tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy Latest Content marketing content from Econsultancy 2017-02-28T11:23:05+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68843 2017-02-28T11:23:05+00:00 2017-02-28T11:23:05+00:00 Seven brands already using Instagram’s new slideshow tool Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are a few examples of those already getting on board, as well as a few reasons why it can work.</p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ1l8e1DhLM/?taken-by=urbandecaycosmetics" target="_blank">Urban Decay</a></h3> <p>The slideshow tool allows Urban Decay to create a mini-tutorial from a single post.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4193/Urban_Decay_1.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="466"></p> <p>By only revealing the finished make-up look at the very end, it gives users an incentive to keep swiping.</p> <p>What's more, by offering greater insight into the featured product - demonstrating how it can actually be used - it also nudges the viewer along the path to purchase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4194/Urban_Decay_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="464"></p> <p>With tutorials being a popular form of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68205-how-three-beauty-ecommerce-sites-integrate-editorial-content" target="_blank">online content for the beauty industry</a>, this means many brands could place an even heavier focus on Instagram in future. And while Instagram Stories can already be used in this way, a slideshow means brands no longer have to worry about investing time and effort into content that will subsequently disappear.</p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BRARrljg7F1/?taken-by=nba" target="_blank">NBA</a></h3> <p>Another way to use the tool is to tell the story of a specific date or event, like this example from the NBA.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4195/NBA_1.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="467"></p> <p>The brand is able to re-cap the results of multiple games, succinctly presenting a lot of information in a single post.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4196/NBA_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="463"></p> <p>While some have bemoaned the content-heavy nature of the feature, examples like this show how it can streamline an account’s overall aesthetic – allowing brands to post a number of interesting images without clogging up their followers' feeds.</p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ1X4cWhVt2/?taken-by=wework" target="_blank">WeWork</a></h3> <p>WeWork’s Instagram account is designed to showcase its stunning co-working spaces around the globe. With just a single image, however, it’s pretty difficult to gain any real insight into what the office actually feels like.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4197/WeWork.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="464"></p> <p>Thanks to the slideshow feature, the brand is now able to do just that. </p> <p>Combined with a detailed description about its history and concept, the series of 10 photos allows the user to dive deeper into the story, as well as gain a much more tangible sense of what it would be like to work there.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4198/WeWork_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="465"></p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ0oUULh4io/?taken-by=baywatchmovie" target="_blank">Baywatch movie</a></h3> <p>Another benefit of being able to upload multiple photos is that it enables brands to use a series of related images that would have otherwise gone unused on the platform.</p> <p>Take Baywatch, for example, which takes the opportunity to post movie posters celebrating the female members of its cast. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4199/Baywatch_1.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="470"></p> <p>This tactic will likely come in handy for teaser-posts, too, with brands revealing candid images or behind-the-scenes videos to engage fans. </p> <p>Baywatch's Tinder-inspired tutorial is also worth a mention here, cleverly reminding users how to use the new feature.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4200/Baywatch_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="469"></p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ8-XdJhznn/?taken-by=time" target="_blank">TIME</a></h3> <p>Publishers often use Instagram to pique the interest of users and encourage them to click through to a particular story. This is heightened with the inclusion of multiple images, enabling a brand like Time to illustrate the narrative.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4201/Time.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="464"></p> <p>Not only does this give the post more impact, but it also helps to validate it, instantly giving the user greater insight and information about the story.   </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4202/Time_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="460"></p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ55ZQllfSh/?taken-by=disney" target="_blank">Disney</a></h3> <p>This post by <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67860-10-examples-of-great-disney-marketing-campaigns" target="_blank">Disney</a> proves that you don’t have to include all 10 photos to create an impact.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4203/Disney_1.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="468"></p> <p>By using just two images, it is able to show the difference between an original illustration and a movie’s final frame - a simple but effective approach. This before and after concept is something we could see more of, especially when it comes to artists and designers showcasing their creative journeys. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4204/Disney_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="464"></p> <h3><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BQ02XnNBIX2/?taken-by=cosmopolitan" target="_blank">Cosmopolitan</a></h3> <p>Finally, a brand that took the reveal concept to another level.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4205/Cosmo_1.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="463"></p> <p>With the promise of a surprise, Cosmopolitan rewarded users with a shirtless Zac Efron if they kept swiping. While this example is rather gimmicky (merely serving as a demonstration of the tool itself), it deserves a mention for sheer creativity.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4206/Cosmo_2.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="469"></p> <p><em><strong>More on Instagram:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68485-what-marketers-need-to-know-about-instagram-shopping" target="_blank">What marketers need to know about Instagram shopping</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68262-three-innovative-examples-of-instagram-ux-hacks" target="_blank">Three innovative examples of Instagram UX hacks</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68142-instagram-stories-what-do-marketers-need-to-know/" target="_blank">Instagram Stories: what do marketers need to know? </a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-02-27T12:55:00+00:00 2017-02-27T12:55:00+00:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to two sector-specific reports, B2B and Healthcare &amp; Pharma) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for sector-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a> and <a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a> reports.</strong></p> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68836 2017-02-27T11:06:06+00:00 2017-02-27T11:06:06+00:00 Eight Western brands running cool campaigns on China's WeChat David Moth <p>Due to the app’s enormous user base and the way in which it is embedded in people’s lives, Western brands often use WeChat as a way of gaining a foothold in the Chinese market. If consumers habitually use an app on a daily basis, then it makes sense to try and use that platform for marketing.</p> <p>To give an idea of the scale of the app’s reach, here are some of those incredible numbers for you to marvel at:</p> <ul> <li>In Q3 2016 <a href="https://www.chinainternetwatch.com/19524/wechat-data-report-2016/">WeChat averaged 846m monthly active users</a>, which represents annual growth of 30%.</li> <li>In the same period the number of daily logged in users was 768m.</li> <li>50% of WeChat users use the app for at least 90 minutes per day.</li> <li>The average user sends 74 messages per day, rising to 81 messages among younger people.</li> <li>As of <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2016/11/16/tencent-q3-2016/">November 2015 more than 200m users</a> had linked their bank card with WeChatPay, which can be used to transfer money between users, make payments online and also to buy things in-store. More than 300,000 brick-and-mortar stores accept WeChat payment.</li> <li>In March 2016 Tencent said it banked over RMB300m ($46m) in a single month from commissions on WePay transactions. WeChat takes 0.1% on all payments, which indicates that app users made close to $50bn in payments that month.</li> </ul> <p>And to give an idea of how Western brands are making use of the app, I’ve rounded up some interesting campaigns and activations from recent years. This is a topic <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65279-how-and-why-western-brands-are-experimenting-with-wechat/">I’ve previously touched on</a>, but that was a few years ago so I’ve trawled the web for new case studies. </p> <p>You’ll notice that most of these campaigns involve either an event in the Chinese calendar or a competition, often both. Equally, we’re largely talking about luxury brands which have an existing cache among Chinese consumers. No doubt these brands are also using WeChat for ongoing content marketing and consumer engagement, but for the purposes of this post I’m only looking at one-off campaigns.</p> <h3>Burberry</h3> <p>In my previous post on Western brands using WeChat I detailed Burberry’s impressive 'Art of the Trench' campaign. But the British fashion brand didn’t rest on its laurels; to coincide with Chinese New Year in February 2016, Burberry sent all of its followers an image of a letter tied with a pink bow. User were told to ‘Shake, tap and swipe’ to try and open the gift.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4151/burberry_lunar_new_year.png" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4150/burberry_lunar_new_year_2.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p><em>Images pinched from <a href="http://digiday.com/marketing/burberry-coach-chanel-win-wechat-users/">Digiday</a></em></p> <p>Once opened, the letter gave users the option to send a personalized Burberry greeting to a friend to celebrate Lunar New Year. They could then shop the brand’s New Year collection within Burberry’s WeChat store. This kind of seamless activation within WeChat’s walled garden is the kind of thing Facebook yearns for.</p> <p>Burberry also gave users the chance to win limited edition Lunar New Year envelopes that could only be picked up in one of the retailer’s boutiques, demonstrating a neat way of using mobile to drive footfall in-store.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VcCitrrCVOg?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Coach</h3> <p>Coach uses WeChat to help run its Chinese loyalty scheme, asking all new followers to enter their mobile number for a chance to win a handbag. There is also a members section where users can manage their accounts and unlock exclusive offers.</p> <p>In addition, for Mother’s Day in 2015 Coach ran a clever campaign called #MyFirstCoach, which celebrated the fact that mothers were their daughters’ first coach. The brand’s WeChat and Weibo followers were encouraged to upload photos of themselves with their mothers in order to be featured on Coach’s homepage and win a wristlet.</p> <p><a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4154/coach.png"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4154/coach.png" alt="" width="583" height="461"></a></p> <p>Backed by paid media, the campaign increased Coach’s WeChat followers by 35,000, as well as receiving more than 5,000 submissions and 2m impressions in three weeks.</p> <h3>Montblanc</h3> <p>Swiss accessories brand Montblanc ran a WeChat campaign that tied into China’s cultural association with the moon’s phases. The brand’s followers had to type in their gender and date of birth to receive information on their personal moon phase and the impact on their personality, love, hobbies and work. A Chinese astrology expert was drafted in to advise on the results.</p> <p>The campaign was to promote Montblanc’s new Meisterstück Heritage Perpetual Calendar and Bohème Perpetual Calendar watches, which feature a dial displaying the specific moon phase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4149/Montblanc-Moon-Phone.jpg" alt="" width="620" height="414"> </p> <p>In a separate campaign, Montblanc used WeChat to tell the story behind its luxury range of fountain pens.</p> <p>Users were invited to scroll through an interactive history lesson which begins with the Industrial Revolution and ends with a showcase of the brand's Rouge et Noir range of pens. The story is intended to hammer home Montblanc's heritage and luxury credentials. Users can even choose to have some suspenseful music play as they scroll through the story.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4147/montblanc_pen.png" alt="" width="620" height="414"></p> <p><em>Photo pinched from <a href="https://jingdaily.com/wechat-campaign-spotlight-montblanc-gives-chinese-fans-a-digital-history-lesson/">Jing Daily</a></em></p> <h3>Roger Dubuis</h3> <p>Another luxury Swiss watch maker - I did say there was a theme among these brands. Roger Dubuis launched a campaign last year called ‘Who is your daring partner?’, which aimed to offer users product suggestions that matched their personality.</p> <p>Upon arriving on the dedicated landing page, users had to answer a series of questions. This included asking people to choose between two city skylines and whether they’d prefer a luxury yacht or a sports car.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4148/Roger-Dubuis.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="399"></p> <p><em>Photo pinched from <a href="https://jingdaily.com/70806-2/">Jing Daily</a></em></p> <p>After answering all the questions, users had to shake their phone to reveal which of Roger Dubuis’s watches they had been paired with. There was no option to purchase the watch within WeChat, with users instead being directed in-store. Participants could also win trips to various branded events by sharing a picture of themselves. </p> <h3>Michael Kors</h3> <p>In April 2016 Michael Kors launched a WeChat campaign in cahoots with Grazia China to promote its spring/summer collection.</p> <p>The ‘Chic Together’ campaign featured five pairs of Chinese celebrities wearing the brand’s bags and shoes. Users could scroll through the interactive app, complete with optional music, and click on each image to find out more about the products on show.</p> <p>At the end of the photo series, users were encouraged to upload a selfie with a friend, with their friend then qualifying for a free gift if they bought some Michael Kors products. Users could also vote for their favourite picture by sharing it on social.</p> <p><a href="https://jingdaily.com/wechat-campaign-spotlight-michael-kors-gives-wechat-followers-free-gifts-tours-new-york-city/"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4153/michael_kors.png" alt="" width="620" height="414"></a></p> <h3>Estée Lauder</h3> <p>Estée Lauder worked with Chinese supermodel Liu Wen for an ‘EyeQ’ campaign to promote its eye care products.</p> <p>An interactive brand post encouraged users to click on a diary that appeared to be falling out of a handbag. The notebook opened to reveal ‘handwritten’ notes from Liu Wen, which all happened to relate to a different Estée Lauder eye care product. Users could also click on Polaroid images to find out more about each of the products.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4146/estee_lauder_feature.png" alt="" width="620" height="414"></p> <p>After scrolling through all the photos users were asked a multiple choice question to make sure they’d been paying attention. If they could correctly guess which product can take years off your eyes, users were offered the chance to win a surprise gift in exchange for their phone number and city of residence.</p> <h3>Clinique</h3> <p>Another cosmetics brand on the list, Clinique created a retro Snake game to lure consumers into learning more about its ‘Even Better Clinical Dark Spot Corrector &amp; Optimizer’. Catchy product name, really rolls off the tongue.</p> <p>Players had to navigate a snake made of skintone squares round the screen, chomping down ‘dark spots’. I can’t pretend to know what dark spots are, but you can see the obvious link between the product and the WeChat game.</p> <p><a href="https://jingdaily.com/campaign-spotlight-clinique-taps-throwback-favorite-persuade-chinese-consumers/"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4155/clinique-featured.png" alt="" width="620" height="414"></a></p> <p>If players scored more than 300 points they won a limited edition sample of the product, and could also share their score to see how they ranked against other WeChat followers. This is another instance of the trend for creating a game or competition within WeChat to encourage user engagement.</p> <h3>British Airways</h3> <p>British Airways used WeChat as part of a broader marketing campaign around Chinese students using the airline to travel to college in England.</p> <p>The central creative idea in ‘Flying the Nest’ was one of those dreadful videos which purport to show someone being totally shocked by an event that just happened to occur while they were casually sitting around with a film crew.</p> <p>In the video a Chinese student called Fangfang is mildly surprised when her parents show up in London unannounced. Apparently Chinese students abroad often get stressed when their parents visit due to language and cultural barriers. British Airways sought to solve this problem by creating a handy travel guide that was downloadable within WeChat.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6T-5jeLG7rs?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>At the end of the video a QR code links the viewer to the HTML5 guide, which details everything a traveller needs to know when flying with British Airways. This includes information on what they should bring, airport signage translations, immigration steps, and more. The guides could also be personalized and printed out.</p> <p>As is common with the examples on this list, British Airways also ran a competition. In this instance users could win flights from China to the UK by sharing an image with a specific hashtag. This is a really neat campaign from British Airways, offering followers something of genuine use via WeChat rather than just a gimmicky competition.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-china-digital-report/"><em>The China Digital Report</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67740-five-things-western-brands-should-know-about-china-s-digital-landscape/"><em>Five things Western brands should know about China's digital landscape</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67702-digital-in-china-10-things-you-might-not-know/"><em>Digital in China: 10 things you might not know</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68755 2017-02-24T12:02:09+00:00 2017-02-24T12:02:09+00:00 How charities capitalise on sponsored abstinence events Nikki Gilliland <p>While it’s certainly a positive for charities – does the trend have a shelf life? What’s more, how do charities ensure their message is delivered in the face of increasing competition?</p> <p>Here’s a look at why it’s been such an effective marketing tool so far, and a bit of insight into how it might evolve in future.  </p> <h3>What’s the appeal?</h3> <h4>Anyone can get involved</h4> <p>Sponsored abstinence events have mass appeal mainly because anyone and everyone can get involved without much effort required. Of course, giving up something <em>is</em> an effort, but the fact that it’s a passive activity – far removed from something like a skydive – means that people are more likely to sign up.</p> <h4>Builds on social media boasting</h4> <p>It’s been suggested that a lot of people participate in these events simply for the enjoyment of posting about it on social media.</p> <p>While the charitable humble brag is a well-known phenomenon, this is a particularly cynical view. But with social media reinforcement being <a href="https://www.ama.org/publications/MarketingNews/Pages/feeding-the-addiction.aspx" target="_blank">linked to a rise in dopamine levels</a> - this addictive cycle is still likely to be a contributing factor.</p> <h4>Personal challenge</h4> <p>Alongside validation from peers, the opportunity to undertake a personal challenge is also part of the abstinence appeal. In fact, many people now participate in events like Dry January even without a fundraising element, proving that charities often (ironically) capitalise on personal interest and gain.</p> <h4>Time limit</h4> <p>While Movember is not an abstinence event, it still uses the typical tactic of a one-month time frame. This can be highly effective, as people are much more likely to agree to a certain behaviour for a limited time period rather than an open-ended amount. </p> <p>Encouragingly, it’s also been suggested that people who give up something for 28 days or more are likely to stop in the long term.</p> <h3>Awareness vs. Fundraising</h3> <p>This year’s Dry January was marred by suggestions that giving up alcohol for a month could <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/12098843/Dry-January-campaign-could-do-more-harm-than-good-claims-expert.html" target="_blank">do more harm than good</a>. Specifically, it was suggested that abstinence events can lead to dangerous bingeing at the end of the month as people ‘celebrate’ its culmination.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the increase in popularity, it appears the charitable element (and core message) could be getting lost amid the social media noise. With three charities running alcohol abstinence events, competing for public attention has become a big challenge - especially considering the somewhat conflicting messages of each.</p> <p>Cancer Research runs a typically light-hearted campaign, focusing on the act of fundraising rather than the core message behind it. Clearly a successful tactic, it has raised an impressive £17m since launching in 2013.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3496/Dryathlete.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="600"></p> <p>In contrast, Alcohol Concern hammers home the importance of changing the core behaviour, with raising money an almost secondary factor. This has proved a problem, which has subsequently led to the charity changing its marketing approach.</p> <p>Aiming to dispel the notion that it is being preachy or condescending, it is now placing greater focus on fundraising. In 2016, it announced that it would be partnering with Virgin Money Giving to allow participants to raise money for both Alcohol Concern and a separate charity. With one in six people reportedly taking part in the event regardless of a charity link, this aimed to provide further incentive and encourage sign ups to Alcohol Concern specifically.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">No Friday night beers this week, it's <a href="https://twitter.com/dryjanuary">@dryjanuary</a>, raising money for <a href="https://twitter.com/AlcoholConcern">@AlcoholConcern</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/breastcancernow">@breastcancernow</a> <a href="https://t.co/srXiHp6ZwG">https://t.co/srXiHp6ZwG</a></p> — Paul Davis (@Saddlerpaul) <a href="https://twitter.com/Saddlerpaul/status/817507977133494272">January 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Ultimately then, the success of these events appears to be more related to raising awareness - be it either of the charity itself, or to a lesser extent, a health-related issue such as smoking – rather than raising money. </p> <p>In turn, perhaps whether or not people <em>do</em> raise money in the process relies on the strength (and persuasive techniques) of marketing campaigns.</p> <p>Here are a few further examples and reasons why they’re effective.</p> <h3>Effective marketing campaigns </h3> <h4>British Heart Foundation's Dechox</h4> <p>BHF raised nearly £800,000 during its first-ever ‘de-chox’ – an event that encourages giving up chocolate for March. This year, it is hoping to raise even more by focusing on the workplace.</p> <p>Building on ‘cake culture’ and the statistic that <a href="https://www.fenews.co.uk/sector-news/new-statistics-reveal-over-two-fifths-of-people-working-in-education-have-ditched-the-diet-after-eating-chocolate-on-the-job-13122" target="_blank">55% of people will eat chocolate at work</a> if it is within eyesight, the charity uses relatable messaging to encourage participation, as well as the notion that ‘we’re all in it together’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3495/Dechox_2.JPG" alt="" width="640" height="642"></p> <h4>Veganuary</h4> <p>Unlike health-related charities, Veganuary capitalises on multiple incentives to promote its meat and dairy-free month. While it champions animal welfare, it likely appeals to people who are concerned about environmental issues – plus those who are drawn into celebrity trends related to food and wellness.</p> <p>Social media plays a huge part of Veganuary’s marketing, with the charity capitalising on food inspiration to engage users. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3490/Veganuary.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="485"></p> <h4>Febfast</h4> <p>Unlike charities that promote health-related causes, e.g. smoking or drinking, Febfast uses the abstinence angle purely as a marketing tool.</p> <p>It also opens up the notion to encourage participants to give up anything they like. Whether it’s fast food or being late – its inclusive nature means there’s no reason <em>not</em> to get involved.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3491/Febfast.JPG" alt="" width="590" height="678"></p> <p>Its phrasing is also quite original, urging people to ‘hit pause’ on something rather than give it up. Deliberately avoiding any danger of sounding preachy or overly-serious, it focuses on the positive results, in both the personal and charitable sense.</p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66592-why-charities-need-true-digital-transformation/"><em>Why charities need true digital transformation</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67451-the-smartest-experiential-charity-marketing-campaign-you-ll-see-this-year/"><em>The smartest experiential &amp; charity marketing campaign you'll see this year</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68781-five-ways-charities-can-encourage-more-online-donations/"><em>Five ways charities can encourage more online donations</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68831 2017-02-23T11:48:06+00:00 2017-02-23T11:48:06+00:00 How brands are tapping into the trend for a digital detox Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, we are able to use mobile technology to encourage creativity and enhance entertainment – but arguably at the expense of our productivity and general well-being.</p> <p>This topic was recently highlighted in Mindshare’s 2017 <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/uk" target="_blank">Trends report</a>, which also cited how certain companies are tapping into the consumer’s desire to switch off.</p> <p>Here’s a bit of elaboration on the subject, and a few more examples of how brands are (ironically) using technology to combat technology overload.</p> <h3>Dolmio Pepper Hacker</h3> <p>Last year, Dolmio used the notion of ‘too much tech’ as the basis of its own marketing campaign. It was built around the idea that technology has hijacked dinner time, with children becoming so absorbed in tablets and smartphones that they are completely unaware of everything going on around them. </p> <p>So, it created the ‘pepper hacker’ - a device that automatically disables surrounding Wi-Fi - to help families reclaim dinner time. </p> <p>It was a well-executed campaign, incorporating an amusing advert, a competition and a related creative – all hosted on a dedicated website. As well as using a relatable topic to target its core demographic of families, the brand was also able to show care and concern for the people who typically buy its products.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dN04OO67_do?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Apple</h3> <p>Apple included a whole host of sleep-related features in its iOS 10 update, recognising the growing problem of users being able to switch off from their phones at night. Putting ‘Bedtime’ into its own dedicated tab, it now allows users to configure alarms to remind them when to go to bed and when to wake up, emphasising that a regular pattern can help aid restful sleep. </p> <p>More recently, there’s been talk that Apple is to introduce new apps for the Apple Watch, including similar sleep and fitness trackers. If it does, this demonstrates the brand's greater intent to infiltrate the health industry, as well as perhaps recognition that it is intrinsically linked to users’ increasing sleep troubles.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4100/Apple_bedtime.jpg" alt="" width="625" height="539"></p> <h3>GE</h3> <p>Another brand to tap into sleep-related issues is GE, with its range of C-Sleep light bulbs.</p> <p>Designed to prevent harsh light from interrupting natural rhythms in the brain, the lightbulbs can be toggled between three settings – one for night, one for morning and one for any time in-between. By changing the light intensity, people will be able to prevent melatonin levels from being disrupted, as well as create a more calming and sleep-inducing bedtime environment.</p> <p>This is a good example of a brand demonstrating that it’s not always about a reaction against technology itself – but finding ways to use technology in smart ways in order to facilitate a modern lifestyle. The fact that the lightbulbs can be controlled via an app proves that balance is key.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4101/GE.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="416"></p> <h3>Meantime Brewing Company</h3> <p>Another content marketing campaign, this time from Meantime Brewing Company, based on the idea that technology is disrupting socialising and our ability to enjoy down-time. As part of its 'Make Time For It' campaign, it challenged six talented craftsmen from six cities to each create one element of a pop up bar. The premise being that it takes time to both create and enjoy a good beer.</p> <p>Meantime’s London bar, also the smallest ever pop-bar, opened last October with one stipulation – everyone entering had to hand over their mobile phone so that they could enjoy a pint, technology-free. </p> <p>It’s not unusual for beer brands to use ideas of patience and calm – Guinness’s famous tagline is course “good things come to those who wait”. However, Meantime’s strict no-smartphone rule proved that more brands are cottoning on to the idea (as well as how it can be used to drum up a good bit of PR).</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jIn0N2mpbKw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Headspace</h3> <p>Lastly, just one example of a brand that would not exist if there wasn’t a desire to switch off.</p> <p>Headspace is one of the most successful mindfulness apps, designed to help users take a break from the treadmill of life and instead take a well-earned breather. Now reported to be worth £25m, there has been some suggestion that Headspace goes against the traditional, spiritual premise of true mindfulness. After all, not all of its features are free.</p> <p>This is a pretty cynical view, however, and perhaps one that is beside the point here. What Headspace shows us is that mindfulness is now mainstream. Brands, whether they are already established or not, are merely finding more ways to capitalise on it.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Life is easier with technology. But is it happier? <a href="https://t.co/sEEs4t62jI">https://t.co/sEEs4t62jI</a> <a href="https://t.co/6FHyxFG9eW">pic.twitter.com/6FHyxFG9eW</a></p> — Headspace (@Headspace) <a href="https://twitter.com/Headspace/status/833858035336425473">February 21, 2017</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68827 2017-02-22T14:11:00+00:00 2017-02-22T14:11:00+00:00 19 words and phrases to weed out of your marketing copy Dan Brotzel <p>'More than not, marketers are abuzz about social media and video without comprehending that most of our communication is still text- and story-based. And frankly, most marketers are really bad at writing.’</p> <p>Good writing is about vigilance, among other things. And as marketers, one easy way to improve our writing is to try and weed out some of those bits of boilerplated guff and clichéd collateralese that are always hanging about ready to sneak their way back into our copy the moment we turn our backs. (I’m sure you’ll find some in my copy; but one can but try.)</p> <p>So here’s a dirty near-score of marketing phrases that refuse to die – together with some extra ammunition as to why it’s time to let them go for good…</p> <h3><strong>‘We understand that x’ </strong></h3> <p>As in ‘we understand that getting a mortgage for the first time can be a daunting experience’. Or ‘we understand that your pet is important to you’. Or ‘we understand that your time is valuable.’</p> <p>When you think about it, is there anything good one can say about this time-honoured marketing construction, which comes over as redundant (why would you tell me things you don’t understand?), patronising, questionable (what do you, a bank, really know or remember about the experience of getting a first-time mortgage?) or bland – and often all at once.</p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Often you can just remove the wording and immediately improve the sentence. But if you really want to make this point about empathy, find a way to show or prove that you understand x, not just state or tell it, for instance through proof points, testimonial quotes or other credible content that showcases your expertise in the area.</p> <h3><strong>‘Tailored to your specific/individual requirements/your unique circumstances’</strong></h3> <p>...And the whole bundle of messages about bespoke/customised solutions. These time-battered phrases promise much but deliver little, and tend to fall apart on closer inspection.</p> <p>There’s the tautology – why would you tailor things to my <em>non-specific</em> requirements? There’s the lazy promise – is your ‘solution’ really as unique as my circumstances? How do you know my circumstances are unique, come to that? (They aren’t always.) Above all, there is the weary sense that this is just what you say to everyone... which delivers exactly the opposite cookie-cutter effect to what you were apparently shooting for.</p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Try and find something fresh to say. Be specific. Demonstrate that you really do ‘bespoke’ your ‘solutions’ (without using either of these words). Or if you don’t really, maybe you don’t need to pretend that you do?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4066/Siemens.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="203"></p> <h3><strong>‘X will soon be upon us’ (and other tired seasonal hooks)</strong></h3> <p>As in ‘winter will soon be upon us and car safety is essential to avoid emergency situations’ (so you need our executive driving winter kit). Or ‘the picnic season will soon be upon us so why not stock up on some al fresco essentials?’ (which we sell, by the way). Or ‘the festive season will soon be upon us, but don’t worry, we’ve got Christmas all wrapped up’.</p> <p>That last one manages to combine two seasonal clichés in one, of course: ‘all wrapped up’ is for my money right up there with ‘new year, new you’ and the assumption that people (especially men) do nothing but DIY on bank holidays.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4067/National-home-buyers.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="412"></p> <p>Does it matter? Aren’t these messages just conventions that we expect at certain times of the year? Well, they often feel very tired, and that can’t be good for our sales prospects. Plus, endless repetition of the same phrases tends to make readers blind/deaf to their meaning (a phenomenon that can affect the writers of such marketing copy too). </p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Say something else. Address the season in an unexpected way. What about single people and divorcees at Valentine’s? What about making a resolution at the start of the Chinese New Year or the tax year?</p> <p>On the other hand, if you have an unexpected event coming up, the use of the mundane cliché actually adds to the impact:  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4064/Zombie-apocalypse-Zazzles.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="388"></p> <h3><strong>‘Looking for/to do x?’ ‘Need x for your y?’ </strong></h3> <p>As in: ‘Looking to review your postage franking solution in 2017?’ Or: ‘Looking for a new flooring solution for your home?’ Or: ‘Looking to drive business growth?’ Or: ‘Need a new UK hospitality purchase decision-maker database provider?’</p> <p>You get this sort of approach in coldish emails a lot. What they tend to have in common is an absence of sizzle, or benefit, or USP. Such marketing simply states what’s on offer, in the most internally focused and unvarnished way possible, and asks you if you want it. Or else it states the bleeding obvious: What business isn’t interested in growth? (And when are you going to get round to telling me what you do?)</p> <p>Sometimes this may be a sensible way of qualifying out people. If I really have no possible need of a new UK hospitality purchase decision-maker database, no amount of fancy copy can change this. But then again, if there is a chance I might be interested, why would I go for the provider who can’t be bothered to do more than list what they do?</p> <p>What this approach also overlooks is that people often don’t know what they want or need, and it’s the job of the marketing copy to get people feeling otherwise. We get engaged with marketing messages because they chime with something we didn't know we were already thinking, because they show how something might fit into our world, because they work hard to create a little feelgood sensation at the thought of having them in our lives. ‘Looking for a new flooring solution?’ doesn’t quite do it for me.</p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Be creative. Think about why someone might care about what you have to offer. Think about scenarios and use cases they might relate to. Tell us stories of other people who’ve benefited from your product or service. Anything but this really.</p> <h3><strong>‘Today’s fast-moving world’ </strong></h3> <p>As in: ‘In today's fast-moving world, any business that fails to keep up with the latest technological trends and developments will be swiftly left behind.’ Or: ‘In today’s fast moving world with its rapid technological advancement, the ability to constantly pivot and see oneself in relation to the larger ecosystem is essential in order to remain relevant.’</p> <p>On Google, a search for ‘today’s fast-moving world’ yields 61,100 results. It’s the sort of phrase that’s especially favoured by consultancies, software providers and personal development outfits. It seems to be a sort of shorthand for our contemporary sense that the world keeps changing in complex ways, what with all the new gadgets and the social media stuff and those disruptive brands and that Donald Trump and drones and AI and loads of the jobs of tomorrow haven’t even been invented yet and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital transformation</a> and oh God, I don’t know, everything’s just really complicated, it won’t stay still and now I’ve got a headache.</p> <p>Something like that. But because everyone uses the same phrase and you show no signs of having any special insights to bring to bear on this complexity, we sort of just assume that you can’t really get your head round it either. Or maybe you can’t be bothered to say anything more meaningful because the world will probably change again, making your comments obsolete before you’ve even published them. But that’s today’s fast-moving world for you all over, alas.</p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Avoid. Be specific instead. Choose a specific topic or issue that your users and prospects might relate to, and that you have something interesting to say about.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4068/Open-genius-website.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="656"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4065/Aldermore-webpage.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="412"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4069/Angel-webpage.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="525"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4070/Key-personnel-webpage.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="412"></p> <h3><strong>'Today, more than ever…'</strong></h3> <p>As in: ‘Today more than ever, you need an effective way to help support a healthy balance of microbes in your gut’ (provider of probiotic supplements). Or: ‘Today, more than ever, we continue to be an industry leader in innovation’ (tool maker). Or: ‘Today more than ever before, our pets have become part of the family […] without asking for anything in return’ (pet urns supplier).</p> <p>Copywriters often invoke this breathless phrase to signal that the thought that comes next is really important. It has to be, because it’s usually the reason they want you to invest in their product or service. Unfortunately, they often don’t have anything of sufficient weight to insert here, and so it all rings a bit hollow. 'Today, more than ever, I need you to buy my product.'</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4071/Google-pets.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="235"></p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Go for a proof point that’s provable and specific, rather than a general statement that’s as sweeping as it is unconvincing. Or think of a topical reference or a story people will be familiar with, to illustrate your point.</p> <h3><strong>'State of the art'</strong></h3> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4072/State-of-the-art.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="406"></p> <p>As in ‘state-of-the-art conference facilities’, ‘state-of-the-art accounting software’, or (even) ‘state-of-the-art pooper scooper’. I’m sure I’ve used this one in my time, but now that I look at in the cold light of day (cliché), I’m not sure I want to any more.</p> <p>Pretty much everyone claims that what they do or sell is ‘state of the art’. This makes the claim meaningless. Another problem is that the phrase is really just a fancy synonym for ‘up to the minute’ or ‘latest’. So you’re basically claiming that your offering isn’t out of date (duh), or else it looks like you’re trying too hard to pretend that you’re still with it.</p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Back to specifics, to showing not telling. Focus on one or a few aspects that genuinely illustrate your state-of-the-artness.</p> <h3><strong>‘Solutions’, ‘global solutions’, ‘global solutions provider’</strong></h3> <p>As in: ‘UK cloud solutions provider’, ‘hotel bookings solutions provider’ or ‘business event solutions provider’. The word ‘solutions’ has been derided so often that satirical magazine <em>Private Eye</em> even ran a regular column in which readers sent in their worst examples of the phrase in action. Someone found a description of cardboard boxes as ‘Christmas Ornament Storage Solutions’. Then there was ‘Lockwoods Mushy Pea Fritters: the frozen versatile meal solution.’</p> <p>But though civilians laughed at the phrase and moved on, in marketing – and especially in B2B and IT – it has refused to die. Google searches show it’s still everywhere. Yet it adds little in terms of meaning or impact, and is often totally redundant.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4061/Ryoden_network_solutions.png" alt="" width="728" height="557"></p> <p><strong>The fix:</strong> Try saying the same thing without mentioning the word ‘solution’ or ‘provider’. It’ll probably read better.</p> <h3><strong>Quick-fire round</strong></h3> <p>Here for your consideration are a few more pet hates from my colleagues, with their comments...</p> <p><strong><em>‘We’ve teamed up with…’ </em></strong>You’re not a superhero!</p> <p><strong><em>‘Meeting the needs of today’s [businesses/global traveller/etc]…’ </em></strong>Bland and meaningless.</p> <p><strong><em>‘It’s up to you…’ </em></strong>As in, ‘Choose x widget, or choose y widget – it’s up to you’. Who else would it be up to??</p> <p><strong><em>‘Whatever you’re looking for/planning etc, we can help/we’ve got you covered’ </em></strong>Really? Anything? Now you’ve just got me thinking of exceptions.</p> <p><strong><em>‘As a [insert audience], you need to [insert product benefit] and that’s why we now offer [insert product feature]’ </em></strong>Formulaic and unimaginative. This is just the brief served up as the execution.</p> <p><strong><em>‘Created by experts’, ‘We're experts in…’ ‘We have the expertise’ etc </em></strong>I hate the 'expert' tag. If you’re really experts, do you have to say it?</p> <p><strong><em>‘[Our event] is fast approaching and it’s going to be the best [thing of its kind] ever’ </em></strong>Don’t believe you.</p> <p><strong><em>‘110%!’ </em></strong>This is simply, mathematically inaccurate.</p> <p><strong><em>‘Something for everyone’ </em></strong>Don't do it. You'll be 'ticking every box' next...</p> <p><strong><em>Unbeatable prices </em></strong>Unless you really do have a price promise.</p> <p><strong><em>‘Your dream x (e.g. your dream kitchen)’ </em></strong>I don’t think I’ve ever dreamt about my ideal kitchen!</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, book yourself onto one of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/copywriting">Econsultancy’s copywriting courses</a>, or check out these other posts:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68583-10-common-traits-of-bad-copywriters/"><em>10 common traits of bad copywriters</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66631-20-banned-words-from-the-econsultancy-blog-and-their-alternatives/"><em>20 banned words from the Econsultancy blog and their alternatives</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68826 2017-02-22T14:06:00+00:00 2017-02-22T14:06:00+00:00 Three things to appreciate about Discover LA’s latest video campaign Nikki Gilliland <p>It’s an interesting approach, and one that I think works quite well. Here are a few reasons why.</p> <h3>Movie inspiration</h3> <p>There are a lot of movies about cities, but there aren’t many that celebrate a location quite like La La Land. Unsurprisingly, Discover LA has jumped on the bandwagon, taking inspiration from the movie and mimicking its celebration of the city’s sweeping skyline.</p> <p>The first video from the campaign, ‘Magic’, is so far the most reminiscent of La La Land. It features a dance troupe performing against the backdrop of a twinkling, dusky Downtown skyline, complete with a view from Griffith Observatory.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7kRl2IWg9qY?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Arguably then, the best thing about Discover LA’s campaign is its timing – cleverly coinciding with the film’s release and subsequent 14 Oscar nominations. </p> <p>However, whether you’ve seen the movie or not, the campaign’s cinematic (and rose-tinted) view of LA is bound to leave you feeling a little captivated – or nonplussed at your own less-than-glamorous surroundings at the very least. I particularly like the fact that the videos feature no talking or background narration. </p> <p>In contrast to a previous tourism campaign from Visit California, which featured a host of people humble-bragging about their laid-back lifestyle, the videos are far more enjoyable to watch.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Iey7_N_mEx4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Based on consumer opinion</h3> <p>Discover LA has traditionally used the real-life experiences of local residents to inform its marketing campaigns, incorporating insight about what makes life in Los Angeles so special.</p> <p>This latest campaign is no different, however this time it uses the opinions of people from elsewhere. The brand reportedly undertook in-depth focus groups in nine key global markets, including the UK, in order to find out why travellers are drawn to the city. From this, it discovered that most people cited the feeling or the lifestyle of LA as the most intriguing part. </p> <p>This is another reason why the campaign feels so refreshing. Instead of promoting the city in a stereotypically ‘Hollywood’ fashion – or the ‘millennials want experiences’ angle - it focuses on the overarching (and sometimes unexplainable) atmosphere.</p> <p>In turn, it recognises that the city is a genuine travel destination for Brits based on a wide range of reasons – not just its recent movie incarnation. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Dh2pHJVIeAo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Social media integration</h3> <p>Lastly, Discover LA’s use of social is particularly impressive – specifically how its uses Instagram to provide extra value for users.</p> <p>By choosing to post its ‘Discover LA’ videos directly within Instagram, it manages to ensure greater reach.</p> <p>Meanwhile, not only are the posts beautiful to look at, but the brand often includes detailed descriptions too. This helps to counteract the feeling that the campaign (and Instagram as a channel) is more shallow than informative – one which merely emphasises what’s on the surface.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4051/Discover_LA_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="497"></p> <p>By including content in this context, Discover LA manages to strike a good balance, both informing the user as well as visually capturing their attention. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67952-five-tourism-websites-guaranteed-to-give-you-wanderlust/" target="_blank">Five tourism websites guaranteed to give you wanderlust</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67996-what-travel-tourism-marketers-can-learn-from-discover-la/" target="_blank">What travel &amp; tourism marketers can learn from Discover LA</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68604-why-ugc-is-the-future-of-social-media-in-travel-and-tourism-marketing/" target="_blank">Why UGC is the future of social media in travel and tourism marketing</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68828 2017-02-21T14:06:31+00:00 2017-02-21T14:06:31+00:00 After years of apathy, football clubs are embracing digital transformation David Moth <p>However, it turns out my research for that article was no better than the scouting performed by Southampton when <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/football/2016/nov/22/ali-dia-story-20-years-on-southampton-souness">they signed Ali Dia</a> back in 1996. While I maintain that <a href="https://southamptonfc.com/">Southampton’s website</a> is still the best the Premier League has to offer, it’s been brought to my attention that other clubs are also doing some excellent digital work. </p> <p>Much has been written about Manchester City’s digital strategy, which includes a strong emphasis on social media, experiments with VR, and hackathons focusing on digital fan engagement.</p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FcSnHBZcC4w?ecver=2&amp;wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe> <p>And while it’s easy to suggest that City’s digital success is inevitable due to the club’s vast resources, one need only <a href="http://www.manutd.com/Splash-Page.aspx">glance at their local rival’s site</a> to see that having lots of cash doesn’t guarantee that some of it will be invested in digital platforms.</p> <p>But it’s wrong to focus only on what’s happening at the top of the league. Robbie Blackburn, client partner at digital agency <a href="http://www.aqueduct.co.uk/">Aqueduct</a>, said that although Man City are known for being digital innovators, other teams are quietly developing their own digital capabilities as well.</p> <p>“It’s been a big play for City to be seen as leaders in digital. They recently launched their own robot partner, which suggests that some of it is for PR value. But a lot of other clubs are really seeing the value in innovating in digital.”</p> <p>Cast your eye lower down the league table, down to the very bottom in fact. <a href="https://www.safc.com/">Sunderland AFC</a> who, at the time of writing, are in last place, have had a strong focus on digital for many years. This approach is fairly unique for a club with a history of yo-yoing between the Premier League and Championship. </p> <p>Most clubs in the Football League (i.e. the Championship down to League Two) outsource their websites to Football League Interactive (FLI). This is a centralised web platform offered for free to Football League clubs that want to outsource their website in return for giving up the right to any ad revenue. While it’s a useful service for lower league clubs looking to reduce their overheads, the UX of FLI sites is poor and customisation options are limited.</p> <p>Sunderland have never used FLI and during the 2012/13 season launched what was then the first responsive Premier League site built in HTML5. Working with Aqueduct, Sunderland unveiled another new site at the beginning of the current 2016/17 season, with the aim of offering fans a more app-like experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4075/sunderland_homepage.png" alt="" width="700" height="416"></p> <p><em>Sunderland's content feed</em></p> <p>Visually the site has a similar layout to Southampton’s, with a content feed that’s frequently updated, as well as a dedicated match day experience. While the range of content and site navigation isn’t quite on par with Southampton’s, plans are afoot to further develop the site in the near future.</p> <p>Despite being a relatively small club compared to some of its Premier League peers, Sunderland is ahead of most teams in terms of its digital capabilities thanks to years of investment by the club’s owners. According to Stuart Vose, Sunderland AFC’s head of digital: “There’s no hard and fast way of getting digital right. What works for one club might not work for another. </p> <p>“The senior management of this club are very ambitious for digital, they realise that it should be at the centre of any modern business, and particularly a sports club where it connects with so many fans around the world plus partners and sponsors.”</p> <p>A common theme among Premier League teams is the desire to use digital both to engage with existing and new fans, and also to open up new sponsorship opportunities. </p> <p>Stuart currently has seven people within his digital team who broadly cover content and digital marketing for the club and the Stadium of Light’s event facilities. One recent example of the club’s in-house capabilities is this #keepthefaith video, which aims to rally support as the club battles relegation.</p> <iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lm7tvIP3ndQ?ecver=2&amp;wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe> <p>Historically Sunderland’s digital team has acted almost as a service function for other departments, responding to requests and helping with specific projects, but plans are now underway to embed the digital team across the entire club.</p> <p>According to Stuart: “We want digital to sit across everything and be able to proactively offer digital products and services into other departments to help drive them forward rather than just reacting to things. Not just ‘can we have a tweet’, but how can we innovate and offer products and services to them.”</p> <p>It’s these new products and services – such as new content hubs or digital platforms – that can provide value to both fans and sponsors alike. As Stuart puts it: “Digital is a virtuous circle. The more you invest in it, the better our digital platforms become, which hopefully helps to attract better sponsors, which gives us more money to invest, and so on. It all builds up.”</p> <p>Sunderland is currently working to create a single sign-on for the club’s digital platforms (ticketing, merchandising, content, etc), which will allow for better management of user data and enable personalisation of content using Sitecore. A previous project saw the club work with Sports Alliance to pull together its data from various sources (ticketing, merchandise, hospitality), which doubled the size of the club’s user database. </p> <h3>Digital in the Championship</h3> <p>And it’s not just in the Premier League where clubs are striving to improve their digital platforms. <a href="http://www.wolves.co.uk/">Wolverhampton Wanderers</a>, currently 19th in the Championship, are also in the middle of a website revamp that aims to create a far better user experience for fans.</p> <p>After 17 years of outsourcing its site to FLI, Wolves has decided to bring control of its website back in-house at the end of this season. Head of marketing, Laura Gabbidon, explained that the club is working to create the kind of digital experience that fans want and expect.</p> <p>Laura said: “We’re not looking at our website like a traditional business would, like a brochure, we want it to be an interactive digital experience, a media centre for fans, the first port of call for all things Wolves.</p> <p>“From our perspective that will hopefully improve the on-site engagement but also our relationship with the fans, or their relationship with the club. It’ll provide us commercial support by collecting behavioural and contact data, and also give us more opportunity to commercialize through sponsors.”</p> <p>Wolves have already had some success with increasing revenues thanks to improvements with digital platforms. After redesigning the ticketing part of the website earlier this year, online sales of home tickets increased by 10%.</p> <p>The overall site redesign, which is being worked on with Aqueduct and aims to go live in June, is the first stage of a bigger <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital transformation project</a>. Laura said that football “isn’t anywhere near up to speed” with digital compared to other industries, and that clubs now have no choice but to play catch up.</p> <p>Wolves haven’t got a clear transformation roadmap in place, and are instead waiting for the website to be complete before deciding what to tackle next. "We want to build the website, get it as good as it can be, and then identify any gaps where we’re not delivering. We don’t want to rush into doing everything at once then end up duplicating things or wasting our efforts,” said Laura.</p> <p>If the site achieves it goals, it will enable the club to make better use of social media and video content, which in turn has required new hires with the right digital content skills. The digital transformation journey is a familiar one, regardless of which league a club plays in.</p> <h3>Luring fans away from fan forums</h3> <p>Will an official club site ever be able to attract fans away from the likes of the BBC, Twitter and Sky? Southampton FC’s research into user behaviour showed that football fans tend to constantly graze on short-form content during the week, skipping between different social networks and publisher sites.</p> <p>Laura admits that it’s a big challenge to insert an official club site into this mix, but hopes that a combination of an improved UX and unique, high quality content will be enough to win fans over. “A lot of our fans like to engage with us using Twitter on match days, and at the same time they’re probably going off to get live scores and updates from other games from the BBC," she explained.</p> <p>“We don’t want to take away any of those experiences, so we’ll look to integrate all of it, offering the same type of experience that you get on Twitter but on the website, as well as giving people similar content that they’d get from the BBC and elsewhere. So you’ll get it all in one place.”</p> <p>More broadly, there has been a concerted effort by the Premier League and top clubs to play catch up with other sports publishers.</p> <p>With <a href="https://www.premierleague.com/">a flashy new website</a> and the launch of a new app, the Premier League itself is aiming to compete with the likes of Opta Sports and the BBC by providing official access to stats, video content and fantasy football leagues.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4076/premier_league_homepage.png" alt="" width="700" height="309"></p> <p><em>The Premier League's new website</em></p> <p>Another noteworthy development is the launch of a new social network called ‘<a href="https://dugout.com/">Dugout</a>’ that enables fans to access exclusive content by following their favourite teams and players. 10 Premier League teams have signed up to the platform, alongside the likes of Juventus, PSG, Barcelona and SC Corinthians Paulista.</p> <p>While it will be difficult to lure fans away from their existing content grazing routine, these new official channels might succeed if they are able to provide unique content and a genuine forum for debate and conversation among fans.</p> <p>Ultimately the user experience will also play a large part. If official club sites, the league’s new app, or Dugout can offer fans a quick, usable, mobile platform then there’s no reason they won’t be able to insert themselves into that mix.</p> <p>And with site traffic comes those new opportunities for lucrative sponsorship deals. As Stuart Vose puts it, investment in digital is a virtuous circle.</p> <p><strong><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68445-can-southampton-fc-break-the-hegemony-of-crap-football-websites/"><em>Can Southampton FC break the hegemony of crap football websites?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63300-why-manchester-city-s-emails-are-premier-league-quality/"><em>Why Manchester City's emails are premier league quality</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67786-10-great-sports-digital-marketing-campaigns/"><em>10 great sports digital marketing campaigns</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68819 2017-02-17T11:03:14+00:00 2017-02-17T11:03:14+00:00 10 outstanding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go...</p> <h3>73% of retailers fear cybercrime will negatively impact them in 2017</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.mimecast.com/resources/white-papers/Dates/2017/2/email-security-risk-assessment" target="_blank">new research</a> from Mimecast, retailers are hyper-aware of cyber-crime, with 73% believing that an attack will negatively impact their business in the year ahead.</p> <p>65% also believe a malicious email is the most likely way they’ll be infected by ransomware, making retail the most fearful industry overall.</p> <p>This news comes on the back of Mimecast’s security risk report which – from analysis of 26m emails – found 3.5m pieces of spam and 6,681 dangerous files.</p> <h3>Lingerie more popular than chocolate this Valentine’s Day</h3> <p>Criteo has revealed the most-searched for items this Valentine’s Day. Coming in at number one was ‘earrings’, followed by ‘men’s watches’ and ‘engagement ring’.</p> <p>Interestingly, searches for lingerie increased a massive 366% in the lead up to the day itself, somewhat justifying many online retailer’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68767-how-retailers-are-targeting-mobile-shoppers-this-valentine-s-day/" target="_blank">heavy promotion</a> of the category.</p> <p>More traditional items were also in demand, with searches for perfume and diamonds up 141% and 130% respectively.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3973/valentines.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>Millennials drive traffic to luxury online retailers</h3> <p>Ahead of London Fashion Week, Hitwise has revealed how a new generation of affluent millennials are increasingly seeking out luxury brands.</p> <p>According to data, 50% of website traffic to Louis Vuitton, Burberry and Gucci is driven by this demographic. Consequently, brands are expected to continue investing in digital efforts to engage with them.</p> <p>Overall, there has been a 45% increase in website traffic to luxury fashion retailers over the past three years.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3972/Luxury_Millennials.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="328"></p> <h3>66% of marketers struggle to understand their audience</h3> <p>In the wake of Brexit and the US Presidential election, two-thirds of digital marketers are now questioning whether they truly know their audience.</p> <p>This is according to a new survey from Greenlight, which also found that, as a result, 94% now intend to better understand what their customers are looking for.</p> <p>37% plan to target subsets of their audience to ensure their brand is tapping into the conversations that suit their business. Typically, 57% rely on customer surveys and 59% use online forms to collect insight.</p> <h3>18-24 year olds dominate Snapchat usage</h3> <p>Data from Verto has revealed that, despite 18-24 year olds accounting for just 35% of Snapchat's UK users, they account for 70% of the overall time spent on the platform.</p> <p>In contrast, while 40% of Snapchat's audience is aged over 35, this age group accounts for just 5% of usage time.</p> <p>Other data shows that the average user spends 4hrs 22mins on Snapchat a month - a figure down from 5hrs 30mins just six months ago. </p> <p>However, this is still much lower than Facebook, which has an average user time of 12hrs 43mins per month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3971/Verto.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="420"></p> <h3>Proflowers.com leads in Valentine’s Day paid search ad spend</h3> <p>Adgooroo has revealed that ahead of the holiday, Proflowers.com generated a 7.3% share of total clicks on Valentine’s Day-related keywords.</p> <p>This means the site beat out the likes of Hallmark, whose e-card website Hallmarkecards.com generated a 7.1% click share.</p> <p>There was heavy competition in the greetings cards category, too, with Tinyprints.com generating a 3.4% click share, edging out American Greetings and Blue Mountain, which both saw a share of 2.5%.</p> <h3>26% of marketers feel unprepared for GDPR</h3> <p>New research from the <a href="https://dma.org.uk/article/the-gdpr-and-you-chapter-two" target="_blank">DMA</a> suggests that one in four businesses are still unprepared for the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), with just over half reporting that they feel prepared, and 5% believing it’s not their responsibility to do anything about it.</p> <p>It’s not all bad news, however, as awareness of the GDPR <em>has</em> risen from 53% to 66% since June, while marketers’ personal feelings of readiness increased from 49% to 71%. </p> <p>Despite this, there is still a clear need for urgency, with many marketers not believing their businesses will be compliant before the new rules come into place.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3969/DMA.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="295"></p> <h3>Almost 6m UK households have no savings </h3> <p>A five-year study from Experian has found that people in their 20s and 30s are far less well off than the previous generation, with nearly 1m households having received a loan or financial gift from other family members. </p> <p>Experian found that almost 6m households in Britain have no savings, with 423,000 Britons relying on unauthorised overdrafts or payday loans to make ends meet.</p> <p>Lastly, the report also highlights how over 35m people in Britain may be paying more than they should for inappropriate financial products and utility plans, with most <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68789-how-smart-switching-energy-apps-are-tapping-into-customer-need/" target="_blank">failing to switch</a> to a better deal.</p> <h3>66% of marketers no longer use mobile apps in campaigns</h3> <p>The State of Digital Commerce report by Episerver has revealed that two-thirds of marketing professionals are no longer using mobile apps in their marketing campaigns, choosing a responsive mobile presence instead.</p> <p>The report also states that 32% of top retailers do not provide a mobile application across either iPhone or Android devices, and eight out of 10 top UK retailers have adopted a responsive ecommerce site.</p> <p>The shift is said to be due to the surge in mobile search as well as the introduction of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68490-google-s-accelerated-mobile-pages-12-pros-and-cons/">Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3970/Episerver.JPG" alt="" width="482" height="206"></p> <h3>Changing attitudes to brand loyalty</h3> <p>The new Accenture Strategy report has highlighted how consumers’ allegiances towards brands are frequently changing. </p> <p>In a survey of the attitudes of 25,426 consumers, Accenture found that 54% of US consumers have switched a provider in the past year, while 18% report that their own expectations about brand loyalty have changed.</p> <p>Alongside personalisation, greater loyalty could be driven by an experiential approach – with 44% saying they are loyal to a brand that encourages the design or co-creation of products or services.</p> <p>Lastly, 42% of US respondents are also loyal to brands that their family and friends do business with, while 37% are loyal to brands that actively support shared causes, such as charities or public campaigns.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68817 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 How brands are targeting business travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>According to a <a href="http://hotelmarketing.com/index.php/content/article/booking.com_survey_reveals_top_causes_of_business_travel_stress" target="_blank">survey from Booking.com</a>, 93% of business travellers feel stressed at some point during their journey - unsurprising given the amount of logistics involved. From planning to managing expenses, and even without taking into account the actual work that needs to done, there’s a whole heap of hassle that goes along with corporate travel.</p> <p>For brands, this traveller presents a unique opportunity. </p> <p>Not only is there less need to dazzle and delight with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">inspirational marketing</a>, but thanks to the deep pockets of corporate companies, the budget can often be sizeable. Meanwhile, with a positive experience likely to result in repeat trips, business travel could prove to be a lucrative market.</p> <p>Here’s how a few brands are setting their sights on it.</p> <h3>Airbnb</h3> <p>The ‘Airbnb for business’ program launched in 2015, signalling the brand’s intent to capture interest from corporate travellers, all the while proving how popular alternative accommodation has become.</p> <p>The service allows companies to integrate their business travel itineraries, giving them a full run-down of where employees are staying and how much they’re spending. More recently, Airbnb has introduced a feature that allows employees to book on behalf of colleagues, making the service even more streamlined.</p> <p>Since it launched, the program has enjoyed a period of growth, however <a href="https://skift.com/2016/11/04/small-companies-have-embraced-airbnb-for-business-travel/" target="_blank">recent data</a> suggests that this could be slowing – mainly due to the companies choosing Airbnb spending as little as possible on short trips. Similarly, Airbnb for business is only seeing real success in cities where the hotel prices are notoriously high.</p> <p>Airbnb is naturally trying to combat this by promoting longer stays and group trips, even offering £40 in travel credit, in order to encourage higher spend.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3951/Airbnb.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="320"></p> <h3>Booking.com</h3> <p>With a reported one in five customers using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/" target="_blank">Booking.com</a> for business travel, it’s no surprise the brand decided to launch its own business travel platform.</p> <p>Designed to make the research and planning stage as easy as possible, it places a big focus on peer-to-peer reviews, sorting through the data to find accommodation that is ‘business traveller tested and approved’.  </p> <p>This customer-centric approach is continued across the board, and reflected in the online UX.</p> <p>After completing a simple registration, users can filter the search by ‘business interest’ like fitness centre or free cancellation. Arguably, the platform doesn't offer anything that much different to the main Booking.com platform, however the ability for company managers or administrators to coordinate plans for others is a key differentiator.</p> <p>Since its launch, there have been suggestions that the brand will expand its business offering into flights - though there's been no sign of this so far.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3952/Booking.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>STA</h3> <p>With millennials forecast to make up half of the workforce by 2020, the stereotype of the middle-aged business traveller no longer applies.</p> <p>STA is tapping into this notion, launching a business travel brand to target young people with a desire to combine both business and pleasure.</p> <p>Alongside young people starting their own business, students travelling for internships or first jobs, it also targets people who want to tag on a holiday at the end of a work trip.</p> <p>With <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2016/05/05/millennials-are-prioritizing-experiences-over-stuff.html" target="_blank">78% of millennials</a> choosing worthwhile experiences over possessions, it’s no surprise that this demand exists. It also bodes well for STA, with the move helping the brand to stay relevant to young people as they move into the workplace.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Need a <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/visa?src=hash">#visa</a>?. We can help you find out if you need one! Speak to our experts to find out more businesstravel@statravel.co.uk <a href="https://t.co/sbH3xH0RzE">pic.twitter.com/sbH3xH0RzE</a></p> — STA Travel Business (@STABusiness) <a href="https://twitter.com/STABusiness/status/825335372343308289">January 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marriot</h3> <p>STA isn’t the only travel brand to target business travellers with the promise of an experience.</p> <p>Marriot’s Renaissance Hotels brand recently launched a new campaign to do just that. Called ‘The Navigator’s Table’, the video series features TV chef Andrew Zimmern from “Bizarre Foods”, and involves chefs and entrepreneurs offering insight and opinions on regional dishes. </p> <p>Essentially, it is designed to appeal to the modern business traveller – someone who is curious, and who wants to get as much out of a business trip as possible.</p> <p>The frequency with which business travellers travel is largely the reason behind this marketing push. For a large hotel chain like Marriot, a single ‘authentic experience’ could result in multiple and repeat bookings in future – reason enough to pay them more attention.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7UUT15kQG1A?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p>