tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/mobile Latest Mobile content from Econsultancy 2016-10-21T09:20:52+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68437 2016-10-21T09:20:52+01:00 2016-10-21T09:20:52+01:00 10 of the best digital marketing stats we've seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>So, let’s waste no more time.</p> <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more.</p> <h3>51% of UK online ads don’t reach viewability standards</h3> <p>Meetrics’ Q3 viewability report has revealed that the UK is underperforming when it comes to online ad viewability.</p> <p>According to the benchmark defined by the IAB and Media Ratings Council, 50% of online ads should be in view for at least one second. </p> <p>However, this is only the case for 49% of display ads.</p> <p>This means that the UK remains far behind other European countries, with the likes of Austria and France having 69% and 60% viewability rates respectively.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0582/Ads.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="455"></p> <h3>68% of digital marketers see data analysis as the skill most integral to their role</h3> <p>Greenlight Digital’s 41 Hour Report has highlighted the increasing role data is playing in all areas of the marketing industry.</p> <p>Alongside content optimisation and the ability to align with the sales team, 68% of digital marketers say that analysing data – a task that is done on a daily basis – is the most integral skill for their job.</p> <p>Coding is also growing in importance, but even more so for younger generations. </p> <p>35% of digital marketers feel that it is important, but more specifically, 50% of marketers under the age of 30 believe that it is essential for their role.</p> <h3>Trump’s email campaign outperforms Clinton's</h3> <p>Despite poor performance overall, research from email service provider, Mailjet, has revealed that Trump’s email campaign is better at engaging grassroots donors.</p> <p>From analysis of both Clinton and Trump’s email campaigns across six different parameters, Trump comes out top in three, with the significant inclusion of calls-to-action winning him vital points.</p> <p>However, with Trump scoring just 12.9 points out of a possible 27, low scores across the board indicate missed opportunities for both nominees. </p> <p>Mailjet suggests that poor personalisation, poor design and a lack of cross device compatibility has led to poor results.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0565/email_campaigns.PNG" alt="" width="650" height="392"></p> <h3>75% of consumers say omnichannel capabilities are a key factor for choosing retailers </h3> <p>The 2016 Mobile Research Survey from Astound Commerce has revealed that consumers are increasing looking for omnichannel capabilities on mobile devices.</p> <p>In a study of consumer behaviour, it found that 64% have made an online purchase with an in-store pick-up in the last three months.</p> <p>Likewise, six out of 10 consumers have used their mobile phone at least three times in a month to check whether a product is in stock at a local store.</p> <p>With 57% saying that features like store locators (including nearby locations and mapped directions) are very important – the desire for a seamless shopping experience across all channels is growing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0566/Astound.PNG" alt="" width="599" height="389"></p> <h3>65% of marketers see digital video as an important sales tool</h3> <p>Video marketing has traditionally been seen as a tool for engaging consumers as opposed to a medium for driving and tracking ROI. </p> <p>However, new research from Sequent Partners shows that new technology in the video marketing space means marketers perceptions of the medium are changing.</p> <p>Now, 65% of marketers say that digital video is growing in importance for driving offline sales.</p> <p>85% of marketers also reported positive ROI from digital video.</p> <h3>Post-Brexit sales see strongest growth since 2014</h3> <p>The IMRG Capgemini eRetail Sales Index has revealed that the quarter following on from Brexit saw the strongest online sales growth since Q1 2014.</p> <p>Alongside a growth of 16% year-on-year for the month of September, the report also shows a 17% growth for Q3 overall.</p> <p>It was an impressive period for the home and garden sector in particular, seeing growth of 21% year-on-year and the 11th consecutive month of positive growth.</p> <p>An unseasonably sunny and warm September is said to have been a big factor.</p> <h3>Sundays and Mondays set to be the best days for US travel this December</h3> <p>According to Sojern’s Global Travel Insights report, just 9% of Americans have booked to travel on Sundays and Mondays in December. </p> <p>This is compared to the 23% who are have made bookings for Fridays and 20% for Thursdays.</p> <p>In terms of the top destination, Sojern says that Miami remains at the very top, with both Las Vegas and London increasing in popularity.</p> <p>As Christmas Eve (historically the busiest day of the year for travel) falls on a Friday, 2016 looks set to be the busiest and most expensive for a while. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0563/Sojern_stats.jpg" alt="" width="770" height="435"></p> <h3>62% of customers feel undervalued by businesses</h3> <p>A report by Wiraya has suggested that businesses need to change the way they communicate with customers or risk losing them to rivals.</p> <p>From a study of 500 UK consumers who have left their bank, energy, mobile or insurance provider in the last six months – 86% said they would have been more content to stay if they’d been contacted differently.</p> <p>One in five consumers complained about the lack of relevancy in email communication, and 41% said being asked the same information twice was also a big annoyance. </p> <p>Overall, banks and mobile providers came out in a better light than insurance and energy companies, however a need for increased relevancy and personalisation was a theme for all.</p> <h3>72% of people now they check their emails on a smartphone</h3> <p>In a survey of over 1,700 US consumers, Mapp Digital recently found 72% of respondents regularly check their emails using a smartphone instead of a desktop or tablet.</p> <p>The fact that this figure rises to a whopping 91% for 18 to 24 year olds shows the growing acceptance of mobile use among millennials.</p> <p>According to Mapp, this also extends to a willingness to receive marketing messages on mobile.</p> <p>The percentage of 18 to 34 year-olds using a separate email address for brand communication decreased from 40% to 30% over the past year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0570/smartphone_use.jpg" alt="" width="500" height="332"></p> <h3>Videos overtake photos as the most popular brand post on Facebook</h3> <p>A new study by Quintly has delved into how big brands are performing on Facebook.</p> <p>One of the biggest findings from the report shows how videos have overtaken photos as the most popular type of post. </p> <p>In the first half of 2016, 54.9% of posts were videos compared to just 45.1% for photos.</p> <p>Finally, there has been a steady decline in brand posts overall, going from an average of 150 posts per month in January to less than 100 posts per month in June.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2016-10-20T16:10:00+01:00 2016-10-20T16:10:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to a B2B report) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet, statistics and online market research with data, facts, charts and figures.The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need, to help make your pitch or internal report up to date.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Those looking for B2B-specific data should consult our <a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</strong></p> <p> <strong>Regions covered in each document (where available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68419 2016-10-14T16:20:32+01:00 2016-10-14T16:20:32+01:00 All the digital news stories you missed this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Amazon and VMare announce partnership</h3> <p>It has been announced that Amazon and VMware – two competitors in cloud computing – are to join forces.</p> <p>From next year, VMware’s software - which includes VSphere, VSAN and NSX - will be able to run on Amazon’s cloud, also becoming available to existing Amazon users. </p> <p>Though they have traditionally been rivals, this move appears to be part of VMware’s attempts to lead innovation rather than compete with the technology giant.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Breaking: VMware officially partners w/ <a href="https://twitter.com/awscloud">@awscloud</a>! Running any app on vSphere-based cloud services just got easier <a href="https://t.co/ZFYuFiReeT">https://t.co/ZFYuFiReeT</a> <a href="https://t.co/yt4XIMqiKe">pic.twitter.com/yt4XIMqiKe</a></p> — VMware (@VMware) <a href="https://twitter.com/VMware/status/786666506457260032">October 13, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Tesco and Unilever fight (and make up again) </h3> <p>Marmite fans were left in despair this week as the famously divisive spread was removed from Tesco’s website, following a dispute with Unilever over wholesale prices.</p> <p>Due to the steep drop in the value of the pound, Unilever wanted to raise its prices by 10%.</p> <p>However, Tesco refused and subsequently removed a range of Unilever products from its website, including PG Tips and Pot Noodle.</p> <p>However, we can now all breathe a sigh of relief.</p> <p>Unilever has since released a statement saying: “We have been working together closely to reach this resolution and ensure our much-loved brands are once again fully available. For all those that missed us, thanks for all the love.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">"I can get you Marmite, son. Been collecting it for years. I knew this day would come. But it's gonna cost ya." <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Marmitegate?src=hash">#Marmitegate</a> <a href="https://t.co/HkYQIC18op">pic.twitter.com/HkYQIC18op</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/786505332147179521">October 13, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Facebook introduces Workplace tool</h3> <p>This week, it was announced that Workplace by Facebook will be opened up to any organization or business that wants to use it.</p> <p>Formerly known as Facebook at Work, the enterprise tool is essentially a rival to Slack, allowing employees to communicate with each other outside the realms of company email.</p> <p>So far, the likes of Danone, Starbucks and Oxfam have all signed up.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0388/Workplace_by_Facebook.PNG" alt="" width="550" height="450"></p> <h3>Samsung set to lose $5.4bn over Galaxy Note 7 recall</h3> <p>Since the Galaxy Note 7 was recalled last month after reports of battery fires, Samsung has announced the total cost of pulling the device off the market will be at least $5.4bn.</p> <p>The company had already lowered its third-quarter profit guidance by $2.3bn, but it is now expected to take an additional hit of $3bn.</p> <p>Meanwhile, hotly anticipated sales figures of rival device, the iPhone 7, are set to be released on 25th October.</p> <h3>Amazon launches new competitor to Spotify and Apple Music</h3> <p>Amazon Music Unlimited is the latest player in the music streaming market.</p> <p>Set to initially launch in the US, it will cost $9.99 per month – the same as Spotify.</p> <p>However, Amazon Prime customers will be able to subscribe for $7.99, while owners of the Amazon Echo can get the service for just $3.99. </p> <p>The only catch with the Amazon Echo deal is that users can only stream using this device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0389/Amazon_music_unlimited.PNG" alt="" width="650" height="352"></p> <h3>Snapchat sets its sights on UK advertisers</h3> <p>Claire Valoti, GM of Snap Inc. in the UK has emphasised the platform’s potential for mobile ads, suggesting that the popularity of brand lenses means that “people are playing with advertising”.</p> <p>A few months ago, Snapchat announced the roll out of an API - an interface that will allow third-party partners to programmatically trade snap ads. </p> <p>Though it is not yet clear whether any programs are underway in the UK, it marks a significant development in the relationship between Snapchat and agencies.</p> <p>A lack of investment from advertisers has so far been put down to a lack of data and inconsistency in branded content guidelines.</p> <h3>Instagram app is now available for Windows 10</h3> <p>An official Instagram app for Windows 10 has just been released.</p> <p>Following on from the launch of the app for mobile in April, Windows 10 users can now access the social network on desktop PCs and tablets.</p> <p>However, despite the inclusion of regular features like Instagram Stories, Explore and direct messaging, the app won’t work on devices without a touchscreen or rear-facing camera.</p> <p>But hey, they can still thank themselves lucky - there's still no sign of an app for iPads. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Today, Windows 10 tablets get the entire Instagram experience — including Instagram Stories. <a href="https://t.co/6h4WahK6Iu">https://t.co/6h4WahK6Iu</a> <a href="https://t.co/tMh2h5drxJ">pic.twitter.com/tMh2h5drxJ</a></p> — Instagram (@instagram) <a href="https://twitter.com/instagram/status/786727830176591873">October 14, 2016</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68418 2016-10-14T13:33:36+01:00 2016-10-14T13:33:36+01:00 10 stupendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Luckily there’s lots of other good stuff to enjoy, including news on travel search, smartphone use and mobile ad spend.</p> <p>You can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more juicy stats and insight.</p> <h3>Visits to holiday rental sites double</h3> <p>According to new data from Hitwise, there has been a 112% increase in visits to holiday rental sites such as Airbnb and Homeaway.</p> <p>Based on the behaviour of 3m online consumers, the findings show that while the majority of visits to hotel aggregators come from search engines, a high proportion of visits to holiday rental sites originate on social media channels.</p> <p>The research also found a difference in search terms - the majority of hotel searches were related to “cheap” and “deal”, however, the biggest keywords for holiday rental searches were “hot tubs” or “villas”. </p> <p>This shows how consumers desire a more tailored approach to holiday-booking rather than one based on price.</p> <h3>Hasbro and Lego lead ecommerce race in run up to Christmas</h3> <p>Research from global ecommerce analytics firm Profitero has found that Hasbro is currently the leading brand in the Amazon UK best-selling toys and games category.</p> <p>The brand now has seven products in the top 100, meaning it has just edged out Lego.</p> <p>Despite winning in the UK last year, Lego is currently in a strong position in the equivalent US list, with a total of 11 products featured in the top 100.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0360/Toys_and_Games.PNG" alt="" width="532" height="307"></p> <h3>48% of millennials used a smartphone to plan travel in the past year</h3> <p>From a study of 2,000 people, Signal has found that consumers are becoming increasingly digital when it comes to booking travel - with millennials in particular driving this change.</p> <p>The study found that 42% of people now use their smartphones for booking both airline tickets and hotel rooms more frequently than they did a year ago.</p> <p>In comparison, booking via desktop has increased just 15%.</p> <p>Further to this, personalisation is becoming more important to young people.</p> <p>48% of millennials planned a trip with their smartphone during the past year, with 29% of this age demographic desiring a booking experience that is customised to their needs and preferences.</p> <h3>Mobile ad spend overtakes PC for the first time</h3> <p>A new report from PwC and IAB has found that spend on digital advertising increased 16.4% in the first half of 2016. </p> <p>Reaching £4.78bn, it saw the highest growth rate in two years.</p> <p>The report also shows that the amount companies spent on mobile display ads overtook that of PC and tablet display for the first time ever.</p> <p>This reflects the rapid growth of time spent on smartphones, as this June saw UK adults reportedly spent 46% of their internet time on a mobile compared to 41% on a desktop or laptop.</p> <p>The demographic that spends more time of their smartphones than anyone is women aged between 18 to 24.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0358/digital_ad_spend.PNG" alt="" width="662" height="409"></p> <h3>66% of consumers shop cross-border</h3> <p>The third annual Global Online Shopping Survey from Pitney Bowes has revealed that cross-border shopping is now more popular with consumers.</p> <p>The survey found that, as well as 94% of consumers making a domestic online purchase in the past year, 66% of them have also purchased online from another country.</p> <p>Out of the countries with the highest number of cross-border shoppers, Singapore and Australia top the list, with 89% and 86% of consumers regularly shopping elsewhere.</p> <p>Regardless of country, the survey also shows that approximately half of consumers say that most of their internet-based shopping is done through an online marketplace.</p> <h3>Disney is among the top US Halloween searches of 2016</h3> <p>Hitwise, a division of Connexity, suggests that Disney is having a big influence in this year’s US online Halloween trends. </p> <p>“Disney Moana” is the most popular overall search term so far, as well as “Belle”, “Beast” and “Ariels” all showing increased interest from 2015.</p> <p>Alongside this, Hitwise has also noted the emergence of a trend for beard-related search terms.</p> <p>Mentions of the word “beard” or “beards” in costume searches are up 18% YoY, while searches for “Halloween costume for guys with beards” are four times greater than in 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0356/Halloween_search.PNG" alt="" width="303" height="495"></p> <h3>American consumers never plan to spend full price at Christmas</h3> <p>According to Accenture, 44% of US consumers plan to spend more than they did last Christmas.</p> <p>But despite this, 42% say they rarely or never expect to pay full price for gifts.</p> <p>Based on an online poll of 1,500 consumers, the Accenture Holiday Shopping Survey found that 67% of consumers plan to shop around from different retailers in order to get the lowest price.</p> <p>Moreoever, 72% would shop with a retailer they haven't used in the last year if they are offered a promotion or discount.</p> <p>Despite this, consumers are now becoming more open to share personal information, with 54% saying they would be willing to do so for an offer or discount in return.</p> <h3>60% of influencers assess a brand’s reputation before working with them</h3> <p>Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/" target="_blank">Voice of the Influencer report</a>, in association with Fashion &amp; Beauty Monitor, has found that influencers are now taking more control when it comes to working with brands.</p> <p>From an online survey of a select number of influencers, 60% said that they always consider a brand’s heritage and reputation before entering into a working relationship.</p> <p>Second to this, 56% also said that a brand’s ethos and values are critical factors to consider. </p> <p>This demonstrates the shift of power within influencer marketing, with online personalities now calling the shots over big name brands.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0359/Influencers.PNG" alt="" width="296" height="494"></p> <h3>Southern Rail fail results in Twitter storm</h3> <p>British commuters were left frustrated again this week, with many taking to social media to vent their frustration at the latest strike action from Southern Rail employees.</p> <p>According to data from Spredfast, 10,000 tweets were sent in a single day on Tuesday – the first day of the official RMT walkout. </p> <p>The hashtag #southernfail was used in over 2,000 tweets, seeing a particular spike at around 8:30am during the delayed commute to work. </p> <p>Overall, 96% of Twitter activity showed no positivity at all, with very few tweets in support of RMT.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0357/Spredfast.PNG" alt="" width="600" height="300"></p> <h3>Use of everyday mobile payments triples </h3> <p>In a poll of 36,800 online consumers across Europe, Visa has found that 54% of consumers now use a mobile device to make everyday payments – this is compared to just 18% in the same survey last year.</p> <p>In the UK, 74% of consumers regularly use their mobile device to manage their money or make a payment in person, online or in an app.</p> <p>Furthermore, 59% also use their mobile devices to transfer money to friends and family, while 45% use them to buy takeaway meals.</p> <p>Overall, the report shows that consumers are becomingly equally confident in making both large and small purchases using their mobile.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68402 2016-10-13T09:38:18+01:00 2016-10-13T09:38:18+01:00 Boss life: How Avon is rebranding to target a new generation Nikki Gilliland <p>Aiming to shed the antiquated image of the old ‘Avon Lady’, it is not only targeting consumers of the make-up brand, but a new generation of potential reps. </p> <p>Here’s a closer look at the campaign as well as why it could be make or break for the brand.</p> <h3>A focus on recruitment rather than sales</h3> <p>While most beauty brands use marketing to increase product sales, Avon is using its new campaign to highlight its direct-sales model and to drive recruitment for the company.</p> <p>The campaign is centred around an advert set to the Gloria Gaynor hit, ‘I Will Survive’. </p> <p>However, this time, the song has been re-worked to fit the theme of entrepreneurial freedom and flexibility. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KWbWJ8xweUg?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Highlighting the positive results of stepping away from a dull office role into life as an Avon representative, the chorus is replaced with the lyrics: “I’m a boss”.</p> <p>While the ad comes across as slightly cheesy, it does succeed in getting the message across. </p> <p>With sales of Avon products <a href="http://fortune.com/2015/12/17/avon-us-decline/" target="_blank">rapidly declining from 2007 to 2014</a> (see below graph), its first major campaign since being sold to private equity firm Cerberus needed to be bold. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0120/Avon_sales.JPG" alt="" width="707" height="474"></p> <p>What’s more, it needed to shake off the idea that being an Avon lady is old fashioned or a role reserved for middle class suburbia.</p> <p>With the rise of the contingent workforce, as well as brands like Uber and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68225-10-examples-of-great-airbnb-marketing-creative/" target="_blank">Airbnb capitalising on the 'experience-hungry' consumer</a>, it is hoping to follow suit and target a younger generation with a greater desire for flexible work.</p> <h3>Using mobile-optimised video</h3> <p>So, we can see who Avon is trying to target, but how exactly is the brand doing it?</p> <p>Alongside traditional broadcast, print, radio and digital efforts, the campaign is heavily focused on mobile, with video ads being optimised for smartphones and used for pre-roll advertising.</p> <p>This appears to be a deliberate attempt to target fans of beauty bloggers and vloggers.</p> <p>With <a href="http://tubularinsights.com/millennials-ensure-46-percent-video-consumed-via-mobile/" target="_blank">46% of video now being consumed on mobile</a>, Avon is hoping to engage with consumers using the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">social channels they feel most comfortable on</a>.  </p> <p>The campaign will further roll out in the coming months, with dedicated Snapchat filters and other digital components.</p> <p>That being said, Avon is keen to show that it’s not only going after millennials.</p> <p>Further to the main ad, the campaign also includes promotional videos featuring real-life Avon representatives, including a mother, student and even a couple that has made their living from the brand. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vQxkMXXXAYA?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Will it reinvent the brand?</h3> <p>While Avon’s latest campaign marks a new narrative for the brand, it remains to be seen whether it’ll help reverse its previous fortunes.</p> <p>After all, its decline wasn’t only down to a lack of new recruits.</p> <p>A lack of digital innovation has often been cited as one of the biggest factors, with both its ecommerce site and software to help reps move online failing to take off.</p> <p>With competitors like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67095-how-birchbox-engages-customers-with-personalisation-that-disappears/">Birchbox</a> and Sephora putting digital at the very heart of their business models, it’s no surprise that Avon struggled to keep pace.</p> <p>Now hoping to strike a balance between direct-sales and ecommerce, its new campaign is definitely a step in the right direction. </p> <p>Whether or not consumers will be more receptive than before remains to be seen.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:RoundtableEvent/832 2016-10-12T17:29:40+01:00 2016-10-12T17:29:40+01:00 Email: Making Design and Content Mobile Friendly <p><strong>Exclusively available for Econsultancy Enterprise subscribers,</strong> this roundtable gives you the opportunity to meet with your peers and share knowledge, best practice, opportunities and challenges in particular areas of Email,</p> <p>Attendance is limited to 14 - 16 attendees, with discussion chaired and facilitated by Econsultancy.</p> <p><strong>Agenda</strong></p> <p>Agenda to be published shortly...</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:RoundtableEvent/830 2016-10-12T17:29:33+01:00 2016-10-12T17:29:33+01:00 Mobile Web Design and Development <p><strong>Exclusively available for Econsultancy Enterprise subscribers</strong>, this roundtable gives you the opportunity to meet with your peers and share knowledge, best practice, opportunities and challenges in particular areas of Mobile Web Design and Development.</p> <p>Attendance is limited to 14 - 16 attendees, with discussion chaired and facilitated by Econsultancy.</p> <h3>Agenda</h3> <p>Agenda points to be published shortly...</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68368 2016-10-12T15:11:43+01:00 2016-10-12T15:11:43+01:00 To win over millennials, brokerage firms rethink their digital services Patricio Robles <p>In an attempt to address that challenge, a number of upstart brokerages are rethinking how their services function and how they charge for them.</p> <p>For example, <a href="https://www.robinhood.com/">Robinhood</a> is a brokerage firm that has a unique proposition: _ts customers can trade only through the company's smartphone app, which is far more simple than those offered by many brokerages.</p> <p>The firm, which has raised over $60m in funding from investors, says that 80% of its users are millennials and the average age of its customers is 28.</p> <p>Not surprisingly, many of Robinhood's customers reportedly have smaller accounts, but the company is betting that as they increase their earnings and funnel more of their money into stock market investments, the loyalty it has built will pay off.</p> <p>Another startup broker, Divy, aims to attract millennials <a href="http://www.barrons.com/articles/two-new-mobile-investing-apps-for-millennials-1453527209">by adding</a> a social layer to investing and allows its customers to buy fractional shares of company stock with friends and family in increments of as little as $10. </p> <p>"Investing in very small increments, while looking at what your friends and colleagues are doing, helps you think about the markets much more broadly," the company's founder, Marc Teren, <a href="http://www.barrons.com/articles/two-new-mobile-investing-apps-for-millennials-1453527209">told Barron's</a>.</p> <h3>Applying familiar business models</h3> <p>Some brokers are rethinking their business models, going so far as to apply business models from other industries.</p> <p>For example, last month, Motif, a Silicon Valley-based brokerage startup that bills itself as a "next-generation online broker," <a href="https://www.motifinvesting.com/about/press/press_release/motif-enters-subscription-economy-introduces-motif-blue">launched</a> a subscription-based trading service called Motif BLUE.</p> <p>According to Hardeep Walia, Motif's founder and CEO:</p> <blockquote> <p>Today’s subscription-based economy means more affordable, customizable services. We don’t think that investing should be an exception, and that’s why we’ve set out to create the Amazon Prime of our industry.</p> </blockquote> <p>Motif BLUE allows customers to trade as frequently as they like without racking up transaction fees.</p> <p>Like many subscription services, Motif BLUE has multiple subscription tiers that offer different features and costs, and a one-month free trial is available.</p> <p>All tiers allow customers to create investment models, configure recurring investments and rebalance their portfolios without management fees.</p> <p>Motif says that its BLUE subscription offering "marks a shift toward business model innovation" whereas previously the company was "focused on product innovation."</p> <p>That's an important point for financial services firms that are attempting to court younger investors.</p> <p>While these firms can update their services and create new ones that are designed to appeal to their young customers, how those customers pay for those services is arguably just as crucial.</p> <p>This is because young consumers are often more comfortable with business models that are not as common in financial services.</p> <p>With BLUE, Motif can potentially lure customers who like the idea of all-you-can-eat trading for a flat monthly subscription fee.</p> <p>And millennial-focused Robinhood doesn't charge its customers transaction fees at all.</p> <p>It relies on other sources of revenue, such as interest from margin accounts, to cover the trading costs other brokerages charge their customers.</p> <h3>Will it work?</h3> <p>There's evidence that all of this is working. For instance, since its launch Robinhood has attracted over 1m customers.</p> <p>But the real question for brokerage firms that are rethinking how their services are structured and sold is whether millenials will stick with them as they grow up and their needs change.</p> <p>There's a danger they will graduate to more traditional brokers that might not meet their needs today but will tomorrow.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66536-digital-transformation-in-financial-services-challenges-and-opportunities/"><em>Digital Transformation in Financial Services: Challenges and opportunities</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-trends-in-the-financial-services-and-insurance-sector-2016/"><em>Digital Trends in the Financial Services and Insurance Sector</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68400 2016-10-12T10:57:14+01:00 2016-10-12T10:57:14+01:00 The KitKat Chocolatory: Is Nestle's London pop-up store any good? Nikki Gilliland <p>Yet another example of a brand entering the world of physical retail, the pop-up is also part of Nestle’s attempts to offer greater personalisation to consumers.</p> <p>Here’s what I thought of the experience...</p> <h3>First impressions and interior</h3> <p>I went to the Chocolatory on a Sunday at around midday - bang on the store’s opening time. </p> <p>It was fairly quiet to begin with, but I was suprised to see how quickly it filled up, with a line soon snaking outside.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0094/kitkat_exterior.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="800"></p> <p>Without much prior knowledge beforehand, I was pretty excited about the prospect of designing my own chocolate bar. </p> <p>(I obviously had visions of a Willy Wonka-style chocolate factory).</p> <p>Entering the store, it was immediately obvious what the whole process would entail, but sadly, it was less magical than I’d hoped.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0096/kitkat_interior.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="800"></p> <p>With an area sectioned off for the ‘expert chocolatiers’, visitors can choose their personalised KitKat designs using a touchscreen device.</p> <p>Alternatively, there is also the option to buy ready-made special edition bars created by Michelin-star chef, Michael O’Hara. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0097/kit_kat_store.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="562"></p> <p>Of course, I wanted to design my own, so began by perusing the ‘menu’ as I waited in the queue.</p> <h3><img style="font-weight: normal;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0098/kitkat_menu.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="696"></h3> <h3>Three-step process</h3> <p>When I arrived at my touchscreen, I was taken through three stages to create my own bar.</p> <p>First I chose the base flavour of milk chocolate, before selecting three out of the possible 16 ‘signature flavours’. </p> <p>I went for pistachio, chocolate brownie bits and honeycomb.</p> <p>Finally, I was able to design my own gift box, which included my name as well as a humorous or personalised slogan.</p> <p>I chose 'sorry, not sorry'. Make of that what you will.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0100/kitkat_personalise.jpg" alt="" width="712" height="551"></p> <p>Before I knew it, I’d paid my £7 and was told that I’d have to wait up to 90 minutes for my KitKat to be created.</p> <p>I did stick around for a while to watch the chocolatiers in action, but with my part of the process done and dusted, I soon left, and I was a bit disappointed with how quickly it was all over. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0101/kitkat_bespoke.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="562"></p> <p>Granted, there were some nice touches of personalisation.</p> <p>I was asked for my mobile number so that the Chocolatory could text me when my KitKat was ready, and being able to choose my own flavours was definitely quite cool. </p> <p>However, the fact that it added up to a few moments using a touchscreen didn't exactly feel that creative or exciting.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0102/kitkat_mobile.jpg" alt="" width="589" height="696"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0121/kitkat_texts.PNG" alt="" width="400" height="709"></p> <h3>The final product</h3> <p>With time to kill, I went off on my merry way (and spent far too much money elsewhere in Westfield).</p> <p>Annoyingly, I did have to wait over 90 minutes until I received the text telling me my KitKat was ready, which makes me wonder how long it would be on a Saturday or even later in the day.</p> <p>So, was my personalised chocolate worth the wait?</p> <p>Sure enough, the final product was quite impressive, and it was definitely nice to be able to go away with something I had chosen myself. It would probably make a nice gift for a real chocolate lover.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0105/kitkat_choc_bar.jpg" alt="" width="593" height="524"></p> <p>In terms of the overall experience, I can definitely appreciate Nestle’s attempts at creating something memorable.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0107/FullSizeRender7.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="800"></p> <p>When you compare visiting the pop-up store to merely picking up a chocolate bar from a supermarket shelf – there’s no denying what will stick in the mind of consumers.</p> <p>The technology in-store is slick and the whole atmosphere is quite buzzy.</p> <p>It is just a shame that the concept is better than the reality, which is essentially that you get to ‘<em>choose</em> your own break’ rather than ‘create’ it.</p> <p>If you really want to do that, you'd be better off baking along with Mary Berry.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>The experience could definitely be improved by more visitor involvement and greater elements of personalisation (such as writing your own message, rather than selecting from a pre-chosen list).</p> <p>So, while the KitKat Chocolatory did not quite live up to the hype, this might be more to do with consumer expectations than anything else. </p> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66908-10-inspiring-experiential-marketing-examples/" target="_blank">inspiring experiential marketin</a><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66908-10-inspiring-experiential-marketing-examples/" target="_blank">g</a> becoming standard practice for brands, and with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67960-eight-ways-veggie-pret-innovated-pop-up-retail-strategy/" target="_blank">successful examples like Pret's Veggie</a> pop-up providing real value and enjoyment for consumers, the bar has already been set higher.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68363 2016-10-11T11:00:11+01:00 2016-10-11T11:00:11+01:00 Will messaging apps be the next walled gardens? Patricio Robles <p>Case in point: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66486-stats-the-growing-and-enduring-appeal-of-messaging-apps/">messaging apps</a>.</p> <p>These are some of the most prolific drivers of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67536-three-dark-social-channels-with-a-billion-active-users-how-to-use-them/">dark social</a> content sharing and referrals, but increasingly messaging apps are building functionality that could force marketers to engage with users in-app.</p> <p>For example, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65047-tencent-and-wechat-35-facts-figures-on-the-chinese-tech-giant/">Tencent-owned WeChat</a>, one of the most popular messaging apps in China with more than 800m monthly active users, is <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/tencent-tries-out-a-stickier-wechat-1475086017">currently testing</a> a featured called Xiaochengxu, which translates to "little program."</p> <p>Xiaochengxu is a development platform for third-parties to build apps that operate within the WeChat app, effectively turning WeChat into an operating system of sorts.</p> <p>As Forrester analyst Wang Xiaofeng told The Wall Street Journal:</p> <blockquote> <p>With everybody coming in to launch Xiaochengxu, WeChat will be much more than an app. It will become the entry point of the Chinese mobile internet.</p> </blockquote> <p>Currently, numerous companies, such as China's Didi Chuxing ride hailing service, have integrations with WeChat, but those link out to their own sites from within WeChat.</p> <p>Xiaochengxu could change that, ensuring that users never leave WeChat. </p> <p>Hong Bo, a marketing consultant, says that's WeChat's goal. "The Chinese internet will be WeChat and others," he predicts.</p> <p>Already, some entrepreneurs and developers are expressing interest in Xiaochengxu, noting that being able to tap into WeChat's user base could be beneficial and reduce their user acquisition costs.</p> <p>Others, however, believe it's "scary" that an app like WeChat could become the ultimate walled garden in which users spend all their time.</p> <h3>A sign of things to come?</h3> <p>Since the Chinese market for messaging apps is seen as leading Western markets, WeChat's Xiaochengxu experiment is worth noting, as it could offer a glimpse of a trend that will eventually come to Western messaging apps.</p> <p>Last year, Viber, which Japanese ecommerce giant Rakuten purchased for $900m in 2014, launched Viber Games globally.</p> <p>Viber Games offers users a catalog of games that they can play from within the Viber app. Viber is popular internationally, and it's worth noting that games are often one of the application types that are used to plant a walled garden.</p> <p>For instance, when Facebook, which is the biggest walled garden on the internet, first launched its developer platform, many of the first Facebook apps that gained traction were games.</p> <p>It's also no surprise that Facebook is looking to extend its walled garden to its Messenger app through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/">bots</a>, <a href="http://newsroom.fb.com/news/2015/03/send-money-to-friends-in-messenger/">money transfers</a> and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66234-is-facebook-about-to-open-messenger-to-content-producers-brands/">third-party integrations</a>.</p> <p>It may also <a href="https://blog.whatsapp.com/615/Making-WhatsApp-free-and-more-useful">be planning</a> to build another walled garden with WhatsApp, the messaging app <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64383-why-facebook-bought-whatsapp/">it purchased</a> in 2014 for more than $16bn.</p> <h3>Walled gardens everywhere</h3> <p>While brands might be comfortable with the idea that messaging apps will become walled gardens – they are after all a part of the broader social market – the reality is that walled gardens seem to be growing eveywhere. </p> <p>As Scott Eagle, the COO of 12 Digit Marketing, <a href="https://www.internetretailer.com/commentary/2016/10/06/new-generation-digital-walled-gardens-coming">detailed</a> in a post on InternetRetailer, major retailers and cable companies are also building walled gardens of their own, raising the specter of a day when brand marketers will have to be comfortable with the idea that it's somebody else's internet and they're just living in it.</p>