tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/marketing-automation Latest Marketing Automation content from Econsultancy 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/4457 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 2017-04-19T09:00:00+01:00 Email Marketing Industry Census 2017 <p>The 11th annual <strong>Email Marketing Industry Census</strong>, published in partnership with <a href="http://www.adestra.com">Adestra</a>, is based on the largest UK survey of email marketers.</p> <p>The census takes an in-depth look at email practices being adopted, the resources being dedicated to email and the channel's effectiveness compared to other types of marketing.</p> <p>Personalisation, marketing automation, optimisation for different devices and the future of email are all themes that are revisited in this year's Census, and there are also new questions about the <strong>use of metrics</strong>, the <strong>application of artificial intelligence</strong> and the <strong>impact of Brexit</strong> on how companies are approaching the <strong>EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)</strong>.</p> <p>With <strong>11 years' worth of data to assess</strong>, this provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the state of the industry and find out how those at the coalface of email marketing are operating.</p> <p>Over 1,000 respondents took part in the 2017 Census, which took the form of an online survey in February and March 2017.</p> <h2>What you'll learn</h2> <ul> <li>Find out how a variety of trends around email practices, budgets and opinions have changed over 11 years.</li> <li>Discover other marketers' opinions on what the future of email will look like.</li> <li>Benchmark your own practices with the activities of marketers maximising their email efforts.</li> <li>Understand the challenges organisations are facing in improving their email capabilities.</li> </ul> <h2>Key findings from the report</h2> <ul> <li>Marketers get to grips with automation, helped by improved technology</li> <li>Email reigns supreme when it comes to delivering ROI, though companies must do more to measure success</li> <li>Companies are still under-investing in a channel which drove an estimated £29bn in UK online retail sales in 2016</li> <li>Companies continue to adapt to consumer use of different devices</li> <li>True personalisation at scale remains elusive for many businesses, though more companies are starting to reap the benefits</li> <li>Census shows signs of inertia and lack of understanding around EU data law changes</li> <li>Segmentation continues to deliver</li> <li>Responsibility for email shifts from the individual to the team</li> <li>Artificial intelligence can improve email marketing performance</li> </ul> <h2>Expert insight</h2> <p>The <strong>80-page</strong> 2017 report contains insight and comment from leading experts in the email marketing world and associated digital sectors, including:</p> <ul> <li>Andrew Campbell, Martech Director, First 10</li> <li>Chris Combemale, Group CEO, DMA</li> <li>Riaz Kanani, Joint MD and Co-Founder, Radiate b2b</li> <li>Dave Littlechild, Email, Ecommerce and Sales &amp; Marketing Consultant</li> <li>Kath Pay, Founder and Senior Consultant, Holistic Email Marketing</li> <li>Jordie van Rijn, eCRM and Email Marketing Consultant, eMailMonday</li> <li>Philip Storey, Email Marketing and CRM Strategy Consultant, CEO at Enchant Agency</li> <li>Tim Watson, Email Marketing Consultant, Zettasphere</li> </ul> <h2>Features of the report</h2> <ul> <li>Approach to email</li> <li>Email effectiveness</li> <li>Place in the organisation</li> <li>Optimising for different devices</li> <li>Personalisation</li> <li>Marketing automation</li> <li>Improving email marketing for the future</li> </ul> <p><strong>You can download a free sample of the report to learn more.</strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3234 2017-03-28T13:11:06+01:00 2017-03-28T13:11:06+01:00 Marketing Automation <p dir="ltr">Align sales with marketing, generate and nurture leads and increase response rates. Marketing Automation (MA) is a growing area of digital that offers big potential for increasing revenue and our training course provide the tools to take advantage of it effectively.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will learn how to match your strategic marketing, demand generation and customer journey with a clear campaign and long term nurture process. </p> <p dir="ltr">No matter if it's your first step, optimising your current platform, or looking to reassess your current goals, this course will help you set clear objectives, to automate and optimise your marketing for maximum success.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3233 2017-03-28T13:10:22+01:00 2017-03-28T13:10:22+01:00 Marketing Automation <p dir="ltr">Align sales with marketing, generate and nurture leads and increase response rates. Marketing Automation (MA) is a growing area of digital that offers big potential for increasing revenue and our training course provide the tools to take advantage of it effectively.</p> <p dir="ltr">You will learn how to match your strategic marketing, demand generation and customer journey with a clear campaign and long term nurture process. </p> <p dir="ltr">No matter if it's your first step, optimising your current platform, or looking to reassess your current goals, this course will help you set clear objectives, to automate and optimise your marketing for maximum success.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68890 2017-03-15T01:00:00+00:00 2017-03-15T01:00:00+00:00 Two innovative ways brands will use web analytics in 2017 Jeff Rajeck <p>In the video below, Mr Clark lays out his vision for web analytics in 2017 and I've then provided a summary, examples, and additional commentary.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GlE_uBPa7io?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>So, according to Andy, in 2017 we will see brands:</p> <h4>1. Combine web analytics with marketing automation for a 360-view of the customer</h4> <p>In the past, customer views to websites were largely used for one thing in marketing – to create a personalised ad campaign through retargeting. That is, if someone visited a web page for 'red shoes', we made sure that those 'red shoes' followed them all around the internet.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4628/redshoes.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="354"></p> <p>Now, brands are using customer browsing behaviour as input data in order to change many things besides just an ad campaign. Through combining analytics data with marketing automation, marketers are able to use data from multiple sources to achieve multiple marketing objectives.</p> <p>For example, here a <a href="http://tealium.com/resources/webinars-and-videos/real-time-marketing-llbean/">marketing manager from LL Bean</a> describes how abandoned shopping cart data not only improves a retargeting display campaign, but can also improve email, paid search, and the user's future website browsing experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4631/llbean.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="338"></p> <p>Then through assembling all of the captured data points, companies can produce a 'Universal Visitor Profile' which will be the central repository and source of data about identifiable customers.</p> <p>This will allow brands, then, to treat each member of their audience pool uniquely. The excellent example provided by LL Bean is that having this profile allows the team to assemble an audience of people who have viewed an out-of-stock item and advertise it to them <em>when it becomes available</em>.</p> <p>In doing so, marketing has captured website behaviour, combined it with their stock system, and leveraged it to give customers information that they are looking for through an email or display ad. </p> <h4>2. Integrate web analytics with offline systems for new business insights</h4> <p>It's curious that while most companies will use website data to improve their web experience, it's rare to find one which uses it as an input for enhancing other, non-web related data.</p> <p>This could mean using page views, time on site, or even bounce rate to determine the level of consumer interest in a product or category.  Or, with the right data, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjoint_analysis_(marketing)">a conjoint analysis</a> of product features and benefits could be carried out through highlighting particular combinations on the website.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4632/conjoint.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="546"></p> <p>American airline US Airways (now American Airlines) had a <a href="http://tealium.com/resources/us-airways-tag-management/">particularly interesting external use case</a> for its website data. Besides providing air travel, US Airways also made significant revenue from its data monetization partner Adara Media.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4633/adara.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="383"></p> <p>But while US Airways had long ago integrated its offline booking system and loyalty programme database, the company website was changing so frequently that the web analytics data was often missing many key data points.</p> <p>Using a tag management solution, though, US Airways was able to greatly enhance the website data passed to Adara, and achieve an annualized ROI of over 400%.</p> <h4>So...</h4> <p>So whether it's through using web analytics to improve your marketing via enhanced automation or repurposing your web analytics to improve internal analysis, 2017 is going to see big changes in how brands use their website data, according to Tealium's Andy Clark.</p> <p>And while it will still be useful for more traditional reporting, the data marketers harvest from their websites can then be used to provide greater value both internally and to customers as well.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68810 2017-02-22T14:09:14+00:00 2017-02-22T14:09:14+00:00 Four ways AI is already being applied to sales and marketing Patricio Robles <p>Here are four examples.</p> <h3>Chorus.ai helps companies analyze their sales calls</h3> <p>While the phone call is an ancient phenomenon to many individuals, companies large and small still conduct a lot of their sales activity over the phone. Unfortunately, for obvious reasons, tracking, analyzing and improving the performance of salespeople on phone calls is a much more challenging task than, say, tracking, analyzing and improving the performance of email sales.</p> <p>But a number of companies, including Marketo, AdRoll and Qualtrics, are using "conversation intelligence" company <a href="https://www.chorus.ai/">Chorus.ai's</a> platform to record sales calls, transcribe them and analyze the content using AI technology.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4099/chorus_ai-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="189"></p> <p>Currently, that AI technology can identify key points in phone conversations, such as when a potential customer talks about features, reveals a pain point or mentions a competitor. This AI-based functionality can be used to develop market and customer insights, help develop best practices and scripts for sales teams and aid sales managers in mentoring individual members of their teams.</p> <p>In the future, Chorus.ai's AI tech could be used to display content to salespeople in real-time as a conversation is taking place. For example, if a customer raises an objection, Chorus.ai could surface content that a salesperson can use to address the objection.</p> <h3>Cosabella Lingerie uses AI to boost email revenue</h3> <p>Since high-end lingerie retailer Cosabella Lingerie adopted the Emarsys Marketing Cloud in October 2016, it has doubled its email subscriber base and <a href="https://www.emarsys.com/en/press-release/cosabellas-revenue-surges-60-percent-using-emarsys-ai-enabled-b2c-marketing-cloud/">grown email-driven revenue by over 60% compared to 2015</a>.</p> <p>Emarsys added an Artificial Intelligence Marketing (AIM) component late last year. It can be used to apply AI technology to a number of email marketing optimizations. Specifically, it offers automatic incentive management, "an AI-driven discount personalization layer that analyzes each recipient’s behavioral history to determine who should receive discounts, and for what amount," as well as send time optimization, which predicts when emails should be delivered to specific customers to maximize open rates and engagement.</p> <p>Because of the success of its email initiative, Cosabella says that, "The roll out of the Emarsys platform is the next big step in Cosabella’s move into AI integration during 2017."</p> <h3>IBM allows Watson to manage its programmatic ad buying</h3> <p>One of the most talked-about AI platforms is IBM's Watson. But rather than just pitching the software to its customers, the software giant is eating its own dog food, and one of the ways that it is applying Watson to its business is by allowing the AI to manage its programmatic buying of digital ads.</p> <p><a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/ibm-s-watson-programmatic-yielding-big-returns-ibm/304946/">According to</a> reports last year, IBM's use of Watson's AI tech led to an average cost-per-click decrease of 35% and as much as 71%. With IBM spending tens of millions of dollars a year on digital display ads, it's no surprise that the company was eager to make plans to have Watson manage all of its programmatic ad buying by the end of 2016.</p> <p>"Because of the volume and the dollars involved, trying to save those fractions of a dollar, or fractions of a cent, really matters to us," IBM's VP of marketing analytics, Ari Sheinkin, told AdAge.</p> <p>Watson's AI is capable of tracking and analyzing vast amounts of data – far more than any human ever could – and learning as it sees more campaign results, which means that despite its apparently already-satisfactory performance, IBM could find that the ROI from using Watson increases even more over time.</p> <h3>LeadGenius brings AI to B2B lead generation</h3> <p>As its name suggests, B2B SaaS startup LeadGenius is in the business of generating leads. Historically, lead generation has been a highly manual process involving human research and categorization, but LeadGenius applies AI to this process to significantly reduce the labor involved, saving customers like fraud prevention solutions provider Signifyd lots of time and money.</p> <p>John Livett, a sales manager for Signifyd, says that LeadGenius' tech saves him 15 hours each week, hours "that would have been spent trawling Google, LinkedIn, etc."</p> <p>The AI applied by LeadGenius to the lead generation problem helps the company identify individual businesses and determine how frequently their information should be retrieved based on an analysis of how long information is likely to be reliable; determine whether a company is "in-market" for a particular product or not; and identify buyer roles based on business titles.</p> <p>LeadGenius also applies AI to MailGenius, a salesperson-focused email client it created. MailGenius uses AI to craft email templates, track performance as responses come in and apply optimizations.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/3BYRspyKizEA5N" width="595" height="485"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68702 2017-01-20T01:00:00+00:00 2017-01-20T01:00:00+00:00 Three bold marketing technology predictions for 2017 Jeff Rajeck <p>Econsultancy has <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68648-five-predictions-for-conversion-rate-optimisation-cro-in-2017/">several posts</a> which make <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68661-five-trends-which-will-define-data-driven-marketing-in-2017/">bold statements</a> about the future of digital, but to change things up slightly we asked a few industry experts to chime in with their vision of what we will see in 2017 as well.</p> <p>In the brief video, Antonia Edmunds from IBM Marketing Cloud offers her views on what marketers should expect in the coming year.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0xm2T518_eU?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>While the trends Ms. Edmunds mentions may not have achieved mass acceptance yet, it seems that marketers have been talking about each of these topics over the past year.</p> <p>Below are summaries of each of the points and links to further reading on the topics.</p> <h3>1. Cognitive marketing will give marketers better customer insights</h3> <p>Cognitive marketing, or marketing which uses technology that mimics the human brain to improve performance, was just starting to emerge as a concept in 2016. <a href="https://martechtoday.com/now-entering-age-cognitive-marketing-169117">Industry experts feel</a> that there will soon be an 'explosion' in the number of marketing systems which use it, though.</p> <p>When <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68634-three-ways-brands-will-use-cognitive-marketing/">the topic was discussed at an Econsultancy event in Delhi</a>, participants came up with three ways in which cognitive marketing could be used to help them understand their customers better and improve their performance.</p> <h4>Segment audiences in new ways</h4> <p>Cognitive-based systems will be better at finding behavioural characteristics among people who appear to be very different.</p> <h4>Personalise content</h4> <p>Marketers using cognitive technology would be able to redesign messaging so that virtually every consumer saw something different, and something which was more relevant to them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2369/delhi2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h4>Help customers make better decisions</h4> <p>By using massive computing power and large data sets, cognitive marketing systems will be able to identify unmet and unstated customer needs and help brands produce better offers and product guidance.</p> <h3>2. Marketers will shift from siloed channel strategies to cross-channel engagement</h3> <p>Marketers needed little prompting in 2016 to discuss their plans for how they were tackling the difficult task of delivering cross-channel marketing.</p> <p>At <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68307-three-things-marketers-must-do-to-deliver-a-brilliant-omnichannel-experience/">a recent event in Melbourne</a>, marketers came up with <strong>three main points about what it will take for brands to follow consumer behaviour and become truly omnichannel.</strong></p> <h4>Identify data sources and break down silos</h4> <p>Effective cross-channel marketing is 'all about the data'. Yet marketers felt that one of the most important steps toward increased cross-channel engagement was to have access to all of the channel performance data.</p> <p>Without it, they would not be able to measure performance and improve.</p> <h4>Train up marketers so they can integrate systems</h4> <p>Another thing which brands need to do for cross-channel marketing is to ensure that their team knows how to use the technology they already have.  </p> <p>Participants indicated that <strong>there is a particularly big knowledge gap between what marketers are familiar with today and what is necessary to map the customer journey.</strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9329/j2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h4>Take a unified approach to offline and online marketing</h4> <p>Finally, the brand needs to have a unified approach to its messaging, both online and offline.  </p> <p>As one delegate said, <strong>there is little point advertising to change perception of the brand on one medium and then not to be able to deliver that experience on the other.</strong></p> <h3>3. Marketing and ad technologies will converge</h3> <p>Predicted for some time now, it seems that combining <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65212-what-is-marketing-automation-and-why-do-you-need-it/">marketing automation</a> with ad buying may finally happen in 2017. Benefits of doing so include being able to leverage data between web, email, and ad platforms to improve performance and customer experience.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68665-three-keys-to-digital-advertising-success-in-2017/">At Digital Cream Singapore</a>, attendees said that there are <strong>three things marketers needed before marketing and advertising could be fully integrated.</strong></p> <h4>A cross-market ad buying strategy</h4> <p>For companies with marketing teams across geographies, marketers need to centralise ad spending before they integrate marketing.  </p> <p>This is particularly difficult in Asia-Pacific and as such many brands in the region are relying solely on the 'ad duopoly', Google and Facebook, for their advertising.</p> <h4>A single view of the customer</h4> <p>Most marketing teams now typically have data spread across many systems. So in order to merge marketing and advertising, they need to combine data to have a single, cross-organisational view of the customer.</p> <p>Doing so will make it much easier to share attributes, interests, and behaviours between ad and marketing automation platforms.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2648/5.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h4>An attribution model</h4> <p>Finally, in order to have one technology stack, marketers felt that they need to agree on how to attribute credit for conversions for each step of the customer journey.</p> <p>Doing so is much more difficult than it sounds, so <strong>many marketers end up using last click or a 'fluid' attribution model which is changed periodically based on data.</strong></p> <p>It seems, therefore, that there are quite a few precursors required for these predictions to come true. One common requirement, though, is the need for a common data platform so that marketers can share data among themselves as well as with the organisation as a whole.  </p> <p>Breaking down data siloes should, therefore, be on everyone's wish list in 2017!</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68706 2017-01-17T10:00:00+00:00 2017-01-17T10:00:00+00:00 Ashley Friedlein's marketing and digital trends for 2017 Ashley Friedlein <p>You can <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67397-ashley-friedlein-s-10-digital-marketing-ecommerce-trends-for-2016/">read my 2016 post</a> to see whether I had any success in predicting the major trends from last year, and here are the trends that I think will have the biggest impact in 2017.</p> <h3>1. The F word </h3> <p>I believe the guiding star for marketing, and digital, for 2017 will be: Focus. </p> <p>In part, this is because the economic outlook is uncertain so there is less appetite for risk and instead a desire to focus on either fixing what is not working or doubling down on what is working and scaling that.</p> <p>Businesses want growth, brands want saliency in a cluttered landscape, but there is not the money to ‘throw a lot at the wall and see what sticks’ so focus has to be the answer. </p> <p>In part, it is also a reaction against the ever-increasing complexity and fragmentation within marketing. Both at the highest levels (What even is ‘marketing’ now? What is ‘digital’ really?) and at the tactical levels (Which new emerging platforms do we now also have to manage? Have we really nailed our responsive programmatic social video campaign? What are we doing about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67529-the-rise-of-dark-social-everything-you-need-to-know/">dark social</a> and messaging?). </p> <p>Focus is an antidote to ambiguity and complexity. In part, I think shareholders and boards are starting to lose patience with marketing and digital strategy and execution which lacks focus.</p> <p>There are only so many times you can say “for us digital is like changing the engines on the plane whilst still flying!” or cunningly pass off what is really indecision, lack of competence or lack of operational clarity as “agile”. </p> <p>In 2017 prioritisation is the top priority. Focus on the focus. So I expect to see:</p> <ul> <li>Brand portfolios being rationalised. This started in 2016 but I expect to continue this year. Weaker brands will be killed off so energies can be focused on the strongest. </li> <li>As well as cutting some brands completely we will see more ‘zero-based branding’ thinking (cf. “<a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/01/26/why-unilever-is-right-to-adopt-zero-based-budgeting/">zero-based budgeting</a>” from 2016) where marketers revisit a brand's purpose, promise, positioning and audience. Again, to ensure clarity of focus. </li> <li>Agency/supplier relationships being rationalised. Again, in the name of focus, I expect to see brands favouring fewer, deeper, supplier relationships. This will be a challenge for mid-sized agencies. I believe it will favour the big consultancies and systems integrators over the agencies too.</li> <li>Media partners being rationalised. There will be less appetite for continual experimentation and fragmented efforts. Rather marketers will want to do better what is already shown to work. In the digital space this is good news for Google and Facebook in particular.  </li> </ul> <p>2017 will be more about refinement than reinvention for most marketers. More about consolidation, embedding and stratification than diversity and fragmentation. Time to get better at ‘operationalising’ marketing in a digital age.</p> <p>Take a cue from Google which has been busy cutting back projects to focus on <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67745-15-examples-of-artificial-intelligence-in-marketing/">artificial intelligence</a>. In 2017 your hardest decisions will be about what <em>not</em> to do. </p> <h3>2. Macro trends impacting marketing in 2017</h3> <p>Following are some broader trends that are shaping marketing, and digital, through 2017 and beyond. </p> <h4>2.1 The democratisation of AI (artificial intelligence)</h4> <p>AI is <em>the</em> hot technology trend. But a bit like ‘big data’ I do not see it as a thing in isolation. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/marketing-in-the-age-of-artificial-intelligence/">AI will permeate all aspects of marketing</a> and beyond.</p> <p>From quite specific applications like AI-powered email subject line optimisation (like <a href="https://phrasee.co/">Phrasee</a>) through smart devices and right up to Samsung-acquired <a href="http://viv.ai/">Viv</a> the ‘global brain’ and ‘intelligent interface to everything’.  </p> <p>AI is already powerful: <a href="http://www.wired.co.uk/article/alphago-deepmind-google-wins-lee-sedol">Google’s Go-winning DeepMind technology</a>, Facebook’s <a href="https://research.fb.com/publications/deepface-closing-the-gap-to-human-level-performance-in-face-verification/">DeepFace</a> facial recognition is better than a human’s etc. But the exciting opportunity for us all is that AI is becoming democratised, becoming a utility, being made available as a service. </p> <p>In 2017 you should not ‘do AI’ but you should keep on top of how AI can help make smarter things that you are already doing and make sure your suppliers and vendors are using AI to improve their services to you. </p> <h4>2.2 Conversational interfaces</h4> <p>I could have gone with bots, chat, messaging, even the ‘conversation economy’. But let us focus on conversational interfaces for now.</p> <p>Messaging, bots and smart home devices, like Amazon’s Echo, are the main actors on the stage of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67767-will-conversational-marketing-become-a-reality-in-2016/">conversational UI</a>. This is an exciting area of development, possibly even a ‘<a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/4502/banned_words.png">paradigm shift</a>’? </p> <p>Conversational UIs can help remove friction in a process. Before long we will expect to say “Find me three of the best tents that sleep up to five people for under £300”, get a good answer, and then purchase, all by voice. Interfaces will have API access to marketplaces like eBay, Google Shopping, Amazon etc. </p> <p>From a brand point of view this conversational paradigm is also compelling. Perhaps we can have conversations like we used to with businesses and recapture some of the intimacy that technology to date has caused us to lose? Can conversational interfaces re-humanise technology? </p> <p>The big question for marketers and brands in 2017 is whether you choose to play directly in this space, by creating your own <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/">chatbot</a> for example, or whether you figure out how best to integrate in the ecosystem of much larger players, e.g. building a ‘skill’ for Amazon’s Alexa platform <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/help/insideguardian/2016/sep/28/introducing-the-guardian-skill-for-alexa">like the Guardian</a>. </p> <h4>2.3 Realtime</h4> <p>Building on the conversational paradigm, we should also expect experiences to become more realtime.</p> <p>Whether that is messaging, live customer service, live location tracking or live video streaming, we can see expectations rising for experiences that are ‘in the moment’. Just recently Google updated its “Popular times and visit duration” information for destinations to include realtime information on how busy the place is. </p> <p>In 2017 and beyond we need to look at how we can deliver <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/customer-experience/">customer experiences</a> that are realtime which is a challenge across technology, people and process. </p> <h4>2.4 Google/Facebook duopoly unchallenged</h4> <p>I cannot see how Google and Facebook will not continue to gain momentum. This will be aided by the focus and consolidation I described earlier.</p> <p>For many marketers who need to get good at a few things that they know have scale and can work, it is much easier to concentrate on a few platforms than many. </p> <p>Over 2017 it will be interesting to see how the video wars play out between Google (YouTube) and Facebook and also the degree to which brands work more directly with Google and Facebook which threatens to relegate the importance of the agency relationship. </p> <h4>2.5 Consultancies and systems integrators steal share from agencies</h4> <p>Speaking of agency relationships... I fear agencies may increasingly lose out to the big consultancies in winning large <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital and marketing transformation</a> work.</p> <p>Creativity and media planning/buying may hold out best against the consultancy attack but, as media becomes more programmatically driven, it is access to (increasingly backend) data and smart business logic that is required.</p> <p>And ‘digital transformation’ is a lot about change management, business strategy, data architecture, process, systems integration, cultural transformation etc. This is home turf to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68570-consultancies-are-buying-agencies-what-does-it-mean-for-marketing/">consultancies who have also been aggressively acquiring</a> or hiring agency talent.   </p> <h4>2.6 Identity management and authentication</h4> <p>We know devices are proliferating, we know we want to deliver personalised experiences across channels, we know multichannel marketing and (re)targeting can work if well executed and we know we want to measure ROI in a properly attributed way across channels. But we also know the sensitivities around data control and privacy.</p> <p>At the root of these challenges is how, and if at all, we can reliably identify who someone is. And even if we can, what the legal and perception challenges are around what we then do with that knowledge.</p> <p>This is another reason for the rise and rise of Google and Facebook who can address these challenges at scale and whose users are pretty much logged in all the time wherever they go online. Not a luxury most of us have.  </p> <h4>2.7 Talent</h4> <p>Yes, there is still a war for that.</p> <h3>3. Marketing trends for 2017</h3> <p>And now the key trends in marketing. </p> <h4>3.1 Marketing transformation</h4> <p>The <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68009-it-is-the-end-of-the-beginning-for-digital-but-is-it-the-beginning-of-the-end/">‘death of digital’ debate</a> rumbles on but certainly I have noticed brands talking not only about ‘digital transformation’ but also about ‘marketing transformation’.</p> <p>Usually the initial focus is a restructure of the marketing organisation, often with the (re)integration of digital marketing, and often with a new person at the top who is increasingly likely to be a CCO (Chief Customer Officer) rather than CMO. </p> <p><a href="http://theoystercatchers.com/">Oystercatchers</a> (a sister brand to Econsultancy and part of Centaur Media plc) note a trend towards clients bringing more marketing teams in house – maybe not permanently but building dream teams for specific tasks. </p> <p>Accompanying this internal transformation is a re-evaluation of supplier relationships, the likely outcome of which I address earlier, and zero-based budgeting has become more popular as another way to ‘reset the clock’. </p> <p>The area that I find most interesting is the idea of ‘marketing ops’: the operating system for marketing. This is one effective way of keeping focus but also dealing with complexity and delivering operational efficiency.</p> <p>Just as (enlightened) IT has ‘dev ops’ it makes absolute sense to me that marketing needs ‘marketing ops’. Marketing is adopting ‘agile’ from the world of technology (incorrectly in many cases, but still…) and could do well to adopt ‘ops’. </p> <p>If you want to get some insight into this emerging area of marketing I recommend you look at <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/MarTechConf/marketing-ops-is-a-philosophy-not-a-department-by-justin-dunham">this presentation on marketing ops by Justin Dunham</a> of Urban Airship.  </p> <h4>3.2 Customer experience still top of the agenda</h4> <p>Customer experience has been a hot topic for a few years now but it shows no sign of cooling in 2017. Every single piece of market research Econsultancy does into what topics marketers are prioritising, and indeed the equivalent data I have seen from other analysts, shows customer experience topping the charts. </p> <p>The drivers for this are partly just to meet customers’ rising expectations, i.e. improved experiences, particularly digital and multichannel ones, are something that you just have to do. Partly, of course, it is in an effort to improve ROI through better conversion and retention rates.  </p> <p>2017 will see more ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68681-mapping-the-customer-journey-doesn-t-have-to-be-difficult/">customer journey mapping</a>’, more defining of personas and further efforts at personalisation. And, according to Econsultancy’s recent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-cx-challenge/">Implementing a CX Strategy</a> research, it is the marketing function which is most likely to own CX within a business. Yet only 8% of companies view themselves as 'very advanced' in terms of customer experience maturity.</p> <p>Multichannel will remain a big focus for customer experience improvements. Amazon Go, which entirely automates the in-store experience using sensors and machine learning, shows what is possible when blending the digital and physical.</p> <p>Multichannel should not be about the distinction of physical and digital channels but about experience fulfilment: what works best for what experience and customer need.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NrmMk1Myrxc?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>In 2017 we will move away from channel execution to thinking more about touchpoints and brand (“omni-brand” anyone?) experience.</p> <p>Rarely is there a single linear customer journey; more usually customer journeys are pretzel-shaped. </p> <h4>3.3 Data lakes and data ops</h4> <p>The move towards brands taking greater, first-party, control of their data as a strategic asset will continue. Expect to hear more about ‘data lakes’ in 2017 and dedicated ‘data/analytics ops’ teams comprising data scientists, engineers and analysts.</p> <p>The focus will be on getting better access to the data that is already available and smarter reuse of analytics assets like algorithms and models. Perhaps this year more marketers will finally be able to get a universal view of cross-channel performance.  </p> <p>In 2017 we will also start to recognise the need to use data to market to machines. We already know the value of structuring our data properly through schematic language to enhance how we appear in search results. But as personal assistants and IoT (internet of things) devices increasingly intermediate between our offerings and our customers we will need to learn how to ‘teach’ these machines with data.</p> <h4>3.4 Measurement scrutiny</h4> <p>2016 saw a lot happening in the area of measurement, performance and metrics: <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2016/08/30/mark-ritson-mcdonalds-zero-margin-omnicom-deal-sets-welcome-precedents-for-agency-contracts/">McDonald’s zero-margin Omnicom deal</a> setting a new precedent for agency contracts; <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68332-should-marketers-be-more-concerned-about-facebook-s-video-metrics-faux-pas/">Facebook’s erroneous video metrics</a>; the <a href="http://www.ana.net/content/show/id/industry-initiative-media-transparency">ANA’s concerning report</a> into lack of transparency in media buying by agencies.</p> <p>As a result, there will be a lot of scrutiny from senior management around how marketing is being measured. Some may reach the nirvana promised by the aforementioned data lakes, assuming they can find the talent to realise them and harness their value, but for many this year’s focus will mean having fewer KPIs but being more rigorously held to account over those.</p> <p>Marketing attribution will still be challenging (less so for Google and Facebook): according to Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-state-of-marketing-attribution/">State of Marketing Attribution</a> research 76% of respondents are struggling to find the right staff to deal with attribution. </p> <h4>3.5 Rethinking segmentation and targeting</h4> <p>2016 saw a lot of debate around approaches to customer segmentation and targeting. How granular is too granular? Is ‘mass targeting’ the answer? How does programmatic work in the mix?</p> <p>In 2017 we need to focus on resolving this question. As ever, the answer will be ‘it depends’. It depends not just on your product and audience but on your business strategy e.g. if you are going after market share at any cost versus focusing on profits and margins. </p> <p>Approaches to targeting are interesting in as far as they expose the sometimes differing philosophies and approaches of ‘traditional’ and ‘digital’ marketing. The former typically has a higher degree of planning and research up front and the segmentation and targeting models often built on more prescribed geo-demographic data attributes. </p> <p>Digital, meanwhile, espouses a ‘test and learn’ approach to validate hypotheses, starting small and scaling what works, and using technology and data to optimise for successful outcomes.</p> <p>For example, using programmatic advertising to optimise for sales using lookalike targeting which may not care what geo-demographic segment a prospect belongs to.</p> <p>Digital focuses on assessing potential customer value based on realtime, dynamic and contextual data variables which might include the weather right now, your precise location right now, what device you are using, what transport you are currently in, what you have just searched for, just clicked on etc.</p> <p>This year, as part of our marketing transformation (see earlier), we need to resolve these tensions between ‘traditional’ and ‘digital’. This will play out in organisational design but also in our processes, culture and capability development.  </p> <h3>4. Digital marketing trends for 2017</h3> <p>There is an increasingly blurred line between ‘digital marketing’ and ‘marketing’ but the following trends focus on the digital elements of marketing.</p> <h4>4.1 Digital Transformation</h4> <p>Econsultancy’s recent research on <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-new-marketing-reality/">The New Marketing Reality</a> with IBM highlights the many challenges facing digital marketing:</p> <ul> <li>fragmentation and complexity.</li> <li>challenges in understanding the customer journey.</li> <li>challenges with organisational and data silos.</li> <li>confusion around metrics and what good looks like.</li> <li>managing both generalist and specialist agencies and vendors at the same time.</li> <li>lack of capability in areas like data and customer experience.</li> <li>lack of clarity in strategy and leadership. </li> </ul> <p>There is nothing particularly new here and there will not be for 2017. The challenges in becoming a digitally adept and mature organisation are many and will take years to work through.</p> <p>2017 will continue to see a mix of initiatives which, on the one hand, deliberately create ‘elite’ digital units (McKinsey talk about ‘<a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/marketing-and-sales/our-insights/agile-marketing-a-step-by-step-guide">war-room teams</a>’) in an attempt to move at speed and, on the other hand, attempts to integrate and unify ‘digital’ and ‘traditional’ within a single marketing function. In practice most organisations will do both at the same time.</p> <p>Digital will also need better ‘ops’ (see the earlier section on marketing transformation), particularly in the area of data. Ops can help corral disjointed data and wrangle the complexity of channel silos.</p> <p>Digital will also be in the vanguard as organisations seek to become more agile and better at <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68503-what-is-design-thinking/">design thinking</a>, customer experience optimisation and product management. </p> <p>Non-Executive Directors with digital expertise will stay in great demand. There will be more Chief Digital Officers (CDOs) but the rate of growth in this job title may have peaked. </p> <h4>4.2 Data and marketing automation</h4> <p>2016 was a big year for marketing automation. Martech outshone adtech. Companies like Oracle, Adobe and IBM went on a spending spree to acquire capabilities to bolster their martech offerings across areas including programmatic, personalisation, video and social.</p> <p>Last year also saw a lot of talk about using data to optimise marketing including customer insight, personalisation, automation, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/conversion-rate-optimization-report/">conversion rate optimisation</a>, multichannel, and predictive analytics. </p> <p>2017 will primarily be about putting these things into action. For most, ‘marketing automation’ is, initially, just better <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">email marketing</a>. Improved customer onboarding, retention or renewal sequences, more refined trigger-driven messaging, more personalisation, introducing lead scoring and lead nurturing.</p> <p>This practice is then extended into other channels as data becomes more joined up and the ‘direct marketing’ of email becomes joined to the ‘above the line’ of advertising with programmatic media. </p> <h4>4.3 Artificial intelligence </h4> <p>Earlier I noted that AI will permeate all areas of marketing so is not a discipline in itself. But it will be the digital experts within the marketing function who will be expected to take the lead in how AI is adopted by organisations.</p> <p>Indeed, Econsultancy researched our subscribers to ask who is responsible for defining the role of AI-powered marketing within their organisations and 61% stated it was the marketing function.</p> <p>The applications of AI in marketing for 2017 sit most obviously in the digital marketing disciplines: AI for content curation (e.g. smart recommendations); AI for customer service (particularly digital/social service); AI for content generation (e.g. email copy or video content); AI for sentiment analysis (e.g. social listening); AI for CRM (e.g. smarter loyalty or sales insights); AI for intelligent digital advertising optimisation; AI to power chatbots (e.g. for assistance in finding products or content). </p> <h4>4.4 Content marketing</h4> <p>As per <a href="http://www.gartner.com/technology/research/methodologies/hype-cycle.jsp">Gartner’s Hype Cycle</a>, 2017 sees content marketing moving through the slope of enlightenment and entering its plateau of productivity. There will be more focus on understanding return on investment, more refined approaches based on learnings to date, more focus on scaling the things that are working, more clarity on roles and capabilities.  </p> <p><em>Gartner's Hype Cycle</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3103/Gartner_hype_cycle.png" alt="" width="589" height="411"></em></p> <p>Scott Brinker has an interesting view on what he terms the <a href="http://marketingland.com/4th-wave-content-marketing-marketing-apps-84108">4th Wave of Content Marketing</a> and I agree that 2017 will see more focus on interactive experiences beyond static content or even rich content like video.  </p> <p>Video, as a form of content, will still be an active area of experimentation during 2017: vertical video, shorter and longer form video, video captioning and optimisation for stream viewing, live streaming, social video ads etc. </p> <h4>4.5 Social</h4> <p>“Social” is a very broad term these days. Plenty of activity to expect in 2017 across social:</p> <p><strong>Social care</strong> – deeper integration of social channels into customer service and care.</p> <p><strong>Social CRM</strong> – similarly to customer care, social data and touchpoints will become more closely integrated with backend CRM systems. </p> <p><strong>Dark social and messaging</strong> – more <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68695-how-brands-are-using-whatsapp-for-marketing/">brands running private social groups</a>, experiments with chatbots, greater usage of messaging as a medium both internally (e.g. Slack) and externally through integrations with Facebook Messenger or trials with WhatsApp groups and, for B2B, setting up messaging groups on LinkedIn. </p> <p><strong>Emerging platforms</strong> – social is at the forefront of experimentation with emerging platforms and formats. Last year it was Meerkat and Pinterest; this year I expect we will see more activity around Snap, Instagram and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67490-10-things-you-didn-t-know-about-wechat/">WeChat</a> (even in the West). </p> <p><strong>Social answering</strong> – I have not yet come up with a name I am happy with for this... but essentially it is about listening for relevant conversations, or questions, taking place online and then participating and answering in order to drive awareness, traffic and search rankings.</p> <p>In B2B this might be answering, or commenting on, content posted to LinkedIn; if you were targeting developers you would do this but on Stack Overflow; Quora, among others, has become a much bigger driver of traffic so it is worth answering relevant questions there. </p> <p><strong>Social amplification</strong> – thankfully there is less talk of ‘going viral’ as relates to social. But 2017 should see efforts in understanding how to use social to distribute, augment and amplify content and messaging.</p> <p>There is a skillset to optimising this: the best practitioners know how to orchestrate social channels to maximise amplification. In its simplest form this is about choreographing how, and when, content is published. Enterprise social management software now allows for more sophisticated scheduling and provides the analytical insights to optimise it.  </p> <p><strong>Influencer marketing</strong> – this is not just about ‘social’, of course, but 2017 will see continued efforts to identify and understand who the ‘new influencers’ might be for your brand and then engage with them, socially, commercially and through PR. </p> <p><strong>Social media advertising</strong> – driven largely by the emerging platforms as well as increasing experimentation by more traditional media owners, 2017 will offer a whole range of new ad formats, experiences and commercial models for agencies and their clients to experiment with. </p> <h3>5. Hot topics but still not significant in marketing for 2017</h3> <p>Our own Econsultancy research says that marketers are excited about VR, AR and IoT for 2017.</p> <p>So perhaps I will get some criticism for having the temerity to suggest these are not likely to form a significant part of an average marketer’s job this year. Unless you work for GAFA (Google Apple Facebook Amazon) that is. </p> <p>My thoughts on some of these topics:</p> <p><strong>AR (augmented reality)</strong> – sure <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68059-should-pokemon-go-give-marketers-hope-for-augmented-reality/">Pokémon Go was a great use of AR</a> but most of us are not gaming businesses. AR has many great applications but it still does not feel like it will go mainstream for marketers in 2017.</p> <p>That said, the iPhone 8 release this year could change that with ‘mixed reality’ getting a big boost. </p> <p><strong>VR (virtual reality)</strong> - there is huge hype and investment around VR including from GAFAM (I have added <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68442-microsoft-s-hololens-a-review-of-the-mixed-reality-headset/">Microsoft because of HoloLens</a>) so it should go large some time. But this year?</p> <p>The hardware requirements are still too onerous, the tech and apps too fragmented, the use cases mostly gaming or too niche, for most marketers to spend much time focusing on VR this year. As with AR, VR’s adoption could be turbocharged by the iPhone 8 release this year. </p> <p><strong>IoT (Internet of Things)</strong> – there are some fantastic examples of successful IoT services, a lot in B2B, and this will only grow. But I am less convinced there is an obvious opportunity for marketers yet.</p> <p>As more products and things become connected, however, there is a really interesting customer-product relationship marketing opportunity. We should see more early examples of that this year.  </p> <p><strong>Wearables</strong> – I am still not convinced there are enough use cases for most marketers to get excited about the wearables opportunity.</p> <p><strong>3D Printing</strong> – <a href="https://www.marketingweek.com/2014/08/14/3d-printing-whats-in-it-for-marketers/">I wrote about 3D printing</a> almost three years ago. The technology has improved, of course, but I’m still not clear how this is particularly relevant for marketers?</p> <p><strong>Blockchain</strong> – <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68693-the-importance-of-the-blockchain-the-second-generation-of-the-internet/">important, exciting, disruptive</a>, but not clear to me how marketing can <a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/4502/banned_words.png">leverage</a> this, unless perhaps for identity management and authentication.  </p> <p><strong>Beacons</strong> – still not doing it for me.</p> <p>But what do you think? Feel free to post any thoughts or links to your own digital/marketing trends and predictions for 2017. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/1980 2017-01-01T00:00:00+00:00 2017-01-01T00:00:00+00:00 Digital Intelligence Briefings Econsultancy <h3>Download the latest Digital Intelligence Briefing (2017 Digital Trends) <a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends/">here</a>.</h3> <p>Econsultancy's <strong>Digital Intelligence Briefings </strong>look at some of the most important trends affecting the marketing landscape.</p> <p>Marketers around the world are surveyed on a regular basis to give an accurate bellwether of trends that matter to marketers. Each year kicks off with a broader view on where marketers are focusing their attention. For the rest of the year, Econsultancy’s Research Team dig into some of the key trends to add depth and insight.</p> <p>These reports will benefit senior marketers with budget and planning responsibility who wish to benchmark themselves against their industry peers. They provide many stats and data points to assist with business cases, presentations and client pitches.</p> <p>The Digital Intelligence Briefings are sponsored by <a title="Adobe" href="http://www.adobe.com/solutions/digital-marketing.html">Adobe</a>.</p> <p><strong>2017</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends/">2017 Digital Trends</a></li> <ul> <li><a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in Financial Services and Insurance" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/2017-digital-trends-in-financial-services-and-insurance/">2017 Digital Trends in Financial Services and Insurance</a></li> <li><a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2017 Digital Trends in Retail" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends-in-retail/">2017 Digital Trends in Retail</a></li> </ul> </ul> <p><strong>2016</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2016 Digital Trends" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2016-digital-trends/">2016 Digital Trends</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity" href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-pursuit-of-data-driven-maturity/">The Pursuit of Data-Driven Maturity</a></li> <li><a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: Taking Advantage of the Mobile Opportunity" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-taking-advantage-of-the-mobile-opportunity/">Taking Advantage of the Mobile Opportunity</a></li> <li><a title="Digital Intelligence Briefing: Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-succeeding-in-the-omnichannel-age/">Succeeding in the Omnichannel Age</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2015</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2015-digital-trends/">2015 Digital Trends</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Quest for Mobile Excellence" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-quest-for-mobile-excellence">The Quest for Mobile Excellence</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: The Multichannel Reality" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-multichannel-reality/">The Multichannel Reality</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-cx-challenge/">The CX Challenge</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2014</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: 2014 Digital Trends" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-2014-digital-trends">Digital Trends for 2014</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Finding the Path to Mobile Maturity" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-finding-the-path-to-mobile-maturity">Finding the Path to Mobile Maturity</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Delivering Digital Experiences" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-delivering-digital-experiences">Delivering Digital Experiences</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-why-marketing-should-be-personal/">Why Marketing Should Be Personal</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2013</strong></p> <ul> <li> <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Digital Trends for 2013" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-digital-trends-for-2013">Digital Trends for 2013</a> </li> <li> <a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: From Content Management to Customer Experience Management" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-from-content-management-to-customer-experience-management">From Content Management to Customer Experience Management</a> </li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Optimising Paid Media" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-optimising-paid-media">Optimising Paid Media</a></li> <li><a title="Channels in Concert: Trends in Integrated Marketing" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-integrated-marketing">Trends in Integrated Marketing</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2012</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Digital Trends for 2012" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-digital-trends-for-2012/">Digital Trends for 2012</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Personalisation, Trust and Return on Investment" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-personalisation-trust-and-roi">Personalisation, Trust and Return on Investment</a></li> <li><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-managing-and-measuring-social">Managing and Measuring Social</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Making Sense of Marketing Attribution" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-making-sense-of-marketing-attribution">Making Sense of Marketing Attribution</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>2011</strong></p> <ul> <li><a title="Digital Trends for 2011" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-q2-2011">Digital Trends for 2011</a></li> <li><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-q3-2011">Impact of Marketing Technology on Business</a></li> <li><a title="Quarterly Digital Intelligence Briefing: Social Data" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-social-data">Social Data</a></li> </ul> <p><em>All reports are free to download as part of an Econsultancy subscription.</em></p> <h3><strong>More trends analysis from Econsultancy</strong></h3> <p>Enterprise subscribers also have access to <a title="Econsultancy Digital Shift" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-shift">Digital Shift</a>, a quarterly service which curates and interprets the most important developments, trends and innovation. Our aim? To make it simple for you to keep track of the key developments in digital technology and marketing. </p> <h4>Find out more about Econsultancy subscriptions</h4> <p>Email us on <a href="mailto:subscriptions@econsultancy.com">subscriptions@econsultancy.com</a>.</p> <p>Or call your local team:</p> <ul> <li>EMEA: Paul Simmons, +44 (0)20 3199 7118</li> <li>Americas: Alex Nodell, +1 212 971 0631</li> <li>APAC: Jefrey Gomez, +65 6653 1911</li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68654 2016-12-21T00:01:00+00:00 2016-12-21T00:01:00+00:00 Five steps toward marketing automation excellence Jeff Rajeck <p>Yet many of those who have implemented marketing automation are struggling to use it to improve overall marketing performance.</p> <p>According to a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/state-of-digital-marketing-in-australia-and-new-zealand/">recent Econsultancy survey,</a> <strong>less than 5% of marketers in Australia and New Zealand consider their automated email campaigns 'very successful'.  </strong></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2548/2.png" alt="" width="800" height="553"></p> <p>Additionally, <strong>more than 90% considered their marketing automation capabilities as 'basic' at best.</strong></p> <p><strong><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2549/1.png" alt="" width="800" height="506"></strong></p> <p>So, what is the problem? What do marketers need to do to get out of the 'basic zone' and deliver marketing automation excellence?</p> <p>To find out, we spoke to dozens of marketers at our recent Digital Cream Sydney about how they overcome the issues they faced when implementing marketing automation.</p> <h3>Background</h3> <p>Delegates agreed that marketing automation has an aura of being a 'magical tool' which will help marketers deliver the right message on the right platform.</p> <p>Implementation, however, often leads to disappointment. Initial projections were rarely met, and many felt that their original goals for marketing automation were 'drifting'.</p> <p>On the whole, participants said that they were still 'pursuing the dream', but many have become more realistic about their marketing automation ambitions. Instead of expecting marketing automation to be a 'silver bullet', they are following several steps which, they believe, achieve more realistic incremental goals.</p> <p>Below are the five steps which attendees agreed are leading them toward 'marketing automation excellence'.</p> <h3>1) Start with a basic marketing automation programme</h3> <p>A rookie mistake of implementing marketing automation, according to participants, is to first choose a marketing automation solution and then try to figure out how to use it.</p> <p>In these cases, a company signs up with a provider and dutifully links up the customer database, the email engine, and the website. Once everything is up and running, however, marketers realise that the programme does not have a clear goal and enthusiasm for the project quickly wanes.</p> <p>A better approach, according to delegates, is to review existing marketing strategies and pick one or two activities with well-known outcomes and work on a way to automate the tasks.</p> <p>For example, an ecommerce company may have data which shows that encouraging customers to return to the site every 3 months reduces churn and increases revenue.</p> <p>In this case, a marketing automation programme might just ensure that each customer is emailed relatively frequently for three months following a purchase. No new technology may be required at all.</p> <p>In time, marketers may use solutions to make these emails more sophisticated, but before investing in marketing automation technology, according to participants, they should first successfully launch a basic programme.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2552/2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2) Identify data sources</h3> <p>For even the simplest marketing automation programme, marketers rely on data. It may be as simple as the date of the last purchase or as sophisticated as customer behavioural data, but marketers need to have access to customer information for automation to be successful.</p> <p>Attendees felt, however, that accessing customer information was a significant roadblock as the data is often spread out throughout the organisations.</p> <p>In our recent survey of marketers in Australia and New Zealand, many in the region agree. When asked to identify the biggest barriers to implementing automation 'integrating data' was the most popular response from the client side.  </p> <p>No single solution to the problem was provided on the day, but participants acknowledged that obtaining and integrating data sources was an issue that everyone faced on the way to a successful marketing automation programme.</p> <h3>3) Implement data governance</h3> <p>While identifying data sources is an essential first step, marketers also need a strategy for how they are going to source data on an ongoing basis.</p> <p>Initially, the data required by the programme may be relatively easy to obtain, but participants indicated that marketers will eventually have to work with departments who may be reluctant to share their data.</p> <p>Several attendees said that having a written data governance policy makes obtaining data from other departments much easier.</p> <p>Such a policy should let other people in the organisation know how you intend to use the data and your strategy for maintaining data integrity and keeping sensitive information secure.</p> <p>One participant indicated that appointing someone as the 'data steward' to deal with policy and inquiries helped a great deal with internal data acquisition.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2553/1.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>4) Have clear success metrics from the start</h3> <p>Participants also agreed that even the most basic marketing automation programme should deliver results which demonstrates the value of the programme to the business.</p> <p>In order to make this happen, marketers need to be clear from the start about what metric they are trying to improve.</p> <p>If the purpose of marketing automation is to increase web traffic, noted one attendee, then marketers should not include email open rates in the performance report.</p> <p>For those marketers whose sponsors only look at top-line figures, they should ensure that the success metrics are focused on how marketing automation is increasing revenue.</p> <p>Without agreeing on what constitutes success from the start, marketing automation, like any programme, will be at risk of drifting from its original goals and losing sponsorship in the process.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2554/3.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>5) Always look for opportunities to expand the programme</h3> <p>The final step toward marketing automation excellence is that marketers must learn from the initial programmes and be on the lookout for other ways to use automation.</p> <p>Those who successfully implement an initiative which provides relevant offers based on purchases may look to do the same with content. Or, if web activity and email have been automated, marketers can also look at ways to deliver more relevant content to their audience via social media.</p> <p>Regardless of the results they have had with it so far, participants agreed that marketing automation was still worth pursuing and that it will be a significant part of their agenda in 2017.</p> <h3>A word of thanks</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day and especially the moderator at the marketing automation table, <strong>Steffen Daleng, General Manager - Digital, The Co-op Bookstore.</strong></p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Sydney Econsultancy events!</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2555/4.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68634 2016-12-13T01:00:00+00:00 2016-12-13T01:00:00+00:00 Three ways brands will use cognitive marketing Jeff Rajeck <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2367/machine_learning.png" alt="" width="800" height="365"></p> <p>These same forces are also being used in marketing. AI, or 'cognitive', marketing systems use industrial computing power, big data, and machine learning to improve marketing performance. </p> <p>While cognitive marketing has not yet been deployed to a great extent, it soon will be. According to IDC, <a href="https://martechtoday.com/now-entering-age-cognitive-marketing-169117">more than half of all companies will be using cognitive marketing by 2020</a>.</p> <p>So, what exactly is cognitive marketing and how will brands use it?</p> <p>To find out, Econsultancy, in association with <a href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/">IBM Watson Marketing</a>, recently held roundtable discussions in Delhi. There, senior client-side marketers discussed the impact of cognitive marketing on brand messaging and how they see the technology developing.  </p> <p>Below is a summary of the three main ways marketers on the day plan to use cognitive marketing.</p> <h3>1. Segment audiences in new ways</h3> <p>Segmenting audiences is a key part of providing relevant messaging to consumers. Participants noted that most marketers use demographics to segment their audience into groups with similar wants and needs.</p> <p>In contrast, cognitive marketing systems search massive data sets from a wide variety of sources, such as web analytics, social media, and purchasing behaviour, to find customer segments which exhibit similar behaviour.</p> <p>In some cases these segments may resemble traditional demographic groups, but in others <strong>cognitive marketing may find common behavioural characteristics among people who appear to be very different.</strong></p> <p>What this means for marketers, according to attendees, is that <strong>cognitive marketing will transform the customer list into a database where each member is connected to others in many different ways</strong>. The result is that one customer will be part of countless segments depending on their observed behaviour.</p> <p>So, a woman aged 34 would no longer be simply considered as 'female, 30-35' but, instead, she would be a 'fashion lover' who 'takes three months to buy', 'travels to Bangalore twice a week', and 'tends to open emails on Tuesday'. </p> <p>Without using cognitive marketing, one participant noted, these sorts of segments would be nearly impossible to build, manage, and use effectively.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2368/delhi3.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2. Personalise content</h3> <p>With these behavioural segments, marketers can use cognitive marketing systems to personalise content more effectively than ever before.</p> <p>After receiving core content, <strong>a cognitive marketing engine could redesign the messaging so that virtually every person saw something different</strong>. Participants envisioned that the system would use data from social media, browsing behaviour, and even sentiment from customer service communications to reformat content for an individual.</p> <p>Attendees offered a couple of reasons why brands will use this approach. First off, <strong>cognitive marketing would ensure that the brand message was delivered in the right way at the right time for each customer.</strong> Long-form, engaging content could be sent when you know a customer is at home and shorter, easy-to-consume messaging would appear when they are commuting, for example.</p> <p><strong>Personalisation would also ensure that brands avoid delivering irrelevant messages and risk being 'tuned out' by the customer.</strong> Put another way, one marketer said, 'you have five seconds to get their attention with something relevant, otherwise you are done'.</p> <p>Following the event, Antonia Edmunds, business leader at <a href="https://www.ibm.com/watson/marketing/">IBM Watson Marketing</a>, had a few more words to say on this topic:</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/M_VeJapDEsU?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>3. Help customers make better decisions</h3> <p>Delivering a personalised message at the right time benefits the brand for the reasons mentioned above, but delegates noted that<strong> cognitive marketing will also help the customer make better decisions.</strong></p> <p>As cognitive marketing can make inferences using data from a wide variety of sources,<strong> it can also help brands identify customers who have a particular unstated need</strong>, said one attendee.  This will allow the brand to deliver personalised offers and guidance. </p> <p>For example, if someone is price sensitive at the moment, they could be told about a lower-priced product range. If they are time poor, the brand could let them know about a new convenience. And if they are in the middle of a major life event, say moving or getting married, the brand could offer to help them with the process.</p> <p>In this way, according to participants, <strong>cognitive marketing will help companies start conversations with consumers around topics which matter to them</strong> and not just around what the brand wants to say about itself.  </p> <p>This, in turn, will demonstrate that the brand anticipates a consumer's wants and needs and, ideally, make it easier for them to choose the brand above all others.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2369/delhi2.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>A word of thanks...</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day and our table leaders: </p> <ul> <li>Antonia Edmunds, Business Leader - IBM Watson Marketing.</li> <li>Gowri Arun, GBS Marketing Leader - IBM India/South Asia.</li> <li>Joseph Sundar, Business Development Executive, ISA/ASEAN - IBM Watson Marketing.</li> <li>Harsh Anand, CSP Leader - IBM Commerce. </li> </ul> <p>We hope to see you all at future Delhi Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2373/delhi4.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p>