tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/conversion-rate-optimization Latest Conversion Rate Optimization content from Econsultancy 2016-07-21T10:57:05+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68074 2016-07-21T10:57:05+01:00 2016-07-21T10:57:05+01:00 Is content really the solution to lacklustre conversion rates? Steve Borges <p dir="ltr">Those who know me will be well aware of my belief in testing and analysis as the basis for targeted investment in improved retail performance – and the content question should, I believe, get the same treatment.</p> <p dir="ltr">So, I’ve taken a look behind the scenes and dug into the data from some of the UK’s biggest high-street fashion and lifestyle brands – essentially to answer the question:  “Does content really improve conversion?”</p> <p dir="ltr">The answer, as it turns out is “Yes and no”.  But before I expand on that, some context...</p> <h3 dir="ltr">It’s undeniably true that the shift to mobile has hit conversion for most brands.</h3> <p dir="ltr">That is driven by three inter-related trends that are right there in the data.</p> <p dir="ltr">First, there has been a dramatic shift to mobile over the last few years – the data tells us that tablet and mobile use (combined) moved from 40% of all sessions in 2013 to 68% in 2015.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Source: Biglight benchmark data (aggregated 2013 - 2015)</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7096/sessions_by_device-blog-flyer.png" alt="sessions by device" width="470" height="276"> </p> <p dir="ltr">But what’s interesting here is the lack of any real session growth.  Quite simply, people aren’t shopping more because of mobile; they are shopping differently.</p> <p dir="ltr">Then there is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67174-five-best-practice-tips-to-boost-mobile-conversions/">the issue of mobile conversion</a>. In general, conversion on tablet is lower than desktop for most brands and conversion on mobile falls to between 14% and 64% of that achieved on desktop.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Source: Biglight benchmark data, based on UK sales (anonymous retailers 2015)</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7099/conversion_by_device-blog-flyer.png" alt="conversion by device type" width="470" height="236"></p> <p dir="ltr">Once again, the data reveals the impact of those trends.</p> <p dir="ltr">Conversion rates were hit hard in 2014, before recovering in 2015, largely due to the implementation of mobile and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66081-responsive-web-design-15-of-the-best-sites-from-2014/">responsive sites</a> and subsequent optimisation efforts.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Source: Biglight benchmark data, based on UK sales (anonymous retailers 2013-15)</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7100/conversion_over_time-blog-flyer.png" alt="conversion over time" width="470" height="242"> </p> <p dir="ltr">As this relentless shift to mobile continues though, retailers will face an uphill struggle to improve conversion – no surprise then, that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/conversion-rate-optimization-report/">conversion rate optimisation</a> (and on mobile in particular) has become a high priority for most brands.</p> <p dir="ltr">So there’s the context; but what does the data tell us about the role of content in that conversion optimisation struggle?</p> <h3>The good news is, there is a positive correlation between content and conversion</h3> <p dir="ltr">Back in 2014, L2 published research that sought to demonstrate a correlation between content quality and conversion.</p> <p dir="ltr">For them, content quality as a measure went beyond <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65656-how-nike-s-merchandising-strategy-can-help-retailers-of-all-types/">merchandising</a> and product presentation to include blogs and microsites, videos and tutorials, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67994-10-ecommerce-ux-treats-on-the-new-oasis-website">user generated content</a> and guided selling tools.</p> <p dir="ltr">I’ll refer to this as “rich content” for ease.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Source: L2 Inc - Content and Commerce, 2014.</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7093/l2_research-blog-flyer.png" alt="L2 research" width="470" height="298"> </p> <p dir="ltr">L2 concluded that improvements in rich content were responsible for 50% of retailers’ conversion improvements and, for every five point increase in content score, conversion increased by 1%. You can read the full report <a href="https://www.l2inc.com/research/content-and-commerce-2014">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Looking at my data, I’ve also been able to demonstrate a correlation between engagement and conversion - <em>Note: We did check that session durations correlated with page-views to rule out site performance /checkout issues.</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Source: Biglight benchmark data, based on UK sites (anonymous retailers 2015)</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7101/session_duration_vs_conversion-blog-flyer.png" alt="session duration vs conversion" width="470" height="233"></p> <p dir="ltr">What’s more, we’ve run a series of A/B tests to really understand the impact of rich content on conversion and AOV. In our most significant test to date, we found that:</p> <ul> <li>Users who interacted with rich-content were 20% more likely to purchase than those who didn’t.</li> <li>AOV was 22% higher for those who interacted with rich content before proceeding to purchase.</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Clearly, these are very encouraging results, on closer inspection, they must carry two very important caveats:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Rich content was presented to customers during their journey and within the same session, so it was highly <strong>visible</strong>.</li> <li>It related to the items being purchased, so it was highly <strong>relevant</strong>.</li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">So the question is how can both of these objectives be achieved on a typical ecommerce website?</p> <p dir="ltr">To understand that we must look at how effective the use of content is currently; crucially, whether it passes the visibility and relevance test – and, in all too many cases, the answer is ‘no’.</p> <p dir="ltr">The truth is traditional content destinations simply do not engage users. For instance, only 25-35% of users see the homepage during their ecommerce journeys, so rich content featured or merchandised here is invisible to the majority of users.</p> <p dir="ltr">In fact, we’ve found that engagement with rich content when it’s featured on the homepage (and category landing pages) is generally very low – conversion rates are actually improved if rich content is relegated or removed from these pages (but the brand people don't like it).</p> <p dir="ltr">But what about blogs, the historical home of rich content on ecommerce sites? Back in 2014 the L2 Research compared blog traffic volumes to that of the sites they support and found that engagement with them is poor.</p> <p dir="ltr">We’ve found that traffic to blogs is significantly lower that to other areas of the site that should be comparable and they suffer from exit rates that are up to three times the site average, even where blogs feature in the main navigation and are merchandised on the homepage.</p> <p dir="ltr">That’s not exactly what we are all trying to achieve and not popular with trading teams.</p> <p dir="ltr">So, if we know that making relevant content visible to users during their journeys to drive engagement and conversion and we can pretty much rule out the homepage, key landing pages and the blog, where should we be looking?</p> <p dir="ltr">Well the answer is in the data; 50% of users now start their ecommerce journeys on a product listings page or product details page - that’s where the opportunities lie.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Source: Biglight benchmark data (aggregated 2015)</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7091/landing_page_breakdown-blog-flyer.png" alt="landing page breakdown" width="470" height="301"></p> <h3>This all has some fairly big implications for site design and content optimisation</h3> <p dir="ltr">The headline here is that content <strong>can</strong> positively affect conversion and AOV - but blindly throwing money at content without really understanding where it is best used is to trust to luck.</p> <p dir="ltr">Chance dictates that some content will be in the right place, but those fortunate retailers will not know why and will still be wasting time and money on content that barely anyone sees.</p> <p dir="ltr">The solution is two fold.</p> <p dir="ltr">First, retailers need to move away from rich content destinations and content merchandising to create content elements that are featured or “threaded” through the pages that make up the user journey - principally the product listings pages, but also the product details pages.</p> <p dir="ltr">Second, they must test, test and test again with real users and A/B testing tools – then let the data tell them what works, and do more of it. That means looking at every type of content to understand its impact in different contexts:</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>1.</strong> Brand heritage content that’s true for ever</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2.</strong> Seasonal content that drives core merchandising messages</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3.</strong> Short term “now” content that creates relevance</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>4.</strong> Social validation content - user-curation, ratings and review</p> <p dir="ltr">In short then, content really can be at least part of the solution to lacklustre conversion rates – but only content that is delivered with purpose and focus; content that is both visible and relevant and whose performance is understood and optimised through exhaustive testing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68058 2016-07-12T14:51:07+01:00 2016-07-12T14:51:07+01:00 Has Amazon Prime Day 2016 made up for 2015’s #PrimeDayFail? Nikki Gilliland <p>Despite some initial fanfare, social media was soon flooded with complaints about laughable discounts and naff products, with consumers gleefully using the hashtag #primedayfail to highlight everything that went wrong.</p> <p>Today, the sales event is back, with Amazon promising even more bargains to tempt consumers.  </p> <p>But has Amazon learnt from its mistakes? Here’s the situation so far…</p> <h3>Who’s eligible?</h3> <p>The clue is in the name. The biggest and best deals are only available to Prime members. </p> <p>With last year’s event resulting in the most Prime sign-ups in a single day (and a subsequent 19m US subscribers since) – the event is clearly just a vehicle to grow Amazon's member base.</p> <p>For regular consumers, this has the power to repel rather than pull people in, especially since the retailer has been intent on hammering home the ‘exclusive’ message on all its main email, website and social media copy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6950/exclusive.PNG" alt="" width="700" height="218"></p> <p>It has to be said, there are <em>some</em> deals accessible to all, but they are extremely limited and very hard to find.</p> <p>It took a good few minutes for me to figure out that the ‘Featured Prime Day’ savings were eligible to me (a non-member).</p> <p>And let’s be honest, they’re far from exciting. (Unless vitamins and minerals are your thing...)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6942/prime_day_deals.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="243"></p> <p>Ironically, if you’re not a Prime member, you’re the consumer that Amazon probably cares about the most today.</p> <p>However, its heavy-handed targeting means that you might feel more inclined to avoid the whole thing rather than tempted to sign up. </p> <h3>Social promotion</h3> <p>If you follow Amazon on any of its main social media channels, you’ll have seen its attempts at building excitement around the event. </p> <p>A series of countdown tweets and Facebook posts means that the event has been well signposted and cleverly executed.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Only 5 days to go!<a href="https://t.co/pRdR7iWm6z">https://t.co/pRdR7iWm6z</a> <a href="https://t.co/6O9TMNVmmD">pic.twitter.com/6O9TMNVmmD</a></p> — Amazon.co.uk (@AmazonUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/AmazonUK/status/751113558352691200">July 7, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>While the Facebook ads are slick and well-designed (with a simple and effective call-to-action for a free trial on the main site), the fact that it's so heavily geared around exclusivity surely means that non-Prime members are likely to ignore it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6945/facebook_prime_day.png" alt="" width="550" height="588"></p> <p>In terms of emails, I only received one on the morning of the event itself.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6946/Amazon_email.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="522"></p> <p>Instead of promoting the discounts, I did find it slightly off-putting that it only showcased the products – an obvious attempt to get consumers to click through to learn more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6947/Amazon_email_deals.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="772"></p> <p>Whether or not that click converts to a purchase, again, probably depends on Prime membership status.</p> <h3>The discounts</h3> <p>One of the biggest complaints from consumers last year was that the biggest discounts were not properly promoted on the site.</p> <p>Eventually, it emerged that Amazon used a broad algorithm to select the deals, leading to a lot of random items such as tupperware and dishwasher detergent.</p> <p>This year, it’s not entirely clear how it’s been set up, but according to a company spokesperson, Amazon has ‘increased the number of deals and at the same time, increased the volume of inventory behind those deals.’</p> <p>With a dedicated homepage, showcasing a variety of categories and filter options, there is a clear attempt to give the user greater direction.</p> <p>Navigation is simple, with good signposts to point customers in the direction of 'deals ending soon' and 'recommended deals'.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6949/amazon_homepage.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="654"></p> <p>In terms of savings, there does appear to be a decent amount of products on offer, with the best being discounts being on electronics and home appliances.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6939/prime_day_deals_tech.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="481"></p> <p>However that algorithm must be working its evil magic again... I also spied far too many irrelevant items for my liking.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6941/Amazon_deals.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="510"></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>It’s probably too early to say for sure if this year’s Prime Day has been any more successful than the last.</p> <p>While clearly an attempt to bag even more Prime memberships, what the retailer fails to realise is that the hype might do more to put people off than draw them in. </p> <p>Similarly, there's already an amusing amount of social media backlash, so Amazon clearly hasn't done much to sort out that algorithm issue.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thanks <a href="https://twitter.com/amazon">@amazon</a>! This is just what I needed! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/PrimeDayFail?src=hash">#PrimeDayFail</a> <a href="https://t.co/mIiNUs4l6u">pic.twitter.com/mIiNUs4l6u</a></p> — Martin Untrojb (@MEUntrojb) <a href="https://twitter.com/MEUntrojb/status/752805002884898820">July 12, 2016</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67973 2016-06-21T14:20:55+01:00 2016-06-21T14:20:55+01:00 Facebook's Offline Conversions API is a big deal for merchants Patricio Robles <p>As the name suggests, the <a href="https://developers.facebook.com/docs/marketing-apis/offline-conversions/v2.6">Offline Conversions API</a> gives merchants advertising on Facebook the ability to track how their Facebook campaigns drive offline action.</p> <p>It functions similarly to <a href="https://developers.google.com/adwords/api/docs/guides/importing-conversions">Google's offline conversion tracking</a>:</p> <ul> <li>Merchants configure their ad accounts for offline conversion tracking.</li> <li>Offline conversion events data is sent to Facebook via API.</li> <li>Facebook identifies offline conversion events that are associated with Facebook users who viewed the merchants ads.</li> </ul> <h3>Getting attribution right</h3> <p>Of course, correlation isn't causation.</p> <p>Merchants may be running campaigns through many networks, so the fact that someone viewed a merchant's Facebook ad does not necessarily mean that the ad was responsible, directly or indirectly, for an offline action like a sale. </p> <p>To make <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65459-what-is-marketing-attribution-and-why-do-you-need-it">attribution</a> a bit more exact, advertisers will need to establish a methodology for analyzing offline conversions data, which can then be applied using Facebook's Ads Insights API.</p> <p>That API allows Facebook advertisers to retrieve statistics about their ads.</p> <p>By combining the API's Breakdowns and Breakdown Actions functionality, it's possible for merchants to do deep analysis of customers who viewed their Facebook ads and completed a specific offline action.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fmarketing%2Fvideos%2F10154372038226337%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>For example, Argentine retailer Frávega was "able to show that for every dollar of ecommerce revenue we were generating from Facebook ads, we were actually getting an additional $2.20 in our brick-and-mortar stores.</p> <p>"With the Offline Conversions API we were able to optimize our investment and increase spending with confidence," <a href="https://www.facebook.com/business/news/drive-and-measure-store-visits-and-sales">according to</a> Frávega digital marketing manager Mariano Tordo.</p> <h3>The importance of first-party data</h3> <p>As one might expect, Facebook's new Offline Conversions API can't perform miracles.</p> <p>To function, merchants must be in a position to supply Facebook with customer information it can use to match offline events to its users.</p> <p>This includes usual suspects like email address, phone number, first and last name, but Facebook will also accept information like date of birth, gender and ZIP code, which can help pinpoint users more accurately.</p> <p>This highlights the growing importance of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-promise-of-first-party-data">first-party data</a> to merchants.</p> <p>Obviously, it is in many cases easier for merchants selling online to collect the personally identifiable information that Facebook needs, but given the challenges brick and mortar merchants face in measuring the influence of online ad campaigns on offline sales, it behooves merchants to develop strategies to collect and store more information about their customers.</p> <p>There are a number of techniques commonly used to do this, such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62489-b-q-s-club-app-is-the-perfect-mobile-loyalty-scheme">loyalty schemes</a>.</p> <h3>Third-party integrations make Facebook's API instantly accessible</h3> <p>In an effort to make the Offline Conversions API more accessible to companies that may lack the technical resources required to integrate with it, Facebook has created partnerships with companies that are already working with merchants of all shapes and sizes.</p> <p>For example, one of those partners is Acxiom-owned data connectivity platform LiveRamp.</p> <p>Thanks to its integration with the Offline Conversions API, LiveRamp clients can take advantage of Facebook's new functionality without building an integration of their own. That was a no-brainer for the company.</p> <p>"By connecting campaign exposure data to offline sales transactions, marketers can understand which campaign strategies are truly generating real business returns,” Travis May, LiveRamp's president and GM, stated in a press release.</p> <p>“This insight is key to optimizing campaign performance and justifying higher digital marketing budgets."</p> <p>Other companies that offer solutions now supporting the Offline Conversions API include IBM, Marketo, Square and Invoca, so many businesses will find that they are in a position to put Facebook's offering to work with minimal effort.</p> <p><em>For more on Facebook Ads, download Econsultancy’s new <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-best-practice-guide/">Social Media Best Practice Guide 2016</a>.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67870 2016-05-24T11:19:35+01:00 2016-05-24T11:19:35+01:00 Why ASOS is still leading the online retailing pack Paul Rouke <p>The reality is the core user experience of ASOS has changed very little over the years and for good reason – it’s an exceptional example of delivering an intuitive, persuasive, streamlined browsing and buying experience.</p> <p>What continually surprises me is how many major retailers still haven’t built some of the core foundations that ASOS did years ago.</p> <p>In this article I share what I feel, in my experience, are things which not only make ASOS exceptional, but should also provide inspiration for other retailers.</p> <h3>Site-wide, immediate visibility of its USP</h3> <p>Long before most retailers realised the importance of communicating their unique selling points site-wide in a high visibility area, ASOS had featured three banners underneath its primary navigation.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5154/UVP_header.PNG" alt="" width="595" height="94"></p> <ul> <li>Ensure the messages stand out visually and attract attention.</li> <li>Make it clear there are distinct messages.</li> <li>Use colour/design touches to draw particular attention to the primary message you want to communicate at any one time.</li> <li>Make it clear if the message is clickable to find out more.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use icons to provide visual clues to differentiate the messages.</li> <li>Ensure you communicate your USPs across devices – don’t hide them when you simplify your mobile UI, visitors still need to be persuaded.</li> </ul> <h3>Streamlined navigation experience</h3> <p>For as long as I can remember, ASOS has had an incredibly simple primary navigation bar.</p> <p>The reality is, it offers every visitor a simple and relevant first choice to start exploring the huge product range.</p> <p>ASOS was also one of the early retailers to provide <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65357-mega-menu-design-trends-in-ecommerce-2011-vs-2014/">a mega menu</a>, but not just <em>any</em> mega menu – it has always been tailored to suit a range of buyer types and expose a wide range of the brand areas i.e. Marketplace.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5155/Screenshot__2_.png" alt="" width="594" height="405"></p> <ul> <li>Simplify the primary navigation to reduce the choices visitors have in order to start exploring the product range.</li> <li>Provide structure and clarity of the types of navigation categories visitors have to choose from.</li> <li>If you have new-in and/or sale items, provide quick access to these areas.</li> <li>Use cookies to store which core category a visitor spends most time in, and when they come back to your homepage URL, redirect them back in to that category (this is a subtly executed spot of personalisation that ASOS provides).</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing</strong><strong>:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Repeat key USPs at the bottom or in the side of the mega menu.</li> <li>Introduce imagery to attract attention to core categories or relevant/seasonal ranges.</li> </ul> <h3>Continually communicate UVPs and USPs throughout the user journey</h3> <p>Not content with making its USP messages “pop” off the page in the header, ASOS has never been shy about repeating these message throughout the user journey.</p> <p>It’s something that another brand I admire, AO.com, also embraces, and I’ve detailed in-depth how it does this previously in my article titled: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66768-ao-com-the-best-ecommerce-experience-available-online/">AO.com: The best ecommerce experience available online?</a></p> <p>So many other retailers simply don’t do this – they feel that as they have a USP bar in their site-wide header, that is enough and they don’t want to waste precious space repeating these messages in important real estate on core shopping pages.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Explore ways of using subtle animations as visitors scroll down a page to draw attention to key messages (ASOS does this on its homepage with the flying plane).</li> <li>Consider ways to repeat a key message in a highly visible part of the product page (ASOS does this under the product price).</li> <li>Add a key message aimed at persuading visitors to purchase in the bottom of the mini-basket.</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5160/UVP_in_mini_basket.PNG" alt="" width="562" height="377"></p> <ul> <li>Promote key messages in the shopping basket, whilst ensuring you don’t take the focus away from checking out.</li> <li>Utilise different visual techniques to draw attention to messages, such as simple, common iconography (remember people typically spend 99% of their time on other websites).</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5161/UVP_in_basket.PNG" alt="" width="593" height="384"></p> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Repeat key USPs at the bottom or on the side of your checkout pages.</li> <li>In addition to promoting USPs in the site-wide header, introduce a section within the footer which communicates core brand messages.</li> </ul> <h3>Provide a simplified, persuasive, non-committal way to begin building up your desired products</h3> <p>Wishlist functionality has been one of the out-of-box features for retailers since the late 1990s, but almost every retailer in 2016 requires visitors to register/sign-in to use it.</p> <p>For over five years, ASOS has allowed visitors to start adding items to their “saved items” without any mention or request to create an account or sign-up.</p> <p>Not only does this provide a seamless browsing experience for visitors whether they are logged in or not, but ASOS has always made “Save for Later” a core action it wants visitors to take.</p> <p>Back in 2010, James Hart (the then Ecommerce Director at ASOS) told me that the site literally sees hundreds of thousands of “saves” made every day.</p> <p>Most retailers tend to see wishlists or saved items as a nice to have but very much a low priority focus area for visitors during the browsing experience.</p> <p>ASOS is the complete opposite for good reason.</p> <p>It knows the importance of the commitment and consistency principle, which has been proven to demonstrate the increased probability of a purchase when people make a smaller initial commitment to lead up to the actual purchase.</p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5162/Screenshot__1_.png" alt="" width="595" height="451"></p> <ul> <li>Don’t force visitors to have to register or sign-up in order to use the save/love/wishlist function – use cookies initially, then encourage visitors to sign-up so they can access their list across devices.</li> <li>Don’t hide away the wishlist/saved items area – encourage visitors to use this functionality and visit this area, giving it similar prominence to your shopping bag.</li> <li>Allow visitors to save items directly from the product listing pages – don’t just provide this on the product page.</li> <li>Within the wishlist/saved items area, allow visitors to move products to their shopping bag, or scroll through individual product images without having to go to the product page.</li> <li>Integrate the wishlist/saved items area in to the shopping basket to encourage increased average order values and average order quantities.</li> <li>Make saving for later an integral part of the mobile browsing experience.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Introduce a section at the bottom of your browsing pages which promote the items in your saved items area, in addition to the typical section showing recently viewed items.</li> </ul> <h3>A focus on simplicity throughout the core user experience</h3> <p>Starting from the primary navigation but moving in to filtering product listing pages, the redesigned product page template, through to the shopping basket and checkout forms, simplicity is the name of the game.</p> <p>Why reinvent the wheel when you can just deliver the essentials really well<em>,</em> <em>then</em> adding in layers of engagement and persuasion to differentiate and keep visitors coming back?</p> <p>ASOS has embraced the approach of utilising white space to provide clarity on the core functions that visitors are looking for, with the product page being a primary example.</p> <p>The product page also provides an excellent example of encouraging visitors to browse through the available images within the big arrows.</p> <p>It sounds simple because it <em>is</em>, and it’s this simplicity that people really want in the vast majority of cases in all my years of experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/5164/product_page.PNG" alt="" width="596" height="560"></p> <p><strong>Lessons to learn from ASOS include:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Focus on delivering a smooth checkout process – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64669-21-first-class-examples-of-effective-web-form-design/">form best practice</a> is your best friend, yet for many retailers, that friend is nowhere to be seen – including the often unfriendly error messages when things go wrong.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Opportunities for A/B testing above and beyond what ASOS is currently doing: </strong></p> <ul> <li>Streamline <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63444-ecommerce-best-practice-the-basket-add-what-is-it-and-how-should-it-work/">the add-to-bag experience</a> if visitors haven’t selected a size or colour, rather than displaying an error message alert box which visitors have to interact with in order to make a selection. <a href="http://www.very.co.uk">Very.co.uk</a> does this extremely well and I know that it performed significantly better when it was A/B tested against the current ASOS approach.</li> </ul> <h3>What do you think?</h3> <p>Thanks for reading and I hope it has provided ideas and opportunities which you can build in to the foundations of your ecommerce experience.</p> <p>So what are the highlights of the ASOS user experience for you? What areas do you feel it could improve upon?</p> <p>Which other retailers do what ASOS does but more intuitively or more persuasively? Please leave your thoughts in the comments.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67853 2016-05-16T14:20:00+01:00 2016-05-16T14:20:00+01:00 Lead generation forms: Five uncommon strategies to increase conversion rates Marcus Taylor <p>And despite the importance forms have, we rarely give them the attention they deserve. </p> <p>Below are five strategies you can use to take your forms to the next level. </p> <h3>1. Simplify your forms by reducing clicks-to-complete</h3> <p>When Microsoft released Windows Vista, fewer people shut down their PCs. Why?</p> <p>It turns out that Microsoft updated its shutdown command from a button to a dropdown box. This trivial change meant that users now had to click three times to shut their computer down instead of once.</p> <p>This small amount of additional effort led to a significant decrease in people using the feature. </p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.49.png" alt="" width="606" height="233"></p> <p>While there are no right or wrong question field types to use, it’s good practice to use field types that minimise the number of clicks-to-completion.</p> <p>Clickable image/icon buttons, like the ones in the Microsoft example in the top left image, are one of the most efficient form elements to use.</p> <p>Not only do they only require one click to answer, they also provide the user with visual prompts.</p> <p>The fewer clicks required to complete your form, the less brain cycles and cognitive load (i.e. ‘thinking’) is required for your users to complete it.</p> <p>In other words, the less your users have to think to complete your form, the better.</p> <p>As a rule of thumb I’ve found reducing the number of ‘clicks-to-completion’ to be a good technique for improving the simplicity and completion time of forms.</p> <h3>2. Focus on motivation &amp; outcomes</h3> <p>People use forms to achieve an outcome. The outcome your users are trying to achieve has a large impact on your conversion rate.</p> <p>After all, if you gave everyone a free Ferrari for using your form - you would likely have a near-100% conversion rate.</p> <p>While this is an exaggerated example, it illustrates how the performance of your form is influenced not only by the form itself - but by the promise of what lies on the other side of it. </p> <p>By clearly communicating the benefits of using your form you can increase the user’s desire to complete it.</p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.43.png" alt="" width="605" height="290"></p> <p>This is a common tactic used by dating websites. <a href="http://www.welovedates.com/">WeLoveDates</a> shows a photo of a happy couple placed next to the lead capture form.</p> <p>As the users of this website are likely to be looking for a relationship this image represents the outcome that they’re hoping for, and as a result, increases their motivation to join.</p> <h3>3. First impressions count</h3> <p>The first impression that your form creates helps visitors decide whether or not the outcome is worth their time and effort in filling out your form.</p> <p>So, first impressions matter. A lot.</p> <p>When we changed the lead capture form on the <a href="http://brokernotes.co">BrokerNotes</a> homepage from a dropdown question box to a full-page clickable image select box, we saw a 212% increase in people using the lead capture form. </p> <p>In addition to simplifying the questions, we tested adding large amounts of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65722-18-highly-effective-examples-of-social-proof-in-ecommerce/">social proof</a> and text to manage the visitors’ expectations (e.g. indicating they’re on step one of two).</p> <p>All of this led to an improved first impression that converted over 46% of visitors.</p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.38.png" alt="" width="604" height="337"></p> <p>One of the best tips for improving the first impression that your form creates is to split it into multiple steps (if you’re currently using a single-step form).</p> <p>When designed well, multi-step forms appear less overwhelming, and have been repeatedly shown to <a href="http://conversionfanatics.com/multi-step-or-single-step-forms/">convert better</a> than single-step forms.</p> <h3>4. Use cognitive biases to your advantage</h3> <p>Cognitive biases are proven ways in which the brain makes illogical decisions.</p> <p>They can be thought of as ‘mental shortcuts’, such as jumping to the conclusion that a restaurant with a queue outside must be good.</p> <p>For example, it’s proven that people overvalue things that they play a part in building (known as the ‘IKEA effect’).</p> <p>There are <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_bias">hundreds of these cognitive biases</a>, which you can use to your advantage to improve your form’s performance.</p> <p>One application of this that can improve form completion is using a bias called the <a href="http://changingminds.org/explanations/theories/endowed_progress.htm">endowed progress effect</a>. This bias proved that people are more likely to complete something if there is an illusion that progress has already been made.</p> <p>Here’s an example of the endowed progress effect in use. In this form, the progress bar starts one third complete, subtly indicating that by seeing the first step you’ve already made progress.  </p> <p>Because of this illusion of progress, users are more likely to go on to the second and third steps.</p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.32.png" alt="" width="603" height="408"></p> <p>There are hundreds of cognitive biases at your dispense. Use them wisely!</p> <h3>5. Don’t be afraid to make forms visual</h3> <p>The old adage says that a picture paints 1,000 words. Scientifically, this isn’t far from the truth.</p> <p>Our brains process images significantly faster than text. In fact, recent research from MIT found that the brain can identify images seen for <a href="http://news.mit.edu/2014/in-the-blink-of-an-eye-0116">as little as 13 milliseconds</a>!</p> <p>Images have an inherent advantage over text. Yet, most forms don’t use them.</p> <p>One of my favourite examples of a visual form is <a href="https://www.toptal.com/">TopTal.com</a>. </p> <p>TopTal could say “we keep your Skype details private”, but instead it places a subtle padlock icon in the ‘Skype username’ field implying that this will be kept private and secure. </p> <p>TopTal could use text in the dropdown question box, like most other forms.</p> <p>But instead it uses recognisable colourful icons that make it easier to process the range of options.</p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.27.png" alt="" width="607" height="327"></p> <p>In the form on <a href="https://www.ventureharbour.com/web-hosting-guide/">this web hosting guide</a>, you can see how without even having to read the questions, it’s clear what is being asked just from scanning the images. </p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.22.png" alt="" width="497" height="415"></p> <p>Images also make a form appear more engaging and less form-like.</p> <p>From my research studying high-converting forms, I’ve found that these kinds of forms, which appear more like ‘tools’ or ‘quizzes’, typically convert best.</p> <h3>Where to start?</h3> <p>Form optimisation can be overwhelming. With so many opportunities and elements to test, it can be difficult knowing where to start.</p> <p>If you’re not sure where to begin, I’d suggest using the <a href="https://leadformly.com/form-optimisation-pyramid/">Form Optimisation Pyramid</a> as a framework. </p> <p>Start at the bottom by brainstorming everything that can be done to increase the motivation your users have to use your form.</p> <p>For example, you might want to test using strong imagery or different copy to communicate why people should use your form.</p> <p><img src="https://www.ventureharbour.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Screen-Shot-2016-05-16-at-11.17.12.png" alt="" width="601" height="407"></p> <p>From here you can move on to brainstorming ways to improve the user’s ability to use the form.</p> <p>Is your form accessible to people who are colour blind? Is it easy to use on a mobile device in bright light? What about for users who like to navigate through forms using the tab key? </p> <p>Once your form passes this phase, you can then focus on ideas to improve the user’s peace of mind, ease of using your form, and how engaging your form is to complete.</p> <p>Most form optimisation advice focuses on usability and ease of use.</p> <p>Using the framework above will ensure that you first take a few steps back to consider the underlying motivation driving your form conversions and whether or not your visitors have the ability to convert.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67727 2016-04-13T14:16:07+01:00 2016-04-13T14:16:07+01:00 The Competition & Market Authority issues open letter about fake reviews Edwin Bos <p>The results showed that - unsurprisingly - reviews influence consumer purchasing habits (it estimates that <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/cma-acts-to-maintain-trust-in-online-reviews-and-endorsements" target="_blank">54% of UK adults consult online reviews</a> before making a purchase).</p> <p>At Reevoo <a href="https://blog.reevoo.com/the-government-cracks-down-on-fake-reviews-are-you-safe/" target="_blank">we reported on this</a> just as Amazon announced that it was introducing a new “machine learning” based review ranking system that promotes verified reviews over others (as much as an algorithm alone can, anyway).</p> <p>But the survey also brought to light more shady tactics by businesses trying to influence potential consumers.</p> <p>These ranged from posting fake reviews on to review sites, eliminating negative reviews (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/8638-bad-reviews-improve-conversion-by-67/">even though this isn’t a good strategy</a>) and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67645-google-s-got-it-right-instead-of-bribing-bloggers-sort-out-your-website/" target="_blank">paying for endorsements in blogs</a> without making it clear to the people watching and reading.</p> <p>The CMA has now written <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/512560/An_open_letter_to_marketing_departments__marketing_agencies_and_their_clients.pdf" target="_blank">an open letter to marketing departments</a>, marketing agencies and their clients about the investigation and offering guidance on how to make sure they’re complying with industry standards.</p> <p>Most of <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/online-reviews-and-endorsements-advice-for-businesses/online-reviews-giving-consumers-the-full-picture" target="_blank">the advice</a> is pretty obvious. For example:</p> <blockquote> <p>Don’t pretend to be a customer and write reviews about your products or other businesses’ products.</p> </blockquote> <h3>See what I mean?</h3> <p>But what is even more clear is that businesses which don’t comply with these guidelines could find that the consequences are significant:</p> <blockquote> <p>Writing or commissioning a fake review – in relation your own products or someone else’s – is a breach of consumer protection law and may lead to civil or even criminal action.</p> </blockquote> <p>Although it’s good to see the issue getting attention, I don’t think the CMA goes far enough, despite the stern wording.</p> <p>If the CMA was serious it would have regulated the industry rather than sending out a letter.</p> <p>There is plenty of incentive for businesses (£23bn of consumer spending is influenced by customer reviews) to publish fake reviews.</p> <p>However, regardless of the CMA’s guidance, I firmly believe that businesses shouldn’t be tempted into faking reviews or deleting negative ones. There's too much to lose.</p> <p>Consumers prize transparency and authenticity. Untampered user-generated content is one of the best ways brands can gain consumers’ trust.</p> <p>And as we’ve seen in recent scandals, trust is one of the hardest things for a brand to earn but one of the easiest things to lose.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67630 2016-03-16T12:07:00+00:00 2016-03-16T12:07:00+00:00 Forget AO.com, does Benefit Cosmetics offer the best ecommerce experience? Paul Rouke <ol> <li>Knowing and communicating your unique value proposition.</li> <li>Being truly, passionately customer centric.</li> <li>Harnessing social proof to make this central to the purchasing decision.</li> <li>Embracing <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/PRWD/iterative-versus-innovative-testing-exploiting-the-full-spectrum-of-testing-opportunities-paul-rouke-elite-camp-2015-final">the full spectrum of testing and optimisation</a>.</li> </ol> <p>Whenever a website is praised or wins an award, I always check to see what all the fuss is about.</p> <p>Using these four criteria as a starting point, you can begin to assess whether or not a website can truly deliver the goods.</p> <p>I am always curious to see who can join the illustrious list of true disrupter brands such as Uber and AirBnb, and as my previous post concluded, AO.com hs joined that list having disrupted the white goods industry.</p> <p>As such, when I read that Benefit Cosmetics (part of the multi-billion, multinational luxury goods conglomerate LVMH) was recently awarded '<a href="http://beauty20awards.com/who-won-the-beauty20-london-the-10-best-loved-beauty-brands-online/">Best Beauty Brand Online</a>’, I had to check it out for myself and see whether the brand is worthy of the title!</p> <p>So here goes. Will Benefit join the illustrious list of disruptive brands and cement itself as a trailblazer for the beauty industry? Let's find out.</p> <h3>1. Knowing and communicating your unique value proposition</h3> <h4><strong>Universal header area</strong></h4> <p>Landing on the homepage - or other primary landing pages - I’m extremely surprised to see that Benefit Cosmetics doesn’t dedicate <em>any</em> part of the primary header area to communicate anything tangible about its unique value proposition.</p> <p>Prime website real estate is just being neglected.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2800/Homepage_top_half.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="382"></p> <p>This online crime happens all the time.</p> <p>Brand X feels like it is big enough, credible enough and well known enough to not need to communicate why visitors should stick around and buy from them and not one of their competitors.</p> <p>As crowded as the beauty market is, you would think every brand would jump at a chance to communicate their USPs.</p> <p>It doesn’t matter how big or well-known you are, <strong>you should always be providing visitors with reasons to stay. </strong></p> <h4>On primary landing and decision making pages, under the navigation</h4> <p>Just as Benefit doesn’t communicate any form of its unique value proposition in the site-wide header, it doesn’t dedicate any area under or around its primary navigation for communicating what makes the brand and products special.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2818/bestsellers.PNG" alt="" width="601" height="339"></p> <p>As I shared in my AO.com critique, we all know about the fact that people need to see things a number of times before it typically “sinks in”.</p> <p>Never has this been more important for retailers than with your unique value and service proposition messages.</p> <p>In summary,<strong> Benefit Cosmetics is failing to communicate its value proposition clearly on key landing pages</strong><em>. </em></p> <h3>2. Being truly, passionately customer centric</h3> <h4><strong>Providing customer journeys that match different types of buyer behaviour</strong></h4> <p>The two ways to browse products on Benefit Cosmetics are to ‘shop by product’ and ‘shop by dilemma’.</p> <p>Though 'shop by dilemma' is an intriguing concept, only having two initial options to start a product search is limiting.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2819/product_page_top_half.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="306"></p> <p>What about shop by latest releases, shop by most popular, shop by highest rated?</p> <p>Even with a small product set compared to a retailer like AO.com, visitors will still benefit from being able to browse your range by other ways than just the type or category of product.</p> <h4><strong>Replicating the offline shopping experience</strong></h4> <p>Benefit Cosmetics is doing some really positive things in this area, not least actively encouraging visitors to visit a store.</p> <p>Often multichannel retailers are almost afraid of promoting their store finder as they want their online visitors to buy online.</p> <p>Truth is, bridging this gap (and encouraging the multichannel shopper) will in turn help create new customers who have the potential to become brand advocates.</p> <p>The terminology used in the primary navigation ‘Get Serviced’ followed by the headline ‘Pamper Yourself Pretty’ are excellent examples of using emotive language and speaking directly to the visitor.</p> <p>Creative and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65365-how-seven-ecommerce-brands-use-highly-persuasive-copywriting/">persuasive copywriting</a> is certainly an area that Benefit has prioritised as part of its online user experience and it shows.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2820/pamper_yourself.PNG" alt="" width="601" height="324"></p> <p>Store integration is intrinsic to the online experience.</p> <p>In the section ‘explore our services’, hovering over any of the services immediately presents you with a ‘Find a Store’ button – this <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67345-23-creative-examples-of-hover-states-in-ecommerce-ux/">subtle hover state</a> change ensures visitors are drawn to what they want you to do.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2821/find_a_store.PNG" alt="" width="601" height="324"></p> <p>Benefit has another whole area dedicated to its customers with the ‘Wow your Brows’ page.</p> <p>From striking, emotive imagery and humanised language, to video content and specific advice tailored to women’s different styles of eyebrows, this is an extremely (and impressively) customer-centric page.</p> <p>I can't help but wonder why it doesn't promote this specialist area in the universal header!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2822/wowbrows.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="360"></p> <p>In addition, it dedicates a whole section of the homepage to helping fix ‘Beauty Dilemmas’.</p> <p>This once again showcases visually striking images that ooze brand personality (which is consistent throughout the whole site).</p> <p>In summary,<strong> when it comes to being truly, passionately customer centric, Benefit is doing a lot right.<br></strong></p> <h3>3. Harnessing social proof to make this central to the purchasing decision</h3> <h4>Customer satisfaction is one of the first things new visitors are presented with</h4> <p>First-time visitors to AO.com see a prominent customer satisfaction score on the homepage.</p> <p>When examining Benefit’s homepage, apart from a sub headline ‘What benebabes love most’ (which doesn’t provide you with any way to find out what or who are ‘benebabes’) and some very small hearts, there is a distinct lack of social proof used to demonstrate the popularity and advocacy of the Benefit customer base.</p> <p>Of course it has the standard social links in the footer, but visitors have absolutely no idea if Benefit has 500 or 500,000 Pinterest followers, or 250 or 250,000 Twitter followers, or 800 or 800,000 Facebook likes.</p> <p>I will let you guess the numbers behind the brand...</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2823/footer.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="117"></p> <h4>Prominence of reviews</h4> <p>As mentioned, with the miniscule love hearts under product images it’s almost as if Benefit Cosmetics doesn't want visitors to think about or look at <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/">the reviews</a>.</p> <p>It would be interesting to see if any research was made in this decision.</p> <p>Not only that, you have no idea whether products have seven or 700 reviews until you get to the product page.</p> <p>From my experience, I always advise retailers to clearly communicate how many reviews you have for a product prior to visitors going to that product page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2824/most_loved.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="371"></p> <h4>Detailed, intelligent, informative, relevant customer reviews</h4> <p>Whilst the reviews are not prominent on the homepage, once you get on the product page Benefit has an exceptional rating and review system.</p> <p>It provides both fantastic depth of reviews and also puts the visitor in control of seeing the reviews most relevant to them.</p> <p>This shows how important Benefit take its customer reviews and the review system should be applauded, but ideally it should look to get this in front of the customer earlier in the journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/2825/mascara_page.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="340"></p> <h3>4. Embracing the full spectrum of testing and optimisation</h3> <p>Unlike with AO.com (which is a brand I know truly embraces the full spectrum of optimisation), the very fact that Benefit doesn’t appear to have a testing tool installed says to me that this is one of the biggest opportunities for its next phase of growth.</p> <h4><strong>What do I mean by the full spectrum of testing and optimisation? </strong></h4> <p>Very few businesses embrace the full spectrum of opportunities on offer from A/B, multivariate and personalisation testing.</p> <p>Typically testing is quick and simple and focused on the low hanging fruit (what we at PRWD call <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67245-why-mvt-doesn-t-live-up-to-the-hype-isn-t-worth-significant-investment/">iterative testing</a>).</p> <p>The biggest business growth opportunity many businesses are missing out on is the impact and growth that innovative and strategic testing can deliver for their business.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>In summary, Benefit Cosmetics is doing some fantastic things with its digital experience to convert visitors into customers.</p> <p>But as this quick evaluation has highlighted, there are a range of opportunities which can take it to the next level:</p> <ol> <li>Effectively communicating the unique value proposition to differentiate itself in the marketplace.</li> <li>Utilising the scale and passion of its social communities and customers to better effect.</li> <li>Most importantly, recognise that full spectrum optimisation represents the biggest growth lever.</li> </ol> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67473 2016-02-04T09:53:00+00:00 2016-02-04T09:53:00+00:00 Seven conversion rate optimization trends to take advantage of in 2016 Rich Page <p>While it still may not be this year that CRO finally hits mainstream, the signs are looking more positive – indeed, the findings of the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/conversion-rate-optimization-report/" target="_blank">2015 CRO Report</a> by Econsultancy and <a href="http://www.redeye.com" target="_blank">RedEye</a> suggest a rising maturity of CRO.</p> <p>But what will be the major CRO trends that online businesses adopt and take advantage of in 2016? </p> <p>Here are the top CRO trends that I foresee happening this year:</p> <h3><strong>1. Growing in-house CRO resources</strong></h3> <p>2016 will see a very positive continual shift in online businesses building and improving in-house CRO capabilities.</p> <p>In particular, the continuation of hiring dedicated CRO roles - echoed by the 2015 CRO report, that found over two-thirds (69%) of respondents now have a dedicated internal CRO resource, the highest percentage since the report started seven years ago.</p> <p>However, many online businesses will continue to find it hard to hire CRO talent due to a low number of suitable candidates, a resource that hasn’t caught up with the rapidly growing demand yet.</p> <p>The 2015 CRO report also supported this by revealing that the biggest barrier to CRO success is a lack of resources.</p> <p>Using a full-service CRO agency to bridge the internal gap or converting internal web analysts are great options to consider.</p> <p><em><strong>What are the biggest barriers preventing your organization from improving conversion rates?</strong></em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/1331/CRO_barriers.png" alt="CRO barriers responses" width="741" height="632"></p> <h3><strong>2. An increase in sticky website elements</strong></h3> <p>This year will see increasing usage of sticky website page elements to improve user navigation experience and to better highlight key conversion-related items.</p> <p>These sticky elements often have a strong impact on CRO because they help cut out the clutter and focus navigation on content that maximises conversions. </p> <p>Good examples of these page elements include sticky header navigation menus, sticky sidebars and sticky CTA buttons, which you can now find on smart websites like <a href="http://www.diy.com/">B&amp;Q</a> and <a href="http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/index.html">PC World</a>.</p> <p>It's definitely worth A/B testing these sticky page elements on your site soon.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/1332/sticky_element_example.png" alt="sticky element example" width="960" height="433"></p> <h3><strong>3. The commoditisation of A/B testing tools</strong></h3> <p>The growth of lower cost A/B testing tools will continue in 2016 with newer contenders like AB Tasty growing its presence in the UK and filling the small business needs that Optimizely seems to be vacating.</p> <p>Helping to fuel this further, each year we seem to see a new entrant into the market, and this year there is the exciting rumour of Google planning a much improved A/B testing tool to replace Content Experiments. </p> <p>Another driver of this commoditisation of A/B testing tools will be the increasing appearance of an A/B testing functionality in other offerings like CMS systems, much like Sitecore has recently successfully implemented.  </p> <h3><strong>4. Increasing usage of video to influence and persuade</strong></h3> <p>Over the last few years there has been much greater use of homepage videos to convert visitors. This includes things like explainer videos, product demos and customer testimonials.</p> <p>The recent increase in lower-cost website video creation services like Demoduck will certainly help this trend continue in 2016.</p> <p>High quality, benefit-driven videos on key pages can have a huge impact on increasing engagement and conversions.</p> <p>An excellent example of this is the explainer video on the Visual Web Optimizer homepage, which is high quality, focusing on key benefits with a strong CTA at the end.</p> <p>I would suggest taking advantage of this trend by creating explainer or demo videos for your key products and A/B testing the impact of them.</p> <p><a href="https://vwo.com/"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/1380/explainer_video.png" alt="explainer video" width="800"></a></p> <h3><strong>5. A demand for higher quality A/B test ideas</strong></h3> <p>We're starting to see a trend for higher quality testing, an encouraging sign of CRO maturity, as online businesses strive for even better results from their A/B testing efforts.</p> <p>In other words, it is becoming less about running a high quantity of tests and the myth that this will equal better results, and more of a focus on lower quantity but higher quality ideas to gain better results. </p> <p>Gaining much greater visitor feedback from usability testing and surveys will play a key role in forming stronger impact ideas, as will online businesses that are starting to benefit more from external CRO expertise for test ideas - the increase in CRO agencies offering expert reviews and heuristic analytics is helping to fuel this. </p> <p>Relying on test ideas from HiPPOs and best guesses will hopefully soon become a thing of the past.</p> <h3><strong>6. Greater capabilities of website personalisation tools</strong></h3> <p>Personalisation remains a very hot topic in the world of CRO, with an increasing demand for personalisation tools – according to the 2015 CRO Report only 22% of respondents were using it, but 56% were planning on using it soon. </p> <p><em><strong>Which of the following methods do you currently use to improve conversion rates?</strong></em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/1381/personalisation_responses.png" alt="personalisation responses" width="800"></p> <p>With this greater demand for personalisation tools in 2016, the capabilities within them will increase, including growing sophistication (and lower cost) of 1:1 personalisation and cross-channel personalisation across web, email and apps (and even the emergence of in-store).</p> <p>Good examples of recent newer personalisation tool offerings are Contour from RedEye and Optimizely Personalisation. </p> <h3><strong>7. More big name website redesign failures</strong></h3> <p>Website redesign failures usually occur due to changing too much at once without using enough CRO redesign best practices.</p> <p>The most spectacular recent failure happened to <a href="http://www.marksandspencer.com/">Marks &amp; Spencer</a> in 2014, when a major redesign costing £150m resulted in an 8% decrease in online revenue, thousands of annoyed customers and probably several people losing their jobs.</p> <p>Which big brand will be next in 2016 to publically reveal a major website redesign failure? One will be coming soon, I’m sure of it. </p> <p>It can easily be avoided though. Incremental CRO-driven changes lessen the risk of failure and ensure higher conversion rates and revenue, instead of step-change redesign without adequate involvement of A/B testing, experts, visitors and their feedback.</p> <p>This new and improved approach to redesign is starting to finally appear, and is being adopted by many CRO agencies including RedEye. </p> <h3><strong>Which CRO trends do you think will be biggest in 2016?</strong></h3> <p>Now over to you – what are your thoughts on these CRO trends for 2016? What other trends do you think will be big in 2016?</p> <p>Please comment below so we can discuss and get some great conversations going. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/2893 2016-01-19T12:20:40+00:00 2016-01-19T12:20:40+00:00 SEO, PPC and Conversion: International Strategy <p>The opportunities to reach an international market through digital marketing and SEO have never been greater, but with it come the challenges around identifying, approaching and engaging across such diverse markets.</p> <p>Drive your online traffic and sales on a global level by learning how to identify opportunities and implement authentic multilingual and international SEO, PPC and social media campaigns</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/2862 2016-01-14T15:11:39+00:00 2016-01-14T15:11:39+00:00 Conversion Optimisation - How to Deliver Digital Growth <p>Have you turned the marketing dial to its limit with diminishing results? Are you working towards delivering the next big website redesign? Are you working on strategies to gain an advantage over your competition?</p> <p>This one day course shows you how to implement a robust conversion optimisation strategy and process which can deliver major uplifts in sales revenue and profitability, as well as changing the way you develop your brand, innovate your offering, and make website redesigns a thing of the past. The course will show you how to implement a data driven approach of onsite testing and optimisation as well as arming you with the strategic knowledge to accelerate growth for forward-thinking businesses.</p>