tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/commerce Latest Commerce content from Econsultancy 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68647 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 2016-12-16T11:45:20+00:00 10 smashing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup includes news about Instagram, online ads, IoT and much more. As always, be sure to check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight.</p> <p>On we go...</p> <h3>Growing recognition of emerging technologies</h3> <p>New research from Adobe has delved into how brands are using emerging technologies such as AR, VR, and AI in their Christmas marketing.</p> <p>While it seems largely limited to big brands, emerging technologies are increasingly being used by marketers to help grab the attention of consumers. </p> <p>Consumers are now cottoning on to its potential, too, with 68% agreeing that it provides brands with a competitive edge. Likewise, 32% of consumers also agree that it helps to drive customer loyalty to a brand, and 55% believe that it is useful in attracting potential customers.</p> <p>Finally, one fifth of marketers also believe VR will be the biggest trend of Christmas campaigns next year.</p> <h3>Instagram reaches 600m monthly users</h3> <p>Instagram has announced that it now has over 600m monthly active users, with 100m having joined in the past six months.</p> <p>This also means that the platform has doubled in size in just two years, increasing from 300m in 2014.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Today we’re proud to announce a community of more than 600 million. From all of us at Instagram, thank you. <a href="https://t.co/DqHwU0y2Lv">https://t.co/DqHwU0y2Lv</a> <a href="https://t.co/OUNyb08tNu">pic.twitter.com/OUNyb08tNu</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/809398925417443328">December 15, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Pre-Christmas discounts reach a new record</h3> <p>UK consumers are witnessing record discounts in the run-up to Christmas, according to analysis from Deloitte.</p> <p>Discounts are currently averaging 43.3%, a figure that’s 1.5% deeper than last year, and discounts are also set to rise to 54% by Christmas Eve.</p> <p>The high level of discounting is said to be due to a number of factors, including a successful Black Friday period, unseasonably warm weather and favourable economic conditions for consumers. </p> <p>However, insight suggests that it is also an indication of nervousness from retailers, particularly in how increasing inflation will affect consumer confidence and spending. </p> <h3>Nearly half of online ads miss target audience</h3> <p>Online advertising is missing the mark, according to new research from Nielsen.</p> <p>In a study of more than 44,000 campaigns across 17 countries, only 53% of ad impressions served in the UK were viewed by people of the intended age and gender.</p> <p>The accuracy of ads also varies between sectors, with travel marketers being the most likely to reach their desired audience, closely followed by entertainment.</p> <p>Demographics also appear to be a tricky factor, with campaigns focusing on those aged 25-44 reaching the audience just 38% of the time. </p> <p>Older consumers are said to be a little easier to reach, with success 44% of the time in campaigns targeting 18-34 year olds and 58% for 35-64 year olds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2486/Nielsen.png" alt="" width="400" height="395"></p> <h3>23% of consumers have bought a fake product online</h3> <p>New research by MarkMonitor has revealed that nearly a quarter of all online consumers have been duped by counterfeiting, with 23% unwillingly ordering a fake item.</p> <p>Surveying the percentage of people that were duped, MarkMonitor found that 71% said the experience had a negative impact on their perception of the genuine brand, with 59% being extra cautious when interacting with the company in future.</p> <p>Likewise, 12% said they wouldn’t buy from that brand again, and 29% complained to the company that owned the brand. </p> <p>Lastly, a very polite 32% took no action upon discovering they were duped.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2489/Counterfeit.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="447"></p> <h3>Eurovision is TV’s most-tweeted about event in 2016</h3> <p>Kantar Media has revealed what got us talking on social media in 2016, with data on the most-tweeted about television shows in 2016.</p> <p>The most-tweets in a minute occurred when Adele won a Brit award in February, generating 16,832 tweets in 60 seconds.</p> <p>In terms of the top broadcasts, everyone went gaga for Eurovision, with the program resulting in 1.6m tweets and 246,000 unique authors overall.</p> <p>Entertainment has been the most-tweeted about genre, accounting for almost half of tweets sent. However, current affairs saw a significant increase, accounting for almost a quarter of TV related tweets. </p> <h3>Abandonment rates drop during Black Friday sales</h3> <p>Data from SaleCycle has shown that abandonment rates dropped on Black Friday and Cyber Monday this year, with shoppers keen to follow through with their bargain hunting.</p> <p>While abandonment rates for the rest of the year averaged out at 75%, they dropped to 67% on Black Friday and 70% on Cyber Monday. </p> <p>However, there was also a 312% increase in abandonment emails sent, due to the greater volume of traffic on retailer websites.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2487/Black_Friday_stats.JPG" alt="" width="440" height="315"></p> <h3>‘Fitness buffs’ 25% more likely to buy on mobile</h3> <p>Hitwise, a division of Connexity, has examined the shopping behaviour of consumers who typically purchase or visit websites for athletic apparel, fitness trackers or workout equipment.</p> <p>It has found that this demographic is strongly dependent on mobile, with 25% of fitness buffs more likely to purchase a product advertised on their mobile.</p> <p>Likewise, this group places a deep trust in social media reviews, being 95% more likely to pay attention to the opinions of other consumers and 94% more likely to follow their favourite brands or companies on social platforms.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2493/fitness_buffs.jpg" alt="" width="459" height="348"></p> <h3>34% of consumers say extended delivery dates would prompt purchase</h3> <p>With Christmas nearing ever closer, Astound Commerce’s latest report revealed how logistics factors will play a role in purchase decisions during the holidays.</p> <p>According to survey results, 35% of consumers say extended shipping dates would cause them to make a purchase from a particular retailer this Christmas. </p> <p>The option for in-store pick-up is also a big draw, with 34% also citing this factor.</p> <p>Lastly, the study also found that technology is of growing importance for consumers, with 81% saying that technology to help locate products in-store would be desirable.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2490/Delivery.JPG" alt="" width="578" height="268"></p> <h3>A fifth of businesses to embrace the Internet of Things</h3> <p>Big data and the Internet of Things (IoT) are expected to add <a href="http://www.sas.com/en_gb/news/press-releases/2016/february/bi-data-internet-of-things-economy.html" target="_blank">£322bn to the UK economy</a> from 2015 to 2020.</p> <p>Now, research from SAS has predicted that a fifth of businesses are planning to adopt IoT to address customer demand and drive overall engagement.</p> <p>In a study of 75 large European organisations, 36% of respondents said that IoT will have a positive impact on end-user experiences if fully embraced.</p> <p>What’s more, 29% believe it would drive them to produce higher quality hardware and services, and one in 10 cited concerns about losing market share as the biggest risk of not embracing IoT.</p> <p>Despite concerns over the time required for IoT implementation, 37% of organisations are said to be responding to these challenges - and to the persistent skills shortage - by collaborating with external technology vendors.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68636 2016-12-14T14:02:00+00:00 2016-12-14T14:02:00+00:00 Pizza Express, Channel 4 and TFL: Three examples of brand chatbots Nikki Gilliland <p>For now, let’s take a look at some of the latest examples to pop up, from three very different UK brands.</p> <h3>Pizza Express</h3> <p>Following on from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/" target="_blank">Domino's</a> and Pizza Hut, Pizza Express is the latest pizza chain to join the chatbot brigade.</p> <p>It has recently launched a bot as part of its Christmas marketing campaign, allowing restaurant diners to play the 'Dough Baubles' game via Messenger.</p> <p>By asking the bot to #shakethetree, customers will receive a personalised video along with the chance to win free pizzas as well as the restaurant’s famous dough balls. </p> <p>The game has already proved to be popular, with 75,000 people reportedly using it in first two weeks.</p> <p>Despite the bot mainly being promoted to diners in restaurants by a special code to scan on phones, I was also able to get involved simply by messaging Pizza Express on Facebook.</p> <p>There's not much to say about it other than that it's a fun bit of marketing - customers are likely to enjoy the light-hearted tone (and chance of a free meal).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2390/Pizza_Express_chat_bot.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="561"></p> <p>For Pizza Express, it is a great way to interact with consumers on social media as well as gain more in-depth data. Apparently, this bot only marks the start of the restaurant using the technology, with the brand also keen to adopt payment via Messenger in future.</p> <p>Of course, it is one thing to play a game via a chatbot, but will customers be as keen to use it to pay for food? A big stumbling block might be the public's willingness to put their trust in Facebook as a payment service. </p> <p>So far, it is unclear how many users have passed on card details via the platform, but with recent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68332-should-marketers-be-more-concerned-about-facebook-s-video-metrics-faux-pas/" target="_blank">controversy over inflated metrics</a>, fake news, as well as a history of privacy issues, it might not be as many as brands might hope. </p> <p>However, regardless of whether the social commerce aspect takes off, Pizza Express’s success with #ShakeTheTree still shows that users are keen to use chatbots in different ways – <em>and</em> in different environments.</p> <p>What’s more, it is also hoping that the technology will help enhance its reputation for customer service, allowing the chain to easily respond to enquiries about opening hours and bookings. </p> <h3>Channel 4</h3> <p>A few months ago, Channel 4 created a Messenger chatbot to promote the second series of its acclaimed drama <em>Humans</em>.</p> <p>If you didn’t see the first series, the broadcaster also created an advert suggesting that robotic humans called ‘Synths’ were actually arriving in shops. This time around, its campaign is based around the notion that the Synths are malfunctioning. </p> <p>As well as an interview between the real editor-in-chief of the New Scientist and a fictional spokesperson from Persona Synthetics, other activity included placing trucks in cities across the country in pretence of being the “synthetic human collection service” for malfunctioning Synths.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9TrkZln4eyY?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>All of this marketing pointed people towards the <a href="http://www.personasynthetics.com/productrecall/" target="_blank">Persona Synthetics website</a>, where they can chat with Synths over Facebook Messenger.  </p> <p>Despite the fact that I’ve never even seen <em>Humans</em> before, I decided to check it out, resulting in a rather interesting conversation with ‘Walter’, my chosen Synth. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2420/Walter_3.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="526"></p> <p>And yes, things got weird, with Walter quickly playing up to his creepy robot persona.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2421/Walter_2.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="539"></p> <p>Some have suggested that Channel 4’s bot is a little self-indulgent, questioning whether or not the premise will be too confusing to viewers who haven’t seen the show - or a case of overkill for existing fans.</p> <p>However, I think it’s incredibly well done, and regardless of my awareness of the TV program it's definitely one of the best bots I’ve experienced.</p> <p>Most chatbots tend to have a limited amount of responses or say fairly basic things, but Walter definitely impressed with his creativity (and ability to tell a joke). That said, the conversation did seem to continue on the designated theme regardless of my responses.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2422/Walter_4.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="552"></p> <p>A great example of a chatbot being used for advertising purposes – it shows that the technology doesn’t have to be used purely for customer service.</p> <h3>TFL</h3> <p>Speaking of customer service, Twitter has recently announced the introduction of new chatbot features into its direct messaging service, designed to lure more brands into using it for this purpose.</p> <p>The features allows brands to set up automatic welcome messages whenever a user starts a conversation, as well as use quick replies to prompt the best ways to reply to a DM.</p> <p>One company to already get on board is Transport for London.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2388/TFL_bot.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>Now, travellers can instantly check the status of a tube line by clicking ‘check status now’ within a direct message. Even better, travellers can also subscribe to receive alerts, meaning that they’ll automatically be alerted whenever there is problem on the line.</p> <p>It’s a slick tool, and certainly makes sense for people who already use their phone (and Twitter) to check travel information on a daily basis. It also nicely prompts customers - when you search for a specific tube line, the 'provides support' description indicates the new feature is there.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2386/TFL_bot_4.png" alt="" width="350" height="622"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2387/TFL_bot_5.png" alt="" width="350" height="622"></p> <p>Another positive is that, even if you're talking to a specific line such as the Jubilee, you can also check the status of other lines in the same conversation.</p> <p>This will certainly be a time-saver for anyone who uses multiple tube lines within a single journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2389/TFL_bot_3.png" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <p>As well as creating a seamless customer experience, Twitter’s new bot feature is also an attempt to move conversations away from the public sphere into a private context, allowing for a greater exchange of information between brands and users.</p> <p>Likewise, with many brands now using Messenger for customer service, it is a strategic attempt from Twitter to catch up with Facebook's progress on bots.</p> <p>With many more predicted to launch in 2017, it'll certainly be interesting to see where chatbots reign supreme in 2017.</p> <p><em><strong>More chat about bots:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care" target="_blank">What are chatbots and why should marketers care?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots/" target="_blank">Five pioneering examples of how brands are using chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68458-why-chatbots-are-an-important-opportunity-for-retailers" target="_blank">Why chatbots are an important opportunity for retailers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68532-the-case-for-chatbots-being-the-new-apps-notes-from-websummit2016/" target="_blank">The case for chatbots being the new apps</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68613 2016-12-09T11:41:06+00:00 2016-12-09T11:41:06+00:00 Argos's 'Christmas Wishlist’ app: Clever Christmas marketing for kids Nikki Gilliland <p>Argos’s ‘My Christmas Wishlist’ has been around for the past couple of years, but having been recently been updated to include more gift ideas, I thought I’d give it a whirl.</p> <p>Here are my thoughts.</p> <h3>Traditional turns digital</h3> <p>It’s a bit sad to think that children don’t write Christmas lists anymore, however, that’s the basis of the Argos wishlist app.</p> <p>Designed for kids between the ages of three to seven, it allows them to pick the items they’d like from Santa whilst having fun with technology.</p> <p>Featuring the animated characters of Mo, Squidge, Gil, Fly, and Stik to help - it’s colourfully designed to engage little ones.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2185/Argos_App.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <h3>Setting it up</h3> <p>When you open the app, you are met with a fun synopsis of its various features, such as adding stickers and taking selfies.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2186/Argos_2.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2187/Argos_3.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>Having been designed for kids, it’s obviously quite easy to use, however it’s nice to have this guide to get you started.</p> <p>From here, you’re immediately prompted to edit the settings – the most important element for adults.</p> <p>This allows you to limit the amount of products kids can select, set a maximum price, as well as enter in your email address to receive the final wishlist or send it to family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2188/Argos_Settings.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2189/Argos_music_setting.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>The ability to stop kids from wanting <em>everything</em> they see is one feature that the old fashioned Argos catalogue does not have.  </p> <p>Another cool feature is the ‘grown-up calculator’, which prevents kids from tampering with the settings by asking a tricky maths question.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2190/calculator.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>Lastly, there’s the option to turn off music and sound effects, which is the biggest blessing of all.</p> <p>If you don’t, look forward to the pleasure of listening to the same neverending tune.</p> <h3>Creating the wish list</h3> <p>As I continued exploring the app, I was met with some nice touches of personalisation, such as the option to enter a name and choose an animated 'helper'.</p> <p>And now the adults have done their bit, it can be handed over to kids worry-free.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2193/Argos_5.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2195/Argos_7.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>With thousands of toys to choose from, everything is separated into brand categories such as ‘Barbie’ or ‘Lego’.</p> <p>Children can then browse the various items and add them to their wishlist.</p> <p>One thing that struck me was that there’s no real information about the toys themselves, other than a few images to swipe through.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2196/Argos_Barbie.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2197/Argos_Barbie_Pics.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>But then again, this is more of a negative for adult users, and certainly isn't something children are going to worry about.</p> <h3>Creative elements</h3> <p>Once the kids have selected the items they want from Santa, they can then choose to decorate the final wishlist.</p> <p>This is the most interactive part of the app and a feature that elevates it from a standard gift guide or brochure.</p> <p>Including stickers and a doodle function, kids can make it as personal (and messy) as they like.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2198/Argos_12.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>This feature also distracts from the ‘I want it now’ element and encourages children to get creative.</p> <p>Despite being digital, it also means the app is at least a little reminiscent of the traditional experience of writing to Santa.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>In terms of actual design or UX, the Argos wishlist isn't overly innovative. There are tonnes of apps out there that are far more slick.</p> <p>However, the difference is that there's normally a distinction between kids apps (for games or learning) and retail apps (for grown-ups).</p> <p>It's quite unusual to see a combination of the two.</p> <p>While the premise is quite basic, it is very easy to use, with plenty of fun and enjoyable interactive elements.</p> <p>Even the most simple features - such as the fart noise you hear while pressing the ‘back’ button - is likely to make kids want to use it.</p> <p>Sadly for parents, this might even continue once the gift selection part is over with.</p> <p><strong><em>Related artices:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62865-six-ingredients-of-a-great-mobile-app/" target="_blank">Six ingredients of a great mobile app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">18 excellent features of Argos’s mobile app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">Eight examples of best practice on Argos product pages</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68587 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2016 ecommerce stats bonanza Nikki Gilliland <h3>Black Friday 2016 breaks US online sales records</h3> <p>Adobe has revealed that this year’s Black Friday shopping frenzy broke online sales records in the US, with $3.34bn being spent online and a 17.7% increase on sales last year.</p> <p>It also found that retailers who invested in mobile, email and social saw 30% more sales on average than those concentrating on just one or two channels.</p> <h3>Black Friday traffic up 220% on a normal day</h3> <p>Confirming the success of this year’s event is Qubit, which has analysed more than 50m visits from 120 UK and US retailers to discover how consumers reacted.</p> <p>The results show a huge increase in both traffic and revenue.</p> <p>When comparing Black Friday to a normal Friday, it found traffic was up 220%. Similarly, traffic increased 155% on Cyber Monday when compared to a normal sales day.</p> <p>The same goes for revenue, which was up 240% and 380% on the Friday and Monday respectively.</p> <h3>Lego is the top-selling toy</h3> <p>Adobe’s results from Black Friday show that Lego is still a hot favourite this festive season, with Lego Creator Sets coming out as the top-selling toy.</p> <p>This was closely followed by Razor electric scooters, Nerf guns, DJI Phantom Drones and Barbie Dreamhouse. </p> <p>With items under $300 being 20% more likely to sell out, this gives us a good indication of the toys parents need to snap up if they still want to get them in time for Christmas.</p> <p>The five bestselling electronics from Black Friday were Apple iPads, Samsung 4k TV’s, Apple’s MacBook Air, LG Televisions and Microsoft Xbox.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1970/Lego.JPG" alt="" width="536" height="345"></p> <h3>Travel companies see greater interest than in 2015</h3> <p>Data from Sojern shows that consumers spent more on travel this year than last, specifically taking advantage of Cyber Monday.</p> <p>On the Monday, there were 32% more searches for flights from the US compared to the week before. </p> <p>Similarly, while 2015 saw an increase in bookings of 9%, this Cyber Monday resulted in a jump of 21%.</p> <p>Out of the most searched for destinations, Italy, Japan and Colombia were in the top 10, while Canada, Haiti and US Virgin Islands were among the most-booked.</p> <h3>Consumers embrace mobile shopping</h3> <p>According to PayPal, Black Friday demonstrated the enormous growth of mobile shopping and its popularity with consumers.</p> <p>On Black Friday, one third of all PayPal payments were made on mobile devices, as PayPal handled $15,507 in payments per second.</p> <p>Cyber Monday resulted in similar activity, with PayPal seeing over 50% year-on-year growth in global mobile payments.</p> <p>Based on the data, it is also expecting more than 40% year-on-year growth in total payments.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1972/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Brits more confident in shopping on mobile</h3> <p>While results show that mobile overtook desktop as the most preferred shopping channel overall, data from ChannelAdvisor suggests that Brits are more at ease than US shoppers when it comes to following through on mobile purchases.</p> <p>Throughout the five-day sales period, 75% of shopping searches in the US took place on mobile devices, however, mobile accounted for less than one in two purchases.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the percentage of UK shopping searches on mobile platforms being slightly lower, more than three in five sales conversions took place on mobile.</p> <h3>1.2m app installs on Black Friday</h3> <p>Continuing the mobile trend, it seems there was a significant increase in retailers targeting consumers via mobile apps this year.</p> <p>According to Urban Airship, retailers sent 56% more holiday notifications in 2016 than in 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1966/App_notifications.png" alt="" width="624" height="469"></p> <p>The big difference this year was retailers embracing targeting, with 88% of notifications being highly targeted to shopper’s locations, preferences and behaviours. Only 12% of messages were broadcast to everyone.</p> <p>The data also shows daily app installs averaged more than 696,000 per day in November, up 24% from the average daily rate in October. </p> <p>On Black Friday itself, there was a peak of more than 1.2m app installs.</p> <h3>Gilmore Girls generates more excitement than Black Friday on social</h3> <p>The latest data from Spredfast shows that there was a huge increase in noise around Black Friday this year, with the event racking up 2.4m mentions on social media - over 1m more than in 2015.</p> <p>However, insight suggests this could be due to more interactions on social overall, rather than direct interest in the shopping event.</p> <p>Despite Black Friday trending in many of these countries last year, the hotly anticipated return of Gilmore Girls, and the hashtag #GilmoreGirlsRevival, came out on top in France, Italy, New Zealand, Ireland and Germany.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When everyone is hyped for black friday but you've been waiting 9 yrs for this day and it's because the <a href="https://twitter.com/GilmoreGirls">@GilmoreGirls</a> revival is today!!</p> — frayadawe (@frayadawe44) <a href="https://twitter.com/frayadawe44/status/802047855955505152">November 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Rise in footfall to UK high streets</h3> <p>Springboard has analysed where UK consumers did their shopping on Black Friday, measuring both online sales and footfall in high streets and retail parks.</p> <p>It found that, while online transactions rose on Saturday by 1.9%, they had dipped by 5.5% on Sunday compared to last year. Footfall also dipped by 0.6%.</p> <p>In terms of the entire weekend, online transactions rose by just 2.3%. </p> <p>Footfall declined by 0.5%, however the 1.4% uplift in footfall to high streets apparently demonstrates the increasing importance of leisure-based trips to retail destinations.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1967/Footfall.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="176"></p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68432-black-friday-2016-how-are-uk-retailers-optimising-search-landing-pages/"><em>Black Friday 2016: How are UK retailers optimising search landing pages?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers/"><em>Seven examples of Black Friday email marketing from retailers</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68577-the-whisky-exchange-increased-prices-on-black-friday-did-it-work/"><em>The Whisky Exchange increased prices on Black Friday: Did it work?</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68568 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 Three reasons behind Dominos’ digital sales boost Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what’s behind the boost?</p> <p>Here’s a few reasons why Domino's is still taking a fairly hefty slice of the takeaway market, even in the face of competition with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68206-ubereats-vs-deliveroo-a-comparison-of-the-app-user-experience/" target="_blank">Deliveroo and UberEats</a>.</p> <h3>Embracing innovation</h3> <p>You might have seen Domino’s partaking in a number of unusual stunts this year. </p> <p>Despite occurring in other countries, many have resulted in UK media coverage due to their innovative and experimental use of new technology.</p> <p>The latest stunt involved a New Zealand couple getting their Domino’s pizza specially delivered by a drone - a result of the brand’s partnership with drone company, Flirtey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1812/Domino_s_Drone.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="471"></p> <p>Described by Domino's Group CEO and Managing Director, Don Meij, as a way to "avoid traffic congestion and safely reduce delivery time and distance" – it offered an exciting glimpse into the possibilities this type of tech could present in future. </p> <p>In a similar event in Australia, Domino’s trialled an autonomous robot designed to deliver pizzas at street-level without the need for human navigation. </p> <p>While it seemed even more gimmicky than the aforementioned drone example, it still demonstrated Domino’s intent to push the boundaries of fast-food delivery.</p> <h3>Utilising social</h3> <p>As well as large-scale technology, Domino’s has been ramping up efforts to make ordering as easy as possible through everyday social platforms.</p> <p>It created its very own <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/">social media chatbot, Dom the pizza bot</a>, allowing users to order via Facebook Messenger with a single word or emoji.</p> <p>This is not the only example of Domino’s capitalising on its large social following. </p> <p>It’s also been making use of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/" target="_blank">Facebook Live</a>, recently offering users the chance to win a year’s supply of pizza in a special art-themed online auction.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDominosPizza%2Fposts%2F10157732659530453%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="646"></iframe></p> <p>Part of its campaign for the new Italiano range, it also allowed the brand to align online and offline marketing by transforming its stores into 'Pizz-Art Galleries'. </p> <p>Both of these examples show how Domino’s is keen to capture interest and excitement in the online spaces that its audience use the most.</p> <p>While it might not have generated many actual sales through Dom, the awareness it (or should I say he?) created was certainly valuable.</p> <h3>Improving mobile </h3> <p>Mobile is big business for the takeaway food market. <a href="https://www.comscore.com/Insights/Data-Mine/How-Food-Delivery-Services-Have-Kept-Customers-Reaching-For-The-Phone" target="_blank">Comscore reported</a> that 11m Brits visited one of the top three food delivery sites via a mobile device or PC during March of this year. </p> <p>What’s more, out of Domino’s 3m monthly users, around 70% are said to be mobile-only.</p> <p>Luckily for these customers, the brand made its website fully responsive in 2015 – a move that helped to <a href="http://internetretailing.net/2016/07/amazon-dash-dominos-pizza-online-changing-takeaway-food-delivery/" target="_blank">increase mobile conversions by an impressive 62%</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1813/Dominos_mobile.JPG" alt="" width="200"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1814/Dominos_mobile_2.JPG" alt="" width="200"></p> <p>As well as this, it has introduced even more features to its popular mobile app, such as a one-touch ordering button for extra ease.</p> <p>Domino's also allows users to order via their Apple Watch or Amazon Echo device, taking an overarching ‘convenience-first’ approach rather than just a mobile one.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Despite the popularity of Deliveroo and Just Eat, Domino’s Pizza has retained its appeal to fast-food lovers.</p> <p>Combining an increasingly innovative approach to delivery with a confident social media strategy it remains in a strong position, with the online sales to prove it.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68560 2016-11-28T11:31:38+00:00 2016-11-28T11:31:38+00:00 Five compelling reasons to offer free Wi-Fi in-store Nikki Gilliland <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1743/WIFI.png" alt="" width="300" height="517"></p> <p>What can I say? I’m a consumer cliché - and a great example of why retailers should be offering Wi-Fi in-store.</p> <p>Despite many retailers introducing it quite a few years ago, a suprising number of others have failed to do so.</p> <p>Here are five reasons to explain further.</p> <h3>Immediate affinity with a brand</h3> <p>According to research, more than <a href="http://www.retailtouchpoints.com/topics/mobile/more-than-90-of-consumers-use-smartphones-while-shopping-in-stores" target="_blank">90% of consumers now use their smartphone</a> while shopping in-store.</p> <p>So, first and foremost, that is a huge percentage of people walking through the door that a retailer could potentially target. </p> <p>If a store does not have Wi-Fi, I doubt it would impact the customer’s perception too negatively. </p> <p>But on the flip side, customers are much more likely to have a positive response towards those that do.</p> <p>Regardless of what I used it for, I certainly appreciated Anthropologie allowing me to log-in whilst perusing their irresistible over-priced candles.</p> <h3>Aids the path to purchase</h3> <p>So why would a person use Wi-Fi in-store, other than to check their WhatsApp messages? </p> <p>SessionM's 2015 study found that approximately 54% of consumers use their smartphones to compare prices, while 48% and 42% use it to search for product information and read reviews respectively. </p> <p>You’ve probably heard of '<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62447-13-ways-for-retailers-to-deal-with-the-threat-of-showrooming/" target="_blank">showrooming</a>' – a phrase that refers to when a customer browses in-store before buying online. However, ‘web-rooming’ is apparently becoming even more popular, meaning to browse online before buying in-store. </p> <p>Rather cringe-worthy terms, I know. </p> <p>But the point is that Wi-Fi enables both. Even a combination of the two.</p> <p>John Lewis is one retailer that introduced Wi-Fi into stores a few years ago, with the aim of facilitating this new type of consumer behaviour.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1739/John_Lewis_Wifi.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="487"></p> <p>By making it easier to shop in-store, and ensuring transparency, the retailer is able to deliver on its famous promise of being ‘never knowingly undersold’.</p> <h3>Encourages more time in-store</h3> <p>Unsurprisingly, Wi-Fi means that customers are more likely to linger in a store for longer.</p> <p>More importantly, around 50% are likely to spend more as a result.</p> <p>With many people using Google Maps and various apps to find where they can access Wi-Fi, it also has the potential to increase foot traffic, acting as a great incentive to enter a store.</p> <p>While this has been standard practice for coffee shops and cafés for a while, only the biggest department stores and flagship shops tend to have it as standard.</p> <h3>Marketing opportunity</h3> <p>Many Wi-Fi solutions allow brands to create custom-made landing pages before a user even signs in. This is a great promotional opportunity.</p> <p>Whether it’s a current deal or or simply a nice bit of copy saying 'welcome' – it allows the retailer to engage with the customer at this first point of contact.</p> <p>Retailers can also use it to promote special or unique services that are exclusive to in-store shoppers only.</p> <p>The Foyles branch on Charing Cross Road is a great example of this. </p> <p>On opening the WiFi, users are met with a map of the store that allows them to find specific books as well as search the store to check if an item is in stock.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1740/Foyles_map.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="552"></p> <p>While my colleague Ben found both <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65096-can-bookshops-like-foyles-benefit-from-digital-in-store/" target="_blank">positives and negatives to the in-store digital experience</a> when it first launched, it is still a great example of how to increase value for consumers.</p> <h3>Captures customer data</h3> <p>Lastly, one of the most obvious reasons a retailer should offer Wi-Fi – the opportunity to retarget customers once they have left the store.</p> <p>With many people more than willing to enter an email address in exchange for the service, retailers can easily follow up with related offers or promotions depending on what a customer did or didn’t purchase.  </p> <p>Likewise, valuable customer data such as demographic information and dwell time can help retailers gain a much better understanding of exactly who is walking through the door.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68554 2016-11-23T11:00:00+00:00 2016-11-23T11:00:00+00:00 How retailers are targeting Generation Z Nikki Gilliland <p>A <a href="http://www.shoppercentric.co.uk/trends" target="_blank">new report by Shoppercentric</a> suggests that Generation Z – those between the ages of 15 to 24 – are set to shape the future of retail. </p> <p>So, move aside millennials, here’s a closer look at how this ‘communicative, confident and complex’ consumer shops - as well as a few ways retailers are targeting them.  </p> <h3>Social media scanning</h3> <p>Unlike older generations who have gradually incorporated social media into their lives, Generation Z has grown up digitally-savvy.</p> <p>The prevalance of smartphones means that social is intrinsic to the way this age group shops.</p> <p>According to the Shoppercentric's research, 50% of Generation Z use Instagram, compared with 17% of older shoppers. 41% of these Generation Z Instagrammers also regularly use the network to contact retailers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1693/Digital_DNA.JPG" alt="" width="294" height="544"></p> <p>Instead of viewing social media solely as a way to keep in touch with friends and family, many young people don’t think twice about engaging with a brand online.</p> <p>A retailer like ASOS is incredibly clever in how it capitalises on this.</p> <p>With a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62038-how-asos-uses-facebook-twitter-pinterest-and-google/" target="_blank">heavy presence on all social channels</a> – and specifically those with a teenage user-base like YouTube and Tumblr – it is highly visible to the eyes of young users.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1684/ASOS_tumblr.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="526"></p> <p>Alongside their 'always on' nature, this also taps into the way Gen Z views shopping as a fun activity as opposed to a necessity.</p> <p>With 62% of young people agreeing that online shopping is a great way to prevent boredom – ASOS knows that if they're 'always on', they're always open to buying.</p> <h3>Inspirational browsing</h3> <p>Today, one in two young consumers (53%) agree that smartphones enable them to get better information to help them buy in-store.</p> <p>While spontaneous buying is also prevalent, this type of considered and thoughtful shopping is becoming all the more common, with younger shoppers typically searching online to gain inspiration.</p> <p>Likewise, having been around to witness the 2008 recession, Gen Z are also unafraid to shop around for the best price as well as the best quality product.</p> <p>Essentially, they are said to be much more open and inquisitive – responding to retailers that are able to validate their choices and instil confidence.</p> <p>Missguided is one brand that appears to do this well.</p> <p>Again, it <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67600-missguided-launches-tinder-inspired-app-experience-review/" target="_blank">uses mobile</a> and social media to ensure it is present in the spaces that young shoppers spend their spare time, but more specifically, Missguided encourages user generated content to inspire purchases.</p> <p>Its blog regularly features other bloggers and social influencers, promoting how they shop and style Missguided.</p> <p>Combining <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65722-18-highly-effective-examples-of-social-proof-in-ecommerce/" target="_blank">social proof</a> with editorial inspiration - the brand is a great example of how to use online content to engage a target market.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1686/Missguided.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="764"></p> <h3>Shopping with a social conscience </h3> <p>One of the most striking statistics from Shoppercentric’s report is that fewer than one in five of Generation Z feel that retailers <em>don’t</em> think they are important – compared to one in three of the general population.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1694/Gen_Z.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="363"></p> <p>This shows that younger generations recognise their own value, and in turn, have higher expectations when it comes to how they are treated by brands.</p> <p>Alongside this confidence, Generation Z is increasingly empowered when it comes to social matters.</p> <p>23% strongly agree that “we can make a difference to our future” – and this is reflected in how many companies are beginning to focus on social good.</p> <p>Lush is one retailer that is typically loved by a younger generation, having <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67953-how-lush-cosmetics-uses-word-of-mouth-marketing/" target="_blank">built upon its cult status</a> in YouTube haul videos and blogger reviews.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/n3dcxsTY9eU?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>It also happens to be one of the most ethically-aware brands out there, only using fair-trade ingredients and setting up a number of charitable initiatives. </p> <p>Nicely combining this with a decent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68308-four-things-to-appreciate-about-lush-s-new-app/" target="_blank">digital presence on mobile</a>, Snapchat and Twitter - Lush ensures its young audience is well aware of its stance on important issues.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Pod goals Margaux and Liz from <a href="https://twitter.com/MC_org">@MC_org</a> have made ending the captivity of dolphins and whales their lives' work: <a href="https://t.co/eMSAuPcfu0">https://t.co/eMSAuPcfu0</a></p> — LUSH Cosmetics UK (@LushLtd) <a href="https://twitter.com/LushLtd/status/781448723989692416">September 29, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Looking for brand-led experiences</h3> <p>Generation Z are said to shop in-store an average of seven or eight times a month.</p> <p>In contrast to older generations, shopping is also seen as more of a social activity than anything else. </p> <p>Consequently, retailers are beginning to focus on the in-store experience in order to meet this demand for fun and immersive shopping.</p> <p>MAC make-up is one example of a brand to do this, designing stores that are specifically tailored to younger consumers.</p> <p>Instead of focusing on sales or transactional elements, MAC’s youth-targeted stores are designed to be spaces that teens want to hang out in.</p> <p>With dedicated hubs for make-up testing, taking selfies and generally spending time in-store – it encourages shoppers to linger and become immersed in the MAC world.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1691/MAC.JPG" alt="" width="591" height="393"></p> <p>Lastly, this also falls in line with the trend for younger shoppers displaying intense loyalty towards the brands they love. </p> <p>Whether it’s MAC make-up, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68536-how-glossier-has-used-instagram-to-create-a-cult-following/" target="_blank">Glossier</a> or Converse, brands typically loved by Generation Z - and that deliver on the aforementioned factors - tend to reach ‘cult’ status.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1692/Starbucks_Converse.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="472"></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>While Generation Z is by no means the only demographic targeted by the likes of Missguided and MAC - it is clear that they are becoming more of a priority for retailers.</p> <p>With an open-mind and a digital-first mindset, it is up to brands to deliver the kind of experiences they expect.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68470 2016-10-28T14:27:34+01:00 2016-10-28T14:27:34+01:00 10 of the finest digital marketing stats we've seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup includes news on adspend, Halloween search, global ecommerce spend and lots more good stuff.</p> <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight. </p> <h3>Time change expected to trigger boost in travel spend</h3> <p>The clocks are set to go back an hour in the UK this weekend, and as a result, online search relating to travel is expected to skyrocket.</p> <p>Data from Lastminute.com shows that searches for international flights shot up 22% overnight when the clocks went back in 2015 - clearly a result of people wanting to escape their winter woes.</p> <p>With a 43% rise in searches, New York topped the list of the most-searched for destinations, followed by Milan, Amsterdam, Barcelona and Las Vegas.</p> <h3>1 in 3 customers are disengaged due to online billing</h3> <p><a href="https://www.echo-ms.com/knowledge-centre/research-resources/the-secrets-of-better-billing" target="_blank">New research</a> from Echo Managed Services has uncovered conflicting consumer views over online billing practice.</p> <p>Despite 70% of consumers preferring to view their bills online, a quarter of people would like greater clarity over their billing.</p> <p>Moreover, from a survey of over 1,000 consumers, 77% said they had experienced poor billing practice including inaccurate bills, incorrect tariffs and hard-to-understand documents.</p> <p>In order to become more in touch with their bills, 27% said they would like to receive alerts in advance to warn them of unusually high payments.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0872/Online_Billing.JPG" alt="" width="503" height="480"></p> <h3>India predicted to become the world’s second biggest ecommerce power</h3> <p>Worldpay’s Global Payments Report has predicted that India will overtake the US as the world’s next biggest ecommerce power, coming second only to China. </p> <p>While India currently accounts for less than 1% of the world’s ecommerce spend, the report predicts the value of the market will reach $2,039bn by 2034.</p> <p>This prediction comes on the back of wages in India rising 10% this year – combined with increased internet usage and the fact that 70% of the population are under the age of 35.</p> <h3>Harley Quinn is the UK’s number one searched-for Halloween costume</h3> <p>Data from Hitwise has revealed what the nation will be dressing up as this Halloween.</p> <p>Suicide Squad's Harley Quinn is the UK’s top costume search, followed by Disney’s Moana, Matilda and Deadpool.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, searches for Donald Trump and Kim Kardashian have also been on the rise this year, coming out on top as the most searched-for celebrity costumes overall.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0873/Halloween.jpg" alt="" width="454" height="164"></p> <h3>57% of consumers expect companies to innovate</h3> <p>A new SalesForce report, the State of the Connected Customer, has revealed the extent to which customer expectations are rising alongside innovation in mobile technology.</p> <p>Now, customers expect that companies will anticipate their needs, with a personalised experience across all channels becoming standard.</p> <p>According to the report, 57% of consumers expect companies to innovate. In turn, 45% of consumers and 57% of business buyers are likely to switch brands if a company doesn’t anticipate their needs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0874/Salesforce.JPG" alt="" width="633" height="308"></p> <h3>Eight out of 10 UK consumers are willing to provide personal measurements when online shopping </h3> <p>New research by Tryzens has shown that confusion over variation in size and fit is driving the rise of the ‘serial returner’.</p> <p>As a result, 68% of consumers say that they would be willing to provide their measurements to online retailers to ensure a good fit.</p> <p>With the estimated average cost of handling returns being £15 per order, this would be a win-win for both retailers and consumers alike, reducing business costs and improving customer experience.</p> <h3>GBBO winner backed by social media fans</h3> <p>It’s been the talk of Twitter for the past 10 weeks, and the latest data from Spredfast has revealed who was this year's most popular contestant from the Great British Bake Off.</p> <p>*Spoiler alert*</p> <p>Reflecting the final results, winner Candice Brown led as favourite throughout the series, garnering nearly 12,000 fan tweets overall.</p> <p>Andrew Smyth was a close second, with Jane Beedle’s popularity failing to take off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0875/GBBO.png" alt="" width="780" height="396"></p> <h3>Mobile predicted to account for 75% of internet use in 2017</h3> <p>From analysis of 60 key markets, Zenith has predicted that mobile devices are expected to account for 75% of global internet use in 2017 - rising to 79% by 2018.</p> <p>The Mobile Advertising Forecasts report also found how quickly mobile has grown over the past four years.</p> <p>Accounting for just 40% of internet use in 2012, it rose to 68% in 2016. </p> <p>In terms of countries with the highest mobile internet use, Spain tops the list, followed by Hong Kong, China and the US.</p> <h3>45% of consumers have reportedly been a victim of cybercrime</h3> <p>According to new research from MarkMonitor, one in six people globally are said to have lost money due to cybercrime, with 20% losing in excess of £1,000.</p> <p>The most common type of fraud is false requests to reset social media account passwords, followed by emails from people attempting to solicit personal information.</p> <p>When it comes to consumer confidence, mobile banking apps and online shopping websites are rated the most trustworthy, both scoring over 50% in terms of trust.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0877/cybercrime.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="400"></p> <h3>US TV adspend fell 5.8% in September</h3> <p>According to data from Standard Media Index, overall TV adspend in the US declined 5.8% year-on-year this September, with broadcast TV seeing a particularly steep fall of 13.2%.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this is due to advertisers holding back on upfront spend in September, after committing a large proportion of the budget to the Summer Olympics. </p> <p>As a result, upfront spend decreased 25% while scatter spend was up 32% YoY.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68415 2016-10-14T11:26:53+01:00 2016-10-14T11:26:53+01:00 The low-down on Facebook Marketplace: Is it any good? Nikki Gilliland <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0303/notification.PNG" alt="" width="640" height="219"></p> <p>While people have been buying and selling on the platform for a while, the activity previously took place within separate Facebook Groups. </p> <p>Now aiming to streamline the process, as well as open up items to millions more users, Facebook is hoping its marketplace will rival the likes of Craigslist and eBay.</p> <p>So, is it any good?</p> <p>And more to the point, will anyone actually use it?</p> <p>Here’s a closer look.</p> <h3>How does it work?</h3> <p>The premise of Facebook Marketplace is pretty simple, and like the rest of the app, it is pretty easy to use.</p> <p>If your location service is enabled, on entering the marketplace you will automatically be shown what people are selling nearest to you.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0306/buy_and_sell.PNG" alt="" width="300"></p> <p>The top header is split into sell, categories, search and 'your items' - where you can view anything you have bid on or are selling.</p> <p>The amount of categories is quite vast, with everything from bikes to books on offer.</p> <p>There's even a classifieds section for housing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0307/categories.PNG" alt="" width="300"></p> <p>Since the launch of the app, there's been a lot in the press about people using the app to sell drugs and other dodgy stuff.</p> <p>While I've not come across anything too bad, I have seen a few strange items, including the recent trend of selling the new £5 note.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0308/five_pounds.PNG" alt="" width="300"></p> <p>If anything, this just shows how easy the feature is to use.</p> <p>It only takes a few minutes to set up an item to sell, so, naturally people are also using it as a solution for their own boredom.</p> <h3>How easy is it to buy and sell?</h3> <p>To find out just how simple it is, I decided to sell a rather charming backgammon set.</p> <p>I managed to post it within the space of about two minutes.</p> <p>I took a snap, included a description as well as my location, and that was that. As easy as updating your status or posting a photo.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0309/selling.PNG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0310/ted_baker_set.PNG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Nobody has responded just yet, though I can see how many people have viewed the item. </p> <p>Buying - or at least bidding on something - is just as easy.</p> <p>Clicking onto any item, you are met with the seller's location as well as a very basic profile.</p> <p>Here you can ask questions about the sale or place a bid.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0311/location.PNG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0312/profile.PNG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>At this point, it is entirely left up to the buyer and seller to negotiate the final details.</p> <p>There is no involvement from Facebook about how you pay or collect the items, meaning the process involves quite a bit of negotiation in Messenger.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0313/notifications.PNG" alt="" width="300"></p> <h3>Will people use it?</h3> <p>As well as issues relating to privacy and safety, the main issue about Facebook Marketplace is whether people will actually follow through with purchases.</p> <p>Without an in-built payment feature, users are more likely to abandon items. </p> <p>Having this option would also encourage more spontaneous buying as well as take away the negotiation aspect.</p> <p>Without it, the experience has the potential to become frustrating and less than clear-cut.</p> <p>Another feature it could definitely do with is some sort of review system.</p> <p>As it stands, users can only see what items a person is selling - there is no indication of how successful or reliable they actually are.</p> <p>On the flip side, there is also nothing to reassure sellers that a potential buyer is not leading them on.</p> <p>All in all, it feels like a bit of a gamble.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>If Facebook figures out the aforementioned issues, Facebook Marketplace has great potential to disrupt the likes of Craiglist and eBay.</p> <p>The real-time element, combined with the unbeatable convenience of living inside the app itself, means that it could easily become the first port of call for buying and selling locally.</p> <p>Until then, you know where to go if you're in the market for a £5 note.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68253 2016-09-01T11:16:08+01:00 2016-09-01T11:16:08+01:00 Four key talking points from our mobile marketing roundtable Rob Thurner <p>However I can say that the session was joined by marketers from a variety of industries, including financial services and travel.</p> <p>Each of the brands get more than 50% of their site traffic from mobile, and each has at least one native app.</p> <p>As the moderator I’ll use this blog to pick up on the main challenges the group face. We split the session into four topics: developing strategy, video content, driving value from apps and managing efficient mobile advertising campaigns.</p> <h3>Mobile strategy – are you managing expectations? </h3> <p>The group agreed that mobile strategy is all about “creating mobile experiences which consistently provide value to the user, and using analytics to learn where users are finding most value.”</p> <p>Whether managing apps, responsive sites or messaging platforms, the real challenge is deciding who owns the strategy, and making sure both marketing and development teams have a shared vision of what customers like or dislike, and how to provide the best user experience.</p> <p>This group was well versed in using analytics to track the features which users love most, but there was a surprising lack of face-to-face focus groups to get feedback direct from users.    </p> <p>Managing expectations is the big issue here – particularly when managing app projects.  </p> <p>If the chief executive expects to see all app investment deliver big returns (e.g. additional sales, repeat usage) it’s important to push back and point out that essential maintenance and responding to feedback is equally important - to keep users on board, and to get the best ratings and reviews.   </p> <h3>Video content – one size fits all or personalised video?</h3> <p>With Mary Meeker predicting that 74% of all internet traffic will be video by 2017, and with mobile watch time on YouTube already surpassing desktop, video was sure to feature in our discussion.  </p> <p>Developing ideas for branded content and coming up with ways to create trully customer-oriented content is the easy bit.</p> <p>We heard about an excellent personalised video created by Thomas Cook with staff at a Greek hotel recording a thank you video for their guests, ending with an invite to come back next year. That works wonders for repeat bookings.</p> <p>[Editor's note: Thomas Cook gave us permission to break the Chatham House Rule on this occasion]</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8684/thomas_cook.png" alt="" width="556" height="418"></p> <p>The group has got to grips with streaming services like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a> and Meerkat, so video is delivering on many fronts.  </p> <p>But one wrinkle exists – download speeds and data costs still prove a barrier to video adoption, particularly for users abroad, and those with no WiFi access.  </p> <h3>Driving value from apps </h3> <p>We started by discussing the business case for developing native apps – what can a native app deliver that can’t be delivered through the browser?  </p> <p>Developing a stellar app is just the start. What sets apart the successful apps with a long lifespan from those which hit an early retirement is an engagement plan to reward users for their time and loyalty.  </p> <p>We heard an example of newly launched app supported by a search, PPC and YouTube campaign.</p> <p>Download results were rapid and could be clearly attributed to the app marketing channels used. The success was rewarded with an eight-fold uplift in marketing spend.  </p> <p>Other apps lacked marketing support, and saw usage numbers flatline.</p> <p>In the retail space, app commerce company Poq tracks the most effective ways to boost engagement and spend in its <a href="http://poqcommerce.com/app-commerce/2016/07/poq-app-retention-report/">App Commerce Report</a>. </p> <p>For example, adding a ‘Wishlist’ button can inspire repeat purchases. Users who add items to their wishlist have a 1.8x higher conversion rates than average, and spend 3.6x longer browsing.</p> <p>Furthermore, adding share buttons can boost referrals.</p> <p>Shoppers who use social sharing are twice as likely to keep using the app, and deliver over 3x higher conversion rates than the average.</p> <h3>Managing efficient mobile advertising campaigns </h3> <p>Of the topics discussed, mobile advertising presented the widest range of views.  </p> <p>While some saw the obvious upside in carrying ads on their sites and apps, there was a strong sense that the spread of pre-roll video ads and interstitials are invasive, and not welcomed by their customers.    </p> <p>We ended by <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68026-programmatic-advertising-why-the-trend-for-moving-it-in-house/">weighing up the case for outsourcing mobile ads</a> to third-party trading desks and building in-house capabilities, which stirred <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65860-13-interesting-quotes-from-our-programmatic-marketing-panel/">recurring questions about transparency and trust</a> with agencies and trading desks. </p> <h3>Last word </h3> <p>We’d love to hear from you with recommendations for video compression tech and partners.  </p> <p>If you can share experiences of app marketing which builds loyalty and revenue, please leave your comments.</p>