeks before Christmas, instead of late November.</p> <p>Unlike in the US, conversion rates tend to be low in the UK during late November, while CPMs are typically high. So, by ignoring the later run up to Christmas, advertisers could be spending over the odds.</p> <p>The report also emphasises how Boxing Day and the early January period presents a great opportunity for the UK in particular. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1172/UK_Adspend.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="608"></p> <h3>34% of UK consumers would become disloyal to a brand after just one bad experience</h3> <p>According to research from Optimizely, 80% of UK consumers have abandoned a basket during an online shopping journey.</p> <p>While this is not surprising news, it could be having a bigger impact on the long-term retention of customers, as well as the reputation of brands.</p> <p>In a recent survey, 34% of consumers said they would become disloyal to a brand after a bad experience. This suggests that retailers need to take more steps to prevent basket abandonment from occurring in future.</p> <h3>Hatchimals is the most searched-for Christmas gift in the UK so far</h3> <p>With Christmas now just two months away, Hitwise has been looking at which toys consumers are searching for this year.</p> <p>Taking the top three spots for the biggest branded search terms is Hatchimals, an interactive hatching egg, and the latest craze to hit the toy world.</p> <p>Traditional toys and games like Baby Annabell and the FIFA video game also make the top 10 searches.</p> <p>Here is the list in full:</p> <ol> <li>Hatchimals</li> <li>Hatchimals UK</li> <li>Hatchimal</li> <li>Baby Annabell</li> <li>Speak Out game</li> <li>Paw Patrol toys</li> <li>Battlefield 1</li> <li>Shopkins</li> <li>Skylanders Imaginators</li> <li>FIFA 17</li> </ol> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wFh9cKRW6Es?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>‘Window shopping’ is the biggest reason for basket abandonment</h3> <p>A new report from SaleCycle has uncovered the biggest reasons behind online shopper basket abandonment.</p> <p>Based on a customer survey data of fashion and retail companies, it found that 34% of consumers abandon a basket because they are ‘just looking’ or researching products. This explains why the travel sector has the highest abandon rates of 80.4%.</p> <p>Second to window shopping, 23% of consumers cite issues with shipping and delivery costs as the reason they most often fail to buy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1173/SaleCycle.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="468"></p> <h3>Simple navigation is the most important feature for online consumers</h3> <p>New research from Tryzens has determined the key areas that consumers see as most important in their ecommerce experience.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 people, 71% said the most imprtant feature was a clear and easy-to-navigate page.</p> <p>Clear stock availability and effective search facilities came in second and third on the list, with 62% and 61% of consumers citing these factors respectively.</p> <p>Tryzens also found that easy delivery and returns, best price assurance, and the delivery of rich multi-media content should also be priorities to drive online retail success.</p> <h3>Global ad spend predicted to slow next year </h3> <p>The latest Consensus Ad Forecast from Warc has indicated that global advertising spend will rise by 4.5% during 2016 as a whole, before the growth rate slows down to 4.2% in 2017.</p> <p>Apart from newspapers and magazines, all major media channels are predicted to record year-on-year growth in 2017, with mobile expected to see the greatest ad spend rise of 34.2%.</p> <p>In terms of the countries with the strongest ad spend, India tops the list, with a predicted 13.3% growth rate. </p> <h3>UK backs Clinton while Trump garners most online attention</h3> <p>According to Kantar Media, while most Brits are backing Clinton to be the next US President, many can’t help but be drawn into online conversations about Trump.</p> <p>From analysis of 700,000 posts made since the first debate, Trump has received 81% of the total share of voice on social platforms. Unsurprisingly, 61% of posts about him were from detractors. </p> <p>Despite this, 57% of posts about Clinton were also disparaging. This demonstrates the nation’s frustration with both candidates and the US election as a whole.</p> <h3>Over half of consumers want to ‘Buy British’ </h3> <p>Research from Rakuten Marketing has revealed that Brits are patriotic when it comes to the brands they buy from, despite many also failing to identify popular British brands.</p> <p>As well as over 50% of survey respondents saying they prefer to buy from home-grown brands, only a tenth correctly identified brands including SuperDry, Hotel Chocolat and Caffé Nero as being British. </p> <p>In terms of consumer confidence, brand heritage looks to be an important factor, with the majority of respondents citing the likes of John Lewis and Marks &amp; Spencer as businesses that will still be around in 10 years’ time.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1174/Brands.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="252"></p> <h3>Smartphones account for 78% of US gaming usage</h3> <p>A new study from PayPal has revealed that smartphones have overtaken tablets and laptops for gaming in the US, with over three-quarters now using their mobile.</p> <p>As a result, mobile is expected to account for just under half of the global games market in 2016, which is predicted to reach $77.3bn in total.</p> <p>From a study of gamers, PayPal also found that 40% play their video games for one to two hours over each session, while 34% play for two to four hours.</p> <p>This level of time commitment suggests that there might be untapped opportunity for in-gaming ads.</p> <h3>Q4 Christmas ad spend increases 32% in the last five years</h3> <p>We just can’t get away from Christmas this week.</p> <p>This time, we’re looking at the Advertising Association’s newly released figures on ad spend. </p> <p>According to the data, Q4 Christmas advertising spend has increased 31% in the last five years, with many retailers capitalising on consumer interest and increased media usage leading up to December.</p> <p>In terms of channels, it appears the biggest focus is the internet, with a predicted £2.6bn to be spent on internet advertising in Q4 2016.</p> <p>Lastly, mobile ad spend is set to increase 27% year-on-year.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68366 2016-10-12T09:46:00+01:00 2016-10-12T09:46:00+01:00 Ecommerce checkouts: What payment options do users want? Nikki Gilliland <p>But what about payment preferences?</p> <p>I’ve recently been questioning whether people do actually care if a site has a one-click buy option.</p> <p>If the process is quick, transparent and easy - does it really matter?</p> <p>According to <a href="https://www.paypal.com/uk/webapps/mpp/stories/media-resources" target="_blank">new research from PayPal</a>, the answer appears to be yes.</p> <p>Here’s a closer look at the stats and the reasons why payment technology is still in demand during checkout.</p> <h3>Changing behaviour of consumers</h3> <p>In a study of 2,000 small businesses and more than 2,000 consumers, PayPal found that there was a stark contrast between retailers’ lack of innovation and the way consumers now browse and shop.</p> <p>Despite the rising popularity of digital wallets, contactless payments and smartphones, 44% of small businesses have reportedly never reviewed their payment methods.</p> <p>As a result, many could be missing out on sales.</p> <p>In fact, mobile shopping could be the biggest factor here, with this area growing at nearly four times the rate of overall online spending in the UK.</p> <p>What’s more, despite a fifth of consumers most frequently buying online using a smartphone, just 17% of small businesses are said to have mobile-optimised websites and just 4% have a mobile app.</p> <p>Last year, we wrote about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66997-starbucks-new-click-collect-app-is-it-any-good" target="_blank">Starbucks Order and Pay</a> – just one example of a brand using dedicated <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68192-how-can-mobile-payment-actually-improve-customer-experience/" target="_blank">mobile payment</a> app to streamline customer service.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9828/Starbucks_Order_and_Pay.JPG" alt="" width="607" height="531"></p> <p>Despite PayPal’s research focusing on smaller businesses, Starbucks is still a good case for what mobile technology can enable.</p> <p>With its in-built wallet and GPS tracker, it makes ordering a coffee as easy as can be.</p> <p>Some might question whether buying a coffee was really that hard to begin with.</p> <p>And they would be right, yet it still goes to show how much value consumers today place on convenience.</p> <h3>Reasons behind <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">abandoned checkouts</a> </h3> <p>While long-winded forms and surprise delivery charges also contribute, a lack of payment options could be the reason behind many abandoned baskets.</p> <p>According to PayPal’s study, 63% of consumers admit to abandoning an online purchase in the last three months due to being unable to pay the way they wanted.</p> <p>Again, this goes back to convenience.</p> <p>Being able to store your bank details or access a real-time payment method means faster and more spontaneous purchases – without the need to locate or enter in your debit or credit card details.</p> <p>Below are two examples of the payment section on ecommerce sites.</p> <p>Oasis' inclusion of PayPal means I am just a couple of clicks away from completing a purchase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9829/Oasis_PayPal.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="422"></p> <p>While H&amp;M doesn't currently accept PayPal (though it is soon to introduce the feature), it does offer users the chance to save their card details for future purchases.</p> <p>Furthermore, it gives customers the option to pay via an invoice and the chance to defer payment for a month.</p> <p>These aren't necessarily convenient options for first-time customers, particularly on mobile where form filling is a pain, but could encourage repeat purchases from customers who have already setup an account.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9830/H_M_checkout.JPG" alt="" width="339" height="832"></p> <h3>Capitalising on new technology </h3> <p>Just as PayPal isn’t the only payment service provider, there are many other companies utilising new technology to offer consumers even more options.</p> <p>Zapp is one such company that has recently caught my eye.</p> <p>It is a mobile payment service like Apple Pay or Pingit, however, Zapp takes away the need for a digital wallet by allowing consumers to buy with their bank’s own mobile banking app.</p> <p>It will be interesting to see whether it takes off.</p> <p>While it does require banks and retailers to partake, the ability to collect greater amounts of data means that it is likely to appeal.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Lloyds, Halifax &amp; Bank of Scotland to launch Pay by Bank app mobile payments. They join Barclays, which is set to launch this Autumn.</p> — Zapp (@ZappPayments) <a href="https://twitter.com/ZappPayments/status/740830433441644544">June 9, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>For consumers, the ability to view bank details (like account balance etc.) at the point of purchase could be an added incentive.</p> <p>Then again, it could put off those who prefer <em>not</em> to see money leaving their account.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>While there are many factors that can make or break a good UX, this latest research suggests that retailers should not underestimate or ignore payment preferences.</p> <p>As technology advances, so will consumer expectations, meaning that retailers of all sizes should take heed.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67982 2016-06-22T11:47:00+01:00 2016-06-22T11:47:00+01:00 Apple Pay developments herald the era of contextual commerce Prosper Williams <p>The first wave involved migrating offline experiences to a website, while the second involved optimizing website experiences for mobile (Apps).</p> <p>And with recent announcements by Google, Facebook (Messenger) and now Apple, it is clear the third wave will be about optimizing apps for a few core pillar platforms that integrate other products and services into a tightly woven experience. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/A3r72C4PM1s?wmode=transparent" width="420" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>This is a significant and disruptive transition, not only for technology incumbents, but for traditional businesses and consumers too.</p> <p>Just like we have built policies, processes and competencies around the web and then mobile, organizations will need to do the same for platforms, but with one caveat.</p> <p>These experiences will be delivered in an environment curated and controlled by a third party, and thought will need to be given not only to how we roll out products and services in the future, but how we maintain our relationship with the end consumer, when essentially we are delivering an experience through an intermediary.</p> <p>Whilst the above is game-changing in nature (particular over the medium to long term) as someone employed in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-transformation-in-the-financial-services-sector-2016/">financial services</a>, I believe Apple’s decision to extend Apple Pay to the web browser also has the potential to be pretty significant and in quicker time, too. </p> <h3>Enhancements in experience design </h3> <p>Essentially Apple Pay on the web will give ecommerce players and all digital incumbents a new lens through which to view experience design. </p> <p>Since the first ecommerce site was launched back in 1992, the generic ecommerce interface has hardly changed. We still employ shopping carts, catalogues, panels and web pages.</p> <p>Yet all of our digital experiences outside commerce have changed.</p> <p>From Tinder, to Uber and Airbnb, customer-obsessed startups are providing fast, simple, personal and enchanting user experiences which are driving growth. </p> <p>And with the introduction of Apple Pay for the web, traditional digital incumbents can now deliver streamlined, frictionless user experiences which do the same.</p> <h3>The rise of contextual commerce </h3> <p>By shortening and in some cases eliminating the purchase stage of the conversion funnel, Apple is not just removing the disconnect in the experience customers have from cart to checkout.</p> <p>The company is unlocking opportunities for merchants to seamlessly implement “one click” payment options for the web/mobile web, image-heavy social media sites like Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and brick and mortar locations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.apple.com/uk/apple-pay/"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6342/Apple_Pay.png" alt="" width="800" height="508"></a></p> <p>This change (in parallel with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65307-five-retailers-using-nfc-and-rfid-to-enhance-shopping-but-do-they-work/">Near Field Communications technology</a> and the adoption of APIs) has the potential to provide a channel agnostic solution that completely condenses what can be an unnecessarily extended customer journey.</p> <p>Giving brands the ability to provide integrated omni-channel experiences in real-time, as consumers discover, evaluate and purchase our products. </p> <h4>Example: Integrated real-time engagements</h4> <p>Imagine being at work, and a colleague has just walked in with the Apple Watch, which you have been thinking about purchasing for some time.</p> <p>Instead of asking her specifics about the device, you tap the watch with your smartphone (both your phone and the watch have NFC-enabled capabilities), and immediately all the information related to the watch, such as price, reviews, similar products, as well as the ability for you to purchase the watch there and then and have it shipped to your home, are communicated to your mobile device. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6343/apple_pay_nfc.jpg" alt="" width="848" height="565"></p> <p>As pointed out by thought-leaders such as Noz Urbina, the introduction of Apple Pay for the web will enable scenarios like the above.</p> <p>Encouraging brands not just to think in terms of online and offline, but instead to focus on integrated real-time engagements, as we deliver user experiences, which allow customers to consider, evaluate and purchase our products simultaneously, at any point along the customer journey.</p> <p>And all without the hassles that came along with earlier forms of payment, such as scrawling a signature on a piece of paper, or spending minutes on end registering to a website. </p> <h3>Loyalty </h3> <p>Finally, beyond being just a payment platform, Apple Pay will provide significant value in regards to loyalty, as brands use it as a mechanism for extending <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65435-what-is-customer-lifetime-value-clv-and-why-do-you-need-to-measure-it/">customer lifetime value</a>.</p> <p>How many of us have online interactions with brands that bear no connection with in-flight contextual data about us or our ongoing relationships with those brands.</p> <p>Tying this data in with the actual marketing and sales platform is a golden opportunity, and this is what the introduction of Apple Pay for the web facilitates. </p> <p>Ultimately this is an experience that could/should be managed by our financial services providers, but with no legacy systems to build upon I believe Apple, Google, or maybe even Samsung will be most aptly placed to facilitate this relationship. </p> <h3>Conclusion</h3> <p>Payment platforms such as Apple Pay are ushering in a new era of digital experience design.</p> <p>The emphasis will no longer be on optimising each stage of the funnel and driving customers towards the shopping cart, but on using technology to create magical frictionless experiences, taking into account what customers are going to feel and what they would want to share. </p> <p>By simplifying and stripping the friction out of the checkout process, not only does Apple Pay increase the likelihood of conversion, the platform changes the mind-set of digital product owners.</p> <p>This will free us up to really think through what the customer is going to have to experience, in order to unlock a growth partnership with our brands. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67870 2016-05-24T11:19:35+01:00 2016-05-24T11:19:35+01:00 Why ASOS is still leading the online retailing pack Paul Rouke <p>The reality is the core user experience of ASOS has changed very little over the years and for good reason – it’s an exceptional example of delivering an intuitive, persuasive, streamlined browsing and buying experience.</p> <p>What continually surprises me is how many major retailers still haven’t built some of the core foundations that ASOS did years ago.</p> <p>In this article I share what I feel, in my experience, are things which not only make ASOS exceptional, but should also provide inspiration for other retailers.</p> <h3>Site-wide, immediate visibility of its USP</h3> <p>Long before most retailers realised the importance of communicating their unique selling points site-wide in a high visibility area, ASOS had featured three banners underneath its primary navigation.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5154/UVP_header.PNG" alt="" width="595" height="94"></p> <ul> <li>Ensure the messages stand out visually and attract attention.</li> <li>Make it clear there are distinct messages.</li> <li>Use colour/design touches to draw particular attention to the primary message you want to communicate at any one time.</li> <li>Make it clear if the message is clickable to find out more.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use icons to provide visual clues to differentiate the messages.</li> <li>Ensure you communicate your USPs across devices – don’t hide them when you simplify your mobile UI, visitors still need to be persuaded.</li> </ul> <h3>Streamlined navigation experience</h3> <p>For as long as I can remember, ASOS has had an incredibly simple primary navigation bar.</p> <p>The reality is, it offers every visitor a simple and relevant first choice to start exploring the huge product range.</p> <p>ASOS was also one of the early retailers to provide <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65357-mega-menu-design-trends-in-ecommerce-2011-vs-2014/">a mega menu</a>, but not just <em>any</em> mega menu – it has always been tailored to suit a range of buyer types and expose a wide range of the brand areas i.e. Marketplace.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5155/Screenshot__2_.png" alt="" width="594" height="405"></p> <ul> <li>Simplify the primary navigation to reduce the choices visitors have in order to start exploring the product range.</li> <li>Provide structure and clarity of the types of navigation categories visitors have to choose from.</li> <li>If you have new-in and/or sale items, provide quick access to these areas.</li> <li>Use cookies to store which core category a visitor spends most time in, and when they come back to your homepage URL, redirect them back in to that category (this is a subtly executed spot of personalisation that ASOS provides).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Repeat key USPs at the bottom or in the side of the mega menu.</li> <li>Introduce imagery to attract attention to core categories or relevant/seasonal ranges.</li> </ul> <h3>Continually communicate UVPs and USPs throughout the user journey</h3> <p>Not content with making its USP messages “pop” off the page in the header, ASOS has never been shy about repeating these message throughout the user journey.</p> <p>It’s something that another brand I admire, AO.com, also embraces, and I’ve detailed in-depth how it does this previously in my article titled: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66768-ao-com-the-best-ecommerce-experience-available-online/">AO.com: The best ecommerce experience available online?</a></p> <p>So many other retailers simply don’t do this – they feel that as they have a USP bar in their site-wide header, that is enough and they don’t want to waste precious space repeating these messages in important real estate on core shopping pages.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Explore ways of using subtle animations as visitors scroll down a page to draw attention to key messages (ASOS does this on its homepage with the flying plane).</li> <li>Consider ways to repeat a key message in a highly visible part of the product page (ASOS does this under the product price).</li> <li>Add a key message aimed at persuading visitors to purchase in the bottom of the mini-basket.</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5160/UVP_in_mini_basket.PNG" alt="" width="562" height="377"></p> <ul> <li>Promote key messages in the shopping basket, whilst ensuring you don’t take the focus away from checking out.</li> <li>Utilise different visual techniques to draw attention to messages, such as simple, common iconography (remember people typically spend 99% of their time on other websites).</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5161/UVP_in_basket.PNG" alt="" width="593" height="384"></p> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Repeat key USPs at the bottom or on the side of your checkout pages.</li> <li>In addition to promoting USPs in the site-wide header, introduce a section within the footer which communicates core brand messages.</li> </ul> <h3>Provide a simplified, persuasive, non-committal way to begin building up your desired products</h3> <p>Wishlist functionality has been one of the out-of-box features for retailers since the late 1990s, but almost every retailer in 2016 requires visitors to register/sign-in to use it.</p> <p>For over five years, ASOS has allowed visitors to start adding items to their “saved items” without any mention or request to create an account or sign-up.</p> <p>Not only does this provide a seamless browsing experience for visitors whether they are logged in or not, but ASOS has always made “Save for Later” a core action it wants visitors to take.</p> <p>Back in 2010, James Hart (the then Ecommerce Director at ASOS) told me that the site literally sees hundreds of thousands of “saves” made every day.</p> <p>Most retailers tend to see wishlists or saved items as a nice to have but very much a low priority focus area for visitors during the browsing experience.</p> <p>ASOS is the complete opposite for good reason.</p> <p>It knows the importance of the commitment and consistency principle, which has been proven to demonstrate the increased probability of a purchase when people make a smaller initial commitment to lead up to the actual purchase.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5162/Screenshot__1_.png" alt="" width="595" height="451"></p> <ul> <li>Don’t force visitors to have to register or sign-up in order to use the save/love/wishlist function – use cookies initially, then encourage visitors to sign-up so they can access their list across devices.</li> <li>Don’t hide away the wishlist/saved items area – encourage visitors to use this functionality and visit this area, giving it similar prominence to your shopping bag.</li> <li>Allow visitors to save items directly from the product listing pages – don’t just provide this on the product page.</li> <li>Within the wishlist/saved items area, allow visitors to move products to their shopping bag, or scroll through individual product images without having to go to the product page.</li> <li>Integrate the wishlist/saved items area in to the shopping basket to encourage increased average order values and average order quantities.</li> <li>Make saving for later an integral part of the mobile browsing experience.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Introduce a section at the bottom of your browsing pages which promote the items in your saved items area, in addition to the typical section showing recently viewed items.</li> </ul> <h3>A focus on simplicity throughout the core user experience</h3> <p>Starting from the primary navigation but moving in to filtering product listing pages, the redesigned product page template, through to the shopping basket and checkout forms, simplicity is the name of the game.</p> <p>Why reinvent the wheel when you can just deliver the essentials really well<em>,</em> <em>then</em> adding in layers of engagement and persuasion to differentiate and keep visitors coming back?</p> <p>ASOS has embraced the approach of utilising white space to provide clarity on the core functions that visitors are looking for, with the product page being a primary example.</p> <p>The product page also provides an excellent example of encouraging visitors to browse through the available images within the big arrows.</p> <p>It sounds simple because it <em>is</em>, and it’s this simplicity that people really want in the vast majority of cases in all my years of experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5164/product_page.PNG" alt="" width="596" height="560"></p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Focus on delivering a smooth checkout process – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64669-21-first-class-examples-of-effective-web-form-design/">form best practice</a> is your best friend, yet for many retailers, that friend is nowhere to be seen – including the often unfriendly error messages when things go wrong.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Streamline <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63444-ecommerce-best-practice-the-basket-add-what-is-it-and-how-should-it-work/">the add-to-bag experience</a> if visitors haven’t selected a size or colour, rather than displaying an error message alert box which visitors have to interact with in order to make a selection. <a href="http://www.very.co.uk">Very.co.uk</a> does this extremely well and I know that it performed significantly better when it was A/B tested against the current ASOS approach.</li> </ul> <h3>What do you think?</h3> <p>Thanks for reading and I hope it has provided ideas and opportunities which you can build in to the foundations of your ecommerce experience.</p> <p>So what are the highlights of the ASOS user experience for you? What areas do you feel it could improve upon?</p> <p>Which other retailers do what ASOS does but more intuitively or more persuasively? Please leave your thoughts in the comments.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67534 2016-02-19T12:51:23+00:00 2016-02-19T12:51:23+00:00 From checkout to conversion: How to prevent basket abandonment Georges Berzgal <p style="text-align: justify;">Whether the customer is shopping in-store or online, a poor <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics/">customer experience</a> is likely to result in an <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63466-nine-case-studies-and-infographics-on-cart-abandonment-and-email-retargeting/">abandoned basket</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">So, how can you prevent valuable online customers from straying from their shopping baskets?</p> <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><strong>1. Keep it clear and simple</strong></h3> <p style="text-align: justify;">Many customers are time poor, easily distracted, and perhaps most notably, have a wide-range of other brands vying for their attention.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A complex or lengthy checkout process could send them running to your competitor. Today’s <a href="http://www.netimperative.com/2015/12/clunky-checkouts-causing-online-retail-woes-infographic/">average checkout process is five pages long.</a></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Wiggle's checkout</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2149/wiggle_checkout.png" alt="" width="615" height="326"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Too many steps will frustrate the customer, which may result in an abandoned basket and lost revenue.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Implementing a step-indicator, which gives customers a clear view of their progress, will help manage their expectations during the entire process.</p> <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><strong>2. Minimise queuing time</strong></h3> <p style="text-align: justify;">Bricks and mortar shops try to prevent customers from waiting in a lengthy queue to make a purchase.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The same attitude must be applied online. A ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65457-be-our-guest-a-guide-to-ecommerce-guest-checkout-best-practice/">guest checkout</a>’ option reduces processing time, enabling customers to complete the purchase without being required to register or set up an account.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A third (33%) of retailers don’t offer this, which has a direct impact on the number of sales they convert.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Of course, capturing customer data via registration is important to enable engaging communications and personalised offers in the future.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">You should consider presenting both options and offer incentives for customers to complete the longer registration process.</p> <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><strong>3. Avoid last minute, unexpected surprises</strong></h3> <p style="text-align: justify;">At this critical stage in the customer journey, you should do everything to encourage the sale, and avoid presenting the customer with any unexpected costs at the last minute.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">The continued growth of promo codes, providing free shipping or money off, are <a href="http://www.retailgazette.co.uk/blog/2015/03/23041-voucher-code-use-grows-43-in-12-months">a powerful way to encourage customers to purchase.</a></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Reduce the risk of disappointment at checkout by allowing customers to apply codes early in the process. This may also create additional revenue as customers realise they can get more for their money.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em>Mulberry's single page checkout</em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2151/Mulberry_s_single_page_checkout.png" alt="" width="615" height="635"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">You also need to avoid exposing customers to sticker shock. More than a third (38%) of online retailers are guilty of this.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Hitting customers with total costs at the end of the checkout process could put them off the purchase if the price is higher than they expected.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Whilst the majority of retailers display shipping costs on the first or second page of checkout, there remain a few who still don’t reveal the rates until page five.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Display a preview of the shopping basket and associated costs, including shipping costs, as early as possible during the checkout process and provide the opportunity to adjust their preference.</p> <h3 style="text-align: justify;"><strong>4. Remind customers what they are missing</strong></h3> <p style="text-align: justify;">There are many other reasons shoppers may abandon their shopping basket, and even if you address the majority you will still face abandoned baskets.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">However, that does not mean the sale is lost. Commerce marketing automation makes it much easier to follow up with the customer to re-engage them.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">Sending <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64167-basket-abandonment-emails-why-you-should-be-sending-them/">automated abandoned basket messages</a> is an effective way to recapture the customer’s interest and remind them why they visited your site in the first place.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">In fact, a basket reminder strategy can recover <a href="http://www.essentialretail.com/essential-ecommerce/article/566a9cf6c983b-third-of-retailers-dont-offer-guest-checkout-leading-to-basket-abandonment">as much as 25% of abandoned revenue</a>. Yet, a surprisingly high number of retailers (59%) don’t do this at all.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">A small number (22%) send only one reminder, even though experience shows that a series of messages is more effective.</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">If you keep customers happy at checkout, and personalise the messages to those that abandon their baskets, you can go a long way toward becoming the retailer that customers come back to again and again.</p>