tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/email-ecrm Latest Email & eCRM content from Econsultancy 2017-05-22T11:00:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69099 2017-05-22T11:00:00+01:00 2017-05-22T11:00:00+01:00 A day in the life of... Head of Product at a behavioural marketing company Ben Davis <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> Please describe your job: What do you do?</h4> <p><em>Michael Barber: </em>I’m Head of Product at SaleCycle. SaleCycle is a global leader in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66468-what-is-behavioural-marketing-and-why-do-you-need-it/">behavioural marketing</a>. We work with some of the world’s leading ecommerce brands; IKEA, Ralph Lauren, Virgin Atlantic, Panasonic, French Connection to name but a few.</p> <p>Basically I’m responsible for product management, portfolio management, commercial decisions, strategy and a whole other list of buzzwords. I’m responsible for the future direction of SaleCycle’s products and to do that I try and blend some operational management with longer term planning.</p> <p><strong><em>E:</em> Whereabouts do you sit within the organisation? Who do you report to?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: I report directly to the CEO/Founder of SaleCycle. I meet with him and our CTO once a week as part of our technology and product management process. When we meet we look at a wide range of topics and subject matters from AI to wearable tech to complex data questions. It's a fairly broad process but we give a lot of focus to the research side of R&amp;D.</p> <p><strong><em>E:</em> What kind of skills do you need to be effective in your role?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: My background is in strategic marketing, I’m a chartered marketer. Aside from that I’m a bit of a geek and have worked in digital marketing roles in technology companies for the last 12 years. So outside of the strategic experience in brand and proposition building and product management, my other set of skills are digital marketing; analytics, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">email marketing</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide/">paid search</a>, ecommerce, social media and web development.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: Tell us about a typical working day…</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> No two days at SaleCycle are the same really, so nothing is really that typical. As a company, we have a blend of agency-style work and working on our software and technology, so I get the best of both worlds.</p> <p>On the agency side I work with a lot of our larger clients on projects and pitches/opportunities. On the technology side, I can be working with our engineers to solve complex problems or with the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68621-ux-in-2017-what-do-the-experts-predict/">UX</a> team working on our interface.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6206/Michael.Barber.jpg" alt="michael barber" width="615"></p> <p><em>Michael Barber, Salecycle</em></p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: What do you love about your job? What sucks?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: Overall I love my job because I get to design the kind of products I would have bought in my previous jobs. Specifically I love the analytics side; we collect and store data for the brands I mentioned earlier.</p> <p>To help us build out features we work closely with clients to really understand what's happening on their website and take a real deep dive into the data. One retailer I worked with looked at all of the abandonment rates for their different products, we examined the ratio of sales per product, looked at the profiles of visitors who bought vs. those who abandoned. This analysis helped us develop new features where we target abandoning visitors differently by product category, price and name, real granular level <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68466-could-ai-kill-off-the-conversion-optimisation-consultant/">conversion optimisation</a>.</p> <p>I could write for hours about more of the stuff I love such as working on new features or products and analysing their performance or integrations with admired third parties such as Trustpilot or Google Tag Manager. But let's leave it as there's lots I love about my job.</p> <p>Not much really sucks. Sometimes when new features we're testing don't work quite as expected it can be a bit deflating but we are really agile as a business and 'everyday's a school day' so what we learn we apply next time and go again quickly.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: What kind of goals do you have? What are the most useful metrics and KPIs for measuring success?</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> My main goals are to develop the strategy for our product portfolio, the measurement is the growth of our business. We've won national and international awards for how successful our growth has been and I'm lucky to be part of a great team that all focuses on that.</p> <p>The growth piece is important because that's what lets us go and hire more great and talented people who can build products that deliver results for our clients. </p> <p>I also work closely with our head of client services. A few years ago I suggested we use Net Promoter (NPS) to measure clients' satisfaction. For my role it's a key metric, but again I'm lucky because our scores are always awesome so in the rare occasion there's feedback about how our products could be improved then I get to use the detail in that measurement to justify changes. </p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: What are your favourite tools to help you to get the job done?</strong></p> <p><em>MB</em>: My current favourite is not a tool I use so much, but our product design manager uses Adobe XD and that allows us to build working prototypes of our interface that we can show to our clients and garner their feedback. I used to use a similar product called Balsamiq that lets you easily wireframe websites and software interfaces but Adobe XD has taken it to a new level if, like our team, you have amazing design skills.</p> <p>For managing our projects and product feature requirements we use Trello and Jira. Both great tools. For team communication we use Slack.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6209/virgin_atlantic.jpg" alt="virgin atlantic email capture" width="615"></p> <p><em>Virgin Atlantic email capture</em></p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: How did you get started in the digital industry, and where might you go from here?</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> I started my marketing career in a FTSE 100 company. I had a background in IT and in about 2005 the team I worked in started its first ever PPC campaign. I was asked to write the ads content and work with our then media agency to start experimenting with less above-the-line media and start looking at this "Google' thing.</p> <p>After that I worked in a number of roles with different responsibilities such as the company's email marketing programs. I've worked on affiliate programs for the software industry and done quite a lot of consulting on CRM for some of the UK's largest brands. </p> <p>My current ambition is to grow SaleCycle to the same size of revenue and client base as some of the global providers in display advertising. After that I'd like to get into a new technology vertical, having previously worked in business software and now martech, something like healthcare tech seems appealing.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: Which brands do you think are doing behavioural marketing well?</strong> </p> <p><em>MB: </em>I'm pretty biased but brands that I work closely with like Tommy Hilfiger and Virgin Atlantic do a great job on the behavioural side.</p> <p><strong><em>E</em>: Do you have any advice for people who want to work in the digital industry?</strong></p> <p><em>MB:</em> Keep learning. I read a lot about the industry from great publications like Econsultancy (cheque is in the post, right?) But also a lot of books on business and creativity. I'm currently reading <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Hunting-Killer-Idea-Nick-McFarlane/dp/1908211342">Hunting the Killer Idea</a>, a book about how to breed creativity.</p> <p>The only other advice I would give would be to try your hand at as much as possible. I worked in search marketing and come back to it time and time again. In 2007 I was a social media ambassador for the large company I worked for and I still remember how to write social media guidelines, how to write an influencer strategy. I'm all for specialism but I feel I benefit from a really broad range of experiences.</p> <p>Also numerical skills and being good with data is important. A Gartner research director told me the biggest challenge facing CMO's from the Fortune 500 companies was finding professionals who could execute great digital marketing who had great data analytical skills. That's stuck with me which is why I always keep trying to improve mine.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69065 2017-05-10T13:30:00+01:00 2017-05-10T13:30:00+01:00 Five advanced data and segmentation tactics for marketing and sales Jordie van Rijn <p>How can marketing effectively play a bigger role in qualifying the leads that are passed on to sales? By scoring those leads and using segmentation.</p> <p>However, one of the key <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69015-three-key-findings-from-the-2017-email-marketing-census/">findings of the email marketing census</a> this year is that advanced segmentation at scale remains elusive for many businesses. While 78% of senders are doing basic segmentation, only one-third are doing advanced segmentation.</p> <p>As far as leading scoring, 29% are scoring their leads while another 25% are only in the planning stages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5928/segmentation-email-census.png" alt="" width="573" height="353"></p> <p>Segmentation is an effective marketing and sales tactic. One could say that lead scoring is segmentation - we divide our contacts into groups based on their lead score.</p> <p>How can we use segmentation and customer data to bridge the qualification gap and identify the ideal next action? Here are five tips.</p> <h3>1. Set up a segmentation model based on the end result</h3> <p>Segmentation is of little use if you don’t use it. And the best way to use it is to be strategic about it, by starting with the end when you set up your segmentation model.</p> <p>Determine what you want your marketing campaigns to accomplish and work backwards from those goals. When your goal is re-activating lapsed customers, for instance, think about which segments are high value. This means “save-able” versus simply “lost and good riddance”. Then look at which are likely to churn. That might seem like a crude approach, but now you have a starting point from which to gather the data during the relationship to get the segmentation and timing right.</p> <h3>2. Identify the funnel stage</h3> <p>Ask leads where they are in the buying process. A newsletter registration is a good time to do so. For example, a car dealership should always ask about the timeframe within which someone is planning to buy. This helps you gauge how far they <a href="https://blog.pipedrive.com/2017/04/customer-journey-sales-success/">are down the sales funnel and customer journey</a>. You can then match up your actions and content with that stage.</p><p>This also helps you use your content more effectively. Review your assets and ask, in which buying stage does this particular piece of content sit? To which prospects does it appeal and how can it help move him or her to the next stage? That sounds like an advanced tactic, but realize it can be a filter for your lead scoring: you know whom should get an offer for a test-drive vs. a brochure vs. someone who should get a call within a few days.</p> <p>This tactic also helps a company become intentional about messaging, reserving the more costly forms of contact for the higher value and hotter prospects. In situations where a lead is identified as “hot” and “high value,” you might even consider <a href="https://blog.leadfeeder.com/best-sales-follow-up-techniques-emails/">manually writing follow-up emails</a>, as opposed to automating them. The personal touch can go a long way, and your leads will feel the difference.</p> <h3>3. Know one bit of data says a lot about another</h3> <p>Psychographics tell you about lifestyle, interests, opinions, etc., but remember that one piece of data can hold a lot of information about all of those. You can safely assume that a 65-year-old engineer will have very different interests and need for knowledge than an office manager who is just starting out. That means you can derive some information from data you already have.</p> <p>As an example, consider the home address as a data point. You can deduct a lot from an address, such as income level, life stage, climate and weather, and even if they will potentially be interested in what you’re selling. From what I call the <a href="http://www.emailmonday.com/smart-email-marketing-segmentation-the-art-of" target="_blank">pillars of segmentation</a>, a home address has a predictive power to inform information in demographics, psychographics and even behavioral information (like benefits sought or usage intensity).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5931/pillars-emailmonday.jpg" alt=""></p> <h3>4. Be wary of self-reported data</h3> <p>Although it seems like it should be 100% factual, data doesn’t always offer absolute truths, especially for self-reported preference data. If you ask for brand preferences, customers will often point towards the more luxurious brands or ones <em>they like but won’t buy</em>. When buying time comes, they will still go for the economical brand. They like the pizza from that fancy little family owned restaurant, yet they buy the frozen stuff instead.</p> <p>People will tell you one thing, then go do another. Do they simply change their minds? No, they are simply doing what people do. We can blame part of it on flawed self-assessment and what is called the “<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illusory_superiority#Driving_ability" rel="nofollow" target="_blank">above average effect</a>”. For example, a study found that 93% of US drivers rated themselves as better than the average driver. (If you’ve ever driven in the US, you know this can’t possibly be true.) It is human nature to perceive ourselves as the better version of ourselves.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5932/better-than-average.jpg" alt=""></p> <p>So ask your questions wisely. One way to improve is to ask about a customer’s buying or past behavior instead of preferences. A combination of data points will always give you a more accurate view. You can also test how accurate the self-reported brand preferences are. Look at your own database and where self-reported preferences and behavior overlap or contradict.</p> <h3>5. Make sure you can identify your audience across multiple touchpoints.</h3> <p>I know omni-channel is the hot term, but every time I see a 360-degree-customer-view presentation or blog post, a cynical part of me thinks, “Yeah, lame”. Those blogs and presentations seem to be made to make marketers feel bad about their data silos.</p> <p>Software vendors and consultants state, “the industry is doing so bad” and push (a part of) their audiences into a fantasy-state using case studies. The reality is, there is no such thing as a 360 degree customer view. It can be at most 180 degrees, as it will only be the part that customers are letting you see.</p><p>Practical marketers will piece together customer behavior across multiple points to get the biggest possible view. Your email marketing, website, search engine advertising, social marketing, in-store promotions, etc. can all be brought together, allowing you to gather more information across those touchpoints as well as do segmentation at those touchpoints.</p> <p>An identifier like a home address, email, customer number or browser cookie can tie it together. In fact, an email address works well as a universal ID, as email software systems can tie the email address to site behavior for you automatically. The software can carry over the ID from the email you sent through a click-through to the website.</p> <p>A practical use is retargeting in search advertising (often found very effective). These systems can even store anonymous profiles of website behavior and later tie them together. If all of that is done in real-time, it is fancily called a <a href="http://www.emailvendorselection.com/why-a-customer-data-platform-cdp-will-be-the-next-evolution-of-your-marketing-automation/" target="_blank">customer data platform</a>, a fairly new term and something every marketer should read up on.</p> <h3>Conclusion</h3> <p>With marketing being pulled into what used to be the domain of sales, it is a challenge to pass over quality leads to sales and generate the content or offer on the spot.</p> <p>However, if you can start with the end in mind, identify the funnel stage, make sure to use the hidden information in your data set, trust the data you know to be true, and create a bigger picture view of each customer, you will be well on your way to bridging that prospect knowledge gap.</p> <p><em><strong>Now read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68431-how-to-combine-attribution-and-segmentation-data-to-achieve-marketing-success/">How to combine attribution and segmentation data to achieve marketing success</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68943 2017-04-05T10:00:00+01:00 2017-04-05T10:00:00+01:00 Five tips to maximize your mailing list signups Patricio Robles <h4>Include a signup form on every page</h4> <p>One of the most effective ways to drive mailing list subscriptions is to invite users to subscribe on as frequent a basis as possible. A dead simple way to do this is to include a signup form on every page of your website.</p> <p>Location can vary; some sites feature signup forms in headers, sidebars or in the middle of page content, while others place them less conspicuously in page footers. Obviously, the more prominent the positioning, the more likely it is that users will see the form, so as a general rule, footer signup forms don't work as well.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5071/nytimes.png" alt="" width="339" height="377"></p> <p><em>The New York Times includes signup forms for its email newsletters in article content.</em></p> <h4>Make sure the call-to-action is descriptive if not compelling</h4> <p>The appeal of signing up to your mailing list might be obvious to you, but is it obvious to your users? A compelling call-to-action is an incredibly important factor in driving mailing list signups, but far too many companies still use weak calls-to-action like "sign up for our email list."</p> <p>Calls-to-action should always describe the value provided. For example, "sign up for our email list to receive exclusive offers" or "sign up for our mailing list and get early access to special events" is a reasonably strong call-to-action.</p> <p>High-end retailer Barneys New York might have a well-known brand, but its call-to-action on the email signup form below leaves a lot to be desired.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5073/barneys.png" alt="" width="368" height="273"></p> <p>In some cases, it can be worthwhile to employ calls-to-action that encourage users to subscribe with a direct incentive. For instance, some retailers offer the promise of a coupon in exchange for a signup ("sign up for our email list and receive 25% off your next order").</p> <p>Incentive-based calls-to-action can be incredibly effective, but it's worth monitoring retention of the segment of subscribers who signed up for an incentive to ensure that the incentive is driving quality signups.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5075/bloomingdales.png" alt="" width="382" height="440"></p> <p><em>Bloomingdale's describes why shoppers should hand over their email addresses, and offers them an incentive.</em></p> <h4>Avoid the dreaded popup</h4> <p>Most users agree: popups are annoying. So don't be lazy: if you can avoid using them, do it. Enough said.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5070/bostonglobe-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="335"></p> <p><em>No-no: the Boston Globe wastes no time displaying pop-ups.</em></p> <h4>If you use the dreaded popup, do it right</h4> <p>To be fair, popups, however annoying, can be effective, which explains why they're still in use despite the fact that they're widely panned. But if you're going to use them, be smart about how you use them. The timing and associated value proposition both need to be right.</p> <p>Many publishers, for instance, hit users with a popup the minute they land on an article page after clicking on a link shared on social media or found through a Google search. This is bad form and generally not very effective in large part because it disrupts the user experience before it even begins. Additionally, in cases where the user is not familiar with the publisher or not a loyal reader, the publisher is asking the user to give up something of value (his or her email address) before the publisher has delivered any value to the user.</p> <p>A better approach is to employ popups based on behavior. For instance, a publisher might display a popup to a user who has read multiple articles across one or more sessions. Or, a publisher that limits users to a set number of free articles each month could give users who have hit the limit access to an additional article if they subscribe to its mailing list.</p> <h4>Use transactional emails</h4> <p>Transactional emails offer great opportunities to convince individuals to subscribe to your mailing list, but they're often under-utilized. For example, retailers frequently invite customers to subscribe to their mailing lists as part of the checkout process. There are a number of reasons that customers don't, but that doesn't mean that they should give up. Instead, transactional emails, such as order confirmations and shipping notifications, are the perfect place to include additional invitations to sign up. </p> <p>The great thing about transactional email calls-to-action is that you will likely have more information about the customer that can be used to more effectively encourage a signup. For instance, a retailer might incentivize a signup with a coupon offering a higher-than-normal discount if a customer placed an order that was well above its average order value.</p> <p><em><strong>For more advice on email best practice:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67872-email-newsletter-sign-ups-how-fashion-brands-welcome-new-subscribers/">Email newsletter signups: How fashion brands welcome new subscribers</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-fundamentals-of-email-marketing/">The Fundamentals of Email Marketing</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3234 2017-03-28T13:11:06+01:00 2017-03-28T13:11:06+01:00 Marketing Automation <p dir="ltr">Align sales with marketing, generate and nurture leads and increase response rates. Marketing Automation (MA) is a growing area of digital that offers big potential for increasing revenue and our training course provide the tools to take advantage of it effectively.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will learn how to match your strategic marketing, demand generation and customer journey with a clear campaign and long term nurture process. </p> <p dir="ltr">No matter if it's your first step, optimising your current platform, or looking to reassess your current goals, this course will help you set clear objectives, to automate and optimise your marketing for maximum success.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3233 2017-03-28T13:10:22+01:00 2017-03-28T13:10:22+01:00 Marketing Automation <p dir="ltr">Align sales with marketing, generate and nurture leads and increase response rates. Marketing Automation (MA) is a growing area of digital that offers big potential for increasing revenue and our training course provide the tools to take advantage of it effectively.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will learn how to match your strategic marketing, demand generation and customer journey with a clear campaign and long term nurture process. </p> <p dir="ltr">No matter if it's your first step, optimising your current platform, or looking to reassess your current goals, this course will help you set clear objectives, to automate and optimise your marketing for maximum success.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68933 2017-03-28T11:43:51+01:00 2017-03-28T11:43:51+01:00 A day in the life of... a data scientist in an AI company Ben Davis <p>Phrasee also happens to be one of the sponsors of <a style="font-weight: normal;" href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/supercharged">Supercharged</a>, a July 2017 event from Econsultancy which looks at exciting new AI technology in marketing. Do check it out.</p> <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> Neil, please describe your job.</h4> <p><em>Neil Yager:</em> My role is at Phrasee is lead 'data scientist'. This is a job that has only existed (at least with its own name) for a few years. A data scientist is someone who knows more statistics than a software engineer, but with more software experience than a statistician.</p> <p>In my case, I’d add ‘research skills’ to the job spec. To me, research is systematically finding answers to problems that don’t have a known solution.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4999/yager.jpg" alt="neil yager" width="300" height="312"></p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Whereabouts do you sit in your organisation?</h4> <p><em>NY:</em> I’m one of Phrasee’s co-founders and work closely with the other founders CEO Parry Malm, our COO Victoria Peppiatt, along with our global team of developers, data scientists, and computational linguists.</p> <p>Together we develop the present, and map out the future, of Phrasee’s technology.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>What kind of skills do you need to be effective in your role?</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>It is important to be ruthlessly analytical and data driven. I’m hesitant to take any action if I don’t feel there is enough evidence to support it. This applies to technical problems, but also to high-level business decisions.</p> <p>At times this can make me a frustrating person to work with. However, Parry and Victoria are patient and somehow manage to put up with me.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>Tell us about a typical working day…</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>There isn’t really a typical day. I spend some days designing and tweaking machine learning models, sometimes I’m doing more traditional software development, and other days I spend reading academic papers to catch up on the latest developments in the field.</p> <p>A lot of my time is spent thinking about stuff. It’s hard to explain what that tangibly is. In a previous role I was an inventor, and my job was to think of things no one had ever thought of before. Ever since then I’ve been pretty happy to stare into space and come up with new ideas. It’s these moments that really drive our innovation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5000/Le_penseur_de_la_Porte_de_lEnfer__muse_e_Rodin___4528252054_.jpg" alt="thinker" width="500" height="333"></p> <p><em>Image via Jean-Pierre Dalbéra - <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24671002">Le penseur de la Porte de l'Enfer</a>.</em></p> <h4> <em>E: </em>What do you love about your job? What sucks?</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>I love being at the cutting edge of technology. Some of the techniques we are using now didn’t even exist when we founded Phrasee a few years ago. This is a very exciting time for AI and especially for natural language generation. </p> <p>On the down side, I work remotely (from Canada). Most of the time this works well since it allows me to bury myself in a problem and focus without interruption. However, there are times when I miss Phrasee’s legendary office banter and shenanigans. </p> <p>Overall, I think being remote is a benefit. A lot of my job involves experimenting, analysing results and whatnot. So I’ll speak to HQ in London at 8am my time, and by the time they wake up the next morning, I’ll have had a full day to come up with ideas and solutions.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>What kind of goals do you have? What are the most useful metrics and KPIs for measuring success?</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>Ultimately, Phrasee’s success is our client’s success. Our goal is to help them to get a greater ROI from their marketing budget.</p> <p>This is a double-edged sword. If our product is working, our clients immediately see an increase in revenue. However, if our product isn’t working, there is nowhere to hide. Therefore, my performance as Chief Scientist is tightly pegged to our customer’s results.</p> <p>My personal goals are to use AI to do things people never thought possible. If you had asked me five years ago if AI could write better subject lines than humans, I’d have called you crazy! But here we are... and that’s what ultimately motivates me.</p> <p><em>An intro to Phrasee</em></p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/138874258" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h4> <em>E: </em>What are your favourite tools to help you get the job done?</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>There is a programming language called Python that we use very heavily. We use this for natural language processing, server-side scripting, training AI neural networks, web frameworks, data visualisation, and much more.</p> <p>Python is powerful, but is also a very graceful language that is easy to pick up. For anyone interested in dabbling in data science, I highly recommend doing some <a href="https://www.coursera.org/courses?languages=en&amp;query=python">free online Python tutorials</a>.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>How did you get started in the digital industry?</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>Prior to Phrasee I was working in computer vision, which was also the focus of my PhD research. I had no experience in the digital marketing area. Therefore, the story of how I got involved in the industry is the story of how I got involved with Phrasee.</p> <p>To set the scene, AI and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67384-how-machine-learning-is-changing-online-retail-for-good/">machine learning</a> have been red hot for a few years now. Researchers with a strong background in these areas are in high demand and short supply. Therefore, I’m constantly approached by people with half-baked ideas for new startups. Normally, the pitch is along the lines of “Hey, I’ve got this great idea. It’s going to be huge! You can run with it and give me a cut.” </p> <p>Phrasee’s CEO Parry is an old friend from university. His pitch was different. He said “I know this problem exists in the industry. If you can solve it, I can sell it.” He was unorthodox (to say the least), but he was driven, well-connected, and clearly brilliant.</p> <p>When he introduced me to COO Victoria there was no doubt left in my mind. She has a remarkable ability to take a grand vision and make it a reality. I knew Parry and I alone would never get off the ground without Vic. The rest is history.</p> <p>At first, I thought my lack of digital marketing knowledge was going to be a bad thing – but it’s turned out to be one of our best assets.</p> <p>I don’t have any preconceived ideas about what’s good and what’s bad. So when my co-founders said, “We think X,” I could say, “Well, what about Y?” It’s this status quo challenging that’s allowed us to continuously innovate.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>Do you have any advice for people who want to work in AI?</h4> <p><em>NY: </em>From Phrasee’s perspective, AI is a set of tools that can be used to solve specific business challenges. This is a broad definition, and there are multiple entry points for those who are interested in the area.</p> <p>To do AI research and development you need a very specific skill set, honed through both academic and industry pursuits. For example, I completed a PhD in in the area and have worked in AI commercially for many years.</p> <p>This doesn’t exclude non-scientists though! AI companies are going concerns and there are many different ways to get involved. For example, language generation and understanding is a core research area of AI. Therefore, at Phrasee we have computational linguists who help develop this technology.</p> <p>Also, we have sales people, customer success colleagues, and heck, we even have HR and an accountant. As far as I’m concerned, all of these people work in AI. </p> <p>We are constantly hiring people who have AI skill sets, but also those who have other skill sets. AI, believe it or not, is only as good as the people driving it. </p> <p><strong><em>If you're looking for a new position in marketing, advertising or ecommerce - why not check out the <a href="https://jobs.econsultancy.com/">Econsultancy jobs board</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/863 2017-03-26T15:24:36+01:00 2017-03-26T15:24:36+01:00 Digital Outlook 2017 Part 2 - The Sequel <p>We hear you, and we understand that there are still many digital marketing topics that were not covered at <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154296603034327" target="_blank">Digital Outlook 2017</a>.</p> <p>We have selected the next six trending digital marketing topics to be presented at this event. Join us in this half day session to find out the trends and digital marketing best practices for the year.</p> <p>There will be 6 keynotes - all aiming to provide the audience with a outlook for the year.</p> <p>&gt;&gt;&gt; <strong>Overview of the 2017's trending digital marketing topics</strong></p> <p>&gt;&gt;&gt; <strong>Trends, best practices and c</strong><strong>ase studies</strong></p> <p>Hear from leading practitioners and network with industry players to learn what digital marketers should focus today to plan for tomorrow and succeed later.</p> <h4>Special Announcement</h4> <p>In partnership with NTUC, e2i and WSG, Econsultancy is carring out research on <strong>digital marketing training and development needs in Singapore for 2017</strong>. Please help us improve our training courses by completing the short survey <a href="http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3421857/b9062f550750" target="_blank">here</a>. In return for your time, you can redeem a discount on Econsultancy training courses in Singapore. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3231 2017-03-21T16:51:04+00:00 2017-03-21T16:51:04+00:00 Email Marketing - Advanced <p>Give your email campaigns an injection of fresh thinking in this fantastic email marketing workshop.</p> <p>You’ll gain advanced, strategic email marketing training and get the opportunity to have your email campaigns reviewed by an industry expert who will provide practical tips for improvement.</p> <p>Strictly limited to 10 places, the workshop allows for plenty of interaction and you’ll be able to bounce ideas off other experienced marketers.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3227 2017-03-21T16:47:15+00:00 2017-03-21T16:47:15+00:00 Email Marketing <p>Econsultancy’s Email Marketing Census highlights that almost three-quarters of companies rate email marketing as “excellent‟ or “good‟ in terms of return on investment. However, the Email Marketing Census also shows that marketers are becoming complacent by continuing to overlook email marketing best practice, even though they are sending significantly more emails and spending more budget on this channel.</p> <p style="vertical-align: baseline;">This course will help you to develop your email marketing campaigns by covering a range of prevalent issues including identifying small wins as well as big wins. You will leave the day with a sharpened email strategy having reviewed the effectiveness of your email communications</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3178 2017-03-21T11:39:19+00:00 2017-03-21T11:39:19+00:00 Intensive: Mastering eCRM <p>Implementing a robust CRM strategy delivers vastly improved effectiveness in your marketing programmes. This three day course will help you understand how CRM can help your business and give you the practical skills to apply and assess CRM techniques in the real world.</p> <p>Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. With content drawn from our academically accredited digital certificates, the intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p>Intensives:</p> <ul> <li>Are led by practitioner trainers</li> <li>Include access to resources to support the training</li> <li>Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</li> <li>Lead to an Econsultancy certificate of completion</li> </ul>