tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy Latest Content marketing content from Econsultancy 2016-12-08T14:46:13+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68608 2016-12-08T14:46:13+00:00 2016-12-08T14:46:13+00:00 Could L’Oréal’s ‘Beauty Squad’ mark a shift for influencer marketing? Nikki Gilliland <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2130/Google_Trends_Influencers.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="240"></p> <p>With the launch of its ‘Beauty Squad’ initiative, the cosmetics giant is hoping to “craft a different type of relationship” with influencers. </p> <p>Here’s a bit more on the collaboration and why it could mark a shift within the world of influencer marketing.</p> <h3>What is the ‘Beauty Squad?’</h3> <p>The Beauty Squad is made up of five of the UK’s most influential beauty bloggers, including Patricia Bright, Emily Canham, Kaushal, Ruth Crilly and Victoria Magrath. </p> <p>Together, they have a combined reach of more than 5m viewers on YouTube as well as a mammoth following on various other social media channels.</p> <p>Victoria Magrath, also known as ‘IntheFrow’, has over 730,000 followers on her Instagram account alone.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2131/InTheFrow.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="409"></p> <p>The idea is that the Beauty Squad will be brand ambassadors for L’Oréal, creating digital content to promote awareness and drive engagement around new products.  </p> <p>This will apparently include behind-the-scenes videos of big events, product reviews, and tips and tutorials.</p> <p>Following on from its #YoursTruly campaign earlier this year, and a change of tagline to ‘Because We Are <em>All</em> Worth It’, the Beauty Squad appears to be a continuation of L’Oréal's efforts to become a more inclusive brand.</p> <p>Incorporating a variety of ages, ethnicities and styles into its marketing mix - a focus on diversity is evident.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6uV9YYLJ8f4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Why is it different to other influencer campaigns?</h3> <p>It’s not unusual for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">beauty brands to work with social media influencers</a>, however it is more uncommon to work with more than one or two at the same time.</p> <p>It begs the question - why didn’t L’Oreal go for Zoella and her 11m subscribers rather than the Beauty Squad and their combined 5m?</p> <p>According to the brand, it’s all about creating a sense of authenticity, and combatting the disingenuous nature of some sponsored campaigns.</p> <p>While they might not have the biggest reach, the members of the Beauty Squad are well known for their knowledge and expertise in a particular field.</p> <p>Each one has been chosen to represent a specific category such as ‘skincare’ or ‘hair’. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2133/Ruth_Crilly.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="525"></p> <p>As well as drawing on this level of knowledge and passion, L’Oreal also maintains that the collaboration will result in the critique and evolution of its products.</p> <p>Instead of merely promoting the brand, influencers are said to be part of an ‘open discussion’ – with the freedom to honestly review products as well as speak about other brands.</p> <p>Whether we will see real evidence of this is unlikely, however it’s definitely nice to hear a big brand take this perspective. </p> <p>Furthermore, the collaboration is also part of L’Oreal’s aim to forge long-term relationships with influencers, rather than using one-off posts or short-term campaigns.</p> <p>Interestingly, Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/" target="_blank">Voice of the Influencer</a> report found one-off sponsored posts to be the most common generator of income for social media personalities.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2134/Voice_of_Influencer.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="725"></p> <p>However, with 67% saying authenticity is a critical attribute for building influence, the monetary value is at odds with what it takes to generate real success.</p> <h3>Will consumers respond?</h3> <p>With the likes of Adidas coming under fire for social media mishaps – consumers are becoming wise to influencers being used for mere monetary gain.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2136/Naomi_Campbell_fail.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="661"></p> <p><em>(Naomi's original caption read: "Naomi, so nice to see you in good spirits!!! Could you put something like: Thanks to my friend @gary.aspden and all at adidas - loving these adidas 350 SPZL from the adidas Spezial range. @adidasoriginals")</em></p> <p>So, even the decision to announce ‘Beauty Squad’ marks a shift towards being more transparent.</p> <p>By highlighting from the start how L’Oreal plans to build a relationship with influencers, it creates an immediate sense of trust with consumers.</p> <p>Beauty Squad is also a good reflection of the changing habits of beauty shoppers.</p> <p>With millennials in particular turning to social media for tips, recommendations and advice - Instagram and YouTube are often the first port of call before any purchase.</p> <p>By working with highly visible and influential voices in these spaces, L’Oreal's chances of engaging with its core consumer is immediately increased.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Presents for teen girls. I tried. I REALLY tried. I want most of the stuff myself... <a href="https://t.co/Azih6Ojrnx">https://t.co/Azih6Ojrnx</a> via <a href="https://twitter.com/modelrecommends">@modelrecommends</a></p> — Ruth Crilly (@modelrecommends) <a href="https://twitter.com/modelrecommends/status/805317144820981762">December 4, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>How can other brands learn from it?</h3> <p>Micro-influencers are people with a social reach of anywhere between 500 and 10,000.</p> <p>With a much bigger audience, the Beauty Squad certainly do not fall under this bracket, especially when combined.</p> <p>However, the collaboration with L’Oréal still reflects a growing trend for smaller yet more authentic partnerships.</p> <p>In fact, a recent study found that as an influencer’s Instagram following increases, the rate of engagement rapidly decreases.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2137/Markerly.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="249"></p> <p>So, somewhere in between the everyday user and the social media superstar is the ‘sweet spot’ – an influencer who is able to better reach a more tailored audience through genuine storytelling.</p> <p>Essentially, this looks to be L’Oréal’s aim, albeit on a slightly bigger scale.</p> <p>For other brands, it could also be a great example to follow, and perhaps the most effective way of approaching influencer marketing in 2017.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/" target="_blank">Voice of the Influencer report</a>. </strong></em></p> <p><em><strong>Or, improve your knowledge with the </strong></em><strong><em>Fashion &amp; Beauty Monitor <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/fashion-beauty-monitor-social-media-and-online-pr/" target="_blank">Social Media and Online PR Training course</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68603 2016-12-07T11:04:00+00:00 2016-12-07T11:04:00+00:00 Five ways luxury brands attempt to increase conversions online Nikki Gilliland <p>Meanwhile, with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68540-how-four-uk-retailers-are-giving-consumers-the-vip-treatment-this-christmas/" target="_blank">VIP treatment expected</a> in-store, getting the balance right between subtle and salesy on an ecommerce site can be tricky.</p> <p>So, how can retailers recreate the luxury experience online, while ensuring customers buy?</p> <p>Here are five ways, with some nice examples to back it up.</p> <h3>Creating a sense of urgency</h3> <p>Without staff to shmooze shopppers in-store, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65348-how-to-increase-conversions-by-creating-buyer-urgency-fear-of-loss/">creating a sense of urgency online</a> can be difficult - especially when luxury brands don't have sales or a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67149-how-to-create-simple-brand-tone-of-voice-guidelines-for-twitter/">unique tone of voice</a> to persuade.</p> <p>An effective online tactic is telling customers if an item is selling out.</p> <p>Fendi is one brand that has recently started to do this.</p> <p>On its product pages, it subtly tells you if an item has limited stock, giving a clever nudge to buy sooner rather than later.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2076/Fendi_stock.JPG" alt="" width="543" height="553"></p> <p>Similarly, it uses pop-ups to inform customers how many others are currently viewing an item.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2075/Fendi_pop_up.JPG" alt="" width="747" height="396"></p> <p>While it's a popular tactic used by travel sites, I've not come across many fashion brands doing it before, especially not a high-end brand like Fendi.</p> <h3>Enabling customisation</h3> <p>Another way for luxury retailers to encourage customers to buy online is to replicate the service they'd receive in-store.</p> <p>Or even better, to offer something they wouldn't.</p> <p>Dior is an example of a brand that cleverly uses personalisation to make shoppers feel special.</p> <p>Its made-to-order range of Dior So Real sunglasses are fully customizable, allowing customers to pick and choose the colour, lens-type and even engraving to suit their own unique taste.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2077/MyDiorSoReal.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="463"></p> <p>By handing over this level of control, it enables customers to feel like they are buying something a little more unique than just a carbon-copy of what everyone else is wearing.</p> <h3>Offering online exclusivity</h3> <p>It's an obvious tactic on the high street, but many luxury retailers resist sales and discounts for fear of devaluing their brand.</p> <p>Ralph Lauren is not afraid to promote discounts, as shown by its current offer of 40% off throughout December. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2079/Ralph_Lauren_Online_Only_Discount.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="595"></p> <p>While this could potentially put off shoppers who like the brand's premium aspect, it cleverly uses an 'online-only' element to offer something of value.</p> <p>It could also help to increase sales at what is a very competitive time of year.</p> <p>With shoppers displaying less loyalty and greater focus on getting the best deal, it appears to be a tactic that's growing in popularity.</p> <p>We've recently seen a trend for new companies aiming to disrupt traditional luxury brands by offering premium and custom-made products at more affordable prices.</p> <p>Awl and Sundry is an example of this. A US-based shoe retailer that wants to 'democratise bespoke luxury', it does so by using a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68139-the-rise-of-the-direct-to-consumer-model-it-s-not-just-dollar-shave-club/" target="_blank">direct-to-consumer business model</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2080/Awl_and_Sundry.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="786"></p> <p>By offering a similar level of luxury but without the extremely high price point, it could potentially steal customers from the brands that are refusing to offer discounts.</p> <h3>Providing extra special customer service</h3> <p>Another important feature of luxury shopping is the level of customer service offered in-store.</p> <p>From personal shopping to champagne - it's incredibly hard to replicate this element online.</p> <p>However, many are introducing features like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64255-why-do-online-retailers-need-live-chat/" target="_blank">live chat</a> and messenger bots to bring the personal touch to their ecommerce offering.</p> <p>Burberry is one brand that does this well, using a chat function to help and guide customers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2082/Live_Chat_Burberry.JPG" alt="" width="432" height="451"></p> <p>Small features like using the employee's full name and a chatty and friendly tone reassures you that you're talking to a human being - not a faceless brand.</p> <p>While it is not advertised on the site as prominently as it could be, this chat feature still lets customers know that they are getting the same premium service that they would be in person.</p> <h3>Capitalising on social reach</h3> <p>With prestige and desirability the hallmarks of luxury brands, maintaining this allure on <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67604-what-s-the-point-of-social-media-for-luxury-brands/" target="_blank">social media</a> can be difficult.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68119-how-everlane-is-using-an-exclusive-instagram-account-to-strengthen-customer-loyalty/" target="_blank">I've written about Everlane before</a>, but it's a great example of how to promote exclusivity while still fostering customer loyalty.</p> <p>It uses a private Instagram account to offer a select group of followers special sneak peeks and early access to sales.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2087/Everlane.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="841"></p> <p>By creating an 'inner circle', it ensures followers will feel valued and encourage sharing on their own social media channels, too.</p> <p>Similarly, with new opportunities for social commerce, more brands are cottoning on to how this tactic can directly lead to sales.</p> <p>Michael Kors revamped its #InstaKors campaign earlier this year to include a new shoppable feature.</p> <p>More than just allowing customers to buy, it has created a social loyalty programme, whereby Instagram followers will be able to get their hands on items before anyone else, as well as access unique offers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2086/Instakors.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <p>A great example of how to increase exclusivity through social media rather than dilute it - it's one element of the luxury ecommerce experience that we can expect to see more of in future.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64776-five-great-ecommerce-sites-from-luxury-brands/"><em>Five great ecommerce sites from luxury brands</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64767-where-are-luxury-brands-going-wrong-online/"><em>Where are luxury brands going wrong online?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66175-louis-vuitton-analysis-of-the-luxury-online-customer-journey/"><em>Louis Vuitton: analysis of the luxury online customer journey</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68606 2016-12-06T10:47:00+00:00 2016-12-06T10:47:00+00:00 Six examples of Christmas email marketing from fashion retailers Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are examples from six top retailers, and for more on this topic check out these resources:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">Email Marketing Industry Census 2016</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/email-ecrm/">Email &amp; eCRM Training Courses</a></li> </ul> <h3>ASOS</h3> <p>Like its <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers" target="_blank">Black Friday efforts</a>, ASOS’s Christmas emails are designed to effectively engage its young user base.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2101/ASOS_email.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="539"></p> <p>As well as promoting continuing sales, it places a lot of focus on its gift guides, which is always a great incentive to get users clicking during the festive period.</p> <p>I particularly like the fact that it talks about products in relation to different budgets – one of the only emails I’ve seen to take this approach.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2102/ASOS_email_2.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="552"></p> <p>Not only does this save shoppers from filtering prices on-site, but it also hints at the variety of products on offer.</p> <h3>H&amp;M</h3> <p>Instead of focusing on gift ideas, H&amp;M pushes the concept of ‘Christmas Jumper Day’ to entice users to shop.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2103/H_M.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="801"></p> <p>As well as promoting a core Christmas-related product, this also builds upon festive excitement.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2104/H_M_3.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="654"></p> <p>Of course, it might put off potential Scrooges or people that don’t like this sort of attire, however that’s arguably the danger of any Christmas marketing.</p> <p>Another feature to note is the continued trend of extending sales after Black Friday, with a 50% discount on gifts included at the bottom.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2105/H_M_2.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="552"></p> <h3>Debenhams</h3> <p>While it is still only early December, Debenhams appears to be stuck in Black Friday mode – choosing to focus on money-off discounts rather than any other kind of Christmas message.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2106/Debenhams_email.JPG" alt="" width="475" height="827"></p> <p>Its emails have so far been geared around its ‘Beautiful Gifts Week’ which, while we’re at it, is a rather weak slogan.</p> <p>The offer of 15% off gifts is enticing, however the emails are very one-sided, which could potentially put off customers who are tired of the sales.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2107/Debenhams_2.JPG" alt="" width="464" height="777"></p> <p>The gridlock design is also a little garish, with no real indication of the specific gifts customers can expect to find online.</p> <h3>John Lewis</h3> <p>So far, John Lewis’s emails have been the least festive in terms of design.</p> <p>There’s no real Christmas sparkle or pizzazz. Instead, it focuses on the retailers’ reputation for quality as well as its dedication to competitive pricing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2108/John_Lewis.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="607"></p> <p>The lack of festive design isn’t a bad thing - it is quite subtle and still pleasing to the eye.</p> <p>Choosing to use a gift guide theme, the copy evokes different types of personalities and what would make the perfect present for them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2109/John_Lewis_email_4.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="779"></p> <p>I particularly like this, as it makes the email feel more personal than other examples, giving customers something of greater value than the standard ‘for him’ or ‘for her’ guides.</p> <h3>House of Fraser</h3> <p>House of Fraser has quite a heavy-handed email strategy, bombarding users with a multitude of messages. </p> <p>As well as being a bit overkill, I’ve also noticed how some of the emails are a little confusing.</p> <p>Despite the email subject line of ‘Ultimate beauty gifts’, the below email is also geared around ‘luxury’ purchases.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2110/HoF_subject.JPG" alt="" width="354" height="76"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2111/HoF.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="615"></p> <p>What’s more, the inclusion of a coffee machine in between mostly grooming and beauty related items is a bit odd.</p> <p>House of Fraser clearly wants to promote a variety of products, however its conflicting message feels poorly judged.</p> <p>That being said, there is some nice editorial-inspired content and a hint towards personalisation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2112/HoF_2.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="929"></p> <h3>Reiss</h3> <p>Lastly, I particularly like Reiss's email strategy for its customer-centric feel.</p> <p>Launching a '12 Days of Gifting' campaign - it offers users the chance to win simply by signing up.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2115/Reiss_4.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="661"></p> <p>Instead of promoting gifts and sales, it focuses on making the customer feel valued.</p> <p>With prizes including experiences as well as material items, it's also a nice fusion of the offline/online shopping experience - and a reflection of Reiss's multichannel approach.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2116/Reiss_3.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="713"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3124 2016-12-05T08:25:13+00:00 2016-12-05T08:25:13+00:00 Content Marketing for Web, Mobile and Social Media - Singapore <p>Brands are increasingly turning to content driven marketing strategies to gain marketplace attention and increase customer engagement in a multi-channel environment. For your marketing to be effective in 2016 and beyond, you will need to provide content that's useful to your customers and that advances your business objectives in a measurable way. It is also vital to create high engagement by building and maintaining a community around your content. </p> <p>The discipline of content marketing provides the framework for ensuring that your content delivers on these essential requirements across all relevant traditional and digital platforms. In addition to covering the basic principles of content marketing, this 2-day workshop seeks to address the challenges of marketers in developing a content strategy and help marketers to create a realistic and sustainable content plan.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3119 2016-12-05T07:35:22+00:00 2016-12-05T07:35:22+00:00 Content Marketing for Web, Mobile and Social Media - Malaysia <p>Brands are increasingly turning to content driven marketing strategies to gain marketplace attention and increase customer engagement in a multi-channel environment. For your marketing to be effective in 2015 and beyond, you will need to provide content that's useful to your customers and that advances your business objectives in a measurable way. It is also vital to create high engagement by building and maintaining a community around your content. </p> <p>The discipline of content marketing provides the framework for ensuring that your content delivers on these essential requirements across all relevant traditional and digital platforms. In addition to covering the basic principles of content marketing, this 3-day workshop seeks to address the challenges of marketers in developing a content strategy and help marketers to create a realistic and sustainable content plan.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3118 2016-12-05T07:32:53+00:00 2016-12-05T07:32:53+00:00 Content Marketing for Web, Mobile and Social Media - Malaysia <p>Brands are increasingly turning to content driven marketing strategies to gain marketplace attention and increase customer engagement in a multi-channel environment. For your marketing to be effective in 2015 and beyond, you will need to provide content that's useful to your customers and that advances your business objectives in a measurable way. It is also vital to create high engagement by building and maintaining a community around your content. </p> <p>The discipline of content marketing provides the framework for ensuring that your content delivers on these essential requirements across all relevant traditional and digital platforms. In addition to covering the basic principles of content marketing, this 3-day workshop seeks to address the challenges of marketers in developing a content strategy and help marketers to create a realistic and sustainable content plan.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68590 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 10 dazzling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup is unashamedly festive, with news about Christmas shopping, social media conversation, consumer trust and more.</p> <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more trusty insight.</p> <h3>85% of UK consumers to buy half of their Christmas gifts online</h3> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68587-black-friday-cyber-monday-2016-ecommerce-stats-bonanza/" target="_blank">Black Friday and Cyber Monday</a> out of the way, Tryzens has revealed that the majority of UK consumers will shop for Christmas online this year.</p> <p>A survey found that 85% of UK consumers will buy at least half their gifts online, while 56% will shop via their smartphones and tablets.</p> <p>22% of people are also reported to have started their Christmas shopping in October and 33% in November.</p> <p>Lastly, a very eager 5% started way back in January 2016.</p> <h3>Over 50% of top UK sites use at least one content recommendation engine</h3> <p>The New Yorker recently stopped using <a href="http://www.8ms.com/2014/02/20/rise-content-recommendation-engines/" target="_blank">content recommendation engines</a> – or monetization platforms known for their 'Around the Web' suggestions – due to allegations that they potentially support questionable content.</p> <p>However, SimilarTech has found that they are in widespread use both in the UK and US.</p> <p>Over 50% of top media sites in the UK use one or more them, and 75 out of 100 biggest online publications do the same.</p> <p>In fact, going against the assumption that they are going out of favour, the number of sites using content recommendation engines appears to be growing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1992/Number-of-Sites-Using-Taboola-and-Outbrain---Top-10k-sites.png" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>Christmas conversation hits social peak on 1st December</h3> <p>New insight from Carat UK suggests we’re less excited about Christmas this year, with a 5% decrease of Christmas mentions on Twitter.</p> <p>However, while figures suggest that 45% of people start to feel excited about Christmas ahead of December, it only become socially acceptable to start posting from 1st December, demonstrated by the fact that Christmas tweets increased by a whopping 65% on the same day last year.</p> <p>As a result of the collective excitement on 1st December people start planning which gifts to buy people, though 46% of shoppers are said to leave present buying to the second half of the month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1991/Social_Christmas.JPG" alt="" width="710" height="385"></p> <h3>Delivery options to determine choice of retailers</h3> <p>According to Shutl, retailers need to rely on more than reputation to ensure sales this Christmas.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,070 online shoppers, 95% said they would consider going to another retailer if a site couldn’t offer a delivery that suited their needs. Likewise, 41% said they’d definitely shop elsewhere if the last mile delivery wasn’t right for them.</p> <p>With 42% of shoppers having higher online delivery expectations than in 2015, the pressure for retailers is on.</p> <h3>Married male millennials are the most engaged consumers, apparently</h3> <p>A study by Affinion has delved into the engagement levels of consumers all over the world.</p> <p>In a Customer Engagement Score of between one and 100, millennials were found to have the highest.</p> <p>Those that were married also reported higher engagement levels, with an average score of 67 compared with 64 in singletons.</p> <p>Likewise, males are the most engaged gender, reporting a stronger bond with their banks and mobile phone providers.</p> <h3>M&amp;S named as the UK’s favourite Christmas shop</h3> <p>New research from Rakuten Marketing has revealed that Marks &amp; Spencer is officially the nation’s favourite Christmas shop, with nearly a third of Brits planning to spend the most there this December.</p> <p>In second position is Boots, and despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68484-the-top-10-most-shared-christmas-ads-of-all-time" target="_blank">strong advertising presence at this time of year,</a> John Lewis comes in third.</p> <p>The survey found that just 27% of British consumers make gift purchase decisions based on a brand’s Christmas TV ad campaign. Instead, 33% say they use retailer websites to source information, and 31% say recommendations from family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1994/M_S.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>31% of shoppers abandon baskets due to complicated payment processes</h3> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK adults, PPRO Group has discovered that online merchants are failing to offer customers their preferred payment option, resulting in 31% of consumers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">abandoning purchases at the checkout</a>.</p> <p>The survey also found that, this Christmas, 61% of consumers will be buying gifts online at home while watching TV, while 13% will shop from their smartphones while lying in bed.</p> <p>Bad news for employers - 17% also admit they will be buying their Christmas gifts online while at work.</p> <h3>UK sees higher online conversation rates than US </h3> <p>The Ecommerce Quarterly report from Monetate has revealed that UK retailers are faring better when it comes to online conversions.</p> <p>It found that the UK is converting more than the US for the second year in a row, taking into account figures from both 2015 and 2016.</p> <p>What’s more, while add-to-basket rates have dropped in the US, the UK’s has steadily increased. </p> <p>Average order value also saw month-on-month improvement in the UK throughout the last year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1993/Monetate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="142"></p> <h3>User-generated content results in greater consumer trust</h3> <p>A new report by Olapic has found that user-generated images are much more likely to generate consumer trust than those created by marketers.</p> <p>In a survey of more than 4,500 active social media users in the US and Europe, 46% of people said they would place trust in user generated content, with just 27% saying they’d trust content created by brands. Only 5% said they would trust straight-forward advertising. </p> <p>In terms of the preferred forms of user generated content, 52% cited photos as the best, ahead of 27% for video and 12% for written content.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1995/Starbucks_UGC.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="479"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3114 2016-12-02T05:44:17+00:00 2016-12-02T05:44:17+00:00 Advanced Content Marketing Masterclass - Singapore <p>People have learnt to avoid the massive amount of content launched into their digital orbit – screening out a nonstop barrage of sales messages. How can Content Marketing effectively engage and build trust with people online?</p> <p>This two-day Content Marketing Masterclass will enable attendees to build deeper customer relationships, loyalty, and commercial success through content marketing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3111 2016-12-02T05:28:22+00:00 2016-12-02T05:28:22+00:00 Content Marketing for Web, Mobile and Social Media - Singapore <p>Brands are increasingly turning to content driven marketing strategies to gain marketplace attention and increase customer engagement in a multi-channel environment. For your marketing to be effective in 2016 and beyond, you will need to provide content that's useful to your customers and that advances your business objectives in a measurable way. It is also vital to create high engagement by building and maintaining a community around your content. </p> <p>The discipline of content marketing provides the framework for ensuring that your content delivers on these essential requirements across all relevant traditional and digital platforms. In addition to covering the basic principles of content marketing, this 2-day workshop seeks to address the challenges of marketers in developing a content strategy and help marketers to create a realistic and sustainable content plan.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68589 2016-12-02T01:01:00+00:00 2016-12-02T01:01:00+00:00 Five essential ingredients for digital marketing success Jeff Rajeck <p>Ideas about how marketers should optimize their time are scarce as well. Some departments use KPI frameworks to 'cover all of the bases' while others simply do what the business asks them to do.</p> <p>To find out what marketers themselves think about what makes digital marketing successful, Econsultancy recently hosted a roundtable workshop with <a href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/">IBM Watson Marketing</a> in Mumbai, India.</p> <p>Senior client-side marketers from a wide variety of industries were invited and asked to come up with<strong> ideas about</strong> <strong>what a digital marketing department should do to increase customer engagement and boost brand loyalty.</strong></p> <p>Below are the five key topics discussed along with details about why these are the 'ingredients' for digital marketing success.</p> <h3>1. Integration</h3> <p>Participants on the day were emphatic that integration was essential for one main reason, consistent messaging.  </p> <p>They felt that without integrating channels, brands risk posting one message on, say, the website, and not following through with it on another, like social media.</p> <p>Integration also helps with customer experience in a couple of ways.  First, off, <strong>integrating channels ensures that the customer has a single view of the company and it helps the company get <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65425-what-is-the-single-customer-view-and-why-do-you-need-it/">a single view of a customer</a>. </strong></p> <p>Attendees noted that a single view is useful for messaging, but even better for providing appropriate customer service.  A customer who has made it clear that she is irate via email will become even more so with a cheerful hello from an uninformed operator in the call centre.</p> <p>To make this level of integration a reality, <strong>marketers must first know what channels their customers use and how they use them.</strong> </p> <p>Then, they need to make sure the data from the channels is available throughout the organisation so that the company can manage the customer relationship in a coordinated fashion.</p> <p>One marketer pointed out that sharing data may cause problems for firms in heavily-regulated industries such as pharma and finance. Everyone, however, agreed that all organisations will benefit from some level of channel integration.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1984/DSC_1663.JPG" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2. Segmentation</h3> <p>Another digital marketing function which attendees felt was key to success was audience segmentation.</p> <p>Customers and prospects can be segmented in many ways.  Some participants said that they stick with simple attributes such as geography or interests. Others felt that behaviour was more important and delivered a better return on investment (ROI) than demographic targeting. </p> <p>Several marketers, however, said that <strong>the best way to segment customers was by where they were in the buying cycle</strong>.  </p> <p>In their opinion, marketers should engage prospects differently if they were just finding out about the company (awareness), showing interest, trying out the product or service, or near to purchase.  </p> <p>Then, once the consumer becomes a customer, any communications with them should focus on encouraging loyalty, advocacy, and re-engagement with the brand.</p> <p>When asked how they segment their customers in practice, participants said that they typically started with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64545-what-is-crm-and-why-do-you-need-it/">a customer relationship management (CRM) system</a> linked to their email engine and, later, personalised the website. </p> <p>Then, for continuous engagement, they created custom audiences on social media with customers' email addresses. These audiences then were targeted with posts crafted for each segment to optimize engagement. </p> <h3>3. Content</h3> <p>Apart from integrating channels and segmenting audiences, attendees felt that <strong>marketers need to create content which drives engagement.</strong> Brands were advised to avoid publishing general purpose content which just drives traffic to the site.</p> <p>Instead, <strong>all content should answer the question, 'why would someone want to do business with you?'</strong></p> <p>One participant said that for ecommerce, the answer to this question is simple - the site offers better prices or a superior shopping experience.  For most brands, it is not quite so easy; they must find a unique value proposition and communicate it consistently.</p> <p>This value proposition could be simply that the company has superior technology or is more efficient than competitors, but regardless of what it is, companies should agree on it and use it repeatedly.</p> <p>Some delegates noted that <strong>behavioural segmentation can help with delivering content as well.</strong>  They suggested that brands can categorise customers according to what content they have clicked on before and ensure that the future content they see addresses their interests.  </p> <p>Doing so helps improves engagement and accelerates the buying cycle, according to one participant.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1985/DSC_1581.JPG" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>4. Automation</h3> <p>The fourth key 'ingredient' to digital marketing success, according to attendees, is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65212-what-is-marketing-automation-and-why-do-you-need-it/">marketing automation</a>.</p> <p>Most organisations, participants argued, work in silos so there is little inter-departmental communication about customers.  </p> <p><strong>Marketing automation breaks down company silos </strong>and ensures that every department is using the same customer information and delivering a consistent message.</p> <p>Doing so ensures that messaging and content are coordinated and that segments do not receive different messages from different parts of the organisation.</p> <p>With automation, then, even the most disjointed organisation can create a single 'virtual channel' of communication with the customer and deliver the single value proposition mentioned previously.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1986/DSC_1658.JPG" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>5. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)</h3> <p>The final characteristic of a successful digital marketing department is agreed-upon key performance indicators (KPIs).  </p> <p>KPIs let everyone in the department know what is important and to what extent they are accomplishing goals of both the marketing department and the business.</p> <p>For the marketing department, <strong>KPIs should indicate whether the customer is engaging with and responding to the content</strong>. Engagement figures should also be linked to business results, noted one attendee. Likes and shares are nice-to-have, but performance metrics such as clicks and conversions are preferred.</p> <p>According to one participant, <strong>KPIs should also be tracked against a particular channel or a piece of content</strong>.</p> <p>Known as 'attribution', knowing whether, say, a web page or a particular ad is driving more conversions is critical to making improvements. Without understanding what activity is delivering more clicks, page views, and conversions, marketers will struggle to make improvements.</p> <p>For the business, <strong>KPIs should help management understand how marketing is helping them realize their financial goals</strong>.</p> <p>Participants felt that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65435-what-is-customer-lifetime-value-clv-and-why-do-you-need-to-measure-it/">customer lifetime value (CLV)</a> and marketing-assisted sales were two of the most important figures which marketers could deliver to the business.</p> <p>Demonstrating ROI from marketing efforts was also the best way for marketers to enjoy continued investment in the technology, such as marketing automation, as well.</p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day, subject matter expert Antonia Edmunds, business leader of IBM Watson Marketing in Asia Pacific, and our keynote speaker Sriman Kota, cognitive engagement executive in Asia Pacific for IBM Commerce.</p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Mumbai Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1987/DSC_1738.JPG" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p>