tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/conversion-rate-optimization Latest Conversion Rate Optimization content from Econsultancy 2017-09-13T12:29:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69402 2017-09-13T12:29:00+01:00 2017-09-13T12:29:00+01:00 Save the recruitment fees: Focus on process & culture, not more resources James Hammersley <p>Yet one of the observations we would have of many organisations is that they are not short of resources. You might think then that the issue is a shortage of the ‘right’ people, but that’s not necessarily true either.</p> <p>I have begun to wonder whether part of the problem is that as ecommerce develops we are less and less sure about what it is we need. Under these circumstances, particularly if we are being pushed for performance improvements, instincts encourage us to look for more heads and I think that counting heads is the wrong place to start.</p> <p>Our experience suggests that heads are the last things to worry about. Where you need to start is with how you want to work. This can be split into three things:</p> <h4><strong>1. Culture</strong></h4> <p>Organisations can behave badly, or at least the people in them can. In ecommerce we need everyone to work together, quite often including support functions such as legal and compliance as well as the more obvious IT and marketing.</p> <p>Function-first cultures abound in many places and these can at best slow down efforts to improve performance and at worst militate against them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8923/badly.png" alt="" width="508" height="254"></p> <p><em>For more on this point, download Econsultancy's guide to <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/building-a-digital-culture">Building A Digital Culture</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>2. Processes</strong></p> <p>Part of the reason why key functions can impact adversely on ecommerce teams is that there is no shared process to underpin roles and expectations. This gives permission for ‘localism’ and enables turf wars and the metaphorical stamping of feet.</p> <p><strong>3. Expert-led thinking</strong></p> <p>Experts in our world are often the cause of failure rather than the answer to a problem. I don’t mean specialists – these are generally very useful to have as they bring expertise and specific skills to help resolve problems.  </p> <p>I’m referring to the self-described ‘expert’ that does seem to exist in many ecommerce teams. You know the types, they start their contributions with phrases like: ‘as a UX expert’ and throw all the jargon in that allow the rest of us to play digital bingo as they talk.</p> <h3>The solution</h3> <p>Generally speaking, if you want to build a high-performing ecommerce team then you will need to be active in your management of culture, processes and egos. In immature functions this is a real challenge but if you get this right, it opens up significant opportunities to be quite radical in resourcing.</p> <p><strong>Cultures need to be customer-centric.</strong> They need to value, recognise and reward constant curiosity about the customer in the market as well as the current customer. They need to be driven by a desire to understand why people do and do not buy or become a lead or self-serve. Cultures that work best in ecommerce are curious, open, learning and rigourous about data and insight.</p> <p><strong>Processes need to be cross-functional.</strong> They should be disciplined and driven from the customer agenda not from a particular functional one. At every stage decision-making needs to be well defined including the data/insight required to make effective decisions. They have to include a test and learn discipline that iterates and links back into developing the understanding of the customer agenda.</p> <p>People need to be low-ego, high standards and low maintenance. They have to be able to collaborate internally and externally and they have to be able to follow a structured disciplined process. Technical specialists are important, but even more important is to ensure you identify the right capabilities that drive performance.  </p> <p>In our view these aren’t defined by activities such as UX/CX or web analytics but by skills sets that can make a competitive difference regardless of where they are deployed:  </p> <ul> <li>Data comprehension and manipulation</li> <li>Customer insight generation process</li> <li>Commercial understanding</li> </ul> <p>Thinking this way about capabilities changes the ‘talent’ pool from a rather limited one into one that embraces a very wide range of disciplines and backgrounds. After all, ecommerce isn’t rocket science is it? What differentiates the outstanding performers are those who understand their customers and the customers in their market and know how to use that to develop optimised executions through a process of test and learn.  </p> <p>That’s true whether you are marketing, selling or building customer relationships.</p> <p>Resourcing against the values that build the right cultures, the attitude that accepts the need to work collaboratively and within strong common processes and a genuine interest in customers rather than themselves is likely to deliver far better outcomes. It will also make your ecommerce team a great one to work for.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68840-culture-and-digital-transformation-how-to-build-a-living-business/"><em>Culture and digital transformation: How to build a 'living business'</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69324-10-companies-with-a-digital-culture"><em>10 companies with a digital culture</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69380 2017-08-31T09:53:00+01:00 2017-08-31T09:53:00+01:00 Arsenal vs. Spurs: Which Premier League club offers the best mobile UX? David Moth <p>Since redesigning and replatforming <a href="https://arsenaldirect.arsenal.com/">their retail site</a> with SAP Hybris Commerce, the club has seen an 86% increase in mobile transactions, a 42% increase in sales, and a 57% reduction in page load time.</p> <p>The ability to checkout using Euros, US dollars, Australian dollars has contributed to a 48% increase in sales from outside the UK. A fine result indeed. To give an idea of the work that has been carried out, here are before and after images of the product pages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8577/Old_Arsenal_Direct_PDP.png" alt="" width="700" height="469"></p> <p><em>The old design</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8578/New_Arsenal_Direct_PDP.png" alt="" width="650" height="478"></em></p> <p><em>The new design</em></p> <p>The redesign included:</p> <ul> <li>Cleaner design with a focus on key products and imagery.</li> <li>Better visibility of key customer journeys; shop-by-player and shirt personalisation.</li> <li>Improved rendering of shirt personalisation.</li> <li>Improved shirt personalisation journey based on mobile first principles.</li> <li>Redesign of the checkout also based on mobile first design principles.</li> </ul> <p>It’s the last two points that I’ve chosen to focus on for this article, because the 86% increase in mobile transactions is quite impressive. To add an element of competition, I’ve compared Arsenal’s mobile journey versus that of my own club, the Hotspurs.</p> <p>Read on to find my totally unbiased appraisal. And for more on digital in the Premier League, checkout these other posts:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69332-how-premier-league-club-websites-are-changing-a-swansea-and-stoke-case-study/">How Premier League club websites are changing: A Swansea &amp; Stoke case study</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68696-digital-transformation-in-the-premier-league-southampton-fc-s-fan-first-strategy/">Digital transformation in the Premier League: Southampton FC's fan-first strategy</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68828-after-years-of-apathy-football-clubs-are-embracing-digital-transformation">After years of apathy, football clubs are embracing digital transformation</a></li> </ul> <h3>My Arsenal journey</h3> <p>The homepage has a hero image that aims to nudge people towards buying the new away kit. It features an indifferent Mesut Ozil, goal-shy Theo Walcott, and a third player who I don’t actually recognise. How can I resist clicking ‘Shop now’?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8561/Arsenal_1.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8563/Arsenal_product_listing.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <p>The product page is clearly designed to get people to personalise their shirts. One could very easily accuse Arsenal of employing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68973-13-examples-of-dark-patterns-in-ecommerce-checkouts">a dark UX pattern here</a>, pushing people towards the more expensive option.</p> <p>Adding a name and number to the shirt is very simple and the product image immediately reflects your choice. Not rocket science, but still all very quick and user-friendly thus far.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8564/Arsenal_4.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8565/Arsenal_5.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <p>One criticism would be that the shirt cost has jumped from £55 to £71 without warning. I would expect a personalised shirt to cost more, but the new price is shown below the 'Add sleeve patches' call-to-action, so users might miss the price increase if they don't scroll down past the CTA. A bit sneaky perhaps, and some users might abandon their purchase if they reach the checkout without noticing the price hike.</p> <p>And by the way, those sleeve patches are an extra £8.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8566/Arsenal_8.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8567/Arsenal_checkout.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"> </p> <p>As promised, the checkout is very simple to use and ticks <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65493-10-of-the-world-s-best-mobile-commerce-checkouts/">all the best practice boxes</a>. A progress bar lets me know it won’t take long to make the purchase and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65311-seven-important-ux-requirements-for-online-postcode-validation">the postcode lookup tool</a> simplifies the process of entering personal details. It even accepts Paypal.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8562/Arsenal_checkout_2.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8568/Arsenal_checkout_3.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <p>Standard delivery is almost £5 though, which seems steep at a time when most retailers offer free delivery or click and collect options. In total my order comes to £83.95.  </p> <h3>The Arsenal result</h3> <p>Overall the mobile purchase journey for a personalised Arsenal shirt was extremely quick and easy. The path from product page to checkout completion was very slick and intuitive, with each screen only requiring a handful of interactions.</p> <p>You could argue that it would be better to condense the checkout onto a single screen, but I don’t think that matters too much as long as there’s a progress bar and each page is short and simple.</p> <h3>My Tottenham journey</h3> <p>I breathed a sigh of relief that Spurs have a mobile site – it would have been a crushing blow if we fell at the first hurdle. </p> <p>The hero image on the homepage promotes Champions League merchandise, an option that wasn’t available on the Arsenal site for some reason. It takes three clicks to get to the home shirt product page, which costs £60. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8569/Spurs_homepage.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8570/Spurs_product_page.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <p>I’m trying to be objective here, and I think that the product pages are pretty much on par with one another.</p> <p>Both have good product images, and while Spurs get bonus points <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them">for product reviews</a>, I prefer Arsenal’s use of buttons to choose the shirt size instead of a dropdown menu. And if we’re assuming that both clubs would prefer to nudge fans towards getting a personalised shirt, then Arsenal’s CTA is probably more effective. </p> <p>If a customer opts for a personalised Spurs shirt, the options are presented in a pop up rather than on a new screen. Though it’s a slightly different experience, the outcome is the same – you enter your name and number and the product image is updated accordingly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8571/Spurs_product_page_2.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8572/Spurs_personalisation.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <p>Spurs do offer some extra options though – you can choose between two fonts (Spurs Lettering or Premier League Lettering), though I’m not sure if that was reflected on the product image as I couldn’t tell any difference. And there’s also the extra option of Champions League badges, again an option that was missing from the Arsenal site.</p> <p>Spurs gain points here for being a bit more upfront about costs, but unfortunately our flaky nature now comes into play...</p> <p>You notice that heart icon at the bottom right of the personalisation screen? I clicked it, but as far as I can tell it didn’t do anything other than boot me back to the product page, deleting the shirt information I had just filled in.</p> <p>Also, if you click the blue 'Confirm’ button, the shirt is subtly added to your basket without any real warning. But you’re then left on the product page, where the price hasn’t been updated to reflect the personalised name and number. </p> <p>Worse still, the next logical step is to click the ‘Add to Bag’ button. But if you click ‘Add to Bag’ you then actually have two items in your basket. And at the checkout you can’t delete the items individually, you have to either buy both shirts or delete the entire order. I wasn’t actually planning to buy a shirt, and I still got frustrated at all this clicking.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8574/Spurs_checkout_2.png" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8573/Spurs_checkout.png" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <p>Pleasingly, the checkout experience is very swift. It all sits on one page, with concertinas expanding out as you move through each phase.</p> <h3>The final result</h3> <p>While the checkouts are evenly matched, Arsenal win this little UX test as Tottenham have contrived to shoot themselves in the foot at the last minute (just like both our home games so far this season...).</p> <p>On the product page Spurs don’t make it clear that the personalised shirt has been added to the user’s shopping basket, nor does the product page reflect the updated cost. It leads to a lot of unnecessary confusion and frustration, which lets down an otherwise quick and simple purchase journey.</p> <p>In contrast Arsenal’s mobile user journey requires minimal thought or effort on the user’s behalf. My only criticism would be that the additional costs for personalising a shirt are not made clear, which could lead some fans to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/11182-basket-abandonment-case-studies-and-tips-to-help-improve-your-conversion-rates">abandon their purchase</a>.</p> <p>Overall then, Arsenal win this user test. Does that make this the ecommerce version of St Totteringham’s Day?</p> <p><em>To learn more on this topic, check out these Econsultancy resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/mobile-user-experience-mobile-marketing/"><em>Mobile UX (User Experience) &amp; Marketing Training</em></a></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/user-experience-and-interaction-design-for-mobile-and-web">User Experience and Interaction Design for Mobile and Web</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69313 2017-08-04T10:26:00+01:00 2017-08-04T10:26:00+01:00 10 thrilling digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Users spend nearly 30 minutes on Instagram every day</h3> <p>Thanks to the popularity of Instagram Stories, which is now a year old, <a href="http://blog.instagram.com/post/163728483085/170802-storiesbirthday" target="_blank">Instagram</a> has revealed that people are spending more time on the platform overall.</p> <p>Users under the age of 25 are said to spend more than 32mins a day on Instagram. Similarly, users aged 25 and older use the app for more than 24mins a day.</p> <p>Stories has 250m daily users, with teenagers consuming four times more stories and producing six times more stories than non-teens.</p> <p>Brands have also been quick to see the value of Instagram Stories – 51% of monthly active businesses have posted a story in the last 28 days.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Celebrating one year of Instagram Stories <a href="https://t.co/GTJaFW7KdW">https://t.co/GTJaFW7KdW</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/892748576195043329">August 2, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marketers willing to pay Facebook influencers £75k per post</h3> <p>Research by Rakuten Marketing has revealed that UK marketers are willing to pay influencers more than £75,000 for a single Facebook post mentioning their brand. This figure rises depending on the industry, with premium fashion marketers saying they’d be willing to pay up to £160,000 per post. </p> <p>Earnings also differ by platform, as celebrity influencers on Facebook are said to earn an average of 12% more than their YouTube peers. And while Snapchat is ranked fifth in terms of earnings, marketers still say they are willing to pay stars as much as £53,000 per Snap.</p> <p>This news comes despite the fact that 86% of marketers admit they aren’t entirely sure how influencer fees are calculated, and 38% cannot tell whether a campaign drives sales.</p> <h3>Brands must offer more to build loyalty with younger customers</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://thoughtleadership.ricoh-europe.com/uk/triple-r/digital-innovation-key-for-smes-pursuing-customer-relationship-excellence/" target="_blank">Ricoh UK</a> has highlighted the generational differences when it comes to attitudes about customer service.</p> <p>Research found that older age groups are less forgiving to brands, with 62% of those aged over 55 saying they would be prepared to walk away from a brand with a laborious sales process compared to 43% of those aged 16-24.</p> <p>Meanwhile, younger customers expect far more information at the consideration stage and post-sales interaction – 43% of those aged 16-24 rated third party reviews and recommendations as the factor that impresses them most, compared to only 20% of people aged 55+.</p> <p>Out of all age groups, 55% of customers say they would abandon a purchase if they found the process difficult.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8088/Capture.JPG" alt="" width="473" height="197"></p> <h3>Brands send more holiday-themed emails despite lower open rates </h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.yeslifecyclemarketing.com/who-we-are/news-and-events/news/study-q4-2016-holiday-themed-emails-may-produce-lower-open-rates" target="_blank">study</a> by Yes Lifecycle Marketing, which involved the analysis of almost 8bn emails sent in Q4 2016, found that holiday-themed emails generated a 14.6% lower open rate than standard emails.</p> <p>Despite this, brands sent 14.5% more emails to subscribers during the period, with 55% of all brands partaking in holiday-themed campaigns. </p> <p>The research also suggests that customers do not particularly value discounts in holiday-themed emails. Emails that didn't include an offer achieved higher open rates than those that promised money off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8087/holiday_emails.JPG" alt="" width="738" height="226"></p> <h3>UK’s June heatwave sparked a 200% increase in Fitbit searches</h3> <p>It might feel like a distant memory now, but analysis by Summit has revealed how retailers benefited from the recent spell of hot weather in the UK.</p> <p>As temperatures reached 34.5 degrees this June, consumers purchased more goods relating to fitness and the great outdoors. Argos sold enough paddling pools to hold over 70m litres of water during the heatwave.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Fitbit searches saw a 200% increase in demand, and camping-related search terms increased by 86%, driving the biggest increase in demand in nine years. Lastly, searches for fishing equipment more than doubled, seeing a 193% increase, and demonstrating how changes in temperature can influence purchasing decisions.</p> <h3>Discounts on direct hotel bookings increase average order value</h3> <p>Research conducted by <a href="https://www.hotelchamp.com/blog/boost-direct-bookings-build-guest-relations/" target="_blank">Hotelchamp</a> has shown that discounts can result in higher conversion rate and average order value for direct hotel bookings.</p> <p>It found that hotels offering a 5% discount (rather than no discount) resulted in an 11% increase in conversion rate and a 12% increase in average booking value. When this was increased to a 10% discount, it found a 50% increase in conversion rate and an 11% increase in average booking value. </p> <p>So, despite offering a discount to guests in both instances, the average booking value always increased by over 10%, meaning that customers were naturally more inclined to purchase upsell features such as breakfast or a room upgrade.</p> <h3>A quarter of US consumers stop buying from brands due to political beliefs</h3> <p><a href="https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/knowledge/society/brand-risk-in-new-age-of-populism" target="_blank">Ipsos</a> has found that the political preferences of consumers have an increasing impact on their buying behaviour. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,016 US adults, it found that a quarter of American consumers have stopped using products and services due to boycotts or a company’s political leanings.</p> <p>The study also revealed that there has been an uptick in online search traffic for the term ‘boycott’ since Trump was officially elected in November 2016. Meanwhile, it found that the firms with the highest rate of consumer boycotts also registered the worst stock market performance between November 2016 and February 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8086/boycott.JPG" alt="" width="637" height="298"></p> <h3>UK ad viewability reaches highest level in over a year</h3> <p>According to analysis by <a href="https://www.meetrics.com/en/benchmarks-uk/" target="_blank">Meetrics</a>, UK ad viewability has risen for the first time in nine months.</p> <p>This appears to be due to a significant increase in the amount of banner ads that meet minimum requirements – rising from 47% to 51% of ads in the second quarter of 2017. This is the highest level since Q3 2016, when 54% of ads met the minimum standard. </p> <p>Despite this news, the UK is still lagging behind in viewability levels compared to elsewhere in Europe, where countries like Austria and France have an average of 69% and 58% respectively. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8089/meetrics.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="267"></p> <h3>UK consumers positive about personal job security</h3> <p>In a survey of 2,000 UK consumers, <a href="http://www.lloydsbankinggroup.com/media/economic-insight/economic-research-library/spending-power-report/" target="_blank">Lloyds</a> found that 64% of people were feeling positive about their personal financial situation in June – up from 63% in May and just two percentage points lower than in June of last year.</p> <p>Despite the value of the pound falling since then, UK consumers appear relatively unfazed when it comes to their own personal prospects, with 80% saying they feel optimistic about their own job security, and 53% saying they are positive about employment prospects nationally.</p> <p>Howoever, the survey did highlight some disparity between attitudes about personal finances and the national economy as a whole, with just 33% saying they feel good about the UK’s financial situation compared to 45% in June 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69301 2017-08-02T11:14:52+01:00 2017-08-02T11:14:52+01:00 How 10 online retailers promote free and fast shipping Nikki Gilliland <p>While <a href="http://www2.temando.com/l/86602/2017-07-10/4g564b">the research suggests</a> that 86% of UK shoppers prefer free over fast delivery, the majority of retailers assume that customers want a fast shipping service above anything else. As a result, just 27% of retailers say they offer free standard shipping every day, and almost a quarter of retailers admit that they don't use free shipping as a promotional tool.</p> <p>With this in mind, let’s take a look at how some of the biggest online retailers are promoting the service – and perhaps what they could be doing better.</p> <h3>Argos</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">Argos</a> is one retailer that firmly favours fast delivery. </p> <p>Its FastTrack service is highlighted throughout its website, heavily promoting the fact that customers can get their hands on products the very same day as placing the order, seven days a week.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7950/Argos.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="365"></p> <p>While the £3.95 price point could arguably put off customers who do prefer free delivery, its Click and Collect service means there is also a fast <em>and</em> free alternative – a feature that combines the best of both worlds. </p> <p>Interestingly, Argos does offer free standard delivery on selected items (in an estimated four working days), but this option is kept a little under wraps, with the retailer clearly placing greater value on its FastTrack option. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7951/FastTrack.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="434"></p> <h3>B&amp;Q</h3> <p>B&amp;Q is not quite as transparent as Argos, with the price of its next day and standard delivery services only being highlighted at the checkout (or in the dedicated delivery info section).</p> <p>It also fails to use the word ‘free’ alongside its click and collect service, and although this is an arguably obvious detail its exclusion seems like a bit of an oversight.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7953/B_Q_1.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="552"></p> <p>That being said, its free delivery on items over £50 is nicely promoted, making sense for customers who will naturally buy bigger or bulkier items online. </p> <p>I also like the icons on category pages that tell customers whether items are available for pick up in-store at a glance.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7954/B_Q.JPG" alt="" width="448" height="412"></p> <h3>John Lewis</h3> <p>John Lewis is a little less worried about the speed of its delivery service, instead choosing to promote free services – both in terms of standard delivery and click and collect.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7955/John_Lewis.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="444"></p> <p>If Temando’s research is correct, and the majority of customers do value low or no-cost shipping, this could work in its favour.</p> <p>However, the fact that customers need to spend £50 to qualify could mean that people are more likely to go in-store. And while it’s a tactic used to increase overall order value, the trend for webrooming (browsing online before buying in-store) could also contribute to customers wanting to look elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7959/John_Lewis_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="448"></p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>Last week, Tesco announced that it is to roll out its same-day delivery service across the UK, allowing customers to receive groceries from 7pm onwards if they order before 1pm.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, the supermarket is now heavily promoting this online, highlighting how it can bring customers even greater levels of convenience. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7957/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="625" height="555"></p> <p>While the service costs between £3 and £9, it is being offered free for a limited period for members of its delivery saver service. But according to Temando, price is not a deal breaker when customers really desire convenience. Its research shows that same-day delivery is the service that most customers are willing to pay extra for, with 56% of women and 57% of men agreeing. </p> <p>With the likes of Amazon setting the bar for this kind of convenience, it’s not surprising that supermarkets are starting to introduce it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7958/same_day_delivery.JPG" alt="" width="714" height="515"></p> <h3>River Island</h3> <p>River Island often uses delivery promotions to increase online conversions. It is currently offering customers free worldwide delivery for a limited time only. </p> <p>With a prominent site-wide banner on the homepage and a creative tagline, it’s an effective example of how to use free delivery to boost short-term sales. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7960/River_Island.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="481"></p> <p>Again, it looks like River Island is veering toward free rather than fast as its selling point. It also promises free click and collect, and once the current promotion is over, free delivery on orders over £100. </p> <p>Meanwhile, the absence of visible returns information is a bit of a let down. Over a fifth of women are reported to abandon a purchase if free returns are not available, meaning that this could have an adverse impact on conversion rates.</p> <h3>M&amp;S</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67883-marks-spencer-what-does-putting-the-customer-at-the-heart-of-everything-mean/" target="_blank">Marks &amp; Spencer</a> is one of the few online retailers that does not visibly highlight its delivery information at the top of its homepage – you’ll only find it if you scroll down to the very bottom. </p> <p>That being said, the services are clearly explained here, with M&amp;S favouring the word ‘free’ across the board to pique the interest of customers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7961/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="549"></p> <p>Its product pages also provide a lot of clear and concise information, including an eye-catching 'free delivery' notice in red. </p> <p>In terms of the actual delivery, M&amp;S gives customers a load of options, offering standard delivery, nominated day, free over £50, and click and collect. The retailer could most definitely shout about this a little more on its homepage, even if it means moving its current banner higher up the page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7962/M_S_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="711"></p> <h3>Clarks</h3> <p>Clarks is currently choosing to offer a special code for free standard delivery. While it’s similar to River Island’s strategy of using a short-term shipping offer, the inclusion of a code is a bit of a strange choice, only adding an extra step in the customer’s journey.</p> <p>The fact that it’s promoted on the homepage also means that there is nothing exclusive about it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7963/Clarks.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="453"></p> <p>Perhaps it is trying to make customer feel like they’re getting something extra. However, with most people now expecting free or fast delivery as standard, customers might feel it doesn’t provide anything of real value.</p> <h3>Warby Parker</h3> <p>Warby Parker cements its customer-focused service with the promise of free shipping in the US and selected countries. This is obviously a sweet deal in itself, but it also goes one step further in its customer-centric approach with the ‘Home Try-On’ feature.</p> <p>This allows customers to pick five frames to try for five days, before sending back the four pairs they don’t want for free. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7964/Warby_Parker.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="523"></p> <p>While it is undoubtedly a big expense for the company, Warby Parker demonstrates the value of free shipping, ramping up word-of-mouth marketing and increasing customer loyalty thanks to the service.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Warby Parker has a pretty good selection, you can pick 5 to try on at home and they'll send em for free, don't even pay shipping &amp; handling <a href="https://t.co/lwWI1miSbE">pic.twitter.com/lwWI1miSbE</a></p> — (@Jibaye_) <a href="https://twitter.com/Jibaye_/status/886610566848143360">July 16, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>JD Sports</h3> <p>JD Sports is yet another retailer using free delivery as a limited offer. Its inclusion of a countdown timer makes it one of the most effective examples of the bunch though, using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65348-how-to-increase-conversions-by-creating-buyer-urgency-fear-of-loss/" target="_blank">urgency</a> to prompt customers into action. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7965/JD_Sports.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="548"></p> <p>It also promotes this throughout the website, prominently highlighting free delivery on its category and product pages. </p> <p>Temando suggests that shipping is not just about the delivery of items – extra factors like tracking orders and options for leaving items in safe places are also important. JD Sports has a useful ‘Track My Order’ feature, which also helps to improve the customer experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7966/Tracking.JPG" alt="" width="679" height="579"></p> <h3>ASOS</h3> <p>Finally, ASOS uses reliable delivery to instil loyalty in customers. Its Premier Delivery programme costs £9.95 per year for unlimited next day delivery and click and collect – an undeniably enticing deal for regular shoppers.</p> <p>The brand is pretty adept at promoting the service too, nicely highlighting both the fast and free nature of the service in its marketing copy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7967/ASOS_premier.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="533"></p> <p>Elsewhere, it gives customers lots of choice and up-front information, helping to prevent customers from abandoning purchases at the checkout due to surprise costs.</p> <p>Even using the word 'options' here effectively evokes the retailer's focus on flexibility.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7968/Options_ASOS.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="599"></p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68739-how-has-click-collect-evolved-and-is-it-still-in-high-demand/" target="_blank"><em>How has Click &amp; Collect evolved, and is it still in high demand?</em></a></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67322-not-offering-same-day-delivery-you-could-be-losing-customers/" target="_blank">Not offering same-day delivery? You could be losing customers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66151-ecommerce-delivery-how-fast-are-uk-retailers/" target="_blank">Ecommerce delivery: how fast are UK retailers?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69279 2017-07-27T10:01:00+01:00 2017-07-27T10:01:00+01:00 13 creative call-to-action examples and reasons why they work Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what makes an effective CTA? Here are 13 creative examples and the reasons why they work so well.</p> <h3>OKCupid</h3> <p>The CTA on OKCupid’s homepage cleverly takes away the need for any deliberation, drawing users in with a simple form that promotes the idea of a quick and easy sign-up process. Combined with the humorous nature of the main copy, which effectively explains the brand’s value proposition, it makes clicking ‘continue’ feel like a natural next step.</p> <p>The prominent position of the CTA button also means that there are zero distractions. With nowhere else to browse or scroll, the chances of the user clicking through are likely to be increased.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7728/OKCupid.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="388"></p> <h3>Joules</h3> <p>This Joules newsletter is another good example of effective CTA positioning. It’s impossible to miss the dark blue button in the centre of the email.</p> <p>Sure, the ‘shop now’ phrase is uninspiring, however, the accompanying pun of ‘don’t mullet over’ is what makes it work. A clever play on user behaviour - it naturally instils urgency, and prompts the consumer to browse the sale before all bargains are gone.</p> <p>I also like the ‘come and say hello’ copy at the bottom, which uses a friendly and personable tone to entice customers to head in-store.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7729/Joules_email.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="774"></p> <h3>Warby Parker</h3> <p>Instead of leaving users to browse the website of their own accord, Warby Parker cleverly uses an interactive quiz to guide people down the purchase funnel. </p> <p>With the promise of helping to narrow down the perfect pair of frames, the ‘take the quiz’ CTA adds a gamification element as well as a more personalised outcome. The inclusion of a box that says ‘good things await you’ emphasises this point.</p> <p>This kind of CTA is particularly effective at hooking in consumers still very much in the discovery stage, adding a bit of fun to what could be a lengthy or boring browsing experience.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7730/Warby_Parker.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="418"></p> <h3>The Skimm</h3> <p>The Skimm – a free daily newsletter aimed at women – uses newsletter CTAs to encourage word of mouth, prompting existing readers to share articles with others. To do so, it encourages people to sign up for its ‘Skimm’bassador’ program, which gives members perks like free trips and early access to special offers.</p> <p>The progress bar shows users how many steps stand between them and their status as a ‘Skimm’bassador’, while the prominent circular button grabs the user’s attention with a tongue-in-cheek CTA.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7733/The_Skimm_2__2_.JPG" alt="" width="648" height="554"></p> <h3>Grammarly</h3> <p>Grammarly’s homepage CTA is simple but incredibly effective. The bright and bold colour ensures the button stands out, while the copy cleverly includes both a prompt to add Grammarly and a reason why you should. Highlighting the fact that Grammarly is free helps reassure people who might be thinking twice about clicking.</p> <p>This CTA is also a great example of personalisation, with Grammarly recognising which browser you are using and changing the copy accordingly. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7734/Grammarly.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="371"></p> <h3>Missguided</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68387-how-missguided-uses-personalisation-to-create-an-addictive-shopping-experience/" target="_blank">Missguided</a> often uses language to appeal to a young, digitally-savvy and pop-culture-loving audience. This CTA prompting customers to sign up to its newsletter is no different, using the word ‘squad’ to promote the sense of comradery and togetherness that comes with being part of the Missguided gang.</p> <p>The 30%-off promise is also a valuable proposition, giving customers a sense that they’re signing up to something far more exclusive than just a newsletter.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7736/Missguided.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="510"></p> <h3>HostelWorld</h3> <p>Unlike the standard ‘search’ button, HostelWorld manages to evoke the exciting nature of travel with a short but punchy CTA. The phrase ‘Let’s go!’ – complete with exclamation point – creates urgency, giving users the sense that there’s no point wasting time. Meanwhile, the ‘best price guarantee’ instils trust. </p> <p>The bright orange design and central positioning grabs the user’s attention, eliminating distraction so that people will be prompted to go straight to search.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7737/HostelWorld.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="632"></p> <h3>Firebox</h3> <p>Firebox is another brand that’s known for its quirky and creative tone of voice, which is demonstrated here by its ‘ARRIBA ARRIBA’ CTA.</p> <p>Meaning a variation of ‘hurry up’ or ‘let’s go’ in Spanish, the phrase cleverly co-ordinates with the fiesta-themed product category, while its playful and motivational nature further entices customers to click-through. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7745/Firebox.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="465"></p> <h3>Amazon Prime</h3> <p>In contrast to other more minimal examples, Amazon veers towards clutter with this CTA for its Amazon Prime service. However, it is undeniably persuasive, using words like ‘simplify’, ‘free’, and ‘limitless’ in the surrounding copy to sell its package of convenience.</p> <p>The CTA button itself is clear and concise, and other phrases such as ‘cancel anytime’ and ‘see more plans’ reassure customers to make them feel like they’re in control. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7739/Amazon_Prime.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="434"></p> <h3>AYR</h3> <p>US clothing brand AYR aims to tap into the consumer mind-set with its short and sweet CTA. </p> <p>Instead of using language that asks you to do something (e.g. ‘buy now’), the company often talks from the perspective of the customer. Language like ‘Mine’ and ‘I want’ reflects an inner desire for the product, inspiring consumers to actually imagine owning it instead of browsing from afar.</p> <p>Elsewhere, the brand uses conversational language to instil intrigue. For example, using ‘it’s super fun’ as a CTA to check out AYR's physical stores might sound abstract, but it makes the user question <em>why</em>, and encourages them to find out.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7740/AYR.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="438"></p> <h3>River Island</h3> <p>Urgency is another tactic often deployed by online retailers, as seen here in a River Island email.</p> <p>It’s certainly not the most inspiring creative, but by including a strong CTA that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65348-how-to-increase-conversions-by-creating-buyer-urgency-fear-of-loss/" target="_blank">successfully instils FOMO</a> (‘fear of missing out’) alongside a discount – with nothing else in the email – the brand increases the likelihood of users clicking straight through rather than browsing other content and eventually clicking away.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7747/River_Island.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="581"></p> <h3>BlueCross</h3> <p>CTAs are a vital tool for the <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68781-five-ways-charities-can-encourage-more-online-donations" target="_blank">charity sector,</a> helping to maximise user engagement and fundraising.</p> <p>People might automatically assume that giving money is the only way to help, so in order to combat this the BlueCross nicely highlights the different ways people can get involved with four distinct CTAs.</p> <p>While it could arguably be more effective to move this section higher up the landing page, the drop-down menu already prompts users to take a specific path. What’s more, the simple but striking graphics grab the user’s attention if they do happen to scroll down. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7744/BlueCross.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="519"></p> <h3>Unicef</h3> <p>Another charity example to end the list, with Unicef and its motivational CTA. Instead of merely asking users to donate or help out, it explains the results of a specific fundraising scenario in order to inspire and drive action. This effectively paints a picture in the mind of the user.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the bright yellow ‘donate to help children’ button catches the eye, simultaneously giving the user a much more direct and immediate route to making a difference. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7743/Unicef.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="456"></p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63139-six-useful-case-studies-on-where-to-place-your-cta-to-maximise-conversions">Six useful case studies on where to place your CTA to maximise conversions</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63139-six-useful-case-studies-on-where-to-place-your-cta-to-maximise-conversions">10 nudge-tastic examples of persuasive copywriting from charities</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69227 2017-07-11T10:45:00+01:00 2017-07-11T10:45:00+01:00 How to attract lots of quality online reviews to your ecommerce store Andy Favell <p>But how do you build and sustain a wealth of quality reviews across your own sites and those of your partners?</p> <p>Answer: 1) Post-interaction email; 2) syndication.</p> <h3>There are two sorts of reviews found on retailer (and other) sites.</h3> <p><strong>1. Organic reviews</strong></p> <p>These are ratings and reviews that the company has collected itself from its customers, probably with the help of a tool, such as Trustpilot, Yotpo, eKomi, Feefo or Bazaarvoice.</p> <p>Let’s be clear, there are lots of ways that companies can and do elicit reviews from customers. These include incentivized requests (e.g. sweepstakes, coupons); post-checkout web survey; sampling (sending out free product; trialling services); requesting reviews via social media channels (paid and unpaid) and soliciting reviews via a homepage banner.</p> <p>However the most common tactic for getting reviews is to request them via post-interaction email (PIE). According to a 2016 survey conducted by Bazaarvoice among its 5,000 retailer and brand customers, PIE is used by 87% of its brand clients and 64% of its retail clients.</p> <p>This could also be called post-purchase email. But then PPE doesn’t have the same acronym appeal as PIE.</p> <p><strong>2. Syndicated reviews</strong></p> <p>These are reviews that were collected on different sites and/or by different companies.</p> <p>These could be reviews that were posted on one retailer website and then reposted to another site in the same group that sells the same products. For example some reviews for products on Shop Direct’s Littlewoods.com were left by customers on the sister site Very.co.uk – see, for example, <a href="http://www.littlewoods.com/calvin-klein-eternity-moment-100ml-edp/1005793955.prd" target="_blank">this perfume</a>.</p> <p>More commonly these are reviews that were collected by brands, perhaps while customers registered a new product to secure a guarantee, which are then supplied to the retailers that sell the brand’s products. These will be distributed through a syndication network such as Bazaarvoice, PowerReviews or Reevoo.</p> <h3>Why reviews matter</h3> <p>As noted in my previous article, which outlined the importance of putting someone <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69220-who-should-own-customer-reviews-in-your-organisation/" target="_blank">in charge of reviews</a>, consumer opinions of products are influenced not only by ratings but also by the number of ratings.</p> <p><a href="https://www.profitero.com/2017/06/profitero-finds-strong-correlation-between-a-products-number-of-online-reviews-and-sales/" target="_blank">Research by Profitero and BzzAgent</a> (June 2016) backs this up. The report concluded that there is a strong correlation between the number of online reviews a product has and ecommerce sales.</p> <p>As shown in the graph below, just adding one review to a product with zero reviews will lead to a sales lift of 10%. Adding 50 reviews leads to a sales lift of 30%. Above 50 reviews products continue to receive a lift in sales, but at a diminishing rate.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7584/bazaarvoice.png" alt="" width="700" height="436"></p> <h3>Post-interaction email - PIE</h3> <p>When a customer has purchased a good or service or otherwise engaged with a company, it is increasingly common for the customer to receive an email asking for feedback. This will often then be posted to the relevant pages of the website. PIE generally gets good results – or better results than other methods – for the retailer.</p> <p>Data provided to Econsultancy by Bazaarvoice, based on insights from its network of 5,000 retailers and brands, shows that this is certainly the case among its customer base. Of all organic reviews on retailer sites the vast majority come from PIE: 81% in APAC, 84% in Europe and 77% in North America. Of all organic reviews on brand sites 80% in APAC, 70% in Europe and 62% in North America come from PIE.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7267/t8_reviews_pie_bazaarvoice.png" alt="" width="615" height="416"></p> <p>Conversations with retailers suggests that success with PIE is an industry-wide phenomena. Shop Direct, which runs the UK-focused online department stores Very.co.uk and Littlewoods.com, sends a PIE to every shopper post purchase.</p> <p>Paul Hornby, head of ecommerce at Shop Direct, tells Econsultancy:</p> <blockquote> <p>Our biggest driver for reviews volume is our post purchase email, which goes out weekly to every customer who’s bought from us. The email needs to go out at the right time and must represent a consistent customer journey across device.</p> <p>We’ve found from experience that the email should be clean and to the point, with no sales tactics distracting from the call to action. We also introduced an incentive, which has definitely helped to encourage more feedback.</p> <p>We’re now doing a piece of work to understand the optimum length of time to wait before asking for feedback, depending on product category.</p> </blockquote> <p>The screenshot below shows a PIE from Very inviting the customer to write a review for two products purchased, with the added incentive of a chance to win £500 in a monthly draw.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7268/t8_review_email_shopdirect.png" alt="" width="467" height="492"></p> <p>Requesting reviews by email also works extremely well for smaller ecommerce vendors.</p> <p>PuraVida, a San Diego-based ecommerce startup that sells hand-made jewellery from artisans in Costa Rica, has generated a volume of reviews for its <a href="https://www.puravidabracelets.com/collections/best-sellers" target="_blank">best sellers</a> that would make eyes water at many much larger retailers. See image below.</p> <p>Griffin Thall, CEO of Pura Vida Bracelets:</p> <blockquote> <p>We use Yotpo to gather customer reviews. To date, we have sent out over 1.7m emails and have received over 130,000 positive reviews.</p> <p>After 12 days, the customer receives their first review request, five days later they receive their second, and five days later they receive their third. There’s no particular time, just the set amount of days after they purchase.</p> <p>For the copy, we recommend being sincere, personable, and thankful that your new customer shopped with you.</p> <p>After the customer writes a review, we email them with a coupon code to say Thank You.</p> <p>We also use Delighted to monitor our NPS (net promoter score) on a weekly basis. </p> </blockquote> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7269/t8_reviews_email_puravida.png" alt="" width="615" height="482"></p> <h3>What works makes consumers read PIEs, click through and review?</h3> <p><a href="https://www.yotpo.com/data/benchmark/" target="_blank">Research by Yotpo</a>, based on analysis of the 200,000 stores that use the platform worldwide, finds that review solicitation emails have an 8.1% response rate on average. Of course some PIEs will deliver a much higher conversion and some much lower.</p> <p>As any email marketer would expect, just the smallest tweaks to the format and wording – particularly the subject line – can increase the email open rate and the response rate. Yotpo’s research highlights three dos and don’ts:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Do:</strong> phrase the request as a question (delivers an 86% increase in response rate); use an incentive (18.5% increase) and include your store name (10% increase)... duh!</li> <li> <strong>Don’t:</strong> include urgent words e.g. now, today (delivers a 28% decrease in response rate); include customer’s name (19% decrease); use a TOTALLY uppercase word (5.8% decrease).</li> </ul> <p>Great advice, but we’d add two more tips. Don’t: just take Yotpo’s word for it. Do: A/B test your emails to see which tweaks work for you.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7270/t8_reviews_email_yotpo.png" alt="" width="615" height="443"></p> <h3>When is the best time to send a review request email?</h3> <p>According to Yotpo’s analysis of 4.5m emails:</p> <ul> <li>The best time is Saturday 8am.</li> <li>The worst time is Thursday 3pm.</li> </ul> <h3>Syndication of reviews</h3> <p>Syndication of reviews happens more regularly than most marketers would expect and certainly more often than most consumers would notice.</p> <p>There is a mutual benefit for the brand and retailer. It is in both their interest if product conversions on retailer sites are improved due to having more and better quality reviews and ratings.</p> <p>Research undertaken by Bazaarvoice among its customer base finds that some types of retailers are particularly heavily reliant on the syndicated reviews. For food, beverage and drug sites 98% of the volume of onsite reviews are syndicated; in pharmaceuticals 93% are syndicated and in footwear it’s 91%.</p> <p>Retailer dependency on syndication for reviews also varies by region. In APAC 81% of reviews are syndicated, in North America it’s 67% and in Europe 33% of reviews are syndicated.</p> <p>Companies will commonly syndicate reviews via a network of brands and retailers, operated by vendors such as Bazaarvoice, PowerReviews or Reevoo. These network providers will verify the reviews/reviewers and distribute to the brand pages on participating retailer sites. The networks also notify brands and or retailers when reviews have been posted, particularly negative ones, so the brand/retailer can respond.</p> <p>For example, if you checkout <a href="http://www.boots.com/electrical/electrical-dental/electric-toothbrushes" target="_blank">electric toothbrushes on Boots.co.uk</a> there are a variety of products from Philips, Colgate and Oral-B, some with hundreds of reviews.</p> <p>But closer inspection of the best sellers, shows that many of the 352 reviews for the <a href="http://www.boots.com/oral-b-pro-2000-rechargeable-electric-toothbrush-powered-by-braun-10176433" target="_blank">Braun Oral-B Genius</a> toothbrush are from the Oral-B site or Victoria.co.uk, which belongs to P&amp;G (the parent brand), though many are also from Boots shoppers. The majority of 194 reviews for <a href="http://www.boots.com/philips-sonicare-easyclean-hx6511-50-rechargeable-toothbrush-10090162" target="_blank">Philips Sonicare</a> brush are syndicated from Philips.co.uk (as shown below). Similarly the <a href="http://www.boots.com/colgate-pro-clinical-c350-max-white-one-electric-toothbrush-10176644" target="_blank">Colgate Pro Clinical</a> draws the majority of its 80 reviews from Colgate.co.uk.</p> <p>Some products by comparison have no reviews, including <a href="http://www.boots.com/electrical/electrical-dental/electric-toothbrushes/panasonic-ew-dl82-sonic-vibration-rechargeable-toothbrush-10176652" target="_blank">Panasonic Sonic Vibration</a> and <a href="http://www.boots.com/lab-chrome-sonic-rechargeable-toothbrush-10182106" target="_blank">LAB Chrome Sonic</a>, both products are found at the wrong end of the Boots bestsellers list. If the two brands wish to improve sales, a good place to start would be soliciting reviews from customers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7271/t8_reviews_philips_boots.png" alt="" width="615" height="575"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69205 2017-06-29T15:00:00+01:00 2017-06-29T15:00:00+01:00 The marketing (to) automation problem: How will IoT products sell their services to other devices? Duncan Shaw <p>Sharing data appropriately can give any device a missing piece of the puzzle, allowing it to provide a more personalised service. </p> <p>But devices in IoT ecosystems can share capabilities as well. Your refrigerator is quite limited in what it can do on its own but if it knows what is inside it, it can guess when food needs reordering. And if you link it to a shopping app then it can reorder items for you as well.</p> <p>The logic of getting data from external sources is easy to see because firms themselves are starting to share data more and more. But sharing capabilities is a bit trickier to understand. Think of IoT devices as a team of royal servants helping a queen (the user). A single servant can only do a small part of the job but together they ‘wait on the queen hand and foot’. </p> <p>IoT products are starting to join up their individually limited capabilities to help each user. And joined-up working needs information sharing – for devices as well as for firms.</p> <h3>But how can a refrigerator choose the right app to help it restock? </h3> <p>There’s a general problem for all IoT firms. In any given user’s personal situation how can a product be aware of which other products it can work together with to help that user? </p> <p>Right now, device manufactures are working with their normal business or supply chain partners to set up relationships between devices. For example, IoT cars are more likely to be set up to book their annual services with garages that are already affiliated to their brand, because there is already a relationship to build on. </p> <p>But most IoT products will not be aware of all the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69024-three-ways-the-internet-of-things-will-improve-business-efficiency-by-harnessing-big-data">potential data sources</a> and potential useful capabilities that they can draw on in any given situation. They will just know that their user has a problem. They will look around with their web connection to see what other devices can help them. Then they will evaluate the alternatives and make a purchase decision. </p> <p>Sounds familiar? Yes, it’s a conversion funnel for machines.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7162/nicolas-barbier-garreau-267667.jpg" alt="fridge" width="600" height="400"></p> <p><em>Could a fridge make purchase decisions? <a href="https://unsplash.com/photos/rdplhEXsSL0">Image via Barbier Garreau</a></em></p> <h3>Conversion rate optimisation for IoT products</h3> <p>Conversion strategies for human customers are getting pretty sophisticated. But how do you drive device traffic into your IoT funnel using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69185-low-cost-iot-will-redefine-the-consumer-purchase-path/" target="_blank">M2M (machine-to-machine) communications</a>? There is no such thing as a Google Search for IoT devices. Although the IoT operating system <a href="https://developer.android.com/things/sdk/index.html" target="_blank">Android Things</a> and the communications platform <a href="https://developers.google.com/weave/" target="_blank">Weave</a> go some way.</p> <p>First, there’s the technical problem of context: how can a device understand our complex human world? This problem might be solved by looking at the customer journey. Devices don’t need to understand the whole human world, just the customer journey that their user is on. And many firms are thinking long and hard right now about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68681-mapping-the-customer-journey-doesn-t-have-to-be-difficult/">mapping customer journeys</a>.</p> <p>Plus there’s the 'marketing (to) automation' problem – how do you spread awareness to toasters, drive them into your funnel and then increase the conversion rate? And how do you do it for toothbrushes, refrigerators, cars, phone apps? Or anything with a chip and an internet connection that could help the user of your product?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7163/things.jpg" alt="android things" width="600" height="280"></p> <p><em>A visualisation of Android Things, which "extends the core Android framework with additional APIs provided by the Things Support Library. These APIs allow apps to integrate with new types of hardware not found on mobile devices."</em></p> <h3>Use customer journey thinking</h3> <p>The most important thing for any IoT product is user experience (UX). And the best UX is produced by devices helping each other in communities that are centred on each individual user’s journey.</p> <p>So be clear about what sort of journey your user is on. Don’t just map touch points and small parts of customer journeys. You need to understand their broader life journeys to get the full context. </p> <p>If you understand the journeys that your users are on then you can specify to your product what data and capabilities it needs to look out for. The logic of the journey explains what outside help is needed. </p> <p>Customer-journey thinking also helps your product to market the idea of collaboration to other devices – or their product designers – because the purpose of partner devices is also to help the same user on the same journey. </p> <p>So, use customer-journey thinking to design your IoT product to work with any device that might be able to help your users along their journey.</p> <p><em><strong>More IoT fun:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67372-atmospheric-marketing-riding-the-tidal-wave-of-iot-data/">Atmospheric marketing - riding the tidal wave of IoT data</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67372-atmospheric-marketing-riding-the-tidal-wave-of-iot-data/">Why won't internet fridges go away?</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69193 2017-06-22T16:02:26+01:00 2017-06-22T16:02:26+01:00 Using data to improve your mobile conversion: A simple but effective approach Steve Borges <p>In<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69160-mobile-conversion-rates-how-does-your-site-compare/"> a recent post</a> here, I described the Biglight Mobile Benchmark - a simple quadrant that allows any retailer to understand their own mobile conversion rate performance compared with the wider retail market. It has proven very useful as a visual and immediate way to answer two important questions: “How big is our mobile optimisation challenge?” and “How urgently do we need to start tackling it?”</p> <p>For many retailers it has also proven a useful way to secure the budget required to invest in their mobile optimisation programmes.</p> <p>In many ways, of course, that is the easy bit. Actually improving conversion rates on mobile can be much more challenging - and, for lots of ecommerce people I have spoken to, the next question is “Where do we start?”.</p> <p>That is where journey mapping and micro-conversion benchmarking are so important - they underpin a focused process that ensures that every penny invested in optimisation is spent where it is most likely to make a difference. What’s more, focusing on the ‘big bets’ enables rapid deployment, so the return on investment is realised quicker too.</p> <p>Here’s how it works - and we know it works, because this is a process we’ve been through with a number of clients this year.</p> <h3>Understand the journey</h3> <p>It is a statement of the obvious to say that it is hard to optimise the mobile experience for your customers if you don’t understand user needs and the user journey.</p> <p>As it happens, shopper behaviour on mobile is quite specific. Shoppers are pretty single minded about getting to the product quickly.</p> <p>Some of the insights from a recent, large-scale study we did at Biglight back that up:</p> <ul> <li>People choose the easiest route - to get to product quickly</li> <li>They bypass or ignore content they consider to be irrelevant</li> <li>Users invest considerable time filtering to refine their selections</li> <li>There is strong interest in interacting with the image gallery</li> <li>Product descriptions are ignored if they are overwhelming</li> <li>Once into the checkout, there is a genuine intent in completion.</li> </ul> <p>That combination of single mindedness and an obvious preference for native device functionality - mobile users want to pinch, swipe and so on - has implications for the way retailers should assess the mobile experience they are delivering.</p> <p>It’s actually quite a simple journey - a journey of two halves, each with its own thread of quite distinct characteristics. We refer to these are the ‘browse to basket’ and ‘basket conversion’ journeys.</p> <h3>Browse-to-basket journey</h3> <p>This part of the journey covers all browsing activity and has as its key success metric the proportion of users who enter the site that go on to view the basket page (with something in it), which we call the “browse-to-basket ratio”.</p> <p>We’ve found this is a reliable indicator of how well the site is performing in its core roles of helping users find products they are interested in, engaging them and motivating them towards purchase.</p> <p>It also represents the total available pool from which overall site conversions are derived. Clearly, if the browse-to-basket ratio is 3%, total site conversion will only ever be a proportion of this, never more.</p> <p>Finally, it’s reasonably simple to track on most websites, so it facilitates comparison from site to site. Right now, 'good' is a ratio of close to 10% and anything below 5% is a worry. But there are other important steps, or micro-conversions, along the way.</p> <p>In simple terms, the journey here is:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6947/BTB_JOURNEY.png" alt="Browse to Basket Journey" width="964" height="146"></p> <p>The principal challenges in this part of the journey are to focus navigation, merchandising, content and search efforts on getting users to a product listings page (PLP) with a minimum of fuss then, once there, ensuring that filtering is simple, relevant and fast, so that users can progress to product details pages (PDPs).</p> <p>Once users get to the PDPs, they’ll spend time there. They’re keen to interact with images and reviews and will consume other relevant content if it’s brief and easy to engage with - in fact engagement with relevant content increases conversion and average order value (AOV).</p> <p>Overall, in the browse-to-basket journey there is a clear, direct correlation between time on site and micro-conversions. In other words, the challenge is to keep users engaged by getting them to product quickly and then making sure the product pages really deliver.</p> <h3>Basket conversion journey</h3> <p>In the second part of the journey, we’re interested in what proportion of the users who viewed a basket subsequently went on to complete a purchase, we call this the “basket conversion ratio”.</p> <p>Unlike the browse-to-basket journey, which is about engagement and motivation, the basket conversion journey is largely about retention or completion, so success is measured in terms of users who progress from step to step.</p> <p>We measure this part of the journey from the basket, rather than the start of the checkout process to allow us to make meaningful comparisons between sites with different checkout structures and those that provide different experiences for users that are logged-in. Broadly-speaking a typical journey has the following elements though:</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6946/BC_JOURNEY.png" alt="Basket Conversion Journey" width="972" height="145"></p> <p>Typically, there is an initial drop-off between the Basket and Welcome page, as those using the basket for other purposes (such as in preparation for store visit), or who have decided not to buy, leave the site. As you might expect, this can be significant, but it does vary considerably between retailers and does present opportunities for optimisation.</p> <p>Once users enter the checkout process proper though, there is evidence of genuine intent to complete it and extremely high micro-conversions of 95%+ between the individual steps in the journey are possible - provided the flow is intuitive and easy to use.</p> <p>In this part of the journey there is an inverse correlation between time and conversion - at the risk of stating the obvious, make it quick and easy, and you’ll convert more. Indeed, unsuccessful steps - where users do not convert - take up to twice as long as successful ones, which provides clear evidence of user struggle that can be addressed.</p> <p>Even so, high conversion rates are not always realised, as the benchmarking data I’ve included in the next section demonstrates - across the eight retailers included for illustration, the average basket conversion ratio is less than 40%, and individual rates range from 26% to 61%.</p> <p>It may be obvious, then, but retailers still have significant opportunities to improve their mobile checkout experiences.</p> <h3>Benchmarking mobile journey micro-conversions</h3> <p>Understanding how the journey works is one thing, but the crucial thing here is to see clearly how your own site is performing - to see where the micro-conversion issues are and identify the big optimisation opportunities.</p> <p>That’s where the more detailed picture behind the <a title="Biglight Mobile Benchmark" href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69160-mobile-conversion-rates-how-does-your-site-compare">Biglight Mobile Benchmark</a> comes in. As the table below demonstrates, the data enables comparison at pretty much every step of the journey - the overall browse to conversion journey expressed in terms of micro-conversions, or the proportion of users that move from one step to the next.</p> <p>Like any benchmark, it’s a really useful starting point - a way to zero in on where the problems and opportunities are. For instance, in the case of retailer 6 (below), a 10% browse-to-basket ratio is followed up by a disappointing 29% basket conversion ratio. No prizes for guessing where the priority optimisation jobs are…</p> <p>Retailer 5, meanwhile, has the opposite problem.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6909/Micro-conversion_benchmarks.png" alt="Micro-conversion benchmarks" width="800"></p> <h3>OK, but what next?</h3> <p>This kind of benchmarking may only be the start, but it is a positive one. It offers a really simple, useful answer to the “Where do we start?” question, and ensures that the ‘what next?’ - the optimisation programme - delivers results fast.</p> <p>It does that by ensuring the starting point is a clear focus on big opportunity areas, a focus that can be further honed through usability testing - centred on high priority steps in the journey - to ensure the <em>why</em> behind the data is understood and can be acted on.</p> <p>Crucially, that means that the final stage - A/B testing alternative approaches to each of the priority areas - is sure footed and confident, based on real insight, not guesswork. It also means that bigger, more extensive alternatives in each area (based on best-practice prototypes) can be tested with the confidence they will succeed.</p> <p>That in turn enables rapid deployment - through an experimentation roadmap that links parallel optimisation streams to specific, measureable goals, and moves each from preparation to results in weeks and months, rather than requiring long development cycles. In a market where mobile is taking over, that mix of certainty and pace could make the difference between success or failure.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69036 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 Six ways Aldo’s new mobile site streamlines the shopping experience Nikki Gilliland <p>Designed to make shopping more seamless across all channels, the mobile site in particular has got customer convenience in mind. Here are six features that deliver on the promise.</p> <h4>Prominent imagery and reviews</h4> <p>One major focus of Aldo’s redesign has been making it easier for mobile users to gain a more detailed view of the product – recognising that even in-store shoppers would like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/" target="_blank">customer reviews and ratings</a>.</p> <p>Reviews are now a prominent feature on all product pages, including information about general sizing, calf size and width. It even allows customers to give feedback on where or how they have worn the item – e.g. ‘wear it for prom or party’ – to give reviews much more depth.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5715/Product_pages_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Alongside this, imagery is now at the forefront with photo galleries showcasing products from multiple angles. As well as giving a better view of the product, this also makes the mobile site look much more slick and polished.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5716/Product_pages.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>Social tie-ins </h4> <p>Today, <a href="http://www.fourthsource.com/social-media/social-media-shopping-next-step-retail-21641" target="_blank">more than half of consumers</a> who follow a brand on social media say they do so to research products and find inspiration. In line with this changing user behaviour, Aldo has introduced user-generated content into its mobile site, with an Instagram feed embedded directly into the homepage.</p> <p>Not only does this draw on the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">power of influencers</a>, but it also helps to drive additional purchases, with the ‘Shop the look’ feature including multiple products in one image.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5717/Shop_the_Look.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>In-store convenience</h4> <p>Recognising the fact that not everyone who browses online will want to checkout, the ‘Find a Store’ feature lets users locate the product to buy offline.</p> <p>Using geo-locational technology, it is super quick and easy to locate the store that’s nearest to you. With information on store opening times and an indication of how many items are in stock, it’s a highly effective way of driving offline conversions based on mobile interest. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5718/Find_a_store_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>True-Fit technology</h4> <p>In a bid to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68477-how-six-online-retailers-are-combatting-wrong-size-returns/" target="_blank">reduce returns</a>, Aldo is another retailer to integrate True Fit – technology that helps customers find the right size.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5719/TrueFit_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>By asking users the brand and size of a shoe that fits them particularly well, it is then able to tell them whether an item will be true to size, or whether to scale up or down.</p> <p>According to research, 60% of consumers say that they would be willing to provide information like this if it meant they'd be guaranteed the perfect fit first time. When it comes to shopping on mobile in comparison to in person, this reassurance can massively increase the likelihood of a transaction.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5720/True_Fit_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>Post-purchase tracking</h4> <p>Of course, the customer journey does not end after the point of purchase, which is nicely highlighted by Aldo’s easy tracking feature.</p> <p>Instead of hiding it within a help or customer service section, this is located towards the bottom of the landing page, with large font to catch the user’s attention.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5721/Easy_tracking.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>As well as being useful post-purchase, it is also likely to instil confidence in those in the early browsing stages, indicating that the brand is focused on delivering good customer service.</p> <h4>Simplified checkout  </h4> <p>Multiple forms or mandatory sign-ups are likely to increase <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">basket abandonment rates</a>, and when it comes to mobile, customers have even less time for complicated processes.</p> <p>Aldo’s redesign has simplified this experience, giving users the option for a guest checkout as well as condensing everything into a single page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5722/Checkout_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Upfront delivery information and returns policies are also helpful for providing reassurance throughout the process, driving customers towards that all-important final purchase.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68465-eight-features-to-appreciate-on-fat-face-s-new-ecommerce-site/">Eight features to appreciate on Fat Face’s new ecommerce site</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66644-how-debenhams-site-redesign-led-to-ecommerce-sales-growth/" target="_blank">How Debenhams' site redesign led to ecommerce sales growth</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69028 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>UK search data shows surge in ‘snap election’ queries</h3> <p>Following on from the announcement of the snap general election this week, Hitwise has analysed how the UK responded online.</p> <p>Data shows there was a 2,000% increase in searches for Theresa May on print media sites, while three out of five searches on Tuesday 18th were about the election news. Most searches were in the form of questions, with the nation generally appearing unsure about what a ‘snap election’ actually means.</p> <h3>One fifth of retailers are failing to offer preferred delivery options</h3> <p><a href="http://ampersandcommerce.com/insights/yougov-consumer-survey-delivery-2017/" target="_blank">Research from Ampersand</a> has found that many of the UK’s biggest retailers are failing to offer next day delivery, despite a YouGov survey showing that 58% of people favour this method over any other.</p> <p>In comparison to 2014, Ampersand found that most people still favour next day delivery over click and collect and same day delivery, with preference for this increasing 6% within three years. </p> <p>Meanwhile, preference for same day delivery has gone from 21% in 2014 down to 12% this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5625/Ampersand.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <h3>UK add-to-basket rates on the up in Q4</h3> <p>Monetate's latest <a href="http://info.monetate.com/ecommerce_report_EQ4_2016.html" target="_blank">ecommerce report</a> has revealed that UK add-to-basket rates were 3.75% higher in Q4 2016 than a year previously. </p> <p>The report also shows that both global and UK conversion rates were lower this Q4 than in 2015. However, global and UK conversion rates saw its first increase since Q4 of 2015.</p> <p>Meanwhile, website visits via mobile continued to increase globally, with 44% of UK website visits coming from smartphones.</p> <h3>75% of UK consumers have not spoken to a chatbot</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://insights.ubisend.com/2017-chatbot-report" target="_blank">Ubisend</a> has uncovered the brand characters people would most like to see turned into chatbots. Compare the Market’s Meerkats topped the poll, followed by the Andrex puppies and Nespresso’s George Clooney. </p> <p>Other research found that 75% of UK consumers have not yet spoken to a chatbot, however, 57% of consumers are aware of what a chatbot is. </p> <p>Lastly, 35% want to see more companies adopting chatbots to solve their queries, with 68% citing ‘reaching the desired outcome’ as the most important factor in their experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5628/chatbots.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <h3>Expedia outperforms other travel brands with 7% market share</h3> <p>Conductor has released its first ever <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwis1ZyKnbXTAhXOaVAKHc0ZA4EQFggiMAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.conductor.com%2Frs%2F149-ZMU-763%2Fimages%2FConductor-Organic-Online-Market-Share-Report-Holiday-2016.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGO-bWF8Ak2EEpMJ7kZeecHFR3fjA" target="_blank">Organic Market Share</a> report, detailing the brands that excel at reaching consumers from organic search.</p> <p>In the travel category, Expedia was found to be the overall top performer, taking a 7% market share. Meanwhile, TripAdvisor dominates the ‘early stages’ of the consumer journey category with a 10% share. </p> <p>Data shows that airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains (including Hilton) have the potential to increase their visibility. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5627/Online_market_share.JPG" alt="" width="713" height="404"></p> <h3>Consumers prefer traditional advertising to digital</h3> <p>Research by Kantar Media has found that UK consumers feel significantly more positive about advertising on traditional platforms, such as TV and magazines, than they do about online formats.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% said they actively dislike seeing advertising on online video services and search engines, while 30% dislike being served ads in news and articles online. In contrast, only 13% and 14% of consumers dislike seeing ads in printed newspapers and printed magazines.</p> <p>With online ads predicted to account for more than half of all advertising spend in the next few years, this provides food for thought for brands.</p> <h3>Connected shopping driven by Generation Y </h3> <p>New research from Savvy suggests that the mass adoption of smartphones and social media has contributed to a fundamental change in the path to purchase.</p> <p>Data shows that Generation Y is driving changes in retail due to being constantly connected. 66% say they regularly use their smartphone to buy products and 49% regularly use their smartphones while in the supermarket. While this group represents around a third of shoppers at the moment, they are predicted to account for 47% by 2022.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5634/connected_shopper.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK marketers increase budgets in 2017</h3> <p>According to data from the Q1 2017 <a href="http://www.ipa.co.uk/page/ipa-bellwether-report#.WPnTjtLyuUk" target="_blank">IPA Bellwether Report</a>, marketing budgets increased in Q1 2017 with significant growth seen in internet and main media advertising categories.  </p> <p>The report suggests that the overall outlook for 2017/18 is positive, with 26.1% of companies suggesting growth in total budgets for the coming year. Meanwhile, ad spend is now predicted to grow 0.6%, replacing the previous forecast of -0.7%.</p> <h3>Only 55% of Brits associate Easter with religion</h3> <p>New <a href="https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/04/13/only-55-brits-associate-jesus-christ-easter/" target="_blank">research from YouGov</a> has found that Brits are more likely to think of Easter in relation to chocolate eggs than religious connotations. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,670 UK adults, only 55% said they personally associate Jesus with Easter, while 67% said they associate it with a bank holiday. Chocolate eggs is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s minds, with 76% associating this with Easter above anything else.</p> <p>In a separate study, Captify analysed found that Cadbury products dominate searches for chocolate eggs, with Crème Egg accounting for 29% of searches and Mini Eggs accounting for 18%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5626/YouGov.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="752"></p> <h3>Luxury ad spend predicted to shift online </h3> <p>Zenith's <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/product/advertising-expenditure-forecasts" target="_blank">latest report</a> suggests that expenditure on luxury advertising is set to recover, with growth predicted to occur due to an increase in online spend. Zenith predicts a 3.9% rise in 2017 – a welcome figure following a 0.5% decline in 2016.</p> <p>It also predicts that the internet will become the main luxury advertising medium in 2018, despite print currently being the principal medium, accounting for 32.7% of ad spend in 2016 compared to 25.8% for internet advertising.</p>