tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/ecommerce Latest Ecommerce content from Econsultancy 2016-07-27T21:00:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4207 2016-07-27T21:00:00+01:00 2016-07-27T21:00:00+01:00 The Japan Digital Report <p><strong>The Japan Digital Report</strong> aims to provide background for marketers who are outside of Japan and currently marketing in Japan, thinking of launching a campaign there, or even just curious about the country and its digital landscape.</p> <p>Additionally, the report provides detailed information about marketing on LINE, the most culturally significant digital platform in Japan presently.</p> <p>Through the data, the charts and the commentary, the report will help marketers looking to make a case for investing more in the country and provide a foundation for further research.</p> <h2>Topics covered include:</h2> <ul> <li> <strong>Demographics.</strong> How does Japan compare to the rest of the world?</li> <li> <strong>Digital readiness.</strong> What is the current state of internet and mobile technology in the country?</li> <li> <strong>Digital landscape.</strong> What are the main web, social, search, video and ecommerce sites in the country, and how do they operate?</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68102 2016-07-27T14:02:00+01:00 2016-07-27T14:02:00+01:00 Why there should be more plaudits for digital audits Chris Bishop <p>Those at the top of organisations don’t feel they have the strategic sweep to justify the time and effort required to commission them.</p> <p>Audits are viewed at times as a little “too tactical” or only done once every blue moon by agencies aiming to impress for your business, only to then collect dust on top of Econsultancy buyers guides print outs or even your old New Media Age magazines (<strong>Ed</strong>: We let this lie, but only to show we have a sense of humour).</p> <p>For the in-house Head of Ecommerce, requesting a digital audit might sound dangerously like a turkey voting for Christmas. </p> <h3>Are we selling audits wrongly?</h3> <p>Or is it the slightly cheesy marketing of website or marketing auditors themselves that is putting people off?</p> <p>All that tired ‘digital health check’ stuff might be the kind of foot in the door tactic that make brands feel suspicious of then giving access to their precious AdWords account, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67171-what-is-affiliate-marketing-why-do-you-need-it/">affiliate network</a> or analytics suite.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7503/healthcheck.jpeg" alt="health check" width="275" height="183"></p> <h3>How important are digital audits anyway?</h3> <p>In reality, though, digital audits are absolutely vital. And third party objective auditing ensures that you’re not marking your own home work or ignoring long term problems.</p> <p>Proper auditing, UX testing and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67473-seven-conversion-rate-optimization-trends-to-take-advantage-of-in-2016/">CRO analysis</a> means you can elongate the lifetime and effectiveness of your website and digital media activity, in a way that can be done on any budget.</p> <p>Your digital real estate is often an expensive investment - you’ve got to maintain it properly to get results.</p> <h3>Regular servicing is vital</h3> <p>Think of that shiny new website you’ve just spent months developing as a new car you’ve just acquired.</p> <p>To start off with, it’s the envy of everyone who sees it. After-sales support is pretty good and you can see years of trouble free motoring ahead of you. Before you know it, though, your warranty is up and you’re on your own.</p> <p>As the car ages, small problems become big problems. It performs less effectively. You’re paying for petrol, but it’s becoming less and less economical to run. There are so many things going wrong with it you don’t know where to start. Eventually the car's value is so diminished you might as well scrap it and buy a new one.</p> <p>It’s the same with websites and digital marketing campaigns. They can’t be left to look after themselves – and even the mechanic themselves might need some fine tuning or training themselves.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7504/service-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="car service" width="380"></p> <h3>What a digital audit can do for you </h3> <p>Audits can show you how to balance your budget more effectively through action and prioritisation. They can identify common issues like plateaus in activity and drop offs in acquisition; all the elements that reduce profitability. </p> <h3>The Lessons of the Audit</h3> <p>Constantly learn, constantly improve, constantly trade! A timely and constructive audit will help you:</p> <ul> <li>Keep up to date with the latest channel trends - Google changes, new publishers in affiliate, new platform or techniques for social. </li> <li>Use competitor analysis to keep your enemies close! It’s crucial to analyse and understand market share/spend and its consequences for your brand. </li> <li>Help you (re)define your goals.</li> <li>Confirm your objectives or KPIs so you can measure success.</li> <li>Understand new opportunities.</li> <li>Benchmark improvements or conversely measure areas of decline.</li> <li>Ensure corporate compliance – its best practice to have someone external “rubber stamp” your activity.</li> <li>Encourage serendipity – the uncovering of that nugget of information that transforms your understanding and makes the commercial difference.</li> </ul> <h3>Should you take the plunge?</h3> <p>Regular and skilled digital auditing is a detailed and never ending task.  It can transform the effectiveness of your digital advertising, website and budget.  </p> <p>Is it sexy? It’s showing your website a lot of love and attention. It’s optimizing and maximizing your marketing profitability and performance. Sounds pretty sexy to me.</p> <p><em>More on auditing:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68031-answering-the-key-question-of-content-auditing-where-do-i-start/">Answering the key question of content auditing - where do I start?</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68099 2016-07-25T12:57:00+01:00 2016-07-25T12:57:00+01:00 Three ways UK retailers can utilise the post-Brexit GBP drop to target international customers Ido Ariel <p><a href="http://www.barilliance.com/brexit-sales-statistics-one-week-later/">An analysis by Barilliance</a> indicates that:</p> <p><strong>1.</strong> A higher number of consumers were browsing the retailers’ websites, with sessions increasing by 5.9%.</p> <p><strong>2.</strong> More visitors were converting and making purchases, leading to a 30% increase in sales.</p> <p><strong>3.</strong> Fewer consumers were abandoning their shopping carts prior to making a purchase; cart abandonment dropped slightly by 1.3%.</p> <p>In light of these findings, UK retailers should utilise specifically-targeted website personalisation tactics to entice international shoppers browsing UK retail sites, thereby increasing the conversion rates of non-UK leads.</p> <h3>Create a sense of urgency with prompts highlighting current low GBP rate </h3> <p>UK retailers can create prompts, such as banners, messages and pop-ups, highlighting the low GBP rate to non-UK website visitors.</p> <p>Geo-targeting consumers, using methods such as e-mail acquisition and sending out <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67815-why-marketers-are-failing-to-make-the-most-of-automated-emails/">trigger e-mails</a>, can enable UK online retailers to promote post-Brexit currency shifts to their advantage, marketing ostensibly reduced prices to international customers accustomed to making transactions in other currencies.</p> <p>Furthermore, highlighting the current low GBP rate as a “limited-time opportunity,” likely to change at any given moment, UK online retailers can create a sense of urgency among non-UK website browsers, promoting conversion even amongst the most hesitant of shoppers.</p> <h3>Create targeted promotions to international website visitors to enhance personalisation</h3> <p>Creating geographically-targeted promotions to website visitors from foreign countries enhances personalisation and increases conversion.</p> <p>Retailers can create banners and popups targeted at specific countries or regions and segment these promotions by city, thus providing the consumer with a very personalised shopping experience.</p> <p>For example, a retailer could offer German customers a special coupon that is exclusively available to them - or that appears to be exclusive.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7284/germany_welcome_image-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="german promotion" width="470" height="311"></p> <p>Additionally, while the current GBP-foreign currency exchange rate may tempt website browsers to purchase from UK retail sites, the mere thought of international shipping and customs fees may be daunting enough to lead customers to abandon their carts and pay a heftier local product price.</p> <p>UK online retailers can create personalised website prompts announcing to international customers that the company provides shipping services to international addresses. Furthermore, they can offer free or reduced-cost international shipping to non-UK customers.</p> <p>Customers who do not have to worry about shipping hassles and costs are more likely to make international purchases, despite longer delivery wait times when compared to items bought locally. </p> <p>If the customer abandons the cart before completing their purchase, retailers can send geo-targeted email that highlight the free or low-cost and makes the purchase worthwhile.</p> <h3>Issue limited-time discounts or coupons to international customers</h3> <p>Presenting non-UK customers with promotional offers valid for a limited time can entice consumers to act immediately and purchase desired items at the reduced price.</p> <p>Internationally-geared limited-time discounts and coupons benefit the company’s overall revenues as well.</p> <p>UK companies feeling the post-Brexit economic pinch can vastly increase individual sales to international customers using promotional offers, despite the company’s profit-per-item rate being lower than originally projected.</p> <p>The discount offer value can be changed according to the cart value, enabling retailers to offer, for example, a 15% discount for carts up to £499 and a 20% discount for carts above £500.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7285/cart_content_over_100_pound-blog-flyer.png" alt="personalised voucher" width="300">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/7287/cart_content_over_500_pound-blog-flyer.png" alt="limited time offer" width="300"></p> <h3>In conclusion</h3> <p>UK online retailers should take advantage of the post-Brexit referendum low GBP rate and target non-UK website visitors utilising <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/website-personalisation-buyers-guide/">website personalisation</a> tactics.</p> <p>International customers benefit from the strengthening of foreign currencies against the GBP, while the UK retailers gain new customers, increased sales, reduced cart abandonment and a rise in overall revenues. </p> <p><strong><em>More on Brexit and ecommerce:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68003-ecommerce-in-the-uk-post-brexit-positives-negatives-opportunities/">Ecommerce in the uK post-Brexit: positives, negatives &amp; opportunities</a> </li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68070 2016-07-25T11:12:46+01:00 2016-07-25T11:12:46+01:00 Eight examples of fashion ecommerce product filters: Good & bad Nikki Gilliland <p>(Note - as there are a few differences on mobile, such as abridged filters, I am solely concentrating on the desktop experience for now.)</p> <h3>H&amp;M</h3> <p>H&amp;M’s ‘Shop by Feature’ filter is designed to point the user in the direction of curated themes.</p> <p>While creative in theory, it actually seems to be quite pointless.</p> <p>What the retailer seems to have forgotten is that the whole point of a filter system is to narrow down products in order to point the consumer in a specific direction – not lead them down a random path to ‘off duty denim’ when it’s far easier to just filter by ‘jeans’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7155/H_M.PNG" alt="" width="477" height="419"></p> <p>Aside from this, the regular filter is very user-friendly.</p> <p>With options to choose by colour, size and style - plus a handy 'clear all' button - it's easy to narrow down exactly what you're looking for.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7310/H_M_filter.PNG" alt="" width="750" height="580"></p> <h3><strong>River Island </strong></h3> <p>River Island’s filtering system is slightly fiddly in that it only allows you to select one filter at a time (selecting mutliple filters involves multiple reloading of the results page).</p> <p>However, one feature I quite like is that it allows you to see how many items each one includes. While this might sound slightly off-putting (I did occasionally find myself focusing on the number rather than the actual category I was selecting) – it is pretty helpful.</p> <p>For instance, if a filter returns just two items, you’ll know ahead of time rather than clicking through just to be disappointed.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6999/river_island_filter.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="699"></p> <h3><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67581-six-reasons-i-love-zara-com-and-a-few-reasons-i-don-t/"><strong>Zara </strong></a></h3> <p>Zara’s filter system is a mixed bag. By placing it at the top of the page instead of the left-hand side, it focuses the user’s attention.</p> <p>It also enables you to select multiple features at once, using specific elements like ‘characteristics’ and ‘colour’.</p> <p>And we mean specific… Anyone happen to know what an ‘ecru’ coloured shirt looks like?</p> <p>Well thanks to its filtering system, you do now.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7002/zara_filter_2.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="512"></p> <p>On the other hand, its filter button is not the most visible, nor are highlighted filters, a fairly major UX issue.</p> <p>Annoyingly, there is also no option to sort filtered results.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7375/Screen_Shot_2016-07-24_at_18.44.10.png" alt="zara" width="615" height="256"></p> <h3><strong>Ted Baker</strong></h3> <p>Much of Ted Baker’s website is slick, so it’s a little disappointing that its filtering system is less so.</p> <p>While it does offer a decent number of options to filter by, including patterns, colours, sizes etc, like River Island it only allows you to choose one option (i.e. colour <em>or</em> size) before you have to repeat the process to choose another.</p> <p>Furthermore, the drop-down menu is a little slow, making the whole process feel slightly frustrating.</p> <p>Luckily, with its creative copywriting and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67999-seven-inspiring-examples-of-ecommerce-lookbooks/">lookbooks</a>, there's a lot to enjoy elsewhere on the site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7003/Ted_Baker_filter.PNG" alt="" width="513" height="670"></p> <h3><strong>Hunter</strong></h3> <p>Like Ted Baker, Hunter’s filter is in the form of a drop-down menu, however, with separate tabs for each filter option – it’s far easier to use.</p> <p>It also includes some nice touches like a tick appearing as you narrow down the search, and an instant reset button.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7004/Hunter_filters.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="539"></p> <h3><strong>Marks and Spencer</strong></h3> <p>User reviews is a feature that many retailers fail to utilise. Functioning as a vote of confidence, rating systems are always useful for consumers that are unsure of what products to buy.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67883-marks-spencer-what-does-putting-the-customer-at-the-heart-of-everything-mean/">Marks and Spencer </a>is one of the few retailers to shrewdly include them.</p> <p>Allowing users to filter by star ratings (1 and above, 2 and above and so on), it helps out the consumer who values other people’s opinions. While it’s located at the bottom of the left-hand side and so fairly inconspicuous, it’s still a worthwhile addition.</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7006/M_S_filter_2.PNG" alt="" width="350" height="669"></p> <h3><strong>Suit Supply </strong></h3> <p>In contrast to H&amp;M, Suit Supply is a great example of how to use product filtering in a more creative fashion.</p> <p>Instead of words, it utilises visuals to highlight various product features, cleverly showcasing the retailer’s wide variety of options.</p> <p>From collar type to style by context, this element is simple but effective, and something I've not come across before.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7007/Suit_supply_collar.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="330"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7008/Suit_supply.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="527"></p> <h3><strong>ASOS</strong></h3> <p>With such a large amount of items, it’s a good job that ASOS offers such as comprehensive filter system.</p> <p>From brand and style to fit and sleeve length, there any many different options to choose from, and with different filters across different categories - it’s cleverly executed.</p> <p>As well as helping to guide the consumer to find what they like, it also allows ASOS the brand to showcase its wide variety of products.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7017/ASOS_filter_2.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="408"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7019/ASOS_jean_filter.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="435"> </p> <h3>What can we learn?</h3> <p>While H&amp;M's example might not work, the brand's willingness to experiment with product filtering should be applauded.</p> <p>If done right, a decent filter can massively improve the user experience.</p> <p>Fast, with clear visuals and the ability to select multiple options... that's the dream.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68106 2016-07-22T12:00:15+01:00 2016-07-22T12:00:15+01:00 10 sizzling digital marketing stats of the week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Travel industry experiences highest cart abandonment rates</h3> <p>According to the latest report by SaleCycle, the travel industry is experiencing the highest rates of online abandonment, with time sensitive flight and hotel bookings being the most commonly discarded.</p> <p>The retail industry is the second biggest industry affected, suffering from abandonment rates of 74.6%.</p> <p>Insight shows that SMS retargeting could be the most beneficial solution as consumers generally read messages within 3 minutes of receiving them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7329/abandonment_rates.PNG" alt="" width="700" height="317"></p> <h3>Sweden biggest users of Snapchat and Instagram in Europe</h3> <p>The latest stage of the Adobe Best of the Best 2015 report has revealed that Swedes are the most social-media savvy of all European countries.</p> <p>33% of people in Sweden use <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67257-15-reasons-your-brand-should-be-on-snapchat/">Snapchat to engage with brands</a>, compared with 22% in France and 20% in the UK.</p> <p>51% of people surveyed in Sweden said that they also use Instagram for the same reason. This is in contrast to the UK where Twitter is the leading platform for brand engagement. </p> <h3>Political searches soar since Brexit</h3> <p>Hitwise, a division of Connexity, has revealed how online behaviour is reflecting the growing concern over the current UK political situation.</p> <p>Since <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68003-ecommerce-in-the-uk-post-brexit-positives-negatives-opportunities">Brexit</a>, there has been a 300% increase in searches about moving to other EU countries.</p> <p>Likewise, there has been an increase in searches for mortgages, interest rates and gold.</p> <p>Despite the weaker pound, searches for holidays and flights have not been impacted.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7334/image001.png" alt="" width="750" height="359"></p> <h3>Shoppers less tolerant of queuing due to technology </h3> <p>A new report from Worldpay has highlighted how Brits are becoming less patient when it comes to queuing in-store.</p> <p>Out of a nationwide survey of over 2,500 consumers, London was found to be the least patient, with 18% prepared to queue for more than five minutes. In contrast, northerners are the most patient, with 28% of shoppers saying they’d be willing to queue for longer.</p> <p>The rise of online shopping is said to be the reason behind this growing trend. </p> <p>One-click ordering and next-day delivery means that consumers are becoming more demanding as a result.</p> <h3>‘Invisible socks’ the most searched-for menswear item in the UK</h3> <p>With temperatures soaring to 33 degrees this week, Lyst has been looking to see if the heat has been affecting our spending habits.</p> <p>According to data, sales of ‘invisible socks’ (i.e ankle or trainer socks) are up 218% week on week, making it the most-searched for item right now.</p> <p>It seems women are feeling summery too, with Monday seeing us purchase more white dresses than black for the first time this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7338/iStock_82510309_SMALL.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="399"></p> <h3>Retail apps overtake mobile web for loyalty and engagement</h3> <p>App commerce company Poq has discovered that more shoppers are moving to mobile apps to buy.</p> <p>According to research, the average online shopper spends 6% more money on apps and 5% less money on the mobile web.</p> <p>What’s more, apps are also said to increase customer retention and improve long-term loyalty. Long-term retention rates are over twice as high when a shopper makes at least one purchase in an app.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7335/mobile.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="424"></p> <h3>7.5m people in the UK left behind by digital revolution</h3> <p>Analysis by Experian has discovered that, when it comes to digital behaviour, Britain is a nation divided into three distinct camps.</p> <p>A third of people in the UK are digital devotees, with the most devices and the most amount of time spent online.</p> <p>Half of the population are day-to-day doers, using the internet for practical reasons like paying bills.</p> <p>Lastly, 7.5m people are said to be digital dawdlers, with a limited knowledge and lack of interest.</p> <p>Insight suggest that businesses must take this into account when communicating with audiences.</p> <h3>Sports fans flock to YouTube ahead of Rio Olympics</h3> <p>In anticipation of the Olympics this summer, research from Ipsos Mori and Flamingo has revealed how online video platforms will benefit from the event.</p> <p>A survey found that 75% of Brits will look for related <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67932-the-future-of-video-is-vertical-texted-emotional/">video content</a> during the Olympics. Similarly, 44% will watch sports or fitness videos online while simultaneously watching live sports on TV. </p> <p>Unsurprisingly, YouTube is the most popular platform, with 78% of people saying that it is home to content that they can’t find elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7336/youtube.PNG" alt="" width="630" height="362"></p> <h3>Binge-viewing is on the rise</h3> <p>Research suggests that binge-viewing (i.e. watching multiple episodes of a TV show in one sitting) has never been more prevalent. </p> <p>According to data from GfK MRI, 6 in 10 television viewers say they regularly watch three or more episodes in one go.</p> <p>Millennials are the most prolific binge-watchers, with 16% of this demographic saying that watching live television is a special event.</p> <p>As a result, the challenge for brands is finding how to advertise to them.</p> <h3>Luxury brands set to get the biggest boost from this year's Black Friday?</h3> <p>According to research by Qubit, brands in the luxury retail category saw the highest boost in conversion rate on last year's Black Friday.</p> <p>Conversely, electronics and home and garden retailers had the lowest increase, with the latter seeing a 27% uplift in conversions compared to the rest of year average.</p> <p>With some fashion retailers seeing a spike in conversions despite not even participating, it appears the day inspires more shopping behaviour all round.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68087 2016-07-21T14:42:17+01:00 2016-07-21T14:42:17+01:00 Six brilliant blogs from the beauty industry Nikki Gilliland <p>Whether you're into beauty or not, the following examples are well worth a look.</p> <h3>L’Oreal</h3> <p>With its unique domain name, L’Oréal’s <a href="http://www.makeup.com/" target="_blank">makeup.com</a> is designed to feel like an independent publication rather than a brand blog.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7167/l_oreal.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="634"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7166/makeup.com_quote.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="145"></p> <p>Its authenticity isn’t fake either.</p> <p>Often publishing product-focused features like “The Best Drugstore Highlighters”, it includes a wide variety of brands (not just promoting its own) to provide readers with a balanced and surprisingly unbiased frame of reference.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7168/makeup.com_2.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="685"></p> <h3>Birchbox</h3> <p>A beauty subscription service, Birchbox gives consumers the opportunity to discover new products each month.</p> <p><a href="http://blog.birchbox.co.uk/%20" target="_blank">Its blog</a> cleverly provides context for these products, using informative articles to inspire, educate and ultimately give consumers a reason to continue their subscription.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7169/birchbox.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="675"></p> <p>With its unboxing videos and ‘Birchbox reactions’ articles, a lot of the content is self-promotional (something that could potentially put non-subscribers off).</p> <p>However, for loyal consumers, this aspect undoubtedly provides extra value.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CbB-hGTye58?wmode=transparent" width="700" height="394"></iframe></p> <h3>Mankind</h3> <p>It might be one of the relatively few <a href="http://www.mankind.co.uk/blog/" target="_blank">male grooming blogs</a> out there, but there's more reason to visit Mankind than that.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7170/mankind.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="607"></p> <p>With five Editors each with their own area of expertise, it has a nice mix of lifestyle content, using distinct verticals like ‘International’ and ‘Luxury’. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7171/mankind_editors.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="751"></p> <p>One of the reasons I like it is that, alongside general articles, it’s not afraid to experiment with a more in-depth approach.</p> <p>It’s ‘ingredient focus’ series is particularly interesting, and something that many of the fluffier, female-driven blogs could learn from.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7172/mankind_mandelic_acid.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="640"></p> <h3>Sephora</h3> <p>Who needs models when beauty products can look so attractive?</p> <p>With its stunning product-focused photography, <a href="http://theglossy.sephora.com/">Sephora Glossy</a> showcases the very best of its main shop.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7173/Sephora_Glossy.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="543"></p> <p>Instead of long-form content, it publishes short how-to’s and product curations, making it feel more like an extension of Pinterest or Tumblr than an in-depth publication.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7174/sephora.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="723"></p> <p>With its user-friendly design, it’s one of those sites that you could find yourself scrolling through for ages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7175/Sephora_how_to.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="850"></p> <h3>Clinique</h3> <p>Marketing itself as a philosophy rather than a cosmetics line, Clinique’s blog focuses on the two verticals of beauty and lifestyle.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7177/clinique_blog.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="644"></p> <p>Cleverly using skincare as a spin-off to other verticals, it also covers topics like food and fitness, implementing video to further engage visitors.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Nw0GvcdKnHY?wmode=transparent" width="730" height="411"></iframe></p> <p>In comparison to other blogs, it is also pleasingly minimal, proving that a less-is-more approach can work. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7182/clinique_minimal.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="368"></p> <h3>Urban Decay</h3> <p>In comparison to Clinique, Urban Decay’s blog is loud, proud and <a href="http://www.urbandecay.com/the-violet-underground">unashamedly purple</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7178/urban_decay_violet.PNG" alt="" width="780" height="335"></p> <p>Recognising the digital mind-set of its core demographic, it is heavily geared around the online beauty community where bloggers and YouTubers have huge influence.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7179/urban_decay.PNG" alt="" width="700" height="825"></p> <p>The blog has an original feel to it, with the standard ‘How-To’s sitting alongside unique ‘Women Who Rock Our World’ and ‘XO, WZ’ – the latter being an insider look at co-founder Wende Zomnir’s world.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ATaqtu7URYI?wmode=transparent" width="800" height="475"></iframe></p> <p><em>More on the beauty industry:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/">Seven ways social media is shaping the beauty industry </a></li> <li> <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">The Rise of the Influencers </a>(subscriber only)</li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67630-forget-ao-com-does-benefit-cosmetics-offer-the-best-ecommerce-experience/">Forget AO.com, does Benefit Cosmetics off the best ecommerce experience? </a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 2016-07-21T11:30:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to a B2B report) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet, statistics and online market research with data, facts, charts and figures.The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need, to help make your pitch or internal report up to date.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for B2B-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</strong></p> <p> <strong>Regions covered in each document (where available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68079 2016-07-15T13:15:43+01:00 2016-07-15T13:15:43+01:00 10 notable digital marketing stats of the week Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, let's crack on.</p> <h3>Amazon receives 81.6m visitors on Amazon Prime Day</h3> <p>It’s been criticised for its lacklustre algorithm, but in terms of traffic, Amazon Prime Day has been confirmed as a success for the retailer.</p> <p>Despite visits from mobile and desktop falling 6% from last year, Amazon.com still received 81.6m visits on <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68058-has-amazon-prime-day-2016-made-up-for-2015-s-primedayfail/">Prime Day 2016</a>.</p> <p>According to data from Hitwise, a division of connexity, this means it has been the most successful online shopping event since Cyber Monday, Black Friday and Amazon Prime Day of 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7120/amazon_prime.PNG" alt="" width="599" height="287"></p> <h3>Pokemon Go surpasses Candy Crush with highest number of US daily users</h3> <p>With 15m downloads, and currently just under 21m daily active users, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68060-what-brands-can-learn-from-nintendo-s-digital-transformation-and-pokemon-go/">Pokemon Go</a> is now the biggest mobile game in US history.</p> <p>It’s only just out in the UK, however data from BoomApp has revealed that over 3% of UK android users had already downloaded the game ahead of its release.</p> <p>Which means, you can probably expect more Pokemon related stats next week…</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7122/pokemon_go.PNG" alt="" width="400" height="335"></p> <h3>Millennials are a key demographic for energy providers </h3> <p>According to research by Accenture, millennials will drive much of the future value for energy providers, with 24% being classed as early adopters.</p> <p>However, despite this, the demographic is also the most demanding.</p> <p>81% of millennials say they would be discouraged from signing up to additional products or services if the company did not offer a seamless digital experience.</p> <h3>APAC overtakes US as world’s biggest digital ad market</h3> <p>Research from Strategy Analytics has found that Asia-Pacific is set to overtake North America for digital ad spend in 2016.</p> <p>While the latter will rise 9.6% to $59.5bn, APAC is predicted to rise 18.2% to $59.7bn.</p> <p>What’s more, APAC’s spend per person is relatively low in comparison to the saturated markets in the west, meaning there is huge potential for growth.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7123/Trend_in_Digital_Ad_Spend_by_Region_540.PNG" alt="" width="540" height="316"></p> <h3>UK population saving 51.4m hours per month thanks to disruptive apps </h3> <p>Opinium has discovered that apps and online tools are saving consumers a collective 51.5m hours over the course of each month.</p> <p>With convenience and time saving being cited as the most important advantage of an app (even over saving money), customer loyalty is up for grabs.</p> <p>68% of survey respondents said that would have no qualms about switching from traditional brands when given the option.</p> <h3><strong>Consumer goods firms unprepared for new data regulation</strong></h3> <p>Capgemini Consulting has revealed that companies risk facing fines of up to $151 billion, by failing to comply with the new General Data Protection Regulation.</p> <p>While the legislation has been created by the European Union, anyone that holds data within Europe or offers services to EU citizens will be affected.</p> <p>With 90% of consumer-facing companies experiencing customer data breaches, many are failing to put safeguards in place.</p> <h3>One in four name Amazon their favourite brand</h3> <p>In a survey of 1,000 consumers, the DMA found that one in four people named Amazon as their favourite brand.</p> <p>High street favourites John Lewis and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67883-marks-spencer-what-does-putting-the-customer-at-the-heart-of-everything-mean/">Marks &amp; Spencer</a> were next in line.</p> <p>With just three out of the top twenty being online brands (ASOS, eBay and Amazon), the physical shopping experience is clearly still in favour.</p> <h3>Live TV viewing drops 6% in two years</h3> <p><a href="http://stakeholders.ofcom.org.uk/binaries/broadcast/reviews-investigations/psb-review/psb2016/PSB-Annual-Report-2016.pdf" target="_blank">Ofcom's Annual Research Report</a> has revealed that fewer young people are watching live television than ever before.</p> <p>From 2014 to 2016, the total viewing time of live TV among young adults dropped from 69% to 63%</p> <p>With one-third of all viewing among 16 to 24 year olds occuring via on-demand services, platforms like Amazon and Netflix have seen a surge.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7139/ofcom_report.PNG" alt="" width="633" height="373"></p> <h3>YouTube pays $2bn to content owners</h3> <p>A statement from Google has revealed that YouTube has generated over $2bn for content owners from its Content ID management system.</p> <p>Over 90% of Content ID claims result in monetisation, and the music industry in particular chooses to monetise 95% of claims.</p> <p>With even <a href="https://publicpolicy.googleblog.com/2016/07/continuing-to-create-value-while.html" target="_blank">more efforts to combat copyright infringment</a>, Google has in turn created a whole new revenue stream for companies.</p> <h3>Apple overtaken by local brands in China</h3> <p>Apple's iPhone is no longer one of the top smartphones in China, having been overtaken by local brands like Huawei, Vivo, Oppo and Xiaomi.</p> <p>The iPhone has dropped to the fifth most popular, although it remains the biggest non-Chinese brand.</p> <p>Huawei, a brand with a lower price point, has seen its market share rise to 17%, while Apple's has dropped to 10.8%.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68084 2016-07-15T12:01:00+01:00 2016-07-15T12:01:00+01:00 The week's news in digital (in five minutes) Ben Davis <h3>Amazon testing programmatic creative with video ads</h3> <p>Amazon has been testing personalised video ads, created automatically using graphics templates to combine imagery and text.</p> <p>Graeme Smith, MD of Amazon's software development centre in Edinburgh<a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-36773409"> told the BBC</a> "...potentially anywhere you can see a video is potentially somewhere you could consider running personalised video ads, right across the internet."</p> <p>Retargeting by retailers often involves <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67516-four-video-campaigns-that-used-dynamic-creative/">slideshow style dynamic content</a> - it will be interesting to see how sophisticated these Amazon video ads are in comparison.</p> <h3>Amazon Prime Day was big</h3> <p>Prime Day on 12th July, Amazon's second annual sales event designed as summer's answer to Black Friday, was the retailer's "biggest day ever", <a href="http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/20fb0de0-4906-11e6-8d68-72e9211e86ab.html#axzz4ESpNIBCk">reports the FT</a>.</p> <p>Global orders were up 60% on last year's Prime Day. No figures were given by Amazon, though Prime Day was declared its busiest day of the year.</p> <p>Sales included 90,000 TVs and more than 215,000 rice cookers. 2015's inaugural Prime Day, you might remember, was <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68058-has-amazon-prime-day-2016-made-up-for-2015-s-primedayfail/">a bit more of a mixed bag</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6939/prime_day_deals_tech.PNG" alt="prime day" width="615"></p> <h3>ASOS introduces one-hour delivery slot</h3> <p>DPD has helped ASOS offer a one-hour delivery slot. Nifty.</p> <p>With so many ecommerce businesses looking at same day delivery in the wake of Prime, this increased flexibility on a named day is another way to nail convenience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7145/DPD-Precise-Hour-Select.png" alt="one hour slot" width="200"> </p> <h3>Pokémon GO - where do we start?</h3> <p>This week has seen the augmented reality game take the press by storm.</p> <p>Daily checks are needed to understand number of downloads (7.5m in the US as of early this week) and the impact on Nintendo stock.</p> <p>On Thursday, the app was released in the UK (users no longer have to engineer a US workaround).</p> <p>Interesting developments include proposed advertising within the game, with brands able to sponsor PokeStops.</p> <p>There has been some criticism of the game, including the 'appearance' of Pokémon in inappropriate locations (e.g. Auschwitz), as well as its request to access all of a user's Google account data (since fixed).</p> <p><em>You might like:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68059-should-pokemon-go-give-marketers-hope-for-augmented-reality/">Should Pokemon GO give marketers hope for augmented reality?</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68060-what-brands-can-learn-from-nintendo-s-digital-transformation-and-pokemon-go/">What brands can learn from Nintendo's digital transformation and Pokemon GO</a></li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0007/6955/pokemon_go-blog-flyer.jpg" alt="pokemon go" width="470" height="264"></p> <h3>Chatbots fail 'new Turing test'</h3> <p>The Winograd Schema Challenge is a new and tougher Turing test, which chatbots must ace to show they are capable of common sense understanding.</p> <p>Here's an example question from the test:</p> <p><strong>The trophy would not fit in the brown suitcase because it was too big (small). What was too big (small)?</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Answer 0: the trophy</strong></li> <li><strong>Answer 1: the suitcase</strong></li> </ul> <p><a href="https://www.technologyreview.com/s/601897/tougher-turing-test-exposes-chatbots-stupidity/?set=601902&amp;utm_source=MIT+TR+Newsletters&amp;utm_campaign=d3b0ca882f-The_Download_July_14_2016&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_term=0_997ed6f472-d3b0ca882f-153860737&amp;goal=0_997ed6f472-d3b0ca882f-153860737&amp;mc_cid=d3b0ca882f&amp;mc_eid=fea291110e">MIT Tech Review reports</a> that the programs entered into the challenge were only a little better than random at choosing the correct meaning of sentences.</p> <p>The best of the bunch scored 48%, with 45% possible at random. 90% accuracy is required to take home the $25k prize.</p> <p>It was notable that Google and Facebook didn't enter - perhaps there is still a little way to go?</p> <h3>Nissan launches semi-autonomous driving</h3> <p>Two weeks after a driver died in a crash <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68019-all-the-week-s-digital-news-in-five-minutes/">whilst his Tesla car was on autopilot</a>, Nissan has launched ProPILOT, a similar semi-autonomous function.</p> <p>Pushing a button on the steering wheel will keep a vehicle a fixed distance from the car in front, without any input from the driver.</p> <p>The driver is still required to have their hands on the wheel, and Nissan EVP Hideyuki Sakamoto <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-nissan-selfdriving-idUSKCN0ZT0NC">told Reuters</a> "These functions are meant to support drivers, and are not meant as self-driving capabilities".</p> <p>ProPILOThits the market next month in the Nissan Serena minivan.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/7142/148020_1_5.jpg" alt="PROPILOT" width="615"></p> <h3>Marie Claire to retail on the high street and online</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><a href="https://www.derwentlondon.com/news/article/tottenham-court-walks-flagship-store-for-new-beauty-and-wellness-brand">Marie Claire will open a beauty store</a> in London at Tottenham Court Walk.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">The magazine has created a new brand, 'Fabled by Marie Claire', which will also sell online and deliver through Ocado.</p> <h3>Woz to headline Festival of Marketing</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Apple co-founder and inventor of the PC <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68057-steve-wozniak-co-founder-of-apple-to-headline-festival-of-marketing-2016/">Steve Wozniak will headline day one</a> of the Festival of Marketing in October in London. <a href="http://www.festivalofmarketing.com/buy-a-ticket?_ga=1.123039373.762110302.1450191097">See the site for tickets</a>.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6957/Woz-Head-Shot-3.jpg" alt="woz" width="400"></p> <h3>EU continues to pursue Google over competition law</h3> <p>The EU Commission has launched a third anti-trust proceeding against Google.</p> <p>Critique of Google Shopping and Android is now followed by criticism of Google's third party site search product (Adsense for search), which doesn't allow ads from Google competitors. </p> <h3>Phrasee one of the first to receive VC funding post-Brexit</h3> <p>Finally, a bit of a shout out to Econsultancy blog favourite Parry Malm (see his <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/authors/parry-malm/">virally good articles about email here</a>).</p> <p><a href="https://phrasee.co/">Phrasee</a>, Parry's startup <a href="https://phrasee.co/why-we-took-on-1m-in-phrasee-funding/">closed a £1m funding</a> round this week, one of the first to do so post-Brexit vote.</p> <p>As we wait to see the impact on Britain's tech and startup scene, this is some cause for optimism at least.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68055 2016-07-12T11:14:47+01:00 2016-07-12T11:14:47+01:00 How Dyson is bringing technology to life in its new London flagship store Nikki Gilliland <p>The brand's very first brick-and-mortar store to open in the UK, it is a conceptual space designed to offer consumers a ‘hands on’ shopping experience.</p> <p>Similarly, it’s yet another example of retail stores bridging the gap between the digital and physical experience. (Note I did not say ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68023-think-retail-how-brands-are-targeting-the-phygital-generation/">phygital’… that ever-so-divisive word</a>).</p> <p>But is it a gimmick, or is it really a rather lovely way to purchase a vacuum cleaner? </p> <p>Here’s a run-down of what the store has got to offer.</p> <h3>Customer-centric experience</h3> <p>As well as some fancy technology, the first thing that strikes you when walking into the Dyson store is a number of rather important-looking people standing around.</p> <p>These are Dyson ‘experts’ – people that are not just employed to sell you a product, but to offer demonstrations and speak in-depth about the science behind them. </p> <p>For the average shopper, i.e. the kind of person who might pop in to have a browse out of curiosity or mild interest, this presence could prove slightly off-putting. After all, there’s nothing worse than feeling out-of-place in a shop. </p> <p>But on the other hand, for anyone actually interested in purchasing a Dyson product, it certainly signals a focus on meeting the customer’s needs.</p> <p>With instant and one-to-one interaction, it brings to mind the sort of service (and attention) that you get in a car showroom – something that’s obviously lacking in the world of ecommerce.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6926/dyson_store_demo.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="639"></p> <h3>Integrating digital</h3> <p>Whether or not you’re determined to buy a Dyson product, the demonstration aspect of the store is hard to resist. </p> <p>Whether it’s an air-purifier or a cordless-vacuum, staff are ready and waiting to give demonstrations – even allowing you to choose between the type of dust or dirt you’d like to hoover up. </p> <p>When it comes to giving the customer a comprehensive overview of a product, it certainly beats any 360-degree video you might come across online.</p> <p>But if you like that sort of thing, you won’t be disappointed with a lack of digital integration - the store is covered in screens, further emphasising its high-tech nature.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6925/IMG_2102.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="822"></p> <h3>Try before you buy</h3> <p>While the ground floor is exciting, I was most impressed by the Supersonic salon – a mock-up hair salon on the first floor that offers visitors the chance to test-drive the brand new Dyson hairdryer.</p> <p>With an <a href="https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/dyson-demo-oxford-street-supersonic-styling-13-19-july-2016-tickets-26481353441">appointment booking system on Eventbrite</a>, it is the gimmickiest part of the store. And yet, it’s undeniably smart. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6923/supersonic_salon.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="585"></p> <p>If you’re serious about spending almost £300 on a hairdryer, why on earth wouldn’t you want to take the time to test it out? </p> <p>What’s more, you’re probably rather curious to learn why it costs so much – which means hearing about the complex engineering behind each product will be music to your ears. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6924/dyson_tech.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="608"></p> <h3>In conclusion</h3> <p>With its slick design and hand-on approach, the new Dyson flagship sort of feels like the Apple store, but a bit fancier and more educational.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6922/dyson_store_walls.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="800"></p> <p>Located just across the road from Selfridges (where another <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68034-how-selfridges-s-body-studio-blurs-the-lines-between-digital-in-store/">creative shopping space has also just launched</a>), it’s certainly worth a visit if you're on the look-out for a new Dyson.</p> <p>But even if you’re not, it might be worth popping in for a nosey anyway...</p> <p>By focusing on how products work as well as what they do, it provides a far more interesting experience than the majority of its neighbouring stores.</p> <p>And just finally, it's worth noting that Dyson hasn't installed any self-serve kiosks or touchscreens, which had threatened to be one of the big retail trends of recent years.</p> <p>Maybe retailers have realised that most people don't want to go in-store to browse products on an iPad?</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67705-what-s-now-next-for-digital-technology-in-retail-stores/"><em>What's now &amp; next for digital technology in retail stores?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67096-in-store-tech-the-screen-in-the-corner-that-nobody-wants-to-use/"><em>In-store tech: the screen in the corner that nobody wants to use</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67085-starbucks-new-london-digital-concept-store-puts-focus-on-customer-experience/"><em>Starbucks' new London digital concept store puts focus on customer experience</em></a></li> </ul>