tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/email-marketing Latest Email content from Econsultancy 2017-11-27T11:33:00+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-11-27T11:33:00+00:00 2017-11-27T11:33:00+00:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are also available:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a><br></strong></li> <li><strong><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a></strong></strong></li> <li> <strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a></strong><strong> </strong> </li> <li><strong><a title="Retail Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/retail-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Retail</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Travel Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/travel-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Travel</a></strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69606 2017-11-27T09:54:36+00:00 2017-11-27T09:54:36+00:00 Seven email strategies used by 10 retailers on Black Friday Nikki Gilliland <p>So, did any retailers manage to pique my interest this year? Here’s a run-down of some Black Friday emails to hit my inbox, categorised by strategy, and what impact they might have on consumers.</p> <h3>Early bird (River Island and Body Shop)</h3> <p>Black Friday and Cyber Monday are no longer day-only events. Now, many retailers hold sales events across an entire week, with emails being a key driver for capturing early consumer spend.</p> <p>River Island is one retailer to attempt to capture clicks before Black Friday itself, letting users know they could get their hands on deals the day before. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0695/River_Island.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="423"></p> <p>Other brands went even further than this, with Body Shop sending out an email on Wednesday to signal its own event. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0708/Body_Shop_2.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="446"></p> <p>This strategy is somewhat risky, with unclear communication potentially leading to confusion over when and how long the sale is running for. Similarly, it could also lead to the brand peaking too soon, with consumer interest subsequently dwindling or being diverted elsewhere on the day itself.</p> <h3>Point of difference (Firebox)</h3> <p>Black Friday is better known for electronics and big-item bargains, however, one tactic used by retailers is to let consumers know that there’s something different on offer.</p> <p>Firebox differentiates itself from others in its email copy, telling users that Firebox is the key to escaping ‘Black Friday mediocrity’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0693/Firebox.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="481"> </p> <p>The retailer also creates a frustrating level of intrigue with its ‘Black Friday box’, which includes a box of best-selling items usually worth £130. Nice, different, interesting.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0694/Firebox_2.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="461"></p> <h3>Subtlety (Anthropologie)</h3> <p>While Firebox goes against the Black Friday grain, other brands choose to take an even subtler approach, with no mention of the event itself or the most commonly associated words or phrases.</p> <p>Anthropologie does this, sending out emails with a subtle 20%-off discount code. The email includes no mention of the sale, instead simply integrating its usual product-focused creative, and clearly avoiding the ‘Black Friday’ bandwagon altogether.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0697/anthropologie_1.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="533"></p> <p>Anthropologie is not a brand typically associated with offers and discounts, so it would be strange if it suddenly started shouting about it.</p> <p>In this sense, it is a good example of how to offer loyal consumers something of real value, without compromising on brand image or pricing strategy.</p> <h3>Urgency (Debenhams and Warehouse)</h3> <p>Naturally, many retailers go for the insistent approach, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64420-now-now-now-five-quick-ways-to-create-consumer-urgency/" target="_blank">using urgency</a> in emails to prompt consumers to click through.</p> <p>Debenhams' highly urgent subject line aims to light a fire under consumers, indicating that now is the time to bag a bargain (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67241-what-s-the-best-black-friday-subject-line-ever-according-to-3-892-emails/">but is that the best approach?</a>). </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0698/Debenhams_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="450" height="62"></p> <p>Warehouse goes one step further, telling users that they have a limited amount of time to shop the 25% offer.</p> <p>It also integrates some nicely-crafted copy to encourage users to shop online instead of heading in-store.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0700/Warehouse.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="461"></p> <h3>Intrigue (John Lewis and Amazon)</h3> <p>Instead of promoting how much money consumers can save, some retailers choose to hold back vital information in emails, with the hope that a level of intrigue will further prompt consumers to click through.</p> <p>John Lewis does this, merely letting consumers know that the event is on. The similarly dark and mysterious email design also contributes to this intrigue, making it all the more tempting to click through and find out what’s on offer.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0701/John_Lewis.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="596"></p> <p>Of course, this tactic does not guarantee sales, but it can be an effective way to counteract the often repetitive and salesy nature of the event – and the consumer frustration that can occur as a result.</p> <p>Amazon is another brand that does this, using the double whammy of urgency and intrigue to make consumers think they might be missing out on something special.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0702/Amazon_1.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="460"></p> <h3>Product promotion (House of Fraser)</h3> <p>The problem with Black Friday sales is that it can all be a bit overwhelming, leading many consumers to avoid browsing retail sites altogether.</p> <p>In order to capture interest via email, a good tactic is to help narrow down choice by showing exactly what products are included in the sale, along with how much money customers can save.</p> <p>Here, for example, House of Fraser chooses a featured or hero product, alongside the number of people that have already been looking at it. This is an effective bit of social proof, indicating the popularity of the product and this particular discount.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0703/HOF.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="521"></p> <h3>Blanket sales (ASOS and H&amp;M)</h3> <p>While the aforementioned tactic can be effective, limited sales or discounts can also put people off. After all, there’s nothing more disappointing than searching to see if a particular item is on sale, before realising it’s not included.</p> <p>With hundreds of different brands sold on its site, ASOS avoids this issue by making it clear that consumers can get 20% off every single one.</p> <p>Including the names of big name brands like Nike and Ralph Lauren in the copy also emphasis this, making it sound much more appealing to customers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0704/ASOS_BF.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="449"></p> <p>Finally, despite the email design being rather bland and disappointing, H&amp;M also takes this no-fuss approach, reassuring customers that the sale covers everything in-store and online.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0706/H_M_1.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="436"></p> <p><em><strong>More on Black Friday 2017:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69528-uk-black-friday-landing-pages-the-good-the-bad-the-ugly" target="_blank">UK Black Friday landing pages: The good, the bad &amp; the ugly</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69534-ask-the-experts-black-friday-ecommerce-strategy" target="_blank">Ask the experts: Black Friday ecommerce strategy</a></em></li> </ul> <p><strong><em>Get more advice on email by downloading <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/email-marketing-best-practice-guide">Econsultancy's Email Best Practice Guide</a></em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69591 2017-11-17T15:00:00+00:00 2017-11-17T15:00:00+00:00 10 thought-provoking digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Without further ado…</p> <h3>Half of online shoppers abandon a purchase if they don’t like the delivery options</h3> <p>MetaPack’s <a href="http://content.metapack.com/acton/media/29620/2017-state-of-ecommerce-delivery" target="_blank">latest report suggests</a> that delivery has the power to make or break the online shopping experience, often being the difference between a purchase or an abandoned basket.</p> <p>In a survey of 3577 consumers across Europe and the US, 54% of respondents said delivery defines what retailers they regularly shop with. Half of all shoppers also said they would abandon a purchase if <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69301-how-10-online-retailers-promote-free-and-fast-shipping">delivery choices</a> were unsatisfactory, while 39% would never use an online retailer again following a negative delivery experience.</p> <p>Lastly, the report also suggests that expectations are rising, with 54% of survey respondents saying they want online retailers to offer one-hour delivery services in metropolitan areas.</p> <h3>89% of B2B businesses attribute growth to ecommerce</h3> <p>With ecommerce predicted to represent 11% of all B2B sales in the US by the end of this year, <a href="https://cloudcraze.com/resource/why-digital-will-become-the-primary-channel-for-b2b-engagement-report/" target="_blank">CloudCraze has uncovered</a> the value B2B organisations are seeing from digital and online channels.</p> <p>In a survey of more than 400 B2B decision-makers in the UK and the US, it was revealed that 48% of B2B businesses sell their full line of products online. As a result, 89% of B2B decision-makers attribute expected business growth to the success of digital commerce, and 60% indicate that the growth of digital has caused their sales team to grow along with it.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0533/b2b.JPG" alt="" width="313" height="420"></p> <h3>83% of 18 to 24 year olds have bought an item of physical media in the last year </h3> <p>While the success of digital services like Spotify and Netflix might suggest otherwise, new data from eBay indicates that a large percentage of consumers are choosing physical media.</p> <p>In a survey of over 2,000 consumers, eBay found that 76% of Brits have bought a book, a DVD or Blu-ray, CD, vinyl record, or video game in the last year, rising to 83% for 18 to 24 year olds or so-called ‘digital natives’.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to an increasing desire to connect with the digital world, coupled with the emotional and intellectual appeal of owning physical objects. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0534/physical_media.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="393"></p> <h3>CMOs overhaul digital strategy amid brand safety concerns</h3> <p>New research from Teads has revealed that concern over brand safety has risen in the path 12 months, leading many CMOs of large UK brands to make drastic changes to their digital advertising strategies.  </p> <p>In a survey of 100 leading CMOs, 83% said they have become more concerned about brand safety in the past year, with 77% more worried about ad fraud than before. As a result, 95% of CMOs say they’ve overhauled their digital strategy, demanding greater transparency from suppliers and agencies, with 44% questioning their supplier relationships and 43% scrutinising agency relationships.</p> <p>What’s more, 36% of CMOs say they have boycotted or reduced spend on channels that can’t guarantee brand safety, and 37% of CMOs say they are now directly involved in the execution of digital strategy. </p> <h3>Singles Day results in a 61% increase in mobile traffic</h3> <p>Analysis of <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69578-what-western-brands-need-to-know-before-joining-china-s-massive-ecommerce-economy">Singles Day</a> by Qubit has revealed that this year's shopping event drew 593% more visitors from China to UK retail sites compared to an average Saturday. </p> <p>There was a 236% increase in overall traffic from Singles Day in 2016, with 59% of visitors to UK retail sites from China coming from mobile.</p> <p>However, despite this growth, just 16% of revenue came from mobile shoppers, while desktop generated 82% of total revenue.</p> <h3>Strong performance in search correlates to retail success </h3> <p><a href="https://www.pi-datametrics.com/winners-loser-retail-causation-correlation/" target="_blank">New research</a> by PI Datametrics suggests that the most successful retailers are those who consider organic performance as a key KPI.</p> <p>From analysis of the top UK retailers - including ASOS, Boohoo, and Missguided - it was revealed that the most successful all have a strategy focused on customer intent and search data. </p> <p>ASOS has the strongest share of voice overall, which perhaps correlates to it also generating the most commercial success. Last year, its revenue grew 33% to £1.88bn.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0536/share_of_voice.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="385"></p> <p><em>Top retailers by share of voice</em></p> <h3>Searches for GDPR rise 215%</h3> <p>According to research from i-COM, more than 3x the number of people are searching for information about the GDPR legislation than they were at this time last year.</p> <p>Searches for terms related to GDPR have risen by 215% in the past 12 months, going from 138,290 in October 2016 to 435,600 searches in October 2017.</p> <h3>Ads failing to represent diversity in Britain</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.the7stars.co.uk/article/state-nation-latest-qt/" target="_blank">a study</a> by the7stars, UK advertising is failing to represent the diversity of life across the UK. </p> <p>The study – which involved a survey of 1000 Brits plus face-to-face workshops – found that just 11% of people feel advertising truly reflects where they live. In contrast, 55% of respondents say that it does not, and 56% agree that the debate around diversity in advertising is a big issue.</p> <p>Interestingly, there appears to be a regional split, with 18% of Londoners saying that advertising is reflective of life compared with just 1% of those in the North East.</p> <h3>Emotion is key to Black Friday email success – not deals</h3> <p>From the analysis of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66328-211-awesome-phrases-for-email-subject-lines-that-sell">email subject lines</a> by 50 UK retailers during Black Friday 2016, <a href="https://persado.com/insights/persado-holiday-email-subject-lines-dos-donts/" target="_blank">Persado found</a> that five key emotions generated greater levels of success.</p> <p>First, more than 20% of consumers engaged with challenge-focused emails, such as “are you ready?”. Meanwhile intimacy and encouragement also prompted consumers to respond. A third emotion was guilt, instilling in consumers a fear of missing out, as well as fascination – with interest piqued at the promise of trying something new.</p> <p>Overall, Persado determined that emotional language accounts for as much as 60% of audience response, showing the clear potential for retailers in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0535/black_friday_email.JPG" alt="" width="450" height="569"></p> <h3>In-app purchases boosted by ‘reward’ ads </h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.journalofadvertisingresearch.com/content/57/3/272.short" target="_blank">new study</a> by the Journal of Advertising Research (JAR) has revealed that ‘reward’ ads in gaming apps - which offer free items to users if they interact – can boost overall in-app purchases.</p> <p>By studying 1.4m transaction records and in-app behaviour, JAR found that more than 17% of users made subsequent purchases after clicking on a reward ad, compared with just 2.75% of users who did not.</p> <p>Finally, the study also found that those who spent more time playing gaming apps each day responded better to reward ads in terms of overall spending value.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69561 2017-11-03T14:00:00+00:00 2017-11-03T14:00:00+00:00 Why online shoppers abandon their baskets and how to stop them Nikki Gilliland <p>Subscribers can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/ecommerce/" target="_blank">full report here</a>, but in the meantime, let’s concentrate on a few reasons why consumers typically abandon their online shopping – and how ecommerce marketers might counteract this behaviour.</p> <h3>Feeling pressured into making a purchase</h3> <p>Checkout isolation has previously been cited as an effective way to reduce basket abandonment. By removing all navigational elements, it theoretically means that consumers are less distracted, and therefore more focused on completing their purchase.</p> <p>However, this tactic also has its downsides, potentially reducing overall performance if the consumer feels like they’re being pushed prematurely towards a purchase. It might be an unconscious feeling, of course, but sensing that they could be forced into buying before they are ready or have done enough research elsewhere could be enough to send consumers fleeing.</p> <p>Instead, it might be better to avoid forcing a too linear path, allowing people to go back onto the site if they want. Similarly, it’s important to avoid information loss – for example if customers are required to move through multiple stages, the data they’ve entered should be temporarily stored so they don’t need to re-enter it if they navigate between stages or away from the checkout.</p> <p>Warehouse is one retailer that stores this type of info, and while it also encloses the checkout to avoid distraction, it effectively highlights the steps to confirmation so that the customer knows exactly where they are in the process.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0152/Warehouse.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="360"></p> <h3>Using the shopping basket for research</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/industries/retail-consumer/total-retail/total-retail-categories.html" target="_blank">PwC</a>, 52% of global shoppers prefer to research clothing and footwear purchases online, with this rising to 62% for electronics and 68% for books, music, and video games. </p> <p>Unsurprisingly then, this is one of the biggest reasons for consumers abandoning their baskets without making a final purchase, with many planning to shop around on other ecommerce sites to ascertain the best price or service. </p> <p>In this instance, consumers can often be tempted back into the purchasing journey with relevant and well-timed communication. An email reminding the consumer that their basket is still there waiting for them can effectively do this, with elements of personalisation (i.e. drawing on names and other data) also adding extra value. </p> <p>Not only does Kate Spade take this approach, but the US retailer also ramps up temptation to buy with the offer of a 15% discount on top.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0155/Kate_Spade.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="663"></p> <h3>Intent to buy in the real world</h3> <p>Alternatively, consumers doing research online might abandon their basket with the aim of purchasing from a physical store (and not necessarily from the same retailer). In this case, retargeting or sending an email reminding them of their basket contents might not be enough. </p> <p>So, instead of trying to tempt them back to complete the online checkout, it makes more sense to align to their own needs or behaviour – which means facilitating the in-store purchase. This could be achieved through incentives, such as a mobile voucher or discount to increase levels of convenience and value.</p> <p>Another way is to consider offering alternative steps during the checkout process or when the user clicks away, such as “find this item in-store” or “save basket contents to a wish list”. That way, the shopper might be prompted to convert using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68739-how-has-click-collect-evolved-and-is-it-still-in-high-demand/" target="_blank">Click and Collect</a> or an in-store pick up there and then.</p> <p>Clothing retailer Barbour includes a “save for later” option at the checkout, which is a good tactic to encourage consumers (both researching with or without online buying intent) to convert at a later date.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0149/Barbour.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="381"></p> <h3>Lack of trust</h3> <p>When it comes to purchasing online, consumers need reassurances throughout the entire journey.</p> <p>First, with online consumer opinions being the second-most trusted form of communication, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them" target="_blank">user reviews</a> are a great way to instil trust.</p> <p>At a basic level, the simple act of handing over card details means that people need to feel certain the site is safe and secure. While some visual signals can of course be reproduced by underhand means, web browsers can fortunately refer to third-party issued certificates that demonstrate security compliance. SSL certificates - which often come in the form of a padlock at the end of the address bar, or a green highlighted area – are one of the most common signs.</p> <p>Alongside this, consumers like to be reassured that they are buying the right product, so another way to instil reassurance is with a persistent basket summary. This helps remind users of the contents and the total cost of their order so they don't have to leave the checkout to find out.</p> <p>Bicycle and outdoor apparel retailer Wiggle is a good example of this, reminding users what they are buying throughout the checkout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0150/Wiggle.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="471"></p> <h3>Frustration over delivery options</h3> <p>In a survey by Walker Sands, nine in 10 respondents cited free shipping as the number one incentive to shop online. Unsurprisingly then, unexpected delivery costs are one of the top reasons consumers might change their mind at the point of checkout.</p> <p>To prevent this from happening, it’s important to communicate delivery options upfront and as prominently as possible, meaning people don’t get halfway through the checkout process and quit in frustration if you’re not providing them with the service they want.</p> <p>Similarly, it's a good idea to offer help during the checkout (perhaps with a live chat icon, for instance) to avoid customers abandoning the process due to unanswered questions.</p> <p>Schuh is a good example of this, asking shoppers to choose their delivery preference as the first step. Also note other effective features like Google Reviews and the reassurance of a secure checkout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0151/Schuh.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="367"></p> <p><em><strong>Don't forget to check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/ecommerce/" target="_blank">Ecommerce Best Practice Guide</a> in full here.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69548 2017-10-27T16:26:00+01:00 2017-10-27T16:26:00+01:00 10 of the best digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>UK marketers eager to capitalise on data pooling</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www2.criteo.com/vibrant-future" target="_blank">Criteo study</a> has revealed that most UK marketers think data pooling is a positive, with 76% of survey respondents agreeing that it offers a huge opportunity to improve the customer experience. </p> <p>Meanwhile, for UK marketers looking to boost multi-channel CX and sales, collaborative data pooling (i.e. the anonymous sharing of data sets) is also a growing priority. 83% of survey respondents think successful data aggregation can improve ease of purchase, while 75% believe it can lead to more relevant deals.</p> <p>UK marketers also appear much more eager to capitalise on pooled data, with 82% willing to contribute online search data to a pool compared to 71% of global respondents.</p> <h3>Ad fraud predicted to peak in Q4</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.whiteops.com/q4-ad-fraud-surge" target="_blank">White Ops</a>, half of all ad fraud in 2017 will take place as we head into the holiday season, leading to a potential $3.5bn in losses.</p> <p>Analysis of last year revealed that ad fraud spiked to 13.5% between October and January, which is more than double the previous quarter. It also found that fraud increased during key holiday periods, such as Black Friday and Cyber Monday.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0023/Ad_Fraud.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="379"></p> <h3>54% of travellers want better mobile tech on holiday</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://www.apadmi.com/travel-report-2017/" target="_blank">Apadmi</a> has found that over half of travellers think the sector needs to offer customers more ways to utilise their mobile devices while on holiday.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 people who have taken a trip in the last 12 months, 50% said they want to see more mobile check-ins in airports, as well as the ability to check-in at hotels via mobile.</p> <p>37% of travellers also want a mobile digital hub containing all the travel information they need, e.g. for transport, accommodation and visitor attractions. Lastly, 38% would like better tools to help them with language translations, and a quarter would like to be able to use mobile payments more.</p> <h3>Seasonal product marketing generates 10% rise in email open rates</h3> <p>As Starbucks and other brands re-introduce Autumnal ranges, a Mailjet test found that email open rates rose 10% in instances where popular flavourings like pumpkin spice were mentioned. </p> <p>In the US, email subject lines mentioning pumpkin spice generated the highest open rate, with a 90% higher open rate than a regular email sent around the same time.</p> <p>Meanwhile, with Halloween on the horizon, Mailjet has found that marketers are successfully engaging consumers on the back on anticipation for the new Stranger Things series. Email open rates were 74% higher when the TV show was directly mentioned in the subject line.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Handcrafted. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MaplePecanLatte?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#MaplePecanLatte</a> <a href="https://t.co/89fURSIOvu">pic.twitter.com/89fURSIOvu</a></p> — Starbucks Coffee (@Starbucks) <a href="https://twitter.com/Starbucks/status/918181475723259905?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 11, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>UK ad viewability hits 18-month high</h3> <p>According to the latest benchmark report from <a href="https://www.meetrics.com/en/benchmark-reports/" target="_blank">Meetrics</a>, UK ad viewability has hit its highest level for 18 months. </p> <p>In the third quarter of 2017, the amount of banner ads served that met minimum viewability standards rose from 51% to 52% – the highest level since Q1 2016. This also follows a rise from 47% to 51% in the previous quarter.</p> <p>Despite this, Meetrics says that the UK still lags behind other European countries on ad viewability. Italy and Austria lead the way, with 68% and 67% viewability respectively, while Switzerland and Poland are the closest to UK levels with 55%. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0024/Country_comparison_chart.PNG" alt="" width="774" height="534"></p> <h3>34% of APAC consumers visit Amazon each month</h3> <p>Research by GlobalWebIndex has revealed that Amazon is now in the top three commerce platforms in the regions of Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Middle East. </p> <p>Its latest report states that 34% of internet users in Asia Pacific are visiting Amazon each month, closing in on rival Alibaba, which draws in 42%.</p> <p>Globally, 75% of digital consumers are now purchasing at least one product online every month. However, APAC is the top region for purchasing online, with 77% of internet spend coming from India, 79% from Indonesia, and 83% from both South Korea and China. </p> <h3>Only 8% of consumers pre-order new products</h3> <p>With pre-orders starting on Apple’s iPhone X, HotUKDeals has been investigating how consumers spend on newly-launched products.</p> <p>Interestingly, just 8% of British consumers say that they usually pre-order new products, while 53% that they prefer to wait to see if the price drops before purchasing. 11% usually purchase at the time of launch (when products are available) and 29% say that it differs depending on the product.</p> <p>Consumers who generally pre-order new products tend to be younger shoppers, with 14% of 16 to 24-year olds doing so. Meanwhile, 9% of the people who usually pre-order are men, compared to 6% of women.</p> <h3>Halloween generates 260% spike in online traffic</h3> <p>New research from BazaarVoice suggests that Halloween is now viewed as the start of the holiday shopping season, with the event generating 260% more online traffic than normal, and steady increases taking place in the lead-up to Christmas.</p> <p>People are said to start planning their costume about six weeks before Halloween, with increased page views for costumes starting around the third week of September.</p> <p>Black Friday and Cyber Monday see the next largest spikes after Halloween, before a peak in the week before Christmas generating 800% more traffic than normal.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0021/BazaarVoice.JPG" alt="" width="450" height="518"></p> <h3>Increase in US children using mobile technology</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.commonsensemedia.org/research/the-common-sense-census-media-use-by-kids-age-zero-to-eight-2017" target="_blank">Common Sense</a> has revealed that American children aged eight and under are spending more time than ever using mobile technology. </p> <p>Kids reportedly spend 48 minutes a day on mobile devices – up from just five minutes in 2011 – with 42% also owning their own tablet device, compared to just 1% in 2011. </p> <p>The report also states that 49% of children aged eight or under typically watch TV or play video games in the hour before bedtime, and 10% of this group have a ‘smart’ toy that connects to the internet or a voice-activated virtual device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0022/Mobile_Devices.JPG" alt="" width="540" height="472"></p> <h3>Mobile consumers more willing to engage during holiday season</h3> <p>Finally, a new study by <a href="https://liftoff.io/resources/" target="_blank">Liftoff</a> suggests that mobile marketers should capitalise on low acquisition costs and high rates of engagement in the period of October to January.</p> <p>Research found that last December, acquisition was at a low of $54.63 while engagement rates were at 6.81%. In contrast, engagement fell to 5.4% at the beginning of March, with the cost to acquire users going on make a purchase rising to $65.06.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3301 2017-10-26T13:34:18+01:00 2017-10-26T13:34:18+01:00 Masterclass: Advanced CRM Strategies (3-days) <p>Implementing a robust CRM strategy delivers vastly improved effectiveness in your marketing programmes. This three day course will help you understand how CRM can help your business and give you the practical skills to apply and assess CRM techniques in the real world.</p> <p>Econsultancy’s intensives are three-day programmes offering you a deep dive into specific digital disciplines. With content drawn from our academically accredited digital certificates, the intensives offer the practical training without the need for long term commitment.</p> <p>Intensives:</p> <ul> <li>Are led by practitioner trainers</li> <li>Include access to resources to support the training</li> <li>Allow delegates to implement and evaluate what they’ve learnt through ‘homework’ and trainer feedback after training</li> <li>Lead to an Econsultancy certificate of completion</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3268 2017-10-26T12:24:41+01:00 2017-10-26T12:24:41+01:00 Email Marketing - Advanced <p>Give your email campaigns an injection of fresh thinking in this fantastic email marketing workshop.</p> <p>You’ll gain advanced, strategic email marketing training and get the opportunity to have your email campaigns reviewed by an industry expert who will provide practical tips for improvement.</p> <p>Strictly limited to 10 places, the workshop allows for plenty of interaction and you’ll be able to bounce ideas off other experienced marketers.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/1217 2017-10-16T15:00:00+01:00 2017-10-16T15:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Best Practice Guide Dave Littlechild, Econsultancy <h2>About this guide</h2> <p>This year’s <strong>Email Marketing Best Practice Guide</strong> sees the original 2014 version rewritten to reflect changes in email marketing over the past 18 months. The strategic sections are organised around ‘pillars’, with new techniques and approaches mentioned throughout. Charts, surveys and case studies have been updated and incorporate the results of <strong>Econsultancy’s <a title="Email Marketing Industry Census 2017" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census" target="_self">Email Marketing Industry Census 2017</a></strong>.</p> <p>Given the ongoing significance of email to most organisations, sections of this guide will be relevant to CEOs and MDs; CMOs and Marketing Directors; FDs and data analysts; brand, content, digital, social, online and ecommerce managers; producers, creatives, and strategists as well as owners in editorial, PR, marketing and customer service departments.</p> <p>This latest version of the guide contains notably more about the technology of email than ever before – including themes such as <strong>Artificial Intelligence and automation</strong> – as well as contributions from expert practitioners throughout. The report also covers the <strong>General Data Protection Regulation</strong>, and how marketers may have to adapt their email marketing strategies to ensure they comply with the new regulation. </p> <p>The report has been created so that marketers can either review their existing email strategy or build a comprehensive email marketing strategy from scratch, by focusing on the following strategic pillars:</p> <ul> <li>Aims and goal setting</li> <li>Segmentation and targeting</li> <li>Communications strategy</li> <li>Copywriting</li> <li>Layout and creative</li> <li>Testing and optimisation</li> </ul> <p>The report also includes a ‘Quick Start’ guide for readers who are looking for short, immediately actionable steps, each set of suggestions tailored to a different level of experience:</p> <ul> <li>Before you start email marketing</li> <li>Intermediate level</li> <li>Refresher tactics for advanced email marketers</li> </ul> <h2>Contributors and reviewers</h2> <p>This report has been updated by <strong>Natalie Rockall</strong> and <strong>Steffan Aquarone</strong>. Natalie is a commercially minded email marketing expert with more than 14 years’ marketing experience. Qualified with the Chartered Institute of Marketing and the Institute of Direct and Digital Marketing, Natalie is also founder of Eleven11 Digital.</p> <p>Steffan leads Econsultancy's Best Practice Report programme. He is a digital entrepreneur and speaker who has trained big brands and spoken around the world on innovation, entrepreneurship and digital marketing.</p> <p>This report builds on a 2014 version, which was authored by <strong>Dave Littlechild</strong>. A founding member of email marketing software provider Adestra, Dave has been at the cutting edge of email marketing for more than a decade.</p> <p>Natalie and Steffan have put together this updated report with the aid of an expert team of contributors who have kindly given their time and effort to producing this guide. Contributors to this report include:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Alice Cornell</strong>, Director of Email Deliverability, Change.org</li> <li> <strong>Catherine Loftus</strong>, Senior Marketing Manager, TrustedHousesitters</li> <li> <strong>Nick Crawford</strong>, Interim Head of eCRM, Travelodge</li> <li> <strong>Rachel Whitter</strong>, Email Channel Manager, RSPB</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69463 2017-09-29T16:43:30+01:00 2017-09-29T16:43:30+01:00 10 delightful digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Without further ado...</p> <h3>Digital ad fraud predicted to rise to $19bn in 2018</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="https://www.juniperresearch.com/researchstore/content-commerce/future-digital-advertising/ai-ad-fraud-ad-blocking-2017-2022" target="_blank">Juniper Research</a> predicts that digital ad fraud will cost advertisers $19bn in 2018 – that’s equivalent to $51m per day. This figure, which represents advertising on online and mobile devices, is also predicted to rise to $44bn by 2022. </p> <p>Meanwhile, the report further predicts that platforms using AI for targeting purposes will account for 74% of total online and mobile advertising spend by 2022.</p> <h3>Honesty is the key to winning trust from travel consumers</h3> <p>According to research by the <a href="https://dma.org.uk/research/dma-insight-customer-engagement-focus-on-travel" target="_blank">DMA</a>, simple factors like honesty and value for money can instill trust in travel consumers – perhaps even more so than technological innovation.</p> <p>The DMA found that 59% of consumers want value for money, 58% want ease of use, and 58% want good customer service from travel brands. Similarly, these factors can also keep customers loyal, with 53% saying good customer service would lead to a repeat booking, and 40% saying the same for deals and loyalty schemes.</p> <p>That's not to say customers don’t want the convenience of technology as well. 52% of consumers say they would use a chatbot to help with pre-travel questions, and 53% would be interested in using a VR headset to see a hotel room.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9270/DMA.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="568"></p> <h3>Three in four UK consumers are concerned about privacy of connected devices</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://www.worldpay.com/uk/about/media-centre/2017-09/shoppers-give-thumbs-up-to-in-store-biometrics" target="_blank">Worldpay</a> has revealed a lack of trust in connected devices among UK consumers. </p> <p>In a study of over 2,000 people, just 23% of UK respondents said they feel comfortable with a smart device such as a fridge or virtual assistant ordering items on their behalf. Not only did the study uncover that Brits are laggards when it comes to Internet of Things adoption, but also that privacy is still a massive barrier. </p> <p>Worldpay found that 78% of British consumers are worried that businesses would share their personal data, while 77% are concerned about the prospect of devices being hacked by fraudsters. UK consumers are clearly a stubborn lot too, as 33% claimed that nothing would make them feel comfortable with automated purchasing.</p> <h3>93% of consumers would consider a rival brand after a negative email experience</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="https://www.mailjet.com/blog/guide/transactional-research-report/" target="_blank">Mailjet</a> suggests that lost emails can negatively affect levels of customer retention.</p> <p>Research has found that 28% of consumers across the UK now receive four or more transactional emails per day. Furthermore, 77% state they always check that they have received a purchase confirmation email, and 41% won’t wait more than one minute for a transactional email to arrive before getting annoyed with the company they are using.</p> <p>Consequently, 93% of customers would consider choosing a rival provider following a negative transactional email experience, with 21% of UK consumers saying speed of email delivery is the most important factor.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9269/Mailjet.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="407"></p> <h3>Decline in number of retailers offering free returns </h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.reboundreturns.com%2Fquarter-2-2017&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdavid.moth%40econsultancy.com%7C3ed69e69770147425ea908d50590c01e%7Cfdd3bf0d1bfa49198a45f1a311d56753%7C0%7C0%7C636421041622281531&amp;sdata=%2B%2F6%2FC2F5MpzzWUd4cyJCEreZwzqYMJR1Zszj3mYBFHE%3D&amp;reserved=0" target="_blank">ReBound</a> has uncovered a drop in the number of UK and European retailers offering their customers free returns. In a study of over 200 leading fashion brands, just 28% were found to offer free returns – a big decrease from 55% in Q1.</p> <p>ReBound’s report also found that the majority of retailers are failing to be upfront about their returns policies, with just 6% promoting their returns policy at all three key stages of the purchase journey – product page, basket, and checkout.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9276/Returns.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="456"></p> <h3>Social sentiment for Uber increases following licence revoke </h3> <p>Since TFL announced that it won’t be renewing Uber’s licence to operate, social media has been awash with conversation about the decision. 4C Insights has been looking at engagement and sentiment for both companies across platforms including Facebook and Twitter.</p> <p>Surprisingly, it found that sentiment has dropped 13% for TFL since the announcement, with Uber remaining level despite the working practices highlighted by TfL's decision. </p> <p>With 730,000 signatures on the petition for Uber to have its London license renewed, it seems the general attitude on social media is annoyance at the service being taken away. </p> <h3>90% of Gen Z travellers influenced by social media</h3> <p>When it comes to travel plans, <a href="https://info.advertising.expedia.com/travel-and-tourism-trends-for-american-travelers" target="_blank">Expedia Media Solutions</a> has revealed that the Generation Z is the demographic most influenced by social media, with Instagram and Facebook being named as the most influential platforms. </p> <p>While Gen X (or millennials) are influenced less by social media than younger generations, more than half of them say Facebook has an effect on their decision-making.</p> <p>Lastly, baby boomers are the least likely to research travel destinations on social media, with more than 55% already deciding where to go, and 43% saying they don’t need help with planning.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9272/Expedia.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="347"></p> <h3>iOS 11 sparks consumer demand for new AR apps</h3> <p>Following on from the launch of iOS 11 and Apple’s new AR platform, ARKit, consumer demand for AR apps is on the rise.</p> <p>A new report by <a href="https://emea01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdigitalbridge.eu%2Fdownload-our-new-report-augmented-reality-changing-the-face-of-retail%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cnikki.gilliland%40centaurmedia.com%7Cadb8f897d4ac427e9e8d08d505beece0%7Cfdd3bf0d1bfa49198a45f1a311d56753%7C0%7C0%7C636421239942488912&amp;sdata=DN6h7HZhQ23xErI%2BpE0u4xwhEyFol2J3t7zrWcfNRAo%3D&amp;reserved=0" target="_blank">DigitalBridge</a> suggests that 61% of consumers say augmented reality is the technology they are most excited about using, compared to 30% for virtual reality. Consequently, 69% now expect retailers to launch an AR app within the next six months.</p> <p>Meanwhile, a further 18% of consumers don’t expect to be kept waiting longer than 12 months before they are offered access to an augmented reality platform, and 82% are expecting the technology to be made available via mobile.</p> <h3>Consumers fail to recall brand logos</h3> <p>Signs.com has been looking at how well consumers can recall the brand logos they see every day. <a href="https://www.signs.com/branded-in-memory/" target="_blank">The study</a> involved 150 participants drawing 10 famous logos from memory, including Apple, Burger King, and Domino's.</p> <p>Results found that just 6% of people could recall the Starbucks logo – perhaps surprising considering many participants buy one of the 18m cups of coffee it sells per day.</p> <p>Ikea saw the most success, with nearly a third of participants recreating near-perfect logos. Meanwhile, more than 20% of participants wrongly included a crown when drawing the Burger King logo, despite the fact that the design hasn’t included one in almost 50 years.</p> <p>Lastly, one in three participants incorrectly included a stalk in the Apple logo. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9271/brand_logos.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="631"></p> <h3>Pizza generates 26m shares on Instagram</h3> <p>Lastminute.com has revealed the world’s most-shared food trends, including the top international foods and the most popular obscure trends.</p> <p>Topping the list of the most-shared international foods is pizza, with 26m shares on Instagram. This is followed by sushi with 17.6m shares, and pasta with 11m shares.</p> <p>Meanwhile, matcha tea was found to be the most popular unusual food, generating 2.5m shares. Cronuts, bubble tea, and freakshake also appear in the top 10 obscure foods Instagram users love to document.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:WebinarEvent/902 2017-09-28T04:06:24+01:00 2017-09-28T04:06:24+01:00 Email: Trends, Data and Best Practice <p>This webinar will highlight results from Econsultancy report, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census" target="_blank">Email Marketing Industry Census</a>.</p> <p>The live session will be hosted by <strong>Jeff Rajeck, Research Analyst, APAC, Econsultancy</strong> and co-hosted by <strong>Jodie Dunkley, Digital Marketing Manager, Accenture Interactive</strong>.</p> <h4> </h4> <h4>Webinar done in collaboration with:      <a href="https://www.ntuc.org.sg/uassociate/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/9214/u_associate__integration_endorsement__logo-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="290" height="89"></a> </h4> <p><strong>FAQ:</strong></p> <p><strong>I'm not an Econsultancy subscriber, can I join?</strong></p> <p>Ans: You sure can. The sessions are complimentary for existing customers and new friends.</p> <p><strong>Will the session be recorded?</strong></p> <p>Ans: Yes! We record all of our webinars, and we'll send out a link to the recording the following week.</p> <p><strong>What if I register but can't make it?</strong></p> <p>Ans: It's all good. We'll send a follow-up with key takeaways and a link to the recording.</p> <p><strong>Can I ask questions?</strong></p> <p>Ans: Absolutely! This session is for you. Bring your questions and participate during Q&amp;A.</p>