tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/delivery-fulfillment Latest Delivery & fulfillment content from Econsultancy 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69351 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 2017-08-18T14:21:00+01:00 10 superior digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>59% of Instagram Stories leads to a shopping cart</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://klear.com/blog/instagram-stories-conversion/" target="_blank">Klear</a> shows that 59% of brands' Instagram Stories link to a shopping cart or shoppable page.</p> <p>In contrast, just 23% of brands link their Stories to other social platforms, while 10% link to a blog post.</p> <p>Klear also found that 36% of brand Instagram Stories involve some form of product promotion, making it the most popular type of post. 22% of Stories involve an 'insider look' at the brand, and 14% involve an influencer takeover.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8341/Klear.JPG" alt="" width="705" height="476"></p> <h3>42% of all US business trips extended for leisure</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="https://info.advertising.expedia.com/custom-research-bleisure-travel-market?utm_campaign=2016+Bleisure+Custom+Research&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-95eaQxjOzd1Wm5VMuR1rk8GpeXcXmlEqI5VyE4c0E936EhBaZ413dK_VHQxo3mDwsC1QszbOJw10YgbY-rQbFF3Yc6ZeBPe57BpU9teRl92GzRveM&amp;_hsmi=40388954&amp;utm_content=40388954&amp;utm_source=hs_automation&amp;hsCtaTracking=71e4538a-6c18-405f-9307-1eba7186fefa%7C7e4357af-3125-4efe-831c-afc5ee46c7c9" target="_blank">Expedia Media Solutions</a> has highlighted the growing trend for ‘bleisure’ trips – i.e. travel that combines both business and leisure.</p> <p>It has found that 42% of all business trips within the US are extended for leisure, with this increasing to 52% when employees have to travel overseas for work. Expedia also suggests that trips to attend conferences and conventions are more likely to turn into leisure trips, as opposed to travel for client meetings or presentations.</p> <p>Lastly, it found that the leisure portion of a trip can often equal or exceed the length of the business portion, making ‘bleisure’ trips much longer than a typical business trip.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8332/Expedia_stat.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="284"></p> <h3>55% of consumers prefer shopping direct from brands than retailers</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://astoundcommerce.com/us/2017/08/15/global-brand-research/" target="_blank">Astound Commerce</a> has found that over half of consumers prefer visiting a brand or manufacturer’s website rather than shopping from multi-brand retailers. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 consumers, 54% said they would turn to brands over retailers for more comprehensive product information, improved customer service, better value and more chance of personalisation. </p> <p>45% of millennials said they expect a more engaging, holistic experience on a brand’s website than a retailer’s, while 59% of shoppers would visit a physical store to seek out the full brand experience they don’t believe they can get online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8335/Astound.JPG" alt="" width="730" height="325"></p> <h3>UK sees surge in search interest for electric cars</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise suggests that there has been a surge of interest in electric cars in the UK, following on from the launch of Tesla’s ‘Model 3’ car.</p> <p>In July, there was a 345% increase in searches for the new ‘Tesla Model 3’, as well as a 346% increase in people searching for ‘electric cars’ in general. This comes on the back of the news that there has been a 10.3% drop in new car sales and an increase in used cars sales in 2017.</p> <p>Hitwise also found that people aged 18-24 were the demographic most likely to be searching for ‘Tesla’, and the third most-asked question to be: “What electric cars are available in the UK?”</p> <h3>Transparency now a pressing priority for brands</h3> <p>In light of last year’s Media Transparency report by the ANA, a large number of global brands are in the midst of making changes to their media governance practices.</p> <p>In a survey of global marketers in 35 multinational companies, the World Federation of Advertisers found transparency to be a top priority for 47% of brands, while 51% said it is rising up the list. </p> <p>Brand safety is also a hot topic, with 70% saying it has escalated as a priority in the last 12 months. As a result, 74% have suspended investment in ad networks where they felt there was an unnecessary risk to their brands. Meanwhile, 89% are also limiting or plan to limit investment in ad networks that do not allow use of third-party verification.</p> <h3>Global cart abandonment increases 1.3% on previous quarter</h3> <p><a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/stats/the-remarketing-report-q2-2017/" target="_blank">SaleCycle</a> has released its Remarketing Report for Q2 2017, highlighting key cart abandonment stats from April to June.</p> <p>It shows that the global cart abandonment rate for Q2 was 76.9%, which is up 1.3% on the previous quarter. Meanwhile, the average retail conversion rate was 3.29%.</p> <p>In terms of sectors, gaming websites had the lowest abandonment rates at 67.4%, while finance had the highest at 83.7%. This was closely followed by non-profit – a sector which faces ongoing challenges in optimising online conversions. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8333/SalesCycle.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="420"></p> <h3>88% of consumers value speed of delivery over choice of brand</h3> <p>A <a href="https://info.salmon.com/buying-tomorrow-report" target="_blank">new report</a> by Salmon has revealed that 88% of consumers see the speed of delivery as more important than the brand being ordered. Additionally, it found that modern-day consumers also like to shop in new ways, with 45% currently using a digital assistant like Alexa or Google Home to do so.</p> <p>Other stats from the report include the fact that almost a quarter of consumers make all their purchases online, while 37% of total online spend is now done through Amazon.</p> <p>Lastly, it is clear that consumers are becoming more digitally obsessed than ever before, with 57% believing they are more digitally advanced than the retailers that serve them.</p> <h3>Searches for ‘make up’ increase over 200% in three years</h3> <p>According to research by <a href="https://www.pi-datametrics.com/resources/market-performance-reports/beauty/?mc_cid=af12c67cd5&amp;mc_eid=bdac343de4" target="_blank">PI Datametrics</a>, the UK beauty market saw a 76% increase in search volume growth from 2013 to 2016. The term ‘make up’ specifically has grown a whopping 203% in these three years.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this growth can be put down to the popularity of bloggers and vloggers within the category, plus the rise of visual social media and its influencers. With make-up sales being worth an estimated £1bn in the UK in 2017, the opportunity for retailers continues to grow.</p> <p>Interestingly, the report also revealed that the top four performers within the beauty market are all retailers (as opposed to make-up or beauty brands themselves), with Boots.com owning 9.1% of the entire market and competitor Superdrug owning 8.7%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8331/PI_Data.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="509"></p> <h3>77% of APAC mobile ads delivered via apps </h3> <p>A new study by <a href="http://www.vpon.com/en/events/2017H1AsiaReport/index.html?utm_source=VPON_EN&amp;utm_medium=EN_PPR&amp;utm_term=TH&amp;vpadn_src=EN_PPR_TH" target="_blank">Vpon</a> has revealed that mobile advertising in Asia-Pacific heavily relies on apps, with 77% of such ads being delivered in-app, and just 23% via the mobile web.</p> <p>This figure rises to 90% in Indonesia, where app usage is at its highest. Similarly, 86% of ads are delivered via apps in India, while the same goes for 85% in Thailand and 82% in Malaysia.</p> <p>In contrast, countries in East Asia are leaning more towards mobile web, with China and Japan delivering just 34% and 33% of ads in apps respectively.</p> <h3>Private Eye is the UK’s most-read current affairs title</h3> <p>The Audit Bureau of Circulation (<a href="https://www.abc.org.uk/" target="_blank">ABC</a>) has named Private Eye as the most-read news and current affairs magazine in the UK, with a circulation of 249,927 per issue, and a growth of 8.6% year-on-year.</p> <p>For the same category, circulation of the Economist was up 5% in the UK to 248,196, while Prospect grew substantially with a rise of 37% to 44,545.</p> <p>In contrast to the popularity of some news titles, ABC noted a decline in women’s weekly magazines, which dropped almost 11% from the same period last year. Look magazine suffered a 35% drop in circulation to 58,561, while Now fell almost 21% to 84,588.</p> <p>Elsewhere, TV Choice was found to have the biggest readership in the UK overall, with a circulation of 1.2m.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Our circulation is up 9% on this time last year, with an ABC of 249,927. Thanks to all of you for buying/subscribing!</p> — Private Eye Magazine (@PrivateEyeNews) <a href="https://twitter.com/PrivateEyeNews/status/895621655615086593">August 10, 2017</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69301 2017-08-02T11:14:52+01:00 2017-08-02T11:14:52+01:00 How 10 online retailers promote free and fast shipping Nikki Gilliland <p>While <a href="http://www2.temando.com/l/86602/2017-07-10/4g564b">the research suggests</a> that 86% of UK shoppers prefer free over fast delivery, the majority of retailers assume that customers want a fast shipping service above anything else. As a result, just 27% of retailers say they offer free standard shipping every day, and almost a quarter of retailers admit that they don't use free shipping as a promotional tool.</p> <p>With this in mind, let’s take a look at how some of the biggest online retailers are promoting the service – and perhaps what they could be doing better.</p> <h3>Argos</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">Argos</a> is one retailer that firmly favours fast delivery. </p> <p>Its FastTrack service is highlighted throughout its website, heavily promoting the fact that customers can get their hands on products the very same day as placing the order, seven days a week.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7950/Argos.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="365"></p> <p>While the £3.95 price point could arguably put off customers who do prefer free delivery, its Click and Collect service means there is also a fast <em>and</em> free alternative – a feature that combines the best of both worlds. </p> <p>Interestingly, Argos does offer free standard delivery on selected items (in an estimated four working days), but this option is kept a little under wraps, with the retailer clearly placing greater value on its FastTrack option. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7951/FastTrack.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="434"></p> <h3>B&amp;Q</h3> <p>B&amp;Q is not quite as transparent as Argos, with the price of its next day and standard delivery services only being highlighted at the checkout (or in the dedicated delivery info section).</p> <p>It also fails to use the word ‘free’ alongside its click and collect service, and although this is an arguably obvious detail its exclusion seems like a bit of an oversight.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7953/B_Q_1.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="552"></p> <p>That being said, its free delivery on items over £50 is nicely promoted, making sense for customers who will naturally buy bigger or bulkier items online. </p> <p>I also like the icons on category pages that tell customers whether items are available for pick up in-store at a glance.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7954/B_Q.JPG" alt="" width="448" height="412"></p> <h3>John Lewis</h3> <p>John Lewis is a little less worried about the speed of its delivery service, instead choosing to promote free services – both in terms of standard delivery and click and collect.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7955/John_Lewis.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="444"></p> <p>If Temando’s research is correct, and the majority of customers do value low or no-cost shipping, this could work in its favour.</p> <p>However, the fact that customers need to spend £50 to qualify could mean that people are more likely to go in-store. And while it’s a tactic used to increase overall order value, the trend for webrooming (browsing online before buying in-store) could also contribute to customers wanting to look elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7959/John_Lewis_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="448"></p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>Last week, Tesco announced that it is to roll out its same-day delivery service across the UK, allowing customers to receive groceries from 7pm onwards if they order before 1pm.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, the supermarket is now heavily promoting this online, highlighting how it can bring customers even greater levels of convenience. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7957/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="625" height="555"></p> <p>While the service costs between £3 and £9, it is being offered free for a limited period for members of its delivery saver service. But according to Temando, price is not a deal breaker when customers really desire convenience. Its research shows that same-day delivery is the service that most customers are willing to pay extra for, with 56% of women and 57% of men agreeing. </p> <p>With the likes of Amazon setting the bar for this kind of convenience, it’s not surprising that supermarkets are starting to introduce it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7958/same_day_delivery.JPG" alt="" width="714" height="515"></p> <h3>River Island</h3> <p>River Island often uses delivery promotions to increase online conversions. It is currently offering customers free worldwide delivery for a limited time only. </p> <p>With a prominent site-wide banner on the homepage and a creative tagline, it’s an effective example of how to use free delivery to boost short-term sales. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7960/River_Island.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="481"></p> <p>Again, it looks like River Island is veering toward free rather than fast as its selling point. It also promises free click and collect, and once the current promotion is over, free delivery on orders over £100. </p> <p>Meanwhile, the absence of visible returns information is a bit of a let down. Over a fifth of women are reported to abandon a purchase if free returns are not available, meaning that this could have an adverse impact on conversion rates.</p> <h3>M&amp;S</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67883-marks-spencer-what-does-putting-the-customer-at-the-heart-of-everything-mean/" target="_blank">Marks &amp; Spencer</a> is one of the few online retailers that does not visibly highlight its delivery information at the top of its homepage – you’ll only find it if you scroll down to the very bottom. </p> <p>That being said, the services are clearly explained here, with M&amp;S favouring the word ‘free’ across the board to pique the interest of customers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7961/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="549"></p> <p>Its product pages also provide a lot of clear and concise information, including an eye-catching 'free delivery' notice in red. </p> <p>In terms of the actual delivery, M&amp;S gives customers a load of options, offering standard delivery, nominated day, free over £50, and click and collect. The retailer could most definitely shout about this a little more on its homepage, even if it means moving its current banner higher up the page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7962/M_S_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="711"></p> <h3>Clarks</h3> <p>Clarks is currently choosing to offer a special code for free standard delivery. While it’s similar to River Island’s strategy of using a short-term shipping offer, the inclusion of a code is a bit of a strange choice, only adding an extra step in the customer’s journey.</p> <p>The fact that it’s promoted on the homepage also means that there is nothing exclusive about it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7963/Clarks.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="453"></p> <p>Perhaps it is trying to make customer feel like they’re getting something extra. However, with most people now expecting free or fast delivery as standard, customers might feel it doesn’t provide anything of real value.</p> <h3>Warby Parker</h3> <p>Warby Parker cements its customer-focused service with the promise of free shipping in the US and selected countries. This is obviously a sweet deal in itself, but it also goes one step further in its customer-centric approach with the ‘Home Try-On’ feature.</p> <p>This allows customers to pick five frames to try for five days, before sending back the four pairs they don’t want for free. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7964/Warby_Parker.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="523"></p> <p>While it is undoubtedly a big expense for the company, Warby Parker demonstrates the value of free shipping, ramping up word-of-mouth marketing and increasing customer loyalty thanks to the service.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Warby Parker has a pretty good selection, you can pick 5 to try on at home and they'll send em for free, don't even pay shipping &amp; handling <a href="https://t.co/lwWI1miSbE">pic.twitter.com/lwWI1miSbE</a></p> — (@Jibaye_) <a href="https://twitter.com/Jibaye_/status/886610566848143360">July 16, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>JD Sports</h3> <p>JD Sports is yet another retailer using free delivery as a limited offer. Its inclusion of a countdown timer makes it one of the most effective examples of the bunch though, using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65348-how-to-increase-conversions-by-creating-buyer-urgency-fear-of-loss/" target="_blank">urgency</a> to prompt customers into action. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7965/JD_Sports.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="548"></p> <p>It also promotes this throughout the website, prominently highlighting free delivery on its category and product pages. </p> <p>Temando suggests that shipping is not just about the delivery of items – extra factors like tracking orders and options for leaving items in safe places are also important. JD Sports has a useful ‘Track My Order’ feature, which also helps to improve the customer experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7966/Tracking.JPG" alt="" width="679" height="579"></p> <h3>ASOS</h3> <p>Finally, ASOS uses reliable delivery to instil loyalty in customers. Its Premier Delivery programme costs £9.95 per year for unlimited next day delivery and click and collect – an undeniably enticing deal for regular shoppers.</p> <p>The brand is pretty adept at promoting the service too, nicely highlighting both the fast and free nature of the service in its marketing copy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7967/ASOS_premier.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="533"></p> <p>Elsewhere, it gives customers lots of choice and up-front information, helping to prevent customers from abandoning purchases at the checkout due to surprise costs.</p> <p>Even using the word 'options' here effectively evokes the retailer's focus on flexibility.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7968/Options_ASOS.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="599"></p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68739-how-has-click-collect-evolved-and-is-it-still-in-high-demand/" target="_blank"><em>How has Click &amp; Collect evolved, and is it still in high demand?</em></a></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67322-not-offering-same-day-delivery-you-could-be-losing-customers/" target="_blank">Not offering same-day delivery? You could be losing customers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66151-ecommerce-delivery-how-fast-are-uk-retailers/" target="_blank">Ecommerce delivery: how fast are UK retailers?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69296 2017-07-28T14:34:27+01:00 2017-07-28T14:34:27+01:00 10 superb digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go…</p> <h3>Only 25% of data is being used for real-time customer engagement</h3> <p>Despite 60% of UK organisations believing that real-time customer engagement can deliver a 10%-40% increase in revenue, those same organisations are collecting less than a third of relevant data on their customers.</p> <p>What’s more, just 25% of this dataset is being used in segmentation for real-time customer engagement.</p> <p>These stats come from SAS’s <a href="https://www.sas.com/en_gb/whitepapers/real-time-customer-experience-report.html" target="_blank">Age of Now</a> report, which also reveals how slow companies are to act. It says that only 16% of UK organisations can adjust their marketing communication in real-time based on customer behaviour.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7888/SAS.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="327"></p> <h3>42% of customers more impatient due to reliance on technology</h3> <p>A new survey by Fetch and YouGov suggests UK consumers are increasingly looking to new technology for functional purposes, with 81% of millennials being more receptive than older generations to try new tech in order to improve the speed at which they do things.</p> <p>42% of UK consumers now say they are more impatient today than they were five years ago, mainly due to an over-reliance on technology to complete everyday life activities.</p> <p>When it comes to food, 61% of Brits are unwilling to wait 45 minutes or more for a takeaway they ordered online or using an app. Similarly, 22% of consumers say they are only willing to wait between 11-15mins for a taxi service.</p> <h3>CPC costs reach an all-time high</h3> <p>iProspect has just released its <a href="https://www.iprospect.com/en/us/insights/povs/paid-search-trends-2017-q2/" target="_blank">Q2 report</a>, which includes in-depth analysis of data from more than 1,800 AdWords accounts.</p> <p>It has revealed that CPC costs continued to rise in Q2, reaching their highest recorded levels since 2014. Despite this, iProspect found year-on-year impressions and clicks declined 16% and 27.5% respectively, as advertisers were forced to pay more per click while dealing with diminishing budgets.</p> <p>Elsewhere, it found mobile CPC to be on the rise, increasing 17% from Q1 to Q2 of this year and 52% year-on-year. Similarly, mobile click share increased 22% year-on-year. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7890/iProspect.JPG" alt="" width="743" height="547"></p> <h3>Over 60% of SMB’s attribute half or more of sales to Amazon</h3> <p>In a survey of 503 small- to mid-size retailers, NetElixir found that 60% of respondents attribute 50% or more of their ecommerce sales to Amazon. Interestingly, 26.6% are seeing a 50/50 split from their website vs. marketplaces like Amazon and eBay.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why SMBs are choosing to sell on Amazon, 52% said that the potential for increased sales volume is the biggest benefit, 32.6% said increased brand exposure and 11.3% noted solid infrastructure. Conversely, 45% cited lower margins as the biggest downside.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What was the biggest benefit and downside of <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Amazon?src=hash">#Amazon</a>? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/webinar?src=hash">#webinar</a> <a href="https://t.co/OhOnUZG67Z">pic.twitter.com/OhOnUZG67Z</a></p> — NetElixir (@NetElixir) <a href="https://twitter.com/NetElixir/status/890292060938543105">July 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>UK advertising spend grows 1.3% YoY in Q1 2017</h3> <p>WARC’s latest <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">Expenditure Report</a> has revealed that overall ad spend grew 1.3% to reach £5.318bn in Q1 2017. But despite being the 15th consecutive quarter of growth, it was actually the slowest rate seen in four years.</p> <p>This growth also occurred despite a 6.2% decline in total television advertising spend – TV’s first fall since 2009. However, it is forecast to recover next year with 2.5% growth in 2018.</p> <p>Meanwhile, online ad spend grew 10.1% year-on-year, and mobile growth was recorded at an impressive 36.2%.</p> <h3>Retailers wrongly assume that customers value speed over free shipping</h3> <p>According to a new report by <a href="http://www2.temando.com/l/86602/2017-07-10/4g564b" target="_blank">Temando</a>, 86% of UK shoppers prefer free delivery over fast delivery. However, the majority of retailers’ surveyed wrongly assume that customers place greater value on a fast shipping service.</p> <p>As a result of this misconception, many retailers are failing to respond to customer demands, with just 27% offering free standard shipping every day. Even worse, almost a quarter of retailers admit that that they don't use free shipping as a promotional tool.</p> <p>With 58% of shoppers stating that they’d shop more if free shipping was offered, many online retailers are still missing a trick.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7889/Tamando.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="439"></p> <h3>Usage of connected TV’s predicted to grow 10.1% in the US this year</h3> <p>Emarketer says that usage of connected TVs will continue to surge in 2017, with 168.1m Americans predicted to use an internet-connected television this year – up 10.1% on 2016.</p> <p>In terms of brands, it predicts that 38.9m Americans will use a Roku device at least once a month – 19.3% more than in 2016. Meanwhile, 36.9m will use a ChromeCast and 35.8m will use an Amazon Fire TV. Just 21.3m users are expected to use an Apple TV.</p> <h3>AI predicted to create over 2.5m jobs in the next 15 years</h3> <p>PwC has estimated that by 2030, 30% of British jobs will be lost to automation. On the back of this, <a href="https://joblift.co.uk/Press/artificial-intelligence-and-automation-potential-job-creation-will-fill-only-19-of-the-hole-left-by-robotic-job-replacement" target="_blank">Joblift</a> has further analysed the situation, comparing potential job creation with jobs lost.</p> <p>Research shows that 136,939 jobs dealing with AI and automation have been posted in the last 12 months, and jobs in this field have increased by an average of 0.06% each month.</p> <p>On this basis, calculations suggest that over the next 15 years, AI, automation and robotics will create 2,535,009 new jobs in total. However, by 2031, 13,375,363 jobs will be at risk from automation, meaning that newly created roles would be able to fill only 19% of the jobs lost.</p> <h3>John Lewis tops UK brand health rankings</h3> <p>John Lewis has ranked first in YouGov’s BrandIndex list of UK brand ‘health’. The ranking is based on consumer perceptions of a brand’s quality, value, impression, satisfaction, reputation and whether consumers would recommend the brand to others.</p> <p>BBC iPlayer comes in at number two on the list, followed by Sony and Marks &amp; Spencer. In contrast to these older, more heritage-based brands, the global list was topped by younger tech brands like Google, YouTube, and Facebook. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7892/Brand_health.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="291"></p> <h3>Cause-related ads generate more views &amp; engagement</h3> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/advertising-channels/video/cause-related-marketing-purpose-driven-ads/" target="_blank">Pixability</a> has revealed that the number of cause-related ads created by the top 100 global brands has increased four times over the past five years.</p> <p>Women’s empowerment accounted for 24% of these ads, making it the top featured issue. Meanwhile, 17% of ads were related to the topic of community aid and 14% were about sustainability.</p> <p>Pixability also found that the average number of views for cause-driven videos was almost 1m more than for those not related to a particular cause. The engagement rate was also 0.31% for cause-related ads compared to 0.29% for the rest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7891/Cause_related_ads.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="384"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69252 2017-07-14T14:04:40+01:00 2017-07-14T14:04:40+01:00 10 dazzling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Three in four shoppers browse elsewhere before making Prime Day purchases</h3> <p>Research from <a href="http://blog.bazaarvoice.com/2017/07/10/brands-retailers-seize-amazon-prime-day/" target="_blank">BazaarVoice</a> suggests that Prime Day shopping extends beyond Amazon, with 76% of people visiting other online retailers before making a purchase. 46% of consumers are said to visit Walmart, while 40% check Target. </p> <p>BazaarVoice also found that consumers tend to browse other retailers depending on product categories. For example, more than half of shoppers researching electronics brands will also visit Best Buy, while 49% turn to Lowe’s for researching outdoor items like hammocks or barbeques.</p> <h3>33% of consumers say they will erase personal data as GDPR comes into effect</h3> <p>A new survey by SAS suggests that nearly half of consumers plan to utilise their new rights over personal data in May 2018.</p> <p>In a poll of over 2,000 UK adults, 33% said they plan to exercise their right to remove personal data from retailers, while 33% will also ask for their data to stop being used for marketing purposes.</p> <p>17% of people said they will challenge automated decisions, and 24% will access the data that retailers hold on them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7477/SAS_GDPR.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="298"></p> <h3>Prime Day is the biggest sales day of the year for Amazon so far</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that there were 9.5m transactions processed on Amazon.com during Prime Day 2017 – making it the biggest sales day of the year so far. The day generated even more sales than last year, when Amazon processed 6.7m transactions.</p> <p>Altogether, Amazon.com accounted for 87% of all online transactions processed by the top 50 retailers on Prime Day – a day when one in every 10 visits to the site resulted in a purchase.</p> <h3>Companies experience digital performance problems once every five days</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.dynatrace.com/digital-transformation-audit/" target="_blank">Dynatrace</a> suggests that organisations are encountering digital performance problems on average once every five days, with individuals across business and IT functions losing a quarter of their working lives fighting to address these problems.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,200 global IT and business professionals, 75% of respondents said they have low levels of confidence in their ability to resolve digital performance problems. 48% also stated these issues were directly hindering the success of digital transformation strategies in their organisations.</p> <p>Marketing professionals are said to lose 470 hours per year or nearly two hours every business day to addressing performance problems, while IT operations professionals lose 522 hours per year or over two hours every business day.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7475/Dynatrace.JPG" alt="" width="582" height="293"></p> <h3>Debit cards overtake cash payments in the UK</h3> <p>The latest <a href="https://brc.org.uk/news/2017/debit-cards-overtake-cash-to-become-number-one-payment-method-in-the-uk" target="_blank">Payments Survey</a> has revealed that debit card purchases have overtaken cash for the first time in the UK, with nearly £190bn being spent via this channel in 2016.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the share of cash transactions shrank 4.5% to account for 42.3%, leaving credit and charge cards to make up the remaining 11.4%. </p> <p>The use of contactless technology has contributed to the rise in card payments, with consumers increasingly using contactless to pay for smaller purchases. The average transaction value on cards declined from £30.53 in 2013 to £25.40 in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7474/Cash.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="513"></p> <h3>37% of online spend goes through Amazon</h3> <p>The success of this year’s Amazon Prime Day might be indication enough, but new research from <a href="https://info.salmon.com/amazon-king-of-jungle-research" target="_blank">Salmon</a> has also highlighted just how much the retailer dominates the ecommerce industry.</p> <p>In a survey of over 6,000 consumers across Europe and the US, Salmon found that 37% of all consumer spending goes through Amazon. This could rise, too, as 73% of consumers say they will increase their use of digital shopping channels in future.</p> <p>53% of survey respondents also said they would be more likely to buy through Prime than a retailer’s online store, while the majority of consumers feel that Amazon is ‘leading the way in digital retail’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7478/Salmon.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="435"></p> <h3>Fresh grocery searches on the rise</h3> <p>From analysis of over 100m online searches in Q2, Criteo has discovered that searches for online groceries increased by 108% during the period of April to June 2017.</p> <p>With consumers relying on faster and more flexible delivery options, buying fresh produce online is becoming all the more convenient. Consequently, searches for milk, eggs and cheese all increased in the second quarter. Online searches for milk increased by 92% from the first three months of the year.</p> <h3>More than 50% of travellers look for inspiration during the planning process</h3> <p>A <a href="https://info.advertising.expedia.com/multi-national-travel-trends-in-the-tourism-industry" target="_blank">new study</a> by Expedia Media Solutions has uncovered the motivations and behaviours of travel consumers across eight countries including China, Australia and the UK.</p> <p>In all eight countries, at least 50% of travellers say they are often undecided on a destination close to booking, with most looking for help and inspiration during the planning process. More than 65% say they are influenced by informative content from travel or tourism brands.</p> <p>That being said, the research also found differences in the kind of marketing people respond to. While ads featuring deals are most likely to influence Americans, Canadians and Australians, Chinese travellers are prompted by ads with appealing imagery and informative content. Both French and German travellers place equal value on appealing deals and imagery.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7476/Expedia_Media_Solutions.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="363"> </p> <h3>Marketers struggling to localise content</h3> <p>According to research from the <a href="https://www.cmocouncil.org/authority-leadership/reports/328" target="_blank">CMO Council</a>, marketers are finding it difficult to localise content and tailor their output for individual media platforms.</p> <p>In a poll of 150 marketers, just 36.2% agreed they were performing well when it comes to translating creative strategies across all the necessary physical and digital touchpoints. Furthermore, just 32% believed they are succeeding in adapting branded content for different markets, audiences, and locations served by their companies around the world.</p> <p>47.7% of respondents stated that ‘localisation demands’ – e.g. language, cultural values and religion – were putting pressure on teams to deliver creative at scale. 43.9% also cited new digital formats and device types as a big challenge.</p> <h3>Emojis lose momentum as a marketing tactic</h3> <p>Research from 2016 showed that 95% of Brits were more likely to open an email if they contained emojis that juxtaposed the subject line. However, a new study by Mailjet suggests that emojis might be losing their effect.</p> <p>In a series of tests, Mailjet found open rates in the UK and the US rise by just 5% and 6% respectively when emojis accompanied the subject line.</p> <p>While the crying-with-laughter emoji was previously the most popular, Brits are now 33% less likely to open a message using the crying emoji than an email without it. The current overall best performer is the simple red heart emoji, being one of the few to generate a positive net result across all test regions with a 6% increase in open rate. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7479/emojis.jpg" alt="" width="540" height="540"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69250 2017-07-14T10:52:35+01:00 2017-07-14T10:52:35+01:00 Four reasons behind Superdrug's 41% increase in profits Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why the big turnaround? Here’s a look at Superdrug’s strategy, and the reasons why it’s currently enjoying a resurgence.</p> <h3>Targeting younger shoppers </h3> <p>Boots is the largest health and beauty retailer in the UK, with over 2,500 stores compared to Superdrug’s 850 or so. It’s also got the longest history, as well as a large and loyal consumer base that includes people of all ages and budgets.</p> <p>With Boots catering to such a large demographic, Superdrug has changed its strategy to target a more specific set of consumers. While its rival concentrates on its own-brand beauty range of Botanics, as well as more mid to high-end brands such No. 7 and L’Oréal, Superdrug deliberately targets younger consumers interested in more affordable cosmetics. </p> <p>Cheaper brands like MUA, GOSH and Make-Up Revolution, despite being less well-known, are now sold in most stores.</p> <p>So, alongside a general focus on affordability, how exactly does Superdrug entice younger consumers?</p> <p>In the face of low-price beauty launches from the likes of Primark, H&amp;M and New Look, Superdrug’s work with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66560-what-are-influencers-and-how-do-you-find-them" target="_blank">influencers</a> certainly sets it apart. The retailer struck a deal with Zoella in 2014 to sell her beauty range, with the collection going on to break sales records. </p> <p>Upon launch, the Superdrug website saw twice as many visitors as usual, with 25% of new visitors clicking on the Zoella range. Since then, Zoella has gone on to release two new collections, both resulting in similar success for Superdrug.  </p> <p>Other popular influencers such as Tanya Burr and Fleur de Force have also partnered with Superdrug to sell exclusive make-up and cosmetics collections, meaning the retailer has been able to capitalise on their existing and loyal audience. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/Zoella">@Zoella</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/ZoellaBeauty">@ZoellaBeauty</a> I've just picked this up from Superdrug it's so pretty <a href="https://t.co/IKAg0QyMdR">pic.twitter.com/IKAg0QyMdR</a></p> — Jessica newman (@jnew135) <a href="https://twitter.com/jnew135/status/883622463531253760">July 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>In-store experience</h3> <p>Influencers are not the only way Superdrug has aligned itself to younger shoppers. In 2014, it rolled out its new ‘Beauty Studio’ concept, offering beauty services such as threading, manicures and eyelash extensions in-stores. In select locations, it also introduced digital displays and an interactive ‘selfie’ area to encourage shoppers to share their makeovers on social media.</p> <p>Elsewhere, and even in stores that do not include a Beauty Studio, the design and layout of most stores is used to differentiate itself from Boots’ pared down approach. The retailer often uses bright colours and illuminated lettering, bringing a fashionable element into stores. Again, cosmetics is a huge focus, with this area often much larger than other areas.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7455/superdrug_cosmetics.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="431"></p> <p>Another way Superdrug has enhanced the in-store experience is to introduce Wi-Fi and its own radio station. ‘Superdrug Live’ is used to support brand campaigns and promotions, as well as create a unique store environment through music.</p> <h3>Healthcare focus</h3> <p>Alongside its Beauty Studio, Superdrug has also expanded into the healthcare market, placing much more focus on its status as a pharmacy as well as cosmetics retailer.</p> <p>While its stores used to have a 70/30 split between beauty and health products, some stores now have a 60/40 strategy, with the retailer introducing consultation rooms and services from pharmacists and nurses, such as flu vaccinations. </p> <p>Interestingly, Superdrug has also introduced its own brand of morning-after pill, selling it at half the cost of the average pill sold over the counter. The move has been praised by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, which applauded the retailer for giving women greater choice and accessibility. </p> <p>There’s no doubt that Superdrug’s focus on healthcare is succeeding – sales of this category grew 12% last year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7456/wellbeing.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="444"></p> <h3>Rewarding loyalty</h3> <p>Superdrug’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/69250-four-reasons-why-superdrug-is-succeeding/edit/Six%20tips%20for%20loyalty%20program%20success" target="_blank">loyalty program</a> has also grown over the past few years. In fact, membership is said to have doubled over the past two years, with the retailer having 19m registered members by the end of 2016. </p> <p>The Health and Beauty card is a fairly standard retail loyalty system, rewarding shoppers with points that can be exchanged for discounts. However, Superdrug adds value with exclusive offers and perks, also rewarding long-term loyalty members with exclusive gifts. Regular promotions like ‘Treat Thursdays’ – which offers exclusive discounts – provide incentive for members to collect and spend points.</p> <p>The Health and Beauty card also works in conjunction with the Superdrug app, allowing shoppers to collect and monitor points as well as access offers. By aligning the app and loyalty program, Superdrug has also been able to improve targeting, offering deals and promotions to customers based on their location or past purchase history.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Calling all Health &amp; Beautycard members! Get 10% off Diet &amp; Fitness products until 23:59 tonight <a href="https://t.co/pj1ctMQvf7">https://t.co/pj1ctMQvf7</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/treatthursday?src=hash">#treatthursday</a> <a href="https://t.co/qcrKFWzd3g">pic.twitter.com/qcrKFWzd3g</a></p> — Superdrug (@superdrug) <a href="https://twitter.com/superdrug/status/885431137660796928">July 13, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Improved online presence </h3> <p>While most consumers might naturally think of Superdrug in terms of physical stores, the retailer has been making strides to improve its ecommerce capabilities – as well as its general digital presence.</p> <p>With improved delivery and click and collect, it offers customers more flexibility than before – perhaps one of the main reasons its saw a 60% growth in online sales last year.</p> <p>Another reason could be its Online Doctor service, which allows customers to consult with a doctor on various medical issues and arrange prescription for collection or delivery. The popularity of the Online Doctor has spurred on expansion of Superdrug’s healthcare services, with the retailer recently announcing that will open 30 new stores and create 600 new jobs in the UK.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Superdrug uses social media to reach out and interact with consumers. Its Twitter and Facebook strategy involves a lot of user generated content, with the brand also using lifestyle and pop-culture inspired content to engage younger, female consumers.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Chris says he isn’t bothered… but we have a feeling that he is defo bothered! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/draaaaaama?src=hash">#draaaaaama</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/muggymikeisback?src=hash">#muggymikeisback</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/loveisland?src=hash">#loveisland</a> <a href="https://t.co/Tzj24KdgFW">pic.twitter.com/Tzj24KdgFW</a></p> — Superdrug (@superdrug) <a href="https://twitter.com/superdrug/status/885590454573641736">July 13, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>Making both beauty and healthcare accessible, Superdrug has managed to carve out a niche in the market, making its high street presence almost indispensable to consumers.</p> <p>While it previously stood in the shadow of Boots, its strong growth and expansion plans means it is a worthy competitor – possibly even winning in the fight for the attention of today’s young consumers. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67138-native-apps-for-retail-10-reasons-it-s-now-or-never/">Native apps for retail: 10 reasons it's now or never</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66160-how-boots-can-improve-its-customer-journey-from-search-to-checkout/">How Boots can improve its customer journey from search to checkout</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68472-three-reasons-behind-whsmith-s-boost-in-profits/" target="_blank">Three reasons behind WHSmith’s boost in profits</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69216 2017-07-07T10:12:39+01:00 2017-07-07T10:12:39+01:00 Four factors fuelling the growth of fast fashion retailers Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what’s fuelling this boom? Here’s a bit of a deep dive into Hitwise’s <a href="http://www.hitwise.com/gb/articles/urgency-catwalk-look-fuels-fast-fashion-industry/?bis_prd=1" target="_blank">research</a> and how brands are capitalising on the consumer desire for instant and affordable fashion.</p> <h3>What is fast fashion?</h3> <p>Before we go any further – what exactly determines a fast fashion retailer? </p> <p>Essentially, it is when the production process is accelerated in order to get new catwalk trends into stores or online as quickly as possible. It also reflects the growing consumer desire for speed and value within retail. </p> <p>It means that, instead of waiting for new seasonal collections (i.e. spring/summer), consumers can get their hands on a continuous cycle of trend-led clothing, all year round.</p> <p>Brands such as H&amp;M and Zara were said to be among the very first fast fashion retailers. When the latter opened its first US store in 1990 (having first launched in Spain in the 1970s) it announced that it would only take 15 days for a garment to go from concept to completion.</p> <p>So, what’s fuelling fast fashion brands?</p> <h3>Speed and agility</h3> <p>Hitwise data suggests that ASOS, New Look and Very are the most popular brands in the category, accounting for 47% of the UK’s fast fashion market share. </p> <p>For brands like ASOS, the ability to capture millennial consumers is key, with this demographic now reportedly having an estimated spending power of $2.45trn. One way it does this is by delivering on the demand for new fashion, as younger consumers typically spend around seasonal events (such as festivals) as well as after payday.</p> <p>ASOS stocks over 60,000 items at any given time, allowing the ecommerce retailer to constantly update its inventory with ‘new in’ products.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7155/ASOS_social.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="475"></p> <p>Research by Goldman Sachs suggests that ASOS is able to do this by mastering its supply chain. The below screenshot shows the correlation between supply-chain lead times and like-for-like sales growth, with the results showing just how important speed is for both <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69044-five-reasons-behind-boohoo-s-97-increase-in-profits" target="_blank">Boohoo</a> and ASOS.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7154/goldman.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="483"></p> <p>ASOS constantly tracks how well (or poorly) trends are selling online, before adjusting its inventory accordingly. This means that it reduces the risk of unsold stock, and in turn, delivers a steady stream of new trends for fashion-hungry consumers.</p> <h3>Celebrity endorsement</h3> <p>Hitwise data also shows that PrettyLittleThing.com is the fastest growing brand in the fast fashion category, with the site seeing a whopping 663% increase in online visits year-on-year since 2014.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7150/Hitwise.png" alt="" width="297" height="233"></p> <p>For PrettyLittleThing, working with celebrities and influencers has allowed the brand to drive awareness of its products. A popular search term relating to the site is ‘celebrities wearing Pretty Little Thing’ – mainly thanks to endorsements from the likes of Kylie Jenner and Sofia Ritchie.</p> <p>However, Pretty Little Thing does not only use celebrities to merely promote its clothing. Well-known names, like former TOWIE star Lucy Meck, have also created their own clothing lines with the brand. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7151/PLT.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="546"></p> <p>In doing so, it has allowed the ecommerce retailer to strengthen its connection with customers, offering them something more authentic and original than a shallow celebrity endorsement.</p> <h3>Sales through social</h3> <p>Alongside influencers, fast fashion brands have mastered the use of social media to drive sales. </p> <p>Today, consumers are constantly craving fashion and lifestyle-related digital content, not just to inspire their choices, but also for the purpose of entertainment. So, in order to deliver this, many retailers have started to act more like media brands – fusing the worlds of shopping, entertainment, and social media. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">SHINE BRIGHT Shop the leggings - <a href="https://t.co/BAozK9oxRq">https://t.co/BAozK9oxRq</a> the shoes - <a href="https://t.co/ybfQaGIWuX">https://t.co/ybfQaGIWuX</a> <a href="https://t.co/7Nnp9xFv7m">pic.twitter.com/7Nnp9xFv7m</a></p> — boohoo.com (@boohoo) <a href="https://twitter.com/boohoo/status/879474400445292544">June 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Unsurprisingly, Instagram reigns supreme as the most effective platform for fashion brands, with many posting videos, Instagram Stories, and including links to shoppable content to allow users to smoothly transition from the act of browsing to buying. </p> <p>One brand that has effectively used social to increase sales volume is Missguided. It has even incorporated the recognisable user interface <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67600-missguided-launches-tinder-inspired-app-experience-review">of another social app – Tinder – into its own</a>.</p> <p>With its ‘swipe to hype’ feature, consumers can dislike or like products to create their own wishlists.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7152/Missguided_app.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="483"> </p> <p>This ‘tinderisation’ of ecommerce shows how fast paced the industry has become, with consumers making impulsive decisions – often based on the knowledge that there will be continuous stream of new products in the pipeline.</p> <h3>Sustainability and ethics</h3> <p>The fast fashion industry has come under fire in recent years for its impact on the environment, as well as suggestions that the demand for cheap clothing is driving poor working and labour conditions. </p> <p>Interestingly, research shows that 19% of the top fast fashion related searches are linked to the environment, ethics and sustainability. In order to counteract this, many brands are now displaying increased levels of transparency, with some also introducing initiatives relating to ethical and environmental issues.</p> <p>H&amp;M, for example, launched a conscious beauty collection in 2016 which included ‘planet-friendly’ products. Similarly, it has set itself the goal of using 100% sustainably sourced cotton by 2020.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7153/H_M.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="321"></p> <p>Meanwhile, Zara has pledged to boycott Uzbek cotton, which is an industry linked to forced labour. The brand has also joined the Better Cotton Initiative to promote sustainability and best practices for workers in the cotton industry.</p> <p>Of course, there is still a long way to go before fast fashion retailers prove themselves, however these examples are helping to satisfy increasingly conscientious consumers – as well as enhance their brand reputation.</p> <h3>Other brands playing catch-up</h3> <p>So, what impact has the fast fashion had on the wider industry in general? Interestingly, mid-tier and luxury brands are recognising that the consumer desire for fast fashion is not only based on low prices. </p> <p>Often, it can simply be because consumers do not want to wait for seasonal collections. </p> <p>As a result, some brands are introducing ‘runway to retail’ concepts to allow consumers to get their hands on clothes as soon as they’re seen on the catwalk. Elsewhere, JC Penney has accelerated the delivery of merchandise in order to update stock mid-season, while GAP has announced that it will be trialling a fast-fashion model to see whether it increases sales.</p> <p>As the continued growth of retailers like Missguided and ASOS demonstrates, fast fashion could be a trend that’s here to stay.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68728-how-fashion-retailers-can-use-search-trend-data-to-inform-marketing-product-strategy/" target="_blank">How fashion retailers can use search trend data to inform marketing &amp; product strategy</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66501-how-fashion-brands-are-setting-trends-in-digital/" target="_blank">How fashion brands are setting trends in digital</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68404-10-examples-of-great-fashion-marketing-campaigns" target="_blank">10 examples of great fashion marketing campaigns</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69135 2017-06-02T09:32:24+01:00 2017-06-02T09:32:24+01:00 Dropit review: Is there a demand for a ‘shop and drop’ delivery service? Nikki Gilliland <p>It sounds kind of cool – but is there <em>really</em> a demand for this kind of service? I was intrigued, so decided to download the app and give it a whirl. Here’s my two penneth.</p> <h3>How does Dropit work?</h3> <p>Dropit works via an app which customers can download or access via the POS device in a store. Buying a day pass for £10 allows you to ‘drop’ as many bags as you like in one day, which will then be collected and sent to you in a single delivery at a chosen time.</p> <p>For my trial, I chose to use Dropit in Lululemon’s Regent Street store – one of over 30 that now offer the service in London’s Regent and Oxford Street area. </p> <p>It was all very simple to do. When I went to buy an item in-store, I told the employee I wanted to use Dropit, which meant I just had to enter my details into the POS device, select a delivery time, and wait for them to scan the receipt and a QR code. It didn’t take long, though it obviously meant a bit of extra waiting time than merely buying and walking out of the store.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6467/Dropit.JPG" alt="" width="589" height="524"></p> <p>I chose my item to be delivered to my flat the following evening, and sure enough, it was - packaged inside Dropit's signature bag along with a matching purse that held the day pass and receipt.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6469/IMG_0401.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="799"></p> <p>I was also able to track my item on the app to see its progress. The app also includes a list and map of all participating stores, though there’s not much else to it than that.</p> <p>In terms of who actually delivers the goods, Dropit partners with a third-party service (similar to most retail stores), so it’s not a company like Deliveroo that actually employs people to deliver.</p> <h3>Who is it aimed at?</h3> <p>The value proposition of Dropit is quite straightforward – it means you don’t have to carry around bags while you continue shopping or go straight out for the evening. However, the question really is whether this is a big enough problem for people to pay £10 on top of their goods to have their bags dropped off elsewhere. </p> <p>Personally, I can’t see myself ever using it in my every day life, unless it was a (first world) emergency and I really couldn’t take shopping bags along with me, say if I was going to a gig after work. </p> <p>Consequently, I do wonder if the service is more aligned to luxury shoppers – people that are willing to pay slightly extra for the comfort and convenience. Or, perhaps even tourists who are really serious about shopping but also want to enjoy their day doing other things. </p> <p>The fact that Dropit often cites hotels in its promotional copy suggests that people from out of town are a target customer. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6471/Dropit_insta.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="353"></p> <h3>What’s the benefit for participating stores?</h3> <p>Meanwhile, there seems to be more in it for retail stores. One benefit is the possibility of extra dwell time in-store. If people aren’t weighed down by heavy bags, I guess they might be less worried about carrying things and therefore more inclined to spend.</p> <p>There is also the benefit of accessing data about offline consumers that would usually only be gathered from online purchases. Details such as where people shop and how much they spend could prove massively beneficial for understanding, targeting and retargeting customers. </p> <p>Finally, Dropit’s partnership network means that it also opens up possible marketing opportunities for retailers, including promotion within the app itself or social media. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6470/Dropit_M_S.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="483"></p> <h3>Is it worth it?</h3> <p>Personally, I can’t see much of a demand for Dropit from your average shopper. Most people don’t tend to buy that much in one go – or at least prefer buying online if they do. Similarly, I can’t imagine many people would even think of carrying bags as an issue.</p> <p>Having said that, there’s no doubt that the service does provide real convenience. The app and delivery service itself is also seamless and slick, which definitely adds to its appeal. Ultimately, I think Dropit solves a problem that most people probably don’t even realise they have. Which I suppose is the hallmark of some of the most successful companies out there. </p> <p>For rich people or tourists who are serious about shopping in London, it could be something to consider. Retailers keen to get their hands on untapped data will certainly be keeping their fingers crossed.</p> <p><em><strong>For more on retail, subscribers can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends-in-retail/" target="_blank">2017 Digital Trends in Retail</a> report.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69071 2017-05-09T11:00:00+01:00 2017-05-09T11:00:00+01:00 M&S to trial grocery delivery service: Will it take off? Nikki Gilliland <h3>Growing UK delivery sector</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://igd.com/About-us/Media/IGD-news-and-press-releases/Online-grocery-delivers-huge-potential/" target="_blank">IGD</a>, Britain’s online food market is expected to nearly double to £17.2bn by 2020. It’s not just the big supermarkets that are involved, of course. The likes of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68508-the-four-goals-underpinning-deliveroo-s-growth-strategy/" target="_blank">Deliveroo</a> and HelloFresh – companies that offer takeaway options and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67861-four-reasons-recipe-box-brands-are-delivering-success/" target="_blank">at-home recipes kits</a> – are also taking a slice of the pie. </p> <p>Meanwhile, M&amp;S has been missing out. </p> <p>Despite the retailer’s previous insistence that its product-range and basket-size is too small to offer a legitimate and price-worthy service, the emergence and popularity of the delivery market is bound to have been a factor in its decision to get involved.</p> <p>The question is – how will M&amp;S convince customers that it’s worth paying for a proper delivery? </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5947/grocery_delivery.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>Changing consumer perceptions</h3> <p>With its ‘dine in for 2’ range, M&amp;S Food is typically seen as a top-up shopping option or a special occasion store. That being said, it is a very profitable one, with M&amp;S’ clothing business dwindling in light of the success of its food arm.</p> <p>Last month, the retailer confirmed it was opening an additional 34 food shops following a review of its UK store portfolio. Meanwhile, it already operates an ecommerce service for its wines by the case, as well as party food, homeware, flowers and other non-food items.</p> <p>As well as a focus on physical stores, M&amp;S has also been concentrating on food in marketing terms. Interestingly, news about its delivery trial aligns with a new campaign that aims to get consumers to think of Marks and Spencer in a different light.</p> <p>The ‘Spend it Well’ campaign is more about promoting brand values than its product-range, telling consumers that life is too short not to spend time and money on the things that matter the most. </p> <p>This, alongside clear investment in physical food stores, is perhaps a sign that M&amp;S is serious about getting consumers to view it as more than just a place to pick up a sandwich.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hYbh7PbYq5g?wmode=transparent" width="940" height="529"></iframe></p> <h3>Potential partnerships</h3> <p>So, back to the biggest obstacle of a viable business model.</p> <p>According to reports, M&amp;S is currently in talks with Ocado about a potential partnership to handle order fulfilment. The most likely scenario would also involve M&amp;S products being available on Ocado’s website, rather than a new standalone website being set up for M&amp;S. </p> <p>This would solve the problem of small-basket values, giving consumers the option to pick and choose from Marks and Spencer alongside other food brands. </p> <p>However, with Ocado currently having a deal in place with both Waitrose and Morrisons, it’s not yet clear whether it’s actually possible to bring M&amp;S into the mix. Ocado’s current contract with Waitrose specifies that 70% of all non-own brand products sold have to come from Waitrose. If M&amp;S is classed as a brand – the deal will be unable to go ahead.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5948/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="528"></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>With a proper logistics model, success with online grocery delivery is not totally implausible for M&amp;S.</p> <p>Even if consumers do not buy into the idea of a weekly shop, perhaps the introduction of speciality delivery services could prove enticing. If the popularity of its seasonal food is anything to go by - with Christmas and Easter ranges typically seeing shoppers flock to buy a large amount of ingredients in one go – consumers are likely to lap up the added convenience if it is on offer.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67883-marks-spencer-what-does-putting-the-customer-at-the-heart-of-everything-mean/" target="_blank">Marks &amp; Spencer: what does 'putting the customer at the heart of everything' mean?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68355-how-online-grocery-retailers-are-capitalising-on-the-need-for-convenience/" target="_blank">How online grocery retailers are capitalising on the need for convenience</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69044 2017-04-28T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-28T10:00:00+01:00 Five reasons behind Boohoo’s 97% increase in profits Nikki Gilliland <p>So, is Boohoo’s success merely a reflection of the dwindling fortunes of the British high street? Perhaps somewhat, but with other online retailers struggling to capture interest, there’s a reason why Boohoo is head and shoulders above the rest.</p> <p>Here’s what it’s been doing in order to drive online sales.</p> <h3>1. Influencer marketing</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">According to research</a>, budgets for influencer marketing were predicted to increase by a whopping 59% last year.</p> <p>Boohoo has evidently ramped up activity in this area, with influencer marketing now a huge part of its strategy to target its core demographic of girls aged 16-24. </p> <p>The retailer has partnered with multiple influencers and bloggers to promote Boohoo across popular platforms like Instagram and Snapchat. One particularly successful example has been its collaboration with model Jordyn Woods on a new range of plus-size clothing. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5790/Jordyn_Woods.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="490"></p> <p>The reason it worked so well was not only due to Woods’ personal social media following, but also her connection to other high-profile media influencers like Kylie Jenner and Justine Skye – names that Boohoo’s Generation Z-consumers are likely to be aware of.</p> <p>More recently, Boohoo has also generated buzz from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69011-jumping-on-the-bandwagon-how-brands-capitalised-on-coachella/" target="_blank">influencers attending Coachella</a> – a festival that typically fills social media news feeds during April.</p> <p>For more on influencers, download these Econsultancy reports:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">The Rise of Influencers</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/">The Voice of the Influencer</a></li> </ul> <h3>2. Mobile mind-set</h3> <p>Google suggests that <a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/interactive-report/gen-z-a-look-inside-its-mobile-first-mindset/" target="_blank">68% of teenagers now shop via their smartphone</a>, while 63% of millennials are said to shop on their mobiles every single day.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, two-thirds of online visits to Boohoo come from mobile, with the retailer subsequently taking steps to ensure that the user experience is as slick and seamless as possible. </p> <p>Last year, it launched apps in international markets as well as a new and improved version for the UK.</p> <p>Personally, I’ve always been a big fan of Boohoo’s app. In fact it’s one of the only examples from a fashion retailer that I turn to over its mobile site. Features like the ‘wishlist’ – which allows you to save items to revisit later – are perfectly aligned with the mobile experience, meaning browsing on the app is even easier than online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5791/bohoo.PNG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>3. International expansion</h3> <p>As well as strong UK growth, Boohoo has also seen a rise in profits in international markets, with revenue rising 140% in the US and 40% in the rest of the world.</p> <p>What’s more, the brand looks set to increase expansion plans even further, acquiring Nasty Gal in February – a retailer with a large and existing customer base in the US. Combined with the fact that Boohoo also took over smaller rival, PrettyLittleThing, earlier this year, it looks set to capitalise on these takeovers with further international growth.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Fries before guys. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NastyGalsDoItBetter?src=hash">#NastyGalsDoItBetter</a> <a href="https://t.co/wYGU0PmtrR">pic.twitter.com/wYGU0PmtrR</a></p> — NASTY GAL (@NastyGal) <a href="https://twitter.com/NastyGal/status/856032866492334080">April 23, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>4. Fast and affordable fashion</h3> <p>Another draw for online consumers is undoubtedly Boohoo’s dedication to fast fashion – meaning the prices are low and the turnover is high. </p> <p>Unlike <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67870-why-asos-is-still-leading-the-online-retailing-pack/" target="_blank">ASOS</a>, which is well-known for carrying a broad and expansive range of designers at a higher price point, Boohoo focuses on stocking key seasonal trends at low prices. While 11% of ASOS products are in the £5 to £9.99 category, this rises to 23% for Boohoo. </p> <p>With consumer expectations rising, and millennial shoppers developing an ‘I want it now’ mindset, Boohoo's business model enables it to deliver a rapid and continuous cycle of affordable fashion trends.</p> <p>Its ‘test and repeat’ strategy allows it to quickly find out what items are selling online before ordering and stocking more.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">This <a href="https://twitter.com/boohoo">@boohoo</a> dress FINALLY came back in stock long enough for me to grab one...Happy Friday!!<a href="https://t.co/xKexqUAbkQ">https://t.co/xKexqUAbkQ</a> <a href="https://t.co/UapfEFbDHr">pic.twitter.com/UapfEFbDHr</a></p> — Halinalinalina (@viechoufleur) <a href="https://twitter.com/viechoufleur/status/850231762961571840">April 7, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>5. Harnessing social media and commerce</h3> <p>Its product offering is not the only reason Boohoo has such a large online customer-base. Its dedication to delivering high quality service – both pre- and post-purchase – has helped it to retain strong levels of customer loyalty.</p> <p>One way it does this is through social media, using platforms like Twitter and Facebook to communicate and resolve customer service issues. </p> <p>Of course, it also uses social to drive engagement, continually asking for feedback and opinions, as well as offering incentives such as promotions and competitions. </p> <p>Meanwhile, its also appears to be veering into the world of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69041-social-commerce-why-basic-bots-and-buy-buttons-are-not-enough/">social commerce</a>, notably including new shoppable elements in a number of recent Facebook posts. While other examples of social commerce have failed to live up to expectations, Boohoo’s ability to resonate and relate to a young and fashion-hungry demographic could mean that its one of the first to truly take off.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5792/facebook_boohoo.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="392"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68659-three-reasons-behind-the-white-company-s-boost-in-profits/">Three reasons behind The White Company’s boost in profits</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68472-three-reasons-behind-whsmith-s-boost-in-profits/">Three reasons behind WHSmith’s boost in profits</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69000 2017-04-24T11:00:00+01:00 2017-04-24T11:00:00+01:00 What Farfetch's 'Store of the Future' tech says about the state of luxury retail Nikki Gilliland <p>This is just one example of Farfetch’s tech-driven approach, which it recently announced alongside a set of ‘Store of the Future’ technologies - designed to enhance the future retail experience for both brands and consumers. </p> <p>So, what exactly does this future look like? Here’s a run-down of Farfetch’s strategy and what it says about the wider luxury retail market as a whole. </p> <h4>Fusion of the online and offline experience</h4> <p>According to Bain &amp; Company, 70% of luxury purchases today are influenced by online interactions, with shoppers partaking in at least one digital interaction with a brand before buying. </p> <p>That being said, it also predicts that stores will play a critical role in the luxury retail market, with 75% of purchases still occurring in a physical location by 2025. </p> <p>So, which one will win out? </p> <p>According to Farfetch - neither. Instead, it predicts a future of ‘connected retail’ – a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68023-think-retail-how-brands-are-targeting-the-phygital-generation/" target="_blank">blend of the digital and physical</a> realms that will allow consumers to seamlessly shift between the two. </p> <p>The brand’s CEO, José Neves, recently suggested that this will include a combination of innovative tech in-store such as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68401-virtual-reality-content-marketing-s-next-big-trend/" target="_blank">virtual reality</a>, emotion-scanning software, and innovative payment options.</p> <p>As well as enhancing the physical shopping experience for consumers, this use of technology will also allow retailers to collect vital data about browsing behaviour in-store. In turn, this will inform online targeting, and so the cycle goes on.</p> <p>Browns, the New York-based store owned by Farfetch, will be the first to experiment with these ‘Store of the Future’ technologies. </p> <h4>Innovative online services</h4> <p>Meanwhile, Farfetch aims to enhance its ecommerce service with a selection of new digital services. </p> <p>With younger customers reportedly taking one-third less time than older customers to make decisions, 90-minute delivery specifically targets the ‘I want it now’ mind-set of millennials. A demographic that clearly wants their Gucci loafers delivered stat. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3unBWk3yp5Y?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Consumer expectations are also changing when it comes to personal aspects such as customisation and an alignment of personal beliefs and values. </p> <p>With this in mind, Farfetch has also launched a <a href="https://www.farfetch.com/uk/sets/women/customizable-NK-women.aspx">design-your-own tool</a> for shoe designer Nicholas Kirkwood. Allowing online shoppers to customise its Beya Bespoke line, it’s another example of the retailer putting greater control into the hands of consumers.</p> <h4>Will others take note? </h4> <p>While the physical shopping experience is still in demand across all sectors, it appears to present a greater opportunity for luxury retailers. This is because consumers naturally expect to leave with an ‘experience’ to go along with the actual product they’re buying.</p> <p>By offering a much more intimate and immersive experience, it is a chance for brands and retailers to forge an emotional connection – far more so than online. </p> <p>Luxury retailers have clearly recognised this, with many introducing in-store technologies to dazzle shoppers. <a href="https://virtualrealityreporter.com/dior-eyes-virtual-reality-headst-vr-fashin/">Dior launched a virtual reality headset</a> to give shoppers a behind-the-scenes look of its runway show, for instance. And Harvey Nichols introduced <a href="http://www.harveynichols.com/project-109/">Project 109</a> – an in-store concept space that hosts immersive installations and pop-ups.</p> <p>With the announcement of Store of the Future, Farfetch might just have upped the ante. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68329-farfetch-s-cmo-why-we-re-more-than-just-a-shopping-platform/" target="_blank">Farfetch’s CMO: Why we’re more than just a shopping platform</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67705-what-s-now-next-for-digital-technology-in-retail-stores/" target="_blank">What's now &amp; next for digital technology in retail stores?</a></em></li> </ul>