tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy Latest Content marketing content from Econsultancy 2017-02-17T11:03:14+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68819 2017-02-17T11:03:14+00:00 2017-02-17T11:03:14+00:00 10 outstanding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go...</p> <h3>73% of retailers fear cybercrime will negatively impact them in 2017</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.mimecast.com/resources/white-papers/Dates/2017/2/email-security-risk-assessment" target="_blank">new research</a> from Mimecast, retailers are hyper-aware of cyber-crime, with 73% believing that an attack will negatively impact their business in the year ahead.</p> <p>65% also believe a malicious email is the most likely way they’ll be infected by ransomware, making retail the most fearful industry overall.</p> <p>This news comes on the back of Mimecast’s security risk report which – from analysis of 26m emails – found 3.5m pieces of spam and 6,681 dangerous files.</p> <h3>Lingerie more popular than chocolate this Valentine’s Day</h3> <p>Criteo has revealed the most-searched for items this Valentine’s Day. Coming in at number one was ‘earrings’, followed by ‘men’s watches’ and ‘engagement ring’.</p> <p>Interestingly, searches for lingerie increased a massive 366% in the lead up to the day itself, somewhat justifying many online retailer’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68767-how-retailers-are-targeting-mobile-shoppers-this-valentine-s-day/" target="_blank">heavy promotion</a> of the category.</p> <p>More traditional items were also in demand, with searches for perfume and diamonds up 141% and 130% respectively.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3973/valentines.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>Millennials drive traffic to luxury online retailers</h3> <p>Ahead of London Fashion Week, Hitwise has revealed how a new generation of affluent millennials are increasingly seeking out luxury brands.</p> <p>According to data, 50% of website traffic to Louis Vuitton, Burberry and Gucci is driven by this demographic. Consequently, brands are expected to continue investing in digital efforts to engage with them.</p> <p>Overall, there has been a 45% increase in website traffic to luxury fashion retailers over the past three years.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3972/Luxury_Millennials.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="328"></p> <h3>66% of marketers struggle to understand their audience</h3> <p>In the wake of Brexit and the US Presidential election, two-thirds of digital marketers are now questioning whether they truly know their audience.</p> <p>This is according to a new survey from Greenlight, which also found that, as a result, 94% now intend to better understand what their customers are looking for.</p> <p>37% plan to target subsets of their audience to ensure their brand is tapping into the conversations that suit their business. Typically, 57% rely on customer surveys and 59% use online forms to collect insight.</p> <h3>18-24 year olds dominate Snapchat usage</h3> <p>Data from Verto has revealed that, despite 18-24 year olds accounting for just 35% of Snapchat's UK users, they account for 70% of the overall time spent on the platform.</p> <p>In contrast, while 40% of Snapchat's audience is aged over 35, this age group accounts for just 5% of usage time.</p> <p>Other data shows that the average user spends 4hrs 22mins on Snapchat a month - a figure down from 5hrs 30mins just six months ago. </p> <p>However, this is still much lower than Facebook, which has an average user time of 12hrs 43mins per month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3971/Verto.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="420"></p> <h3>Proflowers.com leads in Valentine’s Day paid search ad spend</h3> <p>Adgooroo has revealed that ahead of the holiday, Proflowers.com generated a 7.3% share of total clicks on Valentine’s Day-related keywords.</p> <p>This means the site beat out the likes of Hallmark, whose e-card website Hallmarkecards.com generated a 7.1% click share.</p> <p>There was heavy competition in the greetings cards category, too, with Tinyprints.com generating a 3.4% click share, edging out American Greetings and Blue Mountain, which both saw a share of 2.5%.</p> <h3>26% of marketers feel unprepared for GDPR</h3> <p>New research from the <a href="https://dma.org.uk/article/the-gdpr-and-you-chapter-two" target="_blank">DMA</a> suggests that one in four businesses are still unprepared for the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), with just over half reporting that they feel prepared, and 5% believing it’s not their responsibility to do anything about it.</p> <p>It’s not all bad news, however, as awareness of the GDPR <em>has</em> risen from 53% to 66% since June, while marketers’ personal feelings of readiness increased from 49% to 71%. </p> <p>Despite this, there is still a clear need for urgency, with many marketers not believing their businesses will be compliant before the new rules come into place.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3969/DMA.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="295"></p> <h3>Almost 6m UK households have no savings </h3> <p>A five-year study from Experian has found that people in their 20s and 30s are far less well off than the previous generation, with nearly 1m households having received a loan or financial gift from other family members. </p> <p>Experian found that almost 6m households in Britain have no savings, with 423,000 Britons relying on unauthorised overdrafts or payday loans to make ends meet.</p> <p>Lastly, the report also highlights how over 35m people in Britain may be paying more than they should for inappropriate financial products and utility plans, with most <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68789-how-smart-switching-energy-apps-are-tapping-into-customer-need/" target="_blank">failing to switch</a> to a better deal.</p> <h3>66% of marketers no longer use mobile apps in campaigns</h3> <p>The State of Digital Commerce report by Episerver has revealed that two-thirds of marketing professionals are no longer using mobile apps in their marketing campaigns, choosing a responsive mobile presence instead.</p> <p>The report also states that 32% of top retailers do not provide a mobile application across either iPhone or Android devices, and eight out of 10 top UK retailers have adopted a responsive ecommerce site.</p> <p>The shift is said to be due to the surge in mobile search as well as the introduction of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68490-google-s-accelerated-mobile-pages-12-pros-and-cons/">Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3970/Episerver.JPG" alt="" width="482" height="206"></p> <h3>Changing attitudes to brand loyalty</h3> <p>The new Accenture Strategy report has highlighted how consumers’ allegiances towards brands are frequently changing. </p> <p>In a survey of the attitudes of 25,426 consumers, Accenture found that 54% of US consumers have switched a provider in the past year, while 18% report that their own expectations about brand loyalty have changed.</p> <p>Alongside personalisation, greater loyalty could be driven by an experiential approach – with 44% saying they are loyal to a brand that encourages the design or co-creation of products or services.</p> <p>Lastly, 42% of US respondents are also loyal to brands that their family and friends do business with, while 37% are loyal to brands that actively support shared causes, such as charities or public campaigns.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68817 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 How brands are targeting business travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>According to a <a href="http://hotelmarketing.com/index.php/content/article/booking.com_survey_reveals_top_causes_of_business_travel_stress" target="_blank">survey from Booking.com</a>, 93% of business travellers feel stressed at some point during their journey - unsurprising given the amount of logistics involved. From planning to managing expenses, and even without taking into account the actual work that needs to done, there’s a whole heap of hassle that goes along with corporate travel.</p> <p>For brands, this traveller presents a unique opportunity. </p> <p>Not only is there less need to dazzle and delight with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">inspirational marketing</a>, but thanks to the deep pockets of corporate companies, the budget can often be sizeable. Meanwhile, with a positive experience likely to result in repeat trips, business travel could prove to be a lucrative market.</p> <p>Here’s how a few brands are setting their sights on it.</p> <h3>Airbnb</h3> <p>The ‘Airbnb for business’ program launched in 2015, signalling the brand’s intent to capture interest from corporate travellers, all the while proving how popular alternative accommodation has become.</p> <p>The service allows companies to integrate their business travel itineraries, giving them a full run-down of where employees are staying and how much they’re spending. More recently, Airbnb has introduced a feature that allows employees to book on behalf of colleagues, making the service even more streamlined.</p> <p>Since it launched, the program has enjoyed a period of growth, however <a href="https://skift.com/2016/11/04/small-companies-have-embraced-airbnb-for-business-travel/" target="_blank">recent data</a> suggests that this could be slowing – mainly due to the companies choosing Airbnb spending as little as possible on short trips. Similarly, Airbnb for business is only seeing real success in cities where the hotel prices are notoriously high.</p> <p>Airbnb is naturally trying to combat this by promoting longer stays and group trips, even offering £40 in travel credit, in order to encourage higher spend.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3951/Airbnb.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="320"></p> <h3>Booking.com</h3> <p>With a reported one in five customers using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/" target="_blank">Booking.com</a> for business travel, it’s no surprise the brand decided to launch its own business travel platform.</p> <p>Designed to make the research and planning stage as easy as possible, it places a big focus on peer-to-peer reviews, sorting through the data to find accommodation that is ‘business traveller tested and approved’.  </p> <p>This customer-centric approach is continued across the board, and reflected in the online UX.</p> <p>After completing a simple registration, users can filter the search by ‘business interest’ like fitness centre or free cancellation. Arguably, the platform doesn't offer anything that much different to the main Booking.com platform, however the ability for company managers or administrators to coordinate plans for others is a key differentiator.</p> <p>Since its launch, there have been suggestions that the brand will expand its business offering into flights - though there's been no sign of this so far.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3952/Booking.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>STA</h3> <p>With millennials forecast to make up half of the workforce by 2020, the stereotype of the middle-aged business traveller no longer applies.</p> <p>STA is tapping into this notion, launching a business travel brand to target young people with a desire to combine both business and pleasure.</p> <p>Alongside young people starting their own business, students travelling for internships or first jobs, it also targets people who want to tag on a holiday at the end of a work trip.</p> <p>With <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2016/05/05/millennials-are-prioritizing-experiences-over-stuff.html" target="_blank">78% of millennials</a> choosing worthwhile experiences over possessions, it’s no surprise that this demand exists. It also bodes well for STA, with the move helping the brand to stay relevant to young people as they move into the workplace.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Need a <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/visa?src=hash">#visa</a>?. We can help you find out if you need one! Speak to our experts to find out more businesstravel@statravel.co.uk <a href="https://t.co/sbH3xH0RzE">pic.twitter.com/sbH3xH0RzE</a></p> — STA Travel Business (@STABusiness) <a href="https://twitter.com/STABusiness/status/825335372343308289">January 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marriot</h3> <p>STA isn’t the only travel brand to target business travellers with the promise of an experience.</p> <p>Marriot’s Renaissance Hotels brand recently launched a new campaign to do just that. Called ‘The Navigator’s Table’, the video series features TV chef Andrew Zimmern from “Bizarre Foods”, and involves chefs and entrepreneurs offering insight and opinions on regional dishes. </p> <p>Essentially, it is designed to appeal to the modern business traveller – someone who is curious, and who wants to get as much out of a business trip as possible.</p> <p>The frequency with which business travellers travel is largely the reason behind this marketing push. For a large hotel chain like Marriot, a single ‘authentic experience’ could result in multiple and repeat bookings in future – reason enough to pay them more attention.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7UUT15kQG1A?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68809 2017-02-15T11:44:00+00:00 2017-02-15T11:44:00+00:00 The Outnet is using satirical humour for ‘Pretty Influential’ Fashion Week series Nikki Gilliland <p>The online video series is a satirical look at the world of influencer marketing, depicting what life is like <em>without</em> an Instagram filter.</p> <p>Here is a bit more info on the series and a few reasons why I think it works.</p> <h3>The Foster sisters</h3> <p>Pretty Influential is essentially a mock documentary, portraying a pair of aspiring influencers as they attempt to sneak behind the scenes at fashion week.</p> <p>Before we go on, it’s important to point out that the Foster sisters are <em>not</em> social influencers in real life.</p> <p>Despite stemming from a Hollywood background (and looking rather model-esque), they are in fact comedy writers and actors, best known for the VH1 show, Barely Famous, which pokes fun at the world of reality television.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D_Iod9kOg1o?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>A refreshing approach</h3> <p>So why has the Outnet – a fairly high-end ecommerce fashion site – chosen to satirise the world of influencer marketing instead of harnessing its power?</p> <p>Perhaps the decision stems from last year’s controversial Vogue article, which saw a number of editors harshly criticise bloggers for supposedly “preening for the cameras in borrowed clothes”. </p> <p>The feature was a scathing take-down of the influx of influencers within the fashion industry, but instead of being met with agreement, the criticism was labelled as petty and unnecessary by many other media companies as well as influencers themselves.</p> <p>Regardless of the Outnet’s opinion on the topic, Pretty Influential is a rather clever nod to the fact that – as a result of the controversy – influencer marketing is now ripe for parody. </p> <p>Taking the opportunity to do just that, the Outnet manages to come across as both refreshing and self-aware. Likewise, it also makes fun of both sides of the coin, laughing at influencer clichés as well as the highfalutin nature of fashion designers.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/99N-ZXXJ6qw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Short-form content</h3> <p>As well as the humorous concept, Pretty Influential is also another example of a brand using short-form video content to engage consumers.</p> <p>Following a six-video series, with a new video being released every day, it aims to give the audience a reason to invest, and in turn, to continuously interact with the company.</p> <p>We’ve already seen brands using storytelling in this way, with one of the most high-profile being Nike’s YouTube series, Margo vs Lily. While the series itself was not particularly well-received, it still shows that video content is becoming the medium of choice for many big brands.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">2 sisters. 1 bet. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/nikewomen?src=hash">#nikewomen</a> presents Margot vs Lily, an original show series. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/betterforit?src=hash">#betterforit</a> <a href="https://t.co/Ev6gnP6NHf">https://t.co/Ev6gnP6NHf</a><a href="https://t.co/Qn1RU03Yw3">https://t.co/Qn1RU03Yw3</a></p> — NikeWomen (@nikewomen) <a href="https://twitter.com/nikewomen/status/691662259693563904">January 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Ecommerce tie-in</h3> <p>As well as entertaining its audience, Pretty Influential is also designed to point consumers in the direction of products on the Outnet website. </p> <p>Beside each video, there is the call-to-action of ‘Like what you see? Shop their look here’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3903/Foster_Sisters.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="576"></p> <p>It’s a simple touch, but means that viewers might be inclined to check out the fashion after they watch the video, as well as offering extra value and the incentive to check back for another daily episode.</p> <p>It’s also good to remember that, although the site sells luxury clothes, it is fundamentally a discount designer e-tailer.</p> <p>Consequently, the series cleverly aligns with the desires of its demographic, with consumers likely to respond to the self-deprecating and humorous take on high fashion.</p> <h3>Could it alienate influencers?</h3> <p>Lastly, while Pretty Influential is likely to be met with appreciation from consumers, there is the question of whether influencers will feel the same way.</p> <p>For the Outnet, this might not be too much of an issue. The company has a reputation for capturing the attention of everyday consumers through fun and quirky content rather than the aspirational.  </p> <p>Its ‘Shoe Hunter’ campaign, which saw Sergio the dachshund provide a dog’s eye view of London Fashion Week, is a prime example.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Just a tiny bit in love with <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sergioshoehunter?src=hash">#sergioshoehunter</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/THEOUTNET">@THEOUTNET</a> - off to buy cam for my dachshund <a href="http://t.co/JblyyQ69qQ">pic.twitter.com/JblyyQ69qQ</a></p> — Katie Iggulden Exon (@katievi) <a href="https://twitter.com/katievi/status/641251677379670016">September 8, 2015</a> </blockquote> <p>Also, with the series using gentle ribbing rather than scathing humour, here’s hoping most influencers have to ability to laugh at themselves.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">Four key trends within the world of influencer marketing</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67443-eight-influencer-marketing-stats-for-fashion-beauty-brands/"><em>Eight influencer marketing stats for fashion &amp; beauty brands</em></a></li> </ul> <p><em>For even more on this topic, you can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">Rise of the Influencers</a> report.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68802 2017-02-14T10:41:36+00:00 2017-02-14T10:41:36+00:00 Five content marketing examples from dating sites and apps Nikki Gilliland <p>As online dating services become increasingly popular – with <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2016/02/11/15-percent-of-american-adults-have-used-online-dating-sites-or-mobile-dating-apps/" target="_blank">15% of all American adults</a> reportedly having used one – these sites are cleverly tapping into customer demand.</p> <p>While some larger dating sites rely on television or PPC advertising, good old fashioned content marketing remains a great way to attract a clientele.</p> <p>Here’s a look at just a few examples. And to learn more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy">Content Marketing Training Courses</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-future-of-content-marketing/">The Future of Content Marketing Report</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/implementing-content-strategy-digital-best-practice/">Implementing Content Strategy: Digital Best Practice</a></li> </ul> <h3>OKCupid</h3> <p>OKCupid was one of the first online dating websites to use content to drive its overall strategy.</p> <p>The original incarnation – OKTrends – was run by the company's co-founder, Christian Rudder, who used his mathematical background to set the tone of the blog. </p> <p>Essentially, he turned statistics and user data into fascinating articles, generating huge interest from online readers in general - not just those using its main dating service.</p> <p>Since being acquired by Match.com the blog has changed, however data and insight from the dating community remains at the heart of its content.</p> <p>It also regularly posts larger features, designed to poke fun at the perils of modern dating. One recent example is the amusing ‘Dictionary for the Modern Dater’, found on its Medium blog. Managing to steer clear of the clichés of online dating, it uses relatable humour to engage and entertain readers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3867/OKCupid.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="422"></p> <h3>Match.com</h3> <p>Match.com is another site that uses data to inform its content, largely for its annual ‘Singles in America’ study, which surveys over 5,000 US singletons to create informative and in-depth infographics and blog posts.</p> <p>Last year, the ‘Clooney Effect’ was one of the most successful pieces of content to arise, subsequently being picked up by a number of high profile publishers such as Glamour and Business Insider. </p> <p>Stemming from the statistic that 87% of men would date a woman who made ‘considerably more money’ than them (like Clooney and his highly successful wife, Amal Alamuddin) – it built on themes of positivity and empowerment to generate interest. With a reported 38% increase in traffic around the period the study was published, the results speak for themselves.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3868/Match_survey.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="428"></p> <h3>eHarmony</h3> <p>Unlike the aforementioned examples, eHarmony relies on emotive storytelling rather than statistics.</p> <p>With a helpful and thoughtful tone of voice, it aims to stem the fears and general stigmas that surround online dating, using advice-based articles to drive registration on the main site. </p> <p>While some have labelled its style of content as patronising, one area where eHarmony undeniably succeeds is in user-generated content. The 'success stories' page of its website is littered with positive reinforcement, cleverly breaking down content into various categories to target a wide range of demographics and backgrounds.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3870/eharmony.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="720"></p> <h3>Tinder</h3> <p>In just two short years, Tinder acquired more than 50m users – a feat that can perhaps be put down to its shrewd use of third-party integration. </p> <p>By enabling users to sign up with their Facebook login, it cleverly cuts through the frustrations of traditional dating websites, encouraging a younger audience to download and use the app.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, Tinder is also one of the best examples of how to use social media to engage users. Not only does it integrate social on its app (now allowing users to cherry-pick the Instagram photos that they would like to show on their profile) it also populates its own social media with interesting, humorous and decidedly tongue-in-cheek content.</p> <p>For example, its Facebook page continuously drives interest. Last year, a Valentine’s Day post generated over 58,000 likes, 9,600 shares, and 2,900 comments – coming out on top in terms of engagement for online dating sites.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ftinder%2Fphotos%2Fa.378789085524216.87768.353659601370498%2F914594031943716%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="589"></iframe></p> <h3>Hinge</h3> <p>Dating app, Hinge, has turned its back on ‘swipe culture’, recently introducing a subscription-based model to help users cultivate meaningful connections. Features of the app, unlike Tinder, are also designed to resonate on a deeper level. For example, users are required to ‘heart’ specific parts of another’s profile such as the book they’re currently reading or their go-to karaoke song.</p> <p>Hinge also builds on its positioning as a ‘relationship app’ rather than a dating app to inform its wider content marketing. </p> <p>A recent email campaign, launched in time for Thanksgiving, asked users what they were thankful for.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3874/Hinge.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="787"></p> <p>Using a seasonal theme alongside a message of gratitude – it was a clever example of how to use content to reinforce brand values and reignite user interest. </p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64270-five-dating-tips-you-can-apply-to-your-email-marketing/" target="_blank">Five dating tips you can apply to your email marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68068-four-ways-brands-are-marketing-through-dating-services/" target="_blank">Four ways brands are marketing through dating services</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67563-how-tinder-has-changed-ecommerce/" target="_blank">How Tinder has changed ecommerce</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68790 2017-02-13T15:08:00+00:00 2017-02-13T15:08:00+00:00 Pros and cons of creating multiple brand Facebook pages Nikki Gilliland <p>Of course, it’s not always appropriate or realistic to do this, with some arguing that it can dilute quality and even damage brand perception.</p> <p>So what’s the answer? Here are a few pros and cons to help weigh up the argument.</p> <h3>Pros</h3> <h4>Greater impact</h4> <p>While Facebook pages used to be a destination – the place users went to be able to consume content – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66378-facebook-s-algorithm-update-what-it-means-for-marketers/" target="_blank">changes to the algorithm</a> means that these pages now act as publishers, with users being fed content directly in their News Feed. </p> <p>Meanwhile, as the algorithm rewards the most engaging content with greater reach, brands and publishers are taking advantage of this by separating out into multiple verticals or incredibly niche topics.</p> <p>One of the most successful examples of this is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68426-a-brand-that-loves-you-how-buzzfeed-uses-empathy-to-connect-with-its-audience/" target="_blank">Buzzfeed</a>, which has an impressive 90 different pages in total. With the likes of Buzzfeed BFF and Buzzfeed Weddings, it can hone in on the audience’s super specific interests, essentially hoping that the more focused a page is, the better its content will perform.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FBuzzFeedWeddings%2Fposts%2F585014391694477&amp;width=500" width="500" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With around 79 pages, Huffington Post has also demonstrated this approach – and proved it can work. For instance, a video about feminism generated 1.5m views when it was posted on the main HuffPost Facebook page, however, when it was posted on the HuffPost Women, it received 3.7m. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FHuffPostWomen%2Fvideos%2F929651497102904%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>This goes to show that putting relevant content in front of a small but highly engaged audience can generate more success than merely posting content to a large pool of people roughly interested in a similar theme.</p> <h4>Promotes localisation</h4> <p>Another reason for creating multiple Facebook pages is to promote localised content or products, where the strategy is aligned to growing a community based on geography rather than interest.</p> <p>A good example is Lululemon, the women’s sportswear brand, which has multiple Facebook pages for its various store locations around the world. Whether it's Lululemon Edinburgh or Lululemon Toronto, each page is dedicated to promoting specific in-store events (which in this case is often yoga classes) and store-specific offers. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FlululemonLondon%2Fposts%2F1319697514719040&amp;width=500" width="500" height="546"></iframe></p> <p>By doing this, the brand is able foster a real sense of community, as well as aid customer service, as most pages are run by the people who also work in the store location.</p> <h3>Cons</h3> <h4>A lack of resources</h4> <p>So, while it can clearly be beneficial, having multiple Facebook pages is not always so easy or effective. </p> <p>One of the biggest drawbacks, often for smaller brands or publishers, is simply a matter of resources. Requiring constant monitoring and attention, it is naturally easier and less time-consuming to focus on just the one page. </p> <p>Revenue can also be a big issue. Again, for bigger brands like Buzzfeed, it might be feasible to duplicate advertising across multiple pages – yet this could be a very costly and unrealistic notion for others.</p> <h4>Duplicated content</h4> <p>One of the biggest cons is keeping a steady stream of original, relevant and engaging content across the board. It is quite likely that users will like multiple pages from the same brand, which in turn means that duplicated or similar content will be less effective, not to mention off-putting for users.</p> <p>Finally, there is the suggestion that creating multiple pages for segmentation purposes is not only more hassle than its worth, but unnecessary due to the Facebook Targeting feature. This allows brands to post tailored content that can only be seen by a specific audience, meaning that you can already deliver the most relevant content to the right people.</p> <p>All in all, perhaps it depends how much effort a brand is willing to put into its Facebook presence, alongside how ready and willing the audience is to embrace it.</p> <p><em><strong>More on Facebook:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67691-content-creators-it-s-time-to-abandon-yourself-to-facebook/" target="_blank">Content creators, it's time to abandon yourself to Facebook</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67603-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-facebook-s-livestreaming-push/" target="_blank">What marketers need to know about Facebook's livestreaming push</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68415-the-low-down-on-facebook-marketplace-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank">The low-down on Facebook Marketplace: Is it any good?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68785 2017-02-08T14:44:21+00:00 2017-02-08T14:44:21+00:00 How Adidas Originals uses social media to drive sales Nikki Gilliland <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What a trend <a href="https://t.co/Vp78zN8nfL">pic.twitter.com/Vp78zN8nfL</a></p> — meredith faust (@mere_faust) <a href="https://twitter.com/mere_faust/status/822921744512065538">January 21, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The brand has come a long way since the term ‘Adidad’ was coined. Maybe this was something that only occurred in my school, but it was used to denote somebody who typically wore unfashionable sportswear or offensively white trainers. Kids can be so cruel.</p> <p>But what’s made the brand cool again? </p> <p>Interestingly, Adidas Originals now has more followers on Twitter than the main Adidas account, cementing its position as a truly cult lifestyle brand. On the flip side, this also proves that it is definitely doing something right on social.</p> <p>Here are a few ways it has made its mark.</p> <h3>Creating hype</h3> <p>Social media is a natural extension of Adidas’s wider approach to marketing, especially when it comes to creating hype around its high-profile collaborations.</p> <p>Since the brand famously snatched Kanye West from Nike in 2014, it has carefully crafted a series of product launches, cleverly building on the rapper's wider (and fanatical) fan base.</p> <p>Tweeting and posting on Instagram in the run-up to shoe releases, the brand creates massive excitement and interest from followers.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The V2’s Primeknit upper features SPLY-350 in mirrored text on both feet, engineered as part of the knit. Coming February 11th. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YEEZYBOOST?src=hash">#YEEZYBOOST</a> <a href="https://t.co/Bb5H09LLwO">pic.twitter.com/Bb5H09LLwO</a></p> — adidas Originals (@adidasoriginals) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasoriginals/status/828630759548317696">February 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Meanwhile, from Pharrell Williams to Stella McCartney, Adidas Originals is also shrewd in terms of how it collaborates with high profile personalities. Unlike other brands, who might merely use celebrities to front campaigns, Adidas put a huge focus on the personal and direct involvement of influencers in the actual designing process.</p> <p>In doing so, it ensures its collaborations feel entirely authentic rather than purely sales-driven.</p> <p>Again, this is reflected in how it posts on social, continuously reinforcing the core topic of originality and creative and artistic expression.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Strikingly similar. Completely unique. Nothing is original except your true self. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/SUPERSTAR?src=hash">#SUPERSTAR</a> <a href="https://t.co/5TyKfEbN4H">pic.twitter.com/5TyKfEbN4H</a></p> — adidas Originals (@adidasoriginals) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasoriginals/status/827435119375941632">February 3, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Giving control to consumers</h3> <p>Adidas’s resurgence truly began with the relaunch of its iconic Stan Smith shoe. Not only did this draw on feelings of nostalgia, but by emphasising its heritage, it also helped to reinforce the brand’s influence on streetwear and subcultures such as Brit pop and hip-hop.</p> <p>The social media campaign surrounding its release cleverly made consumers feel part of the story.</p> <p>The ‘Stan Yourself’ initiative involved asking users to tweet a photo of themselves for the chance to win a personalised pair of shoes. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Stan yourself! Send us a selfie using <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/stansmith?src=hash">#stansmith</a> - the best will get their own personalised Stan Smith tongue logo! <a href="http://t.co/csFEvnVb6k">pic.twitter.com/csFEvnVb6k</a></p> — adidas UK (@adidasUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/adidasUK/status/422704045229219840">January 13, 2014</a> </blockquote> <p>This customer focus has been integral to the success of Adidas Originals in recent years, with the brand aiming to create conversation about youth and street culture rather than simply promoting its products.</p> <p>One example of this is the brand’s recent series of live events called TLKS. Featuring high profile influencers within fashion and music, each one was <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68075-who-will-win-the-live-streaming-battle-facebook-live-or-periscope/" target="_blank">streamed live on Facebook</a>, while giving fans a unique opportunity to relate to Adidas on an experiential level.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FadidasOriginalsUK%2Fvideos%2F1838108906404925%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Organic content</h3> <p>Lastly, we can see how social media is not simply a one-way marketing tool for Adidas Originals, but also a way for fans and consumers to show their appreciation. </p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67547-10-excellent-examples-of-user-generated-content-in-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">User-generated content</a> is particularly widespread on Instagram, with fans posting their love for the brand as well as excitement about product launches and exclusive events.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3713/Adidas_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="670" height="656"></p> <p>Likewise, the Adidas Originals Instagram feed (also with more followers than the main account) typically makes use of imagery from musicians, fashion designers and models to reinforce its tagline of ‘We Are Originals’ – including the consumer in the collective ‘we’.</p> <p>Using influence and artistic expression, Adidas Originals has managed to make its brand relevant again.</p> <p>By delivering its message on social media in a natural and authentic way, it has truly connected with a new and highly engaged young audience.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68784 2017-02-08T01:00:00+00:00 2017-02-08T01:00:00+00:00 Three ways brands can breach the attention barrier in 2017 Jeff Rajeck <p>While useful for consumers, <strong>the attention barrier is not a good thing for brands.</strong> When people are hiding behind it, they may <em>see</em> brand content but will typically ignore anything commercial straight away. </p> <p>Some brands have been successful regardless. They produce vast quantities of high-quality content and establish a deep relationship with their audience over time. Brands such as <a href="https://www.redbull.com/">Red Bull</a>, <a href="http://www.cmo.com/">Adobe</a>, and <a href="https://bluenotes.anz.com/">ANZ</a> have all succeeded in this way.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3722/cmo.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="380"></p> <p>But what about a marketing team of more modest means? <strong>What can brands do, in 2017, to reach their customers using content?</strong></p> <p>To find out, we asked Aoife McIlraith, Global Director of Search and Marketing Services at Lionbridge, the world's largest marketing localization firm to comment on the topic.</p> <p>She offered three things brands can do to capture their customers' attention in 2017, summarized in the video and comments below.</p> <p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YToEhi7ZBQM?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>1. Use automation to personalise content</h3> <p>The amount of global digital information has doubled since 2014 and there are now an estimated <a href="http://www.worldwidewebsize.com/">45bn web pages indexed by Google</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3723/swebpages.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="461"></p> <p>As the volume of information increases, it is only natural that consumers put up barriers to new information so that only the most relevant content will get through.</p> <p>Brands can try to get around these barriers, according to Ms McIlraith, by<strong> using automation to achieve personalisation</strong>. That is, they can redo their sites and apps so that content changes dynamically to make the digital property more relevant to them.</p> <p>This could be something as simple as showing different content to each targeted segment or as sophisticated as dynamically altering information based on the actual reader.  </p> <p>To some extent, this is what many ecommerce sites do now. The Amazon 'homepage' is always personalised according to which products you have viewed previously, and there is little reason why brand sites couldn't do the same with content.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3724/amzn.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="400"></p> <p>No matter how it is done, offering a personalised experience will almost certainly put a brand's content ahead of all the other, less personal brand messaging.</p> <h3>2. Adapt to new ways of searching</h3> <p>To navigate the overwhelming amount of information, consumers have relied on text-based search engines for many years. To remain relevant, brands have had to tag content to make it easy for searchers to find (SEO) and buy ads against relevant keywords (SEM) to get to the top of the search page.</p> <p>According to Ms McIlraith, this is due to change in 2017 in two ways and the <strong>new search paradigms offer opportunities for brands.</strong></p> <p>First off, voice-based search has become available through a variety of products from Apple, Amazon, and Google which has resulted in a 7x increase in voice search queries since 2010. <strong>Both Google and Microsoft report that nearly one in four mobile searches are now voice-based.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3725/google-trend.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="601"></p> <p>To capitalize on this change, brands need to have a look at how their information is indexed and ensure that it is organised according to how people look for things naturally, as opposed to what they type into search engines.  </p> <p><a href="http://www.apple.com/ios/siri/">Apple</a>, <a href="https://support.google.com/websearch/answer/2940021?hl=en">Google</a> and <a href="https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4000453">Microsoft</a> all offer guides on how people use their respective products and<strong> Amazon has a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/68784-3-ways-brands-can-breach-the-attention-barrier-in-2017/edit/%20https:/developer.amazon.com/alexa-voice-service">self-service API for developers</a> to add new voice-based services ('skills') to its Alexa product.</strong></p> <p>Just like with SEO a decade ago,<strong> brands that adapt to the new voice search medium will have a distinct advantage over those who don't</strong> in capturing the scarce attention of consumers.</p> <p>The other way search will change is the proliferation of text-based, AI chat interfaces or 'bots'. Bots allow brands to develop a customer service interface with its own brand-based personality so that potential customers can have unique, personalised experience even though they are receiving their information from a computer server.</p> <p>While the only major platform in the West which supports brand-based is bots Facebook Messenger presently, it is likely that other messaging apps and social media platforms will follow.  </p> <p>For brands that operate in Japan or China, both LINE and WeChat have had chat interfaces available for some time, and there are numerous tools available to help you build bots for them. LINE is even offering <a href="https://botawards.line.me/en/">awards for the best bots on its network</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3726/2017_02_07_21_18_21_LINE_BOT_AWARDS.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="378"></p> <p>Again, like with voice, <strong>brands who do bots well will be able to provide a superior customer experience and breach the attention barrier.</strong></p> <h3>3. Use micro-influencers </h3> <p>While it was <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68747-from-buzzword-to-bullsh-t-celebrating-144-years-of-influencer-marketing/">mentioned recently</a> on the Econsultancy blog that 'influencer marketing' is not a new phenomena, Ms McIlraith notes that <strong>brands seeking to reach consumers should take another look at influencers. </strong></p> <p>She specifically notes that 'micro-influencers', or someone whose audience is measured in the thousands, could be the way to attract attention in 2017. The case for micro-influencers is based on the finding that<strong> as the numbers of followers rise, the level of engagement per follower dips dramatically after 10,000 and then again after 1m.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3727/Markerly.JPG" alt="" width="638" height="323"></p> <p>Influencers, micro or otherwise, allow brands to move beyond interruptive advertising and become a more natural part of what people are interested in online.</p> <p>For more on the topic, subscribers should refer to the recent Econsultancy report <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers">'The Rise of the Influencers'</a>, which offers definitions, trends, and best practices about influencers for brand marketers.</p> <p>In short, though, for a brand looking for engagement over reach, using micro-influencers will likely result in more comments, shares, and likes - and earn more attention.</p> <h3>So...</h3> <p>Overall, 2017 will be a difficult year for brands to engage consumers. Available information is going to keep on growing this year and so competition for consumers' attention will only become more fierce. </p> <p>Brands can, however, continue to look for new ways to reach consumers and breach the seemingly impenetrable attention barrier - and personalisation, voice search, and micro-influencers are all great starting points to do so.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68778 2017-02-07T11:55:00+00:00 2017-02-07T11:55:00+00:00 Four ways travel & hospitality brands are targeting younger consumers Nikki Gilliland <p>Younger generations aren’t just looking for shareable experiences, of course, and with an increasing percentage of ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67327-six-ways-brands-can-relate-to-generation-z/" target="_blank">Generation Z</a>’ influencing travel decisions, millennials aren’t the only demographic worth engaging.</p> <p>As brands tap into a desire for authenticity, digital convenience and customisation, here are a few examples of how many are tailoring travel experiences to the young.</p> <h3>Utilising design and technology</h3> <p>While companies like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68375-airbnb-how-its-customer-experience-is-revolutionising-the-travel-industry/" target="_blank">Airbnb</a> have capitalised on millennial travel sensibilities - promoting a sense of local authenticity and flexibility – hotels are beginning to figure out how to do the same.</p> <p>Aloft, part of the Starwood group, is one example of this. Described as a hotel for ‘global travellers who love open spaces, open thinking and open expression’ – everything is designed to appeal to younger generations. </p> <p>Communal pool tables and live music encourage social interaction, while free Wi-Fi and keyless entry cater to a desire for seamless and sophisticated technology. </p> <p>In turn, this encourages visitors to take photographs of all their surroundings, with the hope that they will then post about it on social media.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Falofthotels%2Fvideos%2F10155043087562728%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Appealing to ‘experience-based’ interests</h3> <p>Hilton is another hotel chain that has been targeting younger people, partnering with Live Nation to run a series of live music events in various hotels in both the UK and US.</p> <p>Hilton@Play wasn’t just a marketing ploy, however, but an initiative to foster loyalty. The idea was that only HHonors members with 30,000 to 80,000 points could attend the concerts, creating an exclusive incentive specifically for regular guests.</p> <p>Featuring popular artists such as Jess Glynne and Nick Jonas, interest from a specific age-bracket was guaranteed.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">RT if you streamed the Hilton@Play concert featuring <a href="https://twitter.com/nickjonas">@NickJonas</a> last night thru <a href="https://twitter.com/periscopeco">@Periscopeco</a>! <a href="http://t.co/y51en6tIky">http://t.co/y51en6tIky</a></p> — Hilton (@HiltonNewsroom) <a href="https://twitter.com/HiltonNewsroom/status/591310866081062912">April 23, 2015</a> </blockquote> <p>Meanwhile, the hotel chain also live-streamed the event on Periscope, ensuring that non-attendees would also be able to participate in the fun.</p> <h3>Working with social influencers</h3> <p>When it comes to picking a destination, both millennials and Generation Z are said to place greater trust in online peers rather than travel advertising.</p> <p>Consequently, brands are able to target potential travellers through collaboration with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">social influencers</a>.</p> <p>Just one example of this is Turkish Airlines’ campaign with 10 high-profile YouTubers. With a collective audience of over 40m – over 6m belonging to Casey Neistat alone – the brand was able to reach a large and highly engaged audience.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_5Q93Z8LAxA?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Similarly, Marriott’s chain of Moxy Hotels (which is a similar concept to the aforementioned Aloft) has also made use of influencers, creating an online series hosted by comedian Taryn Southern and featuring a number of influencers like Mamrie Hart.</p> <h3>Promoting travel as a lifestyle</h3> <p>Lastly, we can also see how travel companies are turning into lifestyle brands, using inspirational content to evoke concepts of exploration and adventure, and capitalising on interest from young travellers.</p> <p>Take Generator Hostels, for example, whose Instagram account is solely made up of location and experience-based imagery.</p> <p>There is not a photo of a bed or breakfast table in sight, meaning the company sells itself on the travelling experience above and beyond the actual product (i.e. a place to sleep).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3681/Generator_Hostels.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="649"></p> <p>In a twist on this trend, camera brand Leica recently began trying to capitalize on people’s taste for experiences by <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68737-why-brands-are-increasingly-creating-experiences-adventures-to-woo-consumers/">launching a holiday adventure for photography enthusiasts</a>.</p> <p>The pricey adventure is limited to 15 participants, offering a chance to be guided around exotic locations by professional photographers. It seems everyone is trying to get in on the craze for unique adventures.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68776 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 10 astounding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you’re in the mood for something a little extra.</p> <h3>34% of brands admit internal silos</h3> <p>New research from Oracle highlights how closer collaboration between sales and marketing teams is required to better target audiences and increase sales.</p> <p>However, despite also recognising the need, many organisations are failing to put it into practice. </p> <p>The Oracle survey found that 34% of brands admit their sales, marketing and customer service teams work completely independently of each other, leading to a lack of customer insight.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why, 33% blame it on their current systems and technologies, while 30% say their corporate culture makes it tricky for sales and marketing teams to align priorities.</p> <h3>Millennials increasingly influencing tech-buying decisions</h3> <p>With millennials predicted to make up 50% of the US workforce by 2020, Linkedin has been exploring how younger generations are influencing technology buying decisions in the workplace.</p> <p>In a survey of 5,470 global professionals, it found that 61% of younger millennials (age 19-25) contribute to their companies’ technology purchases, with one in three already being decision-makers. Older millennials (those aged 25-35) are said to have even more influence, with 68% contributing to decisions.</p> <p>Lastly, Generation X still holds the power, with 85% of employees aged 36-50 deciding technology purchases or managing the budget.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3667/Linkedin.JPG" alt="" width="428" height="519"></p> <h3>Searches for US visas surge following travel ban</h3> <p>Following Trump’s travel ban, Hitwise data has revealed that searches for American visas have since increased by 34%. More specifically, searches for “visa for USA from UK” and “US visa waiver” have been among the highest.</p> <p>This is similar to what happened after Brexit, when Hitwise witnessed a 300% increase in searches related to moving to the EU. </p> <p>Following the week’s news coverage, approximately one in every 10,000 searches over three days related to the “travel ban”, which is an increase of 2,045% since January 28.</p> <h3> </h3> <h3>One in 10 Gmail users say emails are miscategorised</h3> <p>Gmail’s automatic sorting feature is proving less than effective, with one in 10 users reporting incorrectly categorised messages.</p> <p>This is according to new research from Return Path, leading to warnings that marketers should be more vigilant about how and where their messages are being delivered.</p> <p>The study found that 45% of tabbed inbox users check the ‘Promotions’ tab - used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers - at least once per day. As a result, if marketing email is delivered to another tab, it could be missed entirely.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3665/gmail.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK consumers spent the most via mobile last Christmas </h3> <p>According to Adobe’s latest Digital Index, UK shoppers spent more via mobile last Christmas than the US or any other European nation. </p> <p>Data shows that 60% of online visits to UK retailers over Christmas were made on mobile, and of every £10 spent online in the UK, £4.10 came from a mobile device. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to a rise in last-minute buying, with the amount spent on the last Monday before Christmas increasing by 50% in 2016.</p> <h3>Live chat leads to greater customer loyalty</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://skilled.co/resources/live-chat-best-customer-service-right-now/" target="_blank">infographic</a> by Skilled highlights how live chat on ecommerce sites can lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty.</p> <p>Studies show that 63% of live chat users said they are more likely to return to the site as a result. Interestingly, Mexico is said to be the leader of live chat, with the highest customer satisfaction rate of 94.11%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3663/Skilled.JPG" alt="" width="674" height="342"></p> <h3>Nearly two in five shoppers have used their phone to pay in-store</h3> <p>MEF’s <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a> has revealed that mobile payments are on the rise, with nearly two in five shoppers using their smartphone to make a purchase in-store.</p> <p>From analysis of 6,000 consumers in nine countries, it also found that 78% of people have made a purchase using an app or mobile site.</p> <p>Mobile banking looks to be on a similar path, with 61% of respondents saying they now use their mobile phone to bank, and 44% using an app to check their balance.</p> <h3>Consumers see over half of brand content as ‘clutter’</h3> <p>The <a href="http://www.meaningful-brands.com/en" target="_blank">Meaningful Brands</a> report by Havas has revealed that over half of consumers view brand content as poor or irrelevant.</p> <p>In a study of 375,000 people across 33 countries, Havas found that while 84% of respondents expect brands to produce content of some kind, 60% of it fails to deliver any personal benefit.</p> <p>Consequently, we can see that the greater the impact on a person’s well-being, the more likely content is to be perceived as meaningful or effective.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3664/Havas.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="426"></p> <h3>80% of marketers describe data as ‘critical’ to success</h3> <p>A new GDMA survey has highlighted how customer data has become an indispensable asset, with 80% of global respondents citing it as critical to their marketing efforts.</p> <p>UK marketers are increasingly relying on data, coming top of all countries when asked about its importance.</p> <p>As a result, investment in data-driven marketing and advertising is still on the rise, with over half of global respondents saying they increased their spending in this area in 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68765 2017-02-02T14:19:00+00:00 2017-02-02T14:19:00+00:00 Why brands should be making more use of Pinterest Nikki Gilliland <p>Of course, Pinterest’s age-old image problem remains, with the platform often being dismissed as ‘female-centric’ – a place for wedding inspiration and rainbow cake recipes. But having surpassed 150m monthly users in 2016 – a 50% increase from the previous year – and a growing male audience, could this be a false assumption?</p> <p>Here’s a rundown of why it might be worth paying Pinterest a bit more attention this year. And to learn more on this topic, check out Econsultancy's range of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/social/">social media training courses</a>.</p> <h3>Encourages path to purchase</h3> <p>Unlike Twitter or Facebook, which both have messaging or communication at their core, Pinterest is built on strong commercial elements. 55% of Pinterest users visit the platform for the <a href="https://www.socialbakers.com/blog/detail/?id=2652&amp;url_key=6-pinterest-updates-marketers-need-to-know-from-2016&amp;category_url_key=marketing" target="_blank">sole purpose of finding or shopping for products</a>. In comparison to just 12% doing the same on Facebook and Instagram respectively, the opportunity to directly drive sales is unrivalled. </p> <p>With a Buy Button and Promoted Pins, brands now have the opportunity to expand visibility on the platform, serving native ads to relevant feeds and search results. </p> <h3>Incorporating AI</h3> <p>Further to this, Pinterest has recently announced that it is incorporating <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/" target="_blank">artificial intelligence</a> into its platform, using deep learning to improve its Related Pins feature. </p> <p>By drawing on user data, it will be able to serve pins that are more related to the user's context and ongoing activity. </p> <p>This focus on <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67070-why-personalisation-is-the-key-to-gaining-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">personalisation</a> is already proving successful, with early testing resulting in <a href="https://engineering.pinterest.com/blog/applying-deep-learning-related-pins" target="_blank">5% more engagement</a> on Related Pins.</p> <h3>Introduction of video ads</h3> <p>Last year, Pinterest launched video advertising or ‘promoted video’, allowing brands to add another dimension to their presence on the platform. With a <a href="http://fortune.com/2016/08/04/pinterest-video-focus/" target="_blank">reported 60% increase</a> in the number of videos saved on the platform, it is clear that users crave this visual medium to further enhance their browsing and shopping experience.</p> <p>By pairing video ads with promoted pins, brands have even further opportunity to drive sales, with beauty brands in particular making use of tutorial videos and customer reviews.  </p> <h3>Expanding male audience</h3> <p>While fashion, beauty and weddings remain a few of Pinterest’s most popular categories – Pinterest is not actually dominated by women. In fact, male usage increased by 70% last year, and 40% of the site’s monthly active users are now made up of men.</p> <p>So what are they doing on the site? Funnily enough, exactly the same thing as women, which is curating and discovering content related to their hobbies and interests. </p> <p>Brands are also realising that the platform doesn't have to be so gender-divided. One example of this is Pinterest’s new microsite aimed at Super Bowl fans. Based on the idea that sports viewers will search the platform in advance of big events, looking for party planning ideas and other related content, it aims to target potential buyers, as well as increase the platform’s focus on personalisation.</p> <h3>Examples of brands on Pinterest</h3> <p>So, how exactly are brands utilising Pinterest? Here are a few of the best examples.</p> <h4>Etsy</h4> <p>Pinterest acts a bit like a shop window display for Etsy, carefully curating collections to highlight the very best of the marketplace.</p> <p>For shoppers, it provides inspiration and encourages purchases. On the other hand, it is a brilliant marketing and promotion tool for Etsy sellers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3566/Etsy.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="414"></p> <h4>Lonely Planet</h4> <p>For travel brands, Pinterest can be a highly effective tool for targeting consumers in the 'planning' stage.</p> <p>Lonely Planet uses the platform to curate travel guides, drawing on content from bloggers and social influencers as well as its own site. This approach encourages a community-feel, meaning that users are inclined to contribute to group boards.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3567/Lonely_Planet.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="413"></p> <h4>L’Oreal</h4> <p>Last year, L'Oreal Paris launched a series of Promoted Pins and video ads to promote a new line of highlighters. Results show that these ads <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/pinterests-scroll-activated-video-ads-are-paying-lor-al-and-hersheys-170354/" target="_blank">increased purchase intent by 37.2%</a> and boosted brand awareness by 30.7%.</p> <p>By targeting users with relevant and well-timed content, L'Oreal is one of the best examples of how to use Pinterest for advertising purposes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3568/L_oreal.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="366"></p> <h4>Tesco</h4> <p>Recipe ideas are a great way for supermarkets to drive sales of ingredients, as well as improve general brand awareness.</p> <p>Tesco does this particularly well, using its Pinterest presence to target food-related searches and curate healthy and family-orientated recipes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3569/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="417"></p> <h4>GQ</h4> <p>Apparently, more men use Pinterest than read GQ magazine or Sports Illustrated combined.</p> <p>This puts the platform's scale into perspective, as well as its ability to target men who are already interested in specific media publications.</p> <p>GQ is one magazine that capitalises on online interest, using Pinterest to curate helpful and fun content. It's not afraid to be a little off-the-wall, either. I spotted a particularly humorous board called "Leonardo DiCaprio's Year in Leisure", detailing everything fun that Leo did back in 2014.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3570/GQ.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="404"></p> <p><em><strong>Now read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68763-can-snapchat-survive-instagram-s-aggressive-copycat-tactics/" target="_blank">Can Snapchat survive Instagram’s aggressive copycat tactics?</a></em></li> </ul>