tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy Latest Content marketing content from Econsultancy 2016-07-27T15:05:03+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68120 2016-07-27T15:05:03+01:00 2016-07-27T15:05:03+01:00 As TV ads lose their sway, pharma marketers need to adapt Patricio Robles <h3>"Ask your doctor if [drug name] is right for you."</h3> <p>As Rocco Albano, the VP of strategy and partnerships at Razorfish Health, <a href="http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/280323/does-pharma-have-a-problem-with-ask-your-doctor.html">observes</a>, this call-to-action that pharma marketers have relied on for years makes perfect sense.</p> <p>It's easier for marketers to gain broad reach to consumers than it is to physicians, and physicians are the only ones who can prescribe their drugs to patients.</p> <p>But with consumer trust of pharma companies on the decline and increased calls for tighter regulation of pharma ads on the rise, it's no surprise that 30 and 60-second ads are persuading fewer and fewer consumers.</p> <p>Even so, pharma marketers continue to pour big bucks into television ads. As Albano notes, pharma marketers have increased spending on the medium by nearly a quarter this year, and nine prescription drugs alone are on pace to account for $100m of spend each.</p> <p>Ironically, despite the fact that pharma ads are not convincing consumers to talk to their doctors, the spend is justified by the internet. Albano explains...</p> <blockquote> <p>Another big reason TV advertising is still a key sales driver for pharma is the Internet. The vast majority of people exposed to a prescription drug TV ad that may be relevant to them will use the Internet first and foremost to get questions answered about a treatment before asking their doctor. </p> </blockquote> <p>Unfortunately for pharma marketers, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67653-millennials-open-to-pharma-ads-but-pharma-not-delivering-on-ux">they're not delivering on UX</a>, so when consumers turn to the internet, they're more likely to use and trust information published by third parties, including WebMD and health systems like the Mayo Clinic.</p> <p>That means that pharma marketers are largely missing out on the opportunity to interact with consumers throughout their journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3047/healthstudy.jpg" alt="" width="356" height="153"></p> <h3>Is an even bigger challenge looming?</h3> <p>Pharma marketers could find themselves facing an even bigger challenge in the future.</p> <p><a href="https://cdn1.sph.harvard.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/94/2016/03/STAT-Harvard-Poll-Mar-2016-Prescription-Painkillers.pdf">A STAT-Harvard survey</a> conducted earlier this year found that one in three Americans blame doctors for national opioid epidemic, suggesting that physicians themselves risk losing the trust of patients as it relates to how and why they prescribe medication.</p> <p>And physicians themselves are increasingly wary of pharma companies, as evidenced by the fact that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67227-ban-on-consumer-ads-could-make-pharma-s-digital-shortcomings-more-costly">the American Medical Association supports a ban</a> on direct-to-consumer ads that pitch prescription drugs.</p> <p>Since they're the only ones capable of prescribing prescription medications, this dynamic presents an obvious threat to pharma companies. So how can they address it?</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67747-pharma-marketers-should-use-storytelling-to-improve-the-industry-s-reputation">Better storytelling</a> could be key to helping the pharma industry restore its reputation, but ultimately, pharma marketers will need to change the way that they interact with consumers and physicians. That <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67131-pharma-s-mobile-social-efforts-aren-t-as-healthy-as-they-should-be/">could include tapping their proprietary data to supply physicians with information they're interested in</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4886/pharmadata.png" alt="" width="481" height="326"></p> <p>They should also look to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67831-electronic-health-records-ehrs-could-help-pharma-marketers-reach-doctors">electronic health records (EHRs)</a>, which are a channel through which pharma marketers have the opportunity to reach doctors at the point of care.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68078 2016-07-25T09:57:47+01:00 2016-07-25T09:57:47+01:00 Automated video: considerations for publishers and advertisers Patricio Robles <p>Consumers love video and advertisers can't get enough video ad inventory. As a result, publishers and media companies are increasingly doing whatever they can t<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67958-if-video-is-the-future-of-the-internet-here-s-what-brands-need-to-know">o embrace video</a>.</p> <p>Historically, video production has been a costly undertaking. After all, creating compelling, high-quality video is far more involved than creating compelling, high-quality written content or photography.</p> <p>To address the consumer and advertiser demand for video while at the same time avoiding breaking the bank, publishers have turned to technology that is capable of churning out video content in a highly-automated fashion.</p> <h3>Wochit and Wibbitz</h3> <p>As <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/11/business/media/as-online-video-surges-publishers-turn-to-automation.html?_r=0">detailed by</a> the New York Times, two companies, Wochit and Wibbitz, have come to take an early lead in the automated video production space.</p> <p>A wide range of publishers are making these companies' tools a big part of their online video strategies. One of those publishers is Tronc, formerly Tribune Publishing, which has newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times and Orlando Sentinel in its portfolio.</p> <p>Tronc chairman Michael W. Ferro Jr. told the New York Times' John Herrman that his company is currently producing a "couple hundred" videos each day, but sees that number increasingly substantially. "We think we need to be doing 2,000 videos a day," he said.</p> <p>Such volume is probably impossible without automated video, and as automated video becomes a bigger and bigger source of video on the web, here's what publishers and advertisers should keep in mind.</p> <h3>How it works</h3> <p>Automated video platforms like Wochit and Wibbitz analyze input text content (eg. for a news story) and identify images and video clips that are related, typically from stock and video photography services.</p> <p>Through partnerships, Wochit and Wibbitz offer human voice narration, but fully-automated computer-generated voice-overs can also be used.</p> <p>Wochit and Wibbitz can also automatically caption the videos they assemble, important for creating videos that are suited for social channels that have <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67442-how-to-create-facebook-video-ads-that-cater-for-silent-autoplay">silent autoplay</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7283/automatedvideo-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="265"></p> <p>For publishers that don't trust Wochit and Wibbitz to produce production-ready videos in a totally automated fashion, publishers have the flexibility to make their own edits and add their own content to videos before publishing. </p> <h3>Limitations</h3> <p>While adoption of automated video is growing significantly – major publishers that are clients of Wochit and Wibbitz include Hearst, Gannett, Time, CBS Interactive, Bonnier and The Huffington Post – automated video is not without its limitations. While consumers love video, they still have expectations around quality and it's hard to meet those expectations in a fully-automated fashion. </p> <p>According to USA Today's Chris Pirrone...</p> <blockquote> <p>The data came back very quickly that text-to-video alone, if you don't touch it, consumers can quickly recognize it is not a high-quality product.</p> </blockquote> <p>Even Wochit and Wibbitz agree: their tools are best used in conjunction with a human touch.</p> <p>But even with that human touch, publishers and advertisers need to recognize that the most compelling kinds of videos, which are emotional and tell powerful stories, are probably not going to come from an automated video platform any time soon.</p> <p>So video automation tools, while a potential contributor to the online video ecosystem, aren't a panacea and shouldn't be relied on too heavily.</p> <h3>Supply and demand</h3> <p>A bigger consideration for publishers and advertisers is the fact that automated video is going to change the supply and demand dynamics in the online video market.</p> <p>Since the beginning of the year, Wochit's clients have doubled the number of videos they're producing using the company's technology. That figure now stands at 30,000 videos a month.</p> <p>While consumers love video, <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/internet-habits-are-bad-news-for-digital-media-2016-7">attention is finite</a> and the growing number of videos will make it harder for publishers to stand out. At worst, video in some content categories could be completely commoditized to the point that it isn't a point of differentiation with consumers and prices for ads drops significantly.</p> <p>At the same time, if the rise of automated video comes at the expense of truly original video, demand for original video content, including longer-form content, could increase as it becomes less common, benefiting publishers that continue to invest in its production and making it more expensive for advertisers looking to market their wares through non-commoditized video content.</p> <h3>Risks</h3> <p>The limitations of automated video, combined with the possible supply and demand effects, mean that adoption of automated video on a larger scale presents risks for both publishers and advertisers.</p> <p>For publishers, too much reliance on automated video could backfire, reducing the quality of the video content portfolios. Eventually, that could threaten a publishers' brands and leave them with audiences and ad inventory that are less valuable.</p> <p>For this reason, publishers should be strategic about how much of the video content mix they create using automated video tools. Specifically, they should consider focusing their use of automated video on channels for which this kind of content might be better suited, such as social platforms, where silent autoplay means short, captioned video content is more acceptable.</p> <p>For advertisers, the risk is that the ad inventory created by automated video won't be as high in value, and might even become of limited value if publishers oversaturate the market.</p> <p>For this reason, advertisers should recognize that video ad inventory is not all the same and make sure that they're not paying a premium for inventory that is not premium.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68044 2016-07-21T13:20:15+01:00 2016-07-21T13:20:15+01:00 Millennials don't hate advertising: It's all about the value exchange Dale Lovell <p>To paraphrase the singer Estelle, ‘<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IylQeTYkA3A">1980 was the year that God made me</a>’ (well, I was born in March, 1980, so technically, I was ‘made’ in 1979). And as if to prove my millennial credentials: my undergraduate year was the first intake that had to pay university tuition fees in the UK.</p> <p>My 19-year-old student nephew is also a millennial. We sit pretty much at either ends of the millennial age-range. Our lives are completely different.</p> <p>I’m a daily commuter, run a business, have a mortgage, a wife and young child. I have early nights, Ocado deliveries and weekend trips to the park. He has all day drinking sessions, exams, girlfriends, lie-ins and all-night parties.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7308/ocado.jpeg" alt="ocado" width="275" height="183"></p> <p>But apparently we are the same homogenous marketing demographic? What he likes, I like; what I want, he wants. It’s not quite so simple, is it?</p> <p>Which is why more and more marketers <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/05/18/mark-ritson-the-seven-unmistakable-signs-of-a-shit-brand-consultant/">grit their teeth at mere mention of the word millennial</a>. And I largely agree with them. </p> <p>We are not a homogenous mass of similar tastes, views and actions. But there are certainly traits shared between this age group and how they consume digital media and what they expect from advertisers.</p> <p>So whether you love, like or loathe the term millennial – for the purposes of this post I am going to refer to this age group as ‘millennials.’ Sorry about that.</p> <h3>The millennial value exchange</h3> <p>Digital advertising is increasingly judged on the ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/value-exchange-from-data/">value exchange</a>’. But what does the phrase ‘value exchange’ actually mean? </p> <p>In it’s simplest form this: both the brand and the consumer need to get something out of the advertising message exchange or interaction.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67954-what-is-non-linear-advertising-how-can-it-help-publishers/">Traditionally, marketing messages have been delivered to captive audiences</a> – TV, print, radio, cinema – where there is very little perceived value exchange. In these scenarios consumers are at the mercy of what the advertiser wants them to see. It’s a one-way street. </p> <p>Millennials don’t work like that. They expect the value exchange to be present. Their time is precious. In exchange for their time interacting with your brand they expect something in return. They expect a brand to entertain them. Or to offer them information they find interesting. </p> <h3>This doesn’t mean that millennials hate advertising</h3> <p>Provided that the ‘value exchange’ is there, millennials are happy to engage. An Adyoulike study of 1,000 UK adults aged 18-33 in 2015 found that over half of UK millennials (57%) will happily visit online content that appeals to them even if it has been obviously paid for or sponsored. </p> <p>Millennials do not expect a brand to hammer them with the hard sell, or even worse – boring ads filled with irrelevant messaging, delivered in formats that are intrusive and annoying. That’s never been cool, but it really really isn’t any more. It’s digital brand suicide.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7309/Screen_Shot_2016-07-21_at_12.44.59.png" alt="adyoulike infographic" width="615" height="317"></p> <h3>All demographic groups are changing their behaviour to advertising</h3> <p>But whether you are a millennial or not, it’s worth noting that we’ve all changed how we use technology, consume media and engage with advertisers. It’s just that the younger generation act this way en-masse, and have been ‘early-adopters’ of this new view point.</p> <p>Baby boomers are fickler in their media consumption than they were ten or fifteen years ago, for example, because, well, they can be: like the rest of us they have far more options and demands on their precious time than they did a generation ago.</p> <p>A Nielsen study published in March 2015 found that 25% of baby boomers regularly watch video programming on a mobile device and over half of baby boomer respondents said they use electronic devices to listen to music and take or share photos.</p> <p>Our own research shows that they engage with native adverts too. So all age groups (apart from perhaps the very old) use social media; they multi-screen; they watch videos on YouTube; they skip ads - who would have thought it? - just like millennials. </p> <h3>There is no captive audience</h3> <p>Digital has changed the ‘captive’ audience forever. Marketers need to ‘earn’ the right to advertise to everyone in this hyper-connected, always on world, where content is currency and customer attention is easily lost at the swipe of a finger or click of a mouse.</p> <p>It’s not just millennials. Whatever the demographic, consumers expect more from advertisers. </p> <p>As digital marketers it’s time that we all start to think this way for everyone and every campaign, not just for those buzzwordy, hard-to-define millennial-types. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to a B2B report) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet, statistics and online market research with data, facts, charts and figures.The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need, to help make your pitch or internal report up to date.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for B2B-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</strong></p> <p> <strong>Regions covered in each document (where available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68098 2016-07-21T09:53:00+01:00 2016-07-21T09:53:00+01:00 Twitter announces application process for verified accounts: what marketers need to know Patricio Robles <p>Twitter announced a public verification application process that allows any brand or individual to request a verified account.</p> <p>According to Tina Bhatnagar, Twitter's vice president of User Services, "We hope opening up this application process results in more people finding great, high-quality accounts to follow, and for these creators and influencers to connect with a broader audience."</p> <p>Here's what marketers need to know about this development...</p> <h3>It's open to all</h3> <p>Twitter's new verification application process is available to all Twitter accounts that have a valid phone number and email address, and a bio, website, profile photo and header photo. In addition, accounts must be public and accounts for individuals must have a birthday specified.</p> <p>Applications for verification can be submitted through a form at <a href="http://verification.twitter.com">verification.twitter.com</a>.</p> <h3>Twitter looks for certain characteristics</h3> <p>While accounts meeting the above criteria are eligible for consideration, in deciding which requests to approve, Twitter looks for accounts that have certain characteristics.</p> <p>These include an account name that reflects the real name of an individual or company, as well as profile and header photos that are of the individual or associated with the company's branding. As such, marketers looking to submit an application for verification should ensure that the Twitter account in question meets these criteria.</p> <p>Brand accounts must be associated with a company email address, and Twitter may ask individuals to supply a government-issued ID.</p> <h3>There has to be a good reason for verification</h3> <p>Twitter won't verify accounts unless it believes there's a reason to.</p> <p>Specifically, Twitter requires verification applications to explain why verification is appropriate. "If the account represents a person, we want to understand their impact in their field. If it represents a corporation or company, let us know their mission," the company explains. </p> <p>To help support a rationale for verification, requests can and should include URLs to pages, such as news articles, that "help express the account holder’s newsworthiness or relevancy in their field."</p> <h3>Content marketing and engagement FTW</h3> <p>While not stated, it would seem that marketers behind active Twitter accounts that regularly publish unique, compelling content and engage with followers would be more likely to win Twitter's approval than accounts that aren't adding value to the Twitter community.</p> <p>While it probably wouldn't make sense for a brand to up its investment in Twitter just to win Verified Account status, those that are already investing in the platform probably have few reasons not to try to take advantage of the new application process. </p> <h3>There are no guarantees</h3> <p>Even when an account looks like a legitimate candidate for verification, Twitter isn't necessarily going to approve a verification request.</p> <p>Case in point: Hunter Walk, a former Google employee who now runs a venture capital firm, has tweeted more than 45,000 times since joining Twitter in 2006 and has more than 110,000 followers, but his application was denied.</p> <p>At the same time, a user with 7,500 tweets who joined Twitter in 2014 and has less than 9,000 followers received Verified Account status.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">wanted to see what would happen if i used new Twitter Verification process. Answer: NO <a href="https://t.co/h3T2kggzD1">pic.twitter.com/h3T2kggzD1</a></p> — Hunter Walk (@hunterwalk) <a href="https://twitter.com/hunterwalk/status/755836108953444352">20 de julio de 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Applications that are denied can be re-submitted after 30 days, so marketers that aren't able to win Twitter's approval the first time around should be proactive in making adjustments and trying again.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68056 2016-07-20T15:38:48+01:00 2016-07-20T15:38:48+01:00 Eight quick, no-hassle content ideas for local businesses Jacob McMillen <p>Here's a collection of eight different topics and formats that will inspire your content and help you engage your audience:</p> <h3>1. Tap into local knowledge</h3> <p>One of the big issues that comes up time and time again is that businesses don't know what to write about. </p> <p>They know that they should be posting to social media and blogging on a regular basis, but they freeze every time they set their fingers to the keyboard.</p> <p>If this sounds familiar, consider following other local business blogs or even picking up local/community newspapers that will keep you informed about the hottest events in your area. If you start propagating this information, eventually readers will come to recognize your website as a one-stop location for community news.</p> <p>Here in Utah, for example, one of our biggest events is the <a href="https://www.sundance.org/festivals/sundance-film-festival" target="_blank">Sundance Film Festival</a>. Local businesses could do worse than building some hype on their blog.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> traffic, shares, links, loyalty (i.e. how many users return multiple times).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7231/sundance.jpg" alt="" width="615"></p> <h3>2. Share your experience</h3> <p>The flip side of tapping into local knowledge is to start sharing some experience of your own.</p> <p>For example, medical clinics and sporting goods retailers might blog about their favorite bike trails, whereas SaaS businesses might blog about new technology innovations in their field.</p> <p>If you're not keen on blogging, consider other ways of imparting your local knowledge, such as a downloable checklist, an Instagram account, or an active Twitter feed.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> traffic, shares, links, engagement.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7232/bike.jpg" alt="mountain biking" width="615"></p> <h3>3. Send out eNewsletters</h3> <p>Data from the Content Marketing Institute shows that 81% of B2B and 83% of B2C marketers are using eNewsletters to reach their customers—and that's because they work. </p> <p>When you've fine tuned your mailing list to always pique your audience's curiosity, you'll have a piece of content perfect for customer retention.</p> <p>What you put in your eNewsletters will largely depend on your demographic. New prospects are looking for reasons to purchase—they need compelling calls to action and content that gets them excited to see more. </p> <p>Existing customers want added value—more content of the same quality that got them to sign up in the first place, along with special offers and loyalty perks that might prompt them to repurchase.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> sign-ups, open rates, click-through rates, conversions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7233/news.jpg" alt="newspaper" width="615"></p> <h3>4. Go "behind the scenes"</h3> <p>Live streaming is so hot right now. Companies, like Southwest Airlines, are using live streams and social media to keep their customers informed and showcase the human element in their company.</p> <p>The airline even <a href="http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/f525b21c-f21e-11e5-aff5-19b4e253664a.html#axzz49adWeHI7" target="_blank">live streamed</a> their operation control center in the middle of a blizzard, which showed 100,000 viewers how hard they were working to keep flights on schedule.</p> <p>Your "behind the scenes" look doesn't have to be a live stream either. It could be a video, a blog post, or a series of photos. The point of this content is less about the format and more about helping customers relate to your brand.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> total views, concurrent viewers, engagement.</p> <h2><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7234/air_traffic.jpg" alt="air traffic control" width="615"></h2> <h3>5. Showcase customer testimonials</h3> <p>When it comes to a persuasive piece of content, nothing beats a good testimonial. In this day and age, it's rare to get a customer who hasn't first scouted out your business on Yelp and social media. </p> <p>People want assurances that your business will solve their problem and paid ads have nothing on word of mouth.</p> <p><a href="http://www.premierfamily.net/" target="_blank">Premier Family Medical</a> knows this, which is why they dedicate a whole subpage on their website to testimonials &amp; reviews. When you read about the positive experience other patients have had, it builds your confidence that they'll be able to help you too.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> click-through rates, comments, conversions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7235/testimonial.jpg" alt="testimonial" width="615"></p> <h3>6. Shoot a video</h3> <p>Got something to say, but don't have the writing chops to express it? Video is a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67638-seven-tips-for-driving-an-emotional-response-to-video-marketing">powerful content medium</a> that's been shown time and time again to boost conversions and customer engagement.</p> <p>You can create videos that appeal to customers at any stage of the buyer's journey. These might be branded videos, personal videos, vlog updates, product demonstrations, or viral videos.</p> <p>The key to successful video is to create something that suits your brand's voice and appeals to your audience.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> views, shares, referral traffic.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7236/camera.jpg" alt="" width="615"></p> <h3>7. Create a Microsite</h3> <p>When it comes to keeping up with today's fast-paced internet fare, content that's simple and bite sized is just what the doctor ordered. </p> <p>Microsites offer your users a succinct experience that grabs their attention and encourages them to keep clicking.</p> <p><a href="https://tastethefeeling.coca-cola.com/gb/intro" target="_blank">GIFtheFeeling.com</a> is a prime example. This microsite by Coca-Cola is a powerful brand builder that lets users create custom GIFs out of 30 characters and one of 32 different three-second loops.</p> <p>You can then easily share, tweet, or download your custom GIF, which I guess makes Coca-Cola's feel-good campaign the GIF that keeps on giving (sorry, I couldn't resist).</p> <p>According to CMI, only 47% of B2B and 52% of B2C businesses are using microsites. I can't figure out why that number isn't higher.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> traffic, shares, links, conversions.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="http://img01.thedrum.com/s3fs-public/tumblr_o19r5h9syf1qzsch9o8_400.gif" alt="" width="320" height="180"></p> <h3>8. Repurpose Old Content</h3> <p>I'm often asked how local businesses can keep up with content marketing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67491-how-to-do-successful-link-building-on-a-startup-budget">on a tight budget</a>. Repurposing content is my answer.</p> <p>Repurposing content is the act of making something old new again. Businesses can do this by springing for one huge, cornerstone asset (such as an eBook or whitepaper) and then chunking out the content in that big asset to inform their content over the next few months.</p> <p>For example, an eBook might get repurposed into a bunch of checklists, an infographic of interesting stats, and a series of blog posts. Or, if done a keynote presentation, you can easily turn that into a slideshare and a bunch of quotes you can promote on social media.</p> <p>If you're strapped for content ideas, there's a good chance that you're spreading yourself too thin, instead of focusing on becoming a thought leader on one or two specific topics. Repurposing content solves that problem, by establishing your authority on a very specific topic.</p> <p><strong>Metrics to track:</strong> downloads, shares, links, engagement.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7237/newspaper2.jpg" alt="newspaper" width="615"></p> <h3>Final thoughts: why we measure</h3> <p>Though this assortment of topic ideas and content mediums is eclectic, it's by no means exhaustive. </p> <p>The key to staying inspired lies in finding a healthy middle ground between content that you enjoy producing and that your audience wants to see. The only way to tell if you're succeeding in this is to measure the metrics of every piece of content you produce. </p> <p>If you ever find that a certain topic or type of content isn't working, don't fret! Listen to your audience and find out what would keep them engaged. </p> <p>It’s also important that your CMS is intuitive and easy to use, which is why I nearly always recommend that local businesses use <a href="https://econsultancy.com/search/?only=BlogPost&amp;q=wordpress">Wordpress</a>.</p> <p>Once you have a steady stream of content in place, results will follow. From there, it’s just a matter of fine tuning... and let’s be honest, that’s the fun part!</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68031 2016-07-19T12:14:01+01:00 2016-07-19T12:14:01+01:00 Answering the key question of content auditing: Where do I start? Michael Hewitt <h3>Existing content</h3> <p>When it comes to investment in content marketing, it isn’t a huge surprise that much of it goes on producing new content, new material and new campaigns.</p> <p>Plenty of marketers will talk at length about how much content they are producing, how packed their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64587-eight-free-content-calendar-templates-to-help-plan-your-output/">editorial calendars </a>are and how they are preparing to launch their “next big campaign”, but what about the content that they already have?</p> <p>Content marketers are focused so heavily on producing new content that meets the evolving needs of both their audiences and the expectations of search engines, that they are neglecting to ensure that their existing content does likewise. </p> <h3>A daunting prospect</h3> <p>The phrase “content audit” conjures up many feelings, and few of them positive. </p> <p>For many, it is a laborious process that involves hours upon hours, days upon days or even weeks upon weeks of manual review, fiddling around in analytics, and identifying gaps in coverage. It’s not, for many, the most enthralling responsibility in the job description.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6721/content-audit.jpg" alt="" width="400" height="300"></p> <p>Even if you do manage to conduct a thorough audit, it can often be difficult to force through changes on key brand pages due to the influence of various stakeholders, compliance issues and various other obstacles.</p> <p>Many also find the results and impact of a content audit difficult to measure, and so decide to focus their efforts elsewhere.</p> <p>But content auditing is something that needs to be a prominent and regular part of not only your content marketing strategy, but your wider digital marketing strategy.</p> <p>Just think about how many search algorithm updates that there may have been, how many new devices have been launched and how many new media platforms have emerged since you last reviewed your content – that could be quite a sobering realisation. </p> <h3>The case for a content audit</h3> <p>The ultimate purpose of any content audit is to understand how your content is performing, how it is delivering for your customers and what value it is providing. </p> <p>There are plenty of both tangible and intangible measurements for successful content, but this doesn’t necessarily confirm that content is useful, relevant or could be considered ‘quality’ by most reasonable measures.</p> <p>You could, for instance, use social shares as a measurement of quality content but, in doing so, it’s likely that you’ll reach conclusions that, whilst they may drive engagement, don’t necessarily drive a commercial return. Providing content that your audiences will engage with is undoubtedly a starting point but, and I hate to break this to you, human beings may not always be the best judges of quality.</p> <p>What your content audit is ultimately about is ensuring that every piece of content on your site is making some form of contribution to improving conversion rates, search visibility, user experience, and relevance.</p> <p>Get it right and you could even start stealing that prized <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66672-semantic-search-the-future-of-search-marketing">Google Knowledge Graph</a> real estate. </p> <h3>The manual approach</h3> <p>If you’re in a position where you are managing a relatively small site with a handful of pages, then manual content auditing might not be such a hardship.</p> <p>Starting with your URL and keywords, you can start to build a picture of where your brand ranks for these key terms, which pages consistently rank for those key terms, and how your competitors perform. </p> <p>It is then down to you to make a human assessment of each of these pages, and you can look at multiple factors to judge <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66971-a-content-manager-s-practical-guide-to-doing-just-enough-seo/">how well optimised your pages are for search</a>, and how they contribute to the user journey. These factors could include URL optimisation, title tags, meta description, ‘H-tag’ optimisation and hierarchy, keyword coverage and word count.</p> <p>You can then add layers of insight from Google Analytics, social monitoring tools and start to understand how these pages contribute to the customer search journey.</p> <p>Are there pages that are haemorrhaging traffic through unusually high exit rates? If so, this page might not adequately serve the customer search query. </p> <p>With only this very top-level and basic approach to content, you can already start to understand just how much time that you're going to have to spend with your head in an Excel spreadsheet, and why many marketers are reluctant to run a manual content audit at any sort of scale.</p> <h3>A scientific approach</h3> <p>But content auditing doesn’t have to be such a daunting prospect, and it is possible to take a more scientific, algorithmic approach to content auditing.</p> <p>At Stickyeyes we use SCOT (<a href="http://www.stickyeyes.com/content-optimisation-tool/">Stickyeyes Content Optimisation Tool</a>), to look at content in the same way that a search engine may look at it, and identify key areas of success and areas for improvement. In short, addressing that critical first hurdle – where to start.</p> <p>The factors we consider include technical elements, such as keyword coverage, meta data and the use of header tags, as well as engagement factors for which there is evidence of a correlation with higher search rankings – factors such as bounce rate, time on page, social engagement and brand awareness for example.</p> <p>For those with sizable websites, this kind of process can be invaluable in understanding just where to focus effort and resource. Here is just one example of a typical output for a printing brand that we ran through the tool. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6722/graph1.jpg" alt="" width="668" height="276"></p> <p>What we can see clearly is that whilst the brand in this example does have some strong content optimisation scores, in excess of 85%, there are a number of revenue-driving keywords for which the domain scores poorly – notably “cheap leaflet printing”, “cheap flyers”, and “cheap flyer printing”.</p> <p>Evidently, this brand has struggled to provide content for search terms with a “cheap” prefix and this therefore provides some direction for their content review.</p> <p>Of course, it may be that the brand sees itself as a quality brand and therefore may not want to specifically target search terms such as “cheap” and “low cost”, but the level of insight provided allows the brand to make that decision.</p> <h3>Identifying the quick wins</h3> <p>Of course, any content appraisal and audit needs to have a degree of human intervention, but what this algorithmic approach does is allow us to automate large parts of the process and using this insight, content managers can start to make some key decisions and prioritise their actions. </p> <p>There are, in this example, a number of pages that score highly and, with a few minor tweaks, can potentially drive further value. These are what we would classify as “quick wins”. </p> <p>Of course, it isn’t simply enough to throw a few keyword-heavy paragraphs into the page in the hope that Google will deem that to be more relevant, but we can now start considering how we can enhance the user experience for these pages and these terms.</p> <p>It may be that we create specific content for these terms, we may change the site structure to make our existing pages more prominent, or we may actually decide to remove certain pages to focus traffic on more valuable pages.</p> <p>What we are essentially trying to do is enhance the user journey rather than hinder it; and there are different ways to do that depending on the circumstances. </p> <p>This process makes it easier to run audits on a more regular basis, allowing you to monitor the success of any changes that you do make, understand the contribution that your new content is making and identify the next key actions for your optimisation strategy. If something appears to be having an adverse effect, this can be identified and rectified very quickly. </p> <h3>The impact on search</h3> <p>We have been using this approach for a number of brands and what we have found is that as we continually work on improving our content scores within SCOT, we have experienced increased visibility within organic search. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6723/graph2.jpg" alt="" width="814" height="336"></p> <p>Of course, what we can’t do is isolate the impact of these content amendments from the various other elements of activity that may have been undertaken to improve search performance, but there is evidence of a strong correlation between the quality of on-page content and search rankings. </p> <p>And it is important to stress that whilst we may be looking to introduce an algorithmic approach to content auditing, this shouldn’t be mistaken as an algorithmic approach towards content creation.</p> <p>What we are trying to do here is to ensure that our <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67605-why-content-marketing-isn-t-seo-and-why-seo-isn-t-just-content/">content strategies plug key gaps</a> in what our audiences are looking for, but this shouldn’t turn content creation and optimisation into little more than a box ticking exercise. </p> <p>What matters above all else is that your brand is still providing value to the end user and delivering the best possible experience. Adding a layer of technical competence helps to deliver that user experience, but is also valued by search engines as they look to deliver the most relevant results. </p> <p><a href="http://www.stickyeyes.com/content-optimisation-tool%20">Try the latest version</a> of SCOT for free.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68068 2016-07-18T15:06:00+01:00 2016-07-18T15:06:00+01:00 Four ways brands are marketing through dating services Patricio Robles <h3>Match.com and Starbucks</h3> <p>The coffee shop is a common location for first dates, so when Match.com announced a "Meet Me at Starbucks" feature in 2015, it made sense.</p> <p><a href="http://blog.match.com/match-starbucks-the-perfect-blend/">The tie-up</a>, which continues to this day, allows Match.com users to invite each other to Starbucks for a date.</p> <p>Users can also display a Starbucks badge on their profiles, highlighting their affinity for the coffee chain and making it easier for them to connect with other Starbucks aficionados.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6988/matchstarbucks-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="267"></p> <p>The Match.com/Starbucks relationship has also been used in joint promotions by both companies.</p> <p>While it's not known how much foot traffic Starbucks has seen as a result of its Match.com integration, Match.com says it knows of hundreds of couples who connected on its service and met in person for the first time at Starbucks.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6989/starbuckspromo-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="360" height="506"></p> <h3>Tinder Branded Profiles</h3> <p>Mobile dating app Tinder, which is especially popular with younger singles, has embraced native advertising like no other dating service. Its branded profiles, for instance, allow companies to set up profiles to promote their wares to Tinder users.</p> <p>For example, FOX created a Tinder profile for Mindy Kaling, an American comedian and actress, to promote her television show, The Mindy Project.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6991/mindy_project_tinder-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="229"></p> <p>When users match with a branded profile by swiping right, a marketing message can be sent. While <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2014/02/07/fox-and-mindy-push-limits-of-native-advertising.html">some suggest that this pushes the limits</a> of what is acceptable, other networks and movie studios have created branded profiles for fictional characters.</p> <h3>Tinder Promotions</h3> <p>Tinder has also worked with brands to run more conventional and less controversial promotions. For instance, pizza chain Domino's teamed up with Tinder to offer discounts and the chance to win free food.</p> <p>Other brands using Tinder to connect with singles in a similar fashion include Bud Light, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66288-bud-light-turns-to-dating-app-tinder-for-whatever-usa-campaign">which integrated Tinder into its Whatever USA campaign last year</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6992/dominostinder-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="314"></p> <h3>Happn Branded Profiles</h3> <p>Happn, a dating app designed to help daters connect with people they have crossed paths with in real life, has its own branded profiles, which function similarly to those on Tinder.</p> <p>While Happn's audience is smaller than Tinder's, the company has snagged advertisers like Fiat, which used branded profiles to promote the launch of the Fiat 500.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6993/fiathappn.png" alt="" width="314" height="471"></p> <p>Happn has also run branded profile campaigns for a number of charities, including Equality Now and Plan UK.</p> <p><a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/1389738/advertising-dating-app-happn-ngos-brand-romance">According to</a> Happn exec Marie Cosnard, charity campaigns have experienced "very strong engagement" with branded profiles and their campaigns are a good match for the app.</p> <p>"When NGOs are fighting for a cause that’s linked to human relationships, such campaigns make people think about other types of relationship," she stated.</p> <p><em>Other dating-inspired articles:</em></p> <ul> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67563-how-tinder-has-changed-ecommerce/">How Tinder has changed ecommerce</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67600-missguided-launches-tinder-inspired-app-experience-review/">Missguided launches Tinder inspired app experience: review</a> </li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66086-four-product-marketing-reasons-why-tinder-got-really-really-big/">Four product marketing reasons why Tinder got really, really big</a> </li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68075 2016-07-14T15:17:07+01:00 2016-07-14T15:17:07+01:00 Who will win the live-streaming battle: Facebook Live or Periscope? Blake Cahill <p>With an injection of social along with the time-sensitive nature of breaking broadcast, live-streaming is simply an age-old device repurposed for the present times. </p> <h3><strong>What does it mean for all of us?</strong></h3> <p>As traditional social channels are coming close to saturation, tech companies need to build new channels to invigorate their consumers.</p> <p>For brand marketers, this offers a tremendous opportunity to access tech-native early-adopter millennials and post-millennials – the customers of today and tomorrow.</p> <p>Most of whom have foregone broadcast, print, and 1.0 social networks for next-gen platforms.</p> <p>When it comes to advertising value, according to <a href="http://totalaccess.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1014105&amp;dsNav=Ro:-1,N:789,Nr:NOT(Type%3aComparative+Estimate)">eMarketer</a>, digital video advertising spending grew 46% to $7.7bn in the US last year alone.</p> <p>Meaning marketers are increasingly betting on the success of these live platforms. </p> <h3><strong>#SendMeToSleep – the world’s most sleep-inducing social campaign</strong></h3> <p>A good example is the <a href="http://www.philips.co.uk/healthcare/resources/landing/world-sleep-day">#SendMeToSleep</a> social media campaign we rolled out in time for the World Sleep Day.</p> <p>As part of this campaign – during which we actively tried to create content so boring it was capable of sending our audiences straight to sleep – Philips broadcasted what Twitter tells us is the world’s longest Periscope stream.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZzOFWhtxEUw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>For 41 hours straight, we showed splashes of paint being added to a canvas.</p> <p>And because the whole campaign was engaging and worked as a holistic experience, more than 6,000 people tuned in to watch paint dry.</p> <p>Besides being strangely soothing and entertaining, the campaign has achieved significant commercial success which should be the cornerstone of any good marketing strategy.</p> <h3><strong>Periscope &amp; Facebook Live: A modern day David &amp; Goliath?</strong></h3> <p>At first glance, it might look like Facebook is the obvious winner – it has the size, money, user base and brand trust as a popular advertising platform.</p> <p>Despite all this, however, I wouldn’t count out Twitter just yet.</p> <h4>Four reasons for choosing Facebook Live:</h4> <ol> <li> <strong>Audience:</strong> Facebook has a user base of 1.2bn people.</li> <li> <strong>Brand presence:</strong> Live broadcast can bring life back to Facebook brand pages that have been lagging behind Instagram and Twitter in terms of engagement.</li> <li> <strong>Spending power:</strong> Facebook has been on a spending spree signing over 140 contracts worth more than $50m with the likes of CNN, the New York Times and BuzzFeed.</li> <li> <strong>Pioneers:</strong> Airbnb and Disney teamed up for the Jungle Book premiere, Chevrolet used it to launch its new electric car, and Patron taught viewers how to master the perfect drink. </li> </ol> <h4>Four reasons for choosing Periscope:</h4> <ol> <li> <strong>The “cool” factor:</strong> Twitter’s <a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/gadfly/articles/2016-02-12/social-studies-comparing-twitter-with-facebook-in-charts">user base</a> skew younger, more diverse, wealthier, more educated and more likely to live in urban areas. This will drive usage as the two platforms integrate.</li> <li> <strong>Additional features:</strong> The native app offers a dedicated space with broadcast tabs, account tracking and sketch &amp; reaction options that just make it a bit more fun and user-oriented.</li> <li> <strong>Content:</strong> Periscope recently secured partnerships with <a href="https://gopro.com/help/articles/Block/Periscope-Live-Streaming-with-your-GoPro">GoPro</a> and <a href="http://uk.businessinsider.com/twitter-to-stream-nfl-thursday-night-games-2016-4">Thursday Night Football</a> (NFL) to ensure a lineup of engaging content.</li> <li> <strong>Innovation:</strong> Periscope just recently announced a series of new functions such as drone feed integration, search functions, and auto-save through app and Twitter comments.</li> </ol> <h3><strong>What are the downsides? </strong></h3> <p>Live on camera, some products, and even some people, may not work well.</p> <p>It’s difficult to be smartly scripted while still coming across as authentic, and a constant stream of comments from viewers can be hard to manage and moderate.</p> <p>It’s also important that you own what you’re streaming. No brand wants to end up tied in legal battles because they streamed content where ownership and rights haven’t been made clear.</p> <p>As with all new tools, it’s not easy to measure a return on investment. How you measure success – do you look at viewer numbers or drop-offs, likes or the comments?</p> <p>Lastly, live-streaming without a clear strategy and a clear focus on quality and relevance will ultimately disappoint the audience.</p> <h3><strong>Who is the winner?  </strong></h3> <p>At this point, it’s still too early to call.</p> <p>However, the competition is heating up, with YouTube and Tumblr unveiling their competitive offering along with lesser known players such as Live.ly, Livestream, and Hang all releasing their own live broadcast services.   </p> <p>If you’ve already placed your bets then make sure your content fits with the medium and you’re totally clear on ownership, quality, and measurement.</p> <p>Everything after that is just a stream away. </p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67603-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-facebook-s-livestreaming-push/"><em>What marketers need to know about Facebook's livestreaming push</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67712-seven-helpful-tips-for-livestreaming-success/"><em>Seven helpful tips for livestreaming success</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67967-six-things-we-learned-from-using-periscope-to-live-stream-from-fodm16/"><em>Six things we learned from using Periscope to live stream from #FODM16</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68034 2016-07-07T09:58:23+01:00 2016-07-07T09:58:23+01:00 How Selfridges’s Body Studio blurs the lines between digital & in-store Nikki Gilliland <p><a href="http://www.selfridges.com/GB/en/content/article/body-studio" target="_blank">Body Studio</a>, the latest creative project from Selfridges, is hoping to turn this notion around. </p> <p>Capitalising on the wellness trend, it is an entirely new in-store and online department based around lingerie, hosiery, swimwear and sportswear.</p> <p>Here’s why Body Studio is a great example of creativity within the world of women’s retail.</p> <h3>Empowering content</h3> <p>Whether it’s a Victoria Secret model or David Beckham in his pants, lingerie advertising is often highly sexualised – far removed from the everyday reality of buying underwear.</p> <p>With ‘Incredible Machines’ – a short film designed to promote the campaign – Selfridges sets a very different tone.</p> <p>In the video, a number of inspirational women speak about the relationship they have with their own body.</p> <p>A deliberate move away from traditional advertising, Selfridges uses video as a way of creating conversation as well as promoting its core message. </p> <p>With its empowering tone and inspirational subject matter, it’s certainly a refreshing take on the world of lingerie advertising – and a great way of capturing consumer interest in the Body Studio.</p> <p>By promoting an ethos rather than a product, it is automatically much more memorable.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rmaNcRj-Wd4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Unique in-store space</h3> <p>Described as a ‘statement space’, the Body Studio is Selfridges’ attempt to take a neglected category and truly celebrate it.</p> <p>Instead of resigning lingerie to one corner, it has made it the focus of the largest department in its flagship store.</p> <p>Part of a five-year refurbishment project, it is designed to be a destination within a destination - a place where people will want to come to explore.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6763/Selfridges_Body_Studio_In-Store.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="540"></p> <p>What is unique about the Body Studio is that, despite selling a multitude of luxury brands, the studio itself is heavily promoted as a Selfridges-own service.</p> <p>Instead of focusing on the designers or even the clothes themselves, the store is much more focused on the overall experience it provides.</p> <p>Including a 'Fit Studio', two beauty rooms, a Daniel Galvin hair salon and a healthy eating café, it harks back to the days where shopping was an all-day activity and not just a lunch-time browse. </p> <p>The first department of its kind, it also signals a shift for retailers. Integrating the categories of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/a-marketer-s-guide-to-wearable-technology/">wearable technology</a>, activewear and underwear, it highlights the way clothes are now seen as an extension of our lifestyle choices.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6764/Fit_Studio.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="479"></p> <h3>Interactive digital experience</h3> <p>The Body Studio digital hub aims to complement the in-store experience, offering a wealth of content related to fashion, fitness and wellbeing.</p> <p>With its pared-down design, there is a clear focus on editorial, and this makes for an enjoyable and interesting user experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6765/selfridges_hemsley_and_hemsley.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="645"></p> <p>As well as features that cleverly advertise products, there are also recipes and interviews - making it feel like more of a lifestyle publication as opposed to just a retail website.</p> <p>As we've seen from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67909-selfridges-unveils-ios-app-with-shoppable-instagram-feed-is-it-any-good/">recent launch of its shoppable app</a>, Selfridges has been focusing on its digital efforts of late. With its 360 degree-video as well as integrated streaming of Body Talk debates, this section of its website is similarly digitally-savvy.</p> <p>However, what <em>is</em> different here is that the content always points the user’s attention back to the physical experience.</p> <p>Personally, I found myself far more intrigued by the events happening in-store rather than online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6766/selfridges_events.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="541"></p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>While the digital hub provides an interesting glimpse into the Body Studio, it mainly serves as an advert for the flagship department. And ultimately, this appears to be Selfridges’ aim.</p> <p>More of a creative concept designed to entice shoppers in-store (as well as provide a platform for the growing athleisure industry), it is a great example of how to execute an immersive shopping experience.</p>