tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/multichannel-2 Latest Multichannel content from Econsultancy 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68954 2017-03-31T13:25:00+01:00 2017-03-31T13:25:00+01:00 10 mesmerising digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more.</p> <h3>Video advertising outperforms desktop display</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">A report released by Integral Ad Science has revealed that video advertising outperformed desktop display for the first time. </p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Compared to the first half of 2016, video viewability showed significant improvement in the second half of the year, increasing from 40% to 58.2%. Meanwhile, the completion rate in view increased from 26.7% to 35.1%.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Video brand risk also improved, decreasing from 11.2% to 8.9%. That being said, with the advent of fake news, brand safety remains a critical issue for advertisers, highlighting the need for a solution to protect brand reputations.</p> <h3>One in nine online visits were made to news and media sites in 2016</h3> <p>Hitwise suggests that there’s been a shift in the British public’s media consumption, predicted to be due to the impact of today’s political landscape. </p> <p>Data shows that, as well as consuming more news across broader sources, people are now beginning to question the validity of news providers and changing their preferences of media titles as a result. One in nine visits online were made to news and media sites in 2016 compared to 1 in 10 visits in 2015.</p> <p>Articles focusing on Trump and Brexit accounted for five out of the top 10 read articles in January and February 2017. Meanwhile, in the month before and after Trump’s inauguration, left-leaning newspapers such as the Guardian and The Independent gained readers from traditional tabloids, such as The Sun, Express and Daily Mail.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5157/Hitwise_1.png" alt="" width="510" height="464"></p> <h3>Consumers increasingly favouring mobile loyalty programs</h3> <p>The 2017 <a href="http://www.vibes.com/resources/2017-uk-mobile-consumer-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Consumer Report</a> from Vibes highlights a link between digital loyalty programs and greater consumer loyalty.</p> <p>Research shows that 70% of consumers would have a more positive opinion of a brand if it allowed them to save a loyalty card in their smartphone. Over one-third of people are said to store information from brands in a mobile wallet such as Apple Wallet and Android Pay.</p> <p>83% of smartphone users also say that receiving surprise rewards, exclusive content and special birthday or anniversary messaging would have a positive impact on their brand loyalty overall.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5161/Mobile_Consumer_report.jpg" alt="" width="763" height="756"></p> <h3>Mobile consumers in emerging markets are more intolerant of bad user experiences</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://wearefetch.com/cms/content/media/2015/12/Fetch-Global-Mobile-Consumer-Survey.pdf" target="_blank">Fetch</a> suggests that brands should consider shifting their mobile advertising focus to emerging markets, as levels of engagement rapidly increase.</p> <p>According to research, 31% of users in emerging markets define themselves as mobile-first, compared to 15% in Europe and 18% in North America.</p> <p>Similarly, where 66% of European consumers claim to access social media every hour, this rises to 72% amongst emerging markets.</p> <p>Lastly, mobile-first consumers in emerging markets are more intolerant of bad <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/user-experience-and-interaction-design-for-mobile-and-web/">mobile web experiences</a>, with 84% saying they would leave a mobile website if it loaded slowly, compared to 69% in Europe and 75% in North America.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5160/Fetch_mobile_consumer.jpg" alt="" width="780" height="280"></p> <h3>62% of consumers will stick to premium if prices rise post-Brexit</h3> <p>New findings from Centre for Retail Research and Rakuten Marketing suggest that consumers have differing views of how the referendum result will affect prices in the UK.</p> <p>A survey of 1000 consumers across the UK found that, over the next six months, 37% of people are sure they will be better off, while 40% think they will be worse off.</p> <p>Regardless, the survey also found that shoppers will not stop purchasing premium products if prices have to rise as a result of Brexit. If faced with a price increase of up to 10%, only 6% of Brits claim they would refuse to buy the item, while 62% would buy the premium brand anyway.</p> <p>There does seem to be a tipping point, however, with a 15% price increase expected to make 21% of shoppers switch to a cheaper brand.</p> <h3>UK companies unprepared for business pitching</h3> <p>Research from <a href="http://buffalo7.co.uk/uk-companies-are-not-prepared-for-pitching/" target="_blank">Buffalo7</a> has found that the majority of UK companies are not properly prepared to win new business pitches.</p> <p>From a survey of industry professionals, 61% of respondents said their companies did not employ any staff with slide-deck design expertise. In contrast, 60% wished their companies did have such expertise in-house, with 62% believing it would help their companies to win more pitches. </p> <p>Despite this recognition, a whopping 75% of respondents said that that their companies do not provide any formal training for delivering pitches.</p> <p>Perhaps unsurprisingly, the survey also found that 76% of companies have pitched for business in the last 12 months, but that 54% are losing half or more of the pitches they contest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5159/Buffalo7.jpg" alt="" width="721" height="458"></p> <h3>YouTube is number one for consumer positivity</h3> <p>According to a new study from Trinity McQueen, YouTube tops the list of media brands that people feel the most positively about.</p> <p>In a survey of ‘unbound consumers’ - people who reject scheduled media for on-demand services -  21% cited that they feel positively about YouTube, followed by 20% feeling positive towards the BBC and 16% about Netflix. </p> <p>New content appears to be a key factor in a media brand’s popularity, with 46% of unbound audiences most likely to believe YouTube always has new content, while 35% saying the same about the BBC.</p> <p>Lastly, 41% of unbound audiences feel that Facebook offers the most personalised experience, while 41% thinks YouTube offers the best overall online experience.</p> <h3>Car brands see Instagram follower growth of 20% in two months</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://www.quintly.com/blog/2017/03/the-10-most-liked-uk-brands-on-instagram/" target="_blank">Quintly</a> has revealed that five out of the top ten most-liked UK brands on Instagram are car manufacturers. </p> <p>What’s more, they all had a follower growth of at least 20% in the period of October to December 2016.</p> <p>Other analysis shows that Jaguar had the most successful post in terms of the number of likes, with a post showing the model F-Type garnering over 110,000 likes. </p> <p>This is just one example of the popularity of luxury brands on Instagram, which is also reflected by the success of other big brands like Burberry and Rolls Royce.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5154/Jaguar.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="489"></p> <h3>Mobile accounts for more than 60% of digital minutes in global markets</h3> <p>According comScore’s <a href="http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Presentations-and-Whitepapers/2017/Mobiles-Hierarchy-of-Needs?cs_edgescape_cc=GB" target="_blank">Mobile Hierarchy of Needs</a> report, mobile devices now account for a majority of consumers' digital minutes, with most of that time spent in apps.</p> <p>The growing share of consumer time claimed by mobile devices accounted for more than 60% of all digital minutes in nine major markets, rising to 91% in the case of Indonesia.</p> <p>Apps represented more than 80% of mobile minutes in all markets studied, rising to 99% in the case of China.</p> <p>The top apps are no surprise, with WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67490-10-things-you-didn-t-know-about-wechat/">WeChat</a>, QQ Instant Messenger and Line showing the popularity of messaging apps</p> <h3>63% of consumers believe the media needs more regulation</h3> <p>A new report by Network Research shows that public trust in the reliability of media information has declined significantly in the last 12 months, with 63% of people now believing that media outlets need more regulation.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK adults, the study also found that 39.5% of people feel the government has significant influence on the media agenda, while 32% feel that businesses do.</p> <p>Almost half of the public are suspicious they may have seen or read fake news recently, with 75% subsequently trusting publications to a lesser extent. 83% of people also believe there should be greater penalties for reporting fabricated news.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68888 2017-03-14T10:08:00+00:00 2017-03-14T10:08:00+00:00 Six examples of Mother’s Day marketing from online retailers Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are a few Mother’s Day campaigns that have caught my eye, including activity online, via email and social.</p> <h3>The Body Shop</h3> <p>With L’Oréal reportedly planning to sell it on, the future of the Body Shop hangs in the balance. Meanwhile, the brand has been attempting to counteract negativity with a strong multichannel campaign for Mother’s Day.</p> <p>Built around the #GotItFromHer hashtag, it encourages users to share photos of the women that have passed on quirky and empowering traits. The email creative is also one of the strongest to land in my inbox, making a refreshing change from the standard images of product-heavy gift guides.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4576/Mothers_Day.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="666"></p> <h3>Interflora</h3> <p>Mother’s Day is unsurprisingly a busy time for flower retailers, with brands typically ramping up marketing activity in the run up. This year is no exception, with Interflora releasing video content as long as a month ago.</p> <p>Created as part of its #ChallengeTheFlorist series, the video sees an Interflora-employed florist creating a spring bouquet by special request. While it’s certainly not the most impressive or slick style of video content, its behind-the-scenes element – showcasing the expertise of its employees – is used to effectively instil confidence in the quality of the product.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fpHlMqul--M?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Marks &amp; Spencer</h3> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67883-marks-spencer-what-does-putting-the-customer-at-the-heart-of-everything-mean/" target="_blank">Marks &amp; Spencer</a> has been using extra incentives to drive flower sales, with free chocolates worth £5 for early bird flower orders.</p> <p>While this is sure to pique the interest of consumers searching for deals, M&amp;S’s online gift guide is also one of the best examples of its kind.</p> <p>Nicely showcasing its product range, the guide draws attention to under-the-radar categories like cards and sweet treats – not something online shoppers might even realise they could order online. By including them here, M&amp;S is likely to increase add ons or <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68877-how-retailers-are-capturing-the-loyalty-of-impulse-shoppers/" target="_blank">impulse purchases</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4578/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="548"></p> <h3>Paperchase</h3> <p>You might pop into Paperchase for a Mother’s Day card, but you probably wouldn’t turn to the brand for an actual gift. This is the idea behind Paperchase’s main Mother’s Day marketing push, which cleverly encourages users to get crafty in celebration of their mum. </p> <p>Created by expert crafter Emily Dawes, its blog on ‘quilling’ tells users how to create their very own paper creation in the form of a heart. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We've teamed up with the lovely Emily Dawe to show you how to make a Mother's Day gift with heart. Give it a twirl: <a href="https://t.co/S8kV8npluy">https://t.co/S8kV8npluy</a> <a href="https://t.co/Tuekoa2dx0">pic.twitter.com/Tuekoa2dx0</a></p> — Paperchase (@FromPaperchase) <a href="https://twitter.com/FromPaperchase/status/839484730538082305">March 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>As well as being a nice example of online content, it also prompts users to think differently about the brand, effectively pushing them towards its Art and Craft category.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4581/Paperchase_Journal.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="504"></p> <h3>Pandora</h3> <p>Pandora is another brand using Mother’s Day to ramp up engagement on social media. This year, it has created the ‘Pandora Mum Awards’, asking users to upload an image to Twitter or Instagram with the hashtag #DOTreatMum. </p> <p>Using the incentive of a Virgin Experience Days package for two and £50 gift card, it’s a clever (if slightly predictable) way of capturing consumer data during a key time period.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/PANDORA_UK">@PANDORA_UK</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/VirginExp">@VirginExp</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DOTreatMum?src=hash">#DOTreatMum</a> she's been making me laugh 'til I pee my pants for 40 years! I love all her jokes, good and bad! <a href="https://t.co/5KkPF7UU3p">pic.twitter.com/5KkPF7UU3p</a></p> — Olivia Kirby (@sayhelloflo) <a href="https://twitter.com/sayhelloflo/status/839894453548642307">March 9, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Etsy</h3> <p>Lastly, Etsy deserves a mention for its comprehensive gift guide, which I particularly like for its inclusive nature.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4604/Etsy.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="710"></p> <p>While most brands tend to go down the traditional route, Etsy recognises that mother figures of all kinds should be celebrated, highlighting gifts for mothers-in-law, step mums and even new mums.</p> <p>This is effective for showcasing the varied array of products on offer, as well as encouraging all consumers to buy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4603/Etsy_2.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="575"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68886 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 10 mega digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Correlation between spam rates and subscriber engagement</h3> <p>The latest report from Return Path highlights how industries that outperform the average on key email marketing metrics (like read rate, reply rate etc.) also see less email delivered to spam folders.</p> <p>While the <a href="https://returnpath.com/downloads/hidden-metrics-email-deliverability/?sfdc=70137000000MhwH" target="_blank">Hidden Metrics of Email Deliverability</a> shows that overall spam placement has increased slightly year on year  - from 13% in 2016 vs 12% in 2015 - levels of positive engagement have significantly improved.</p> <p>In terms of industries, the banking and finance and distribution and manufacturing categories saw just 6% of email delivered to spam folders, while this figure rose to 28% in the automotive category. </p> <p><em>Chart shows percentage of email delivered to spam folders</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4558/Spam_rate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="353"></p> <h3>Generation X perform four in 10 family travel searches</h3> <p>New research from Bing Ads has revealed how families are searching for holiday inspiration and services online.</p> <p>The <a href="https://advertise.bingads.microsoft.com/en-us/insights/set-sail-for-family-travel-searches-and-clicks" target="_blank">report</a> shows that 59% of searches for family holidays are undertaken by women compared to 41% by men. Similarly, Generation X (those aged 35 to 59) perform four of every 10 searches.</p> <p>Other highlights from the report include how consumers are more likely to use mobile devices to search for inspiration and PCs or tablet devices to make a final reservation. Meanwhile, it appears consumers dream of visiting the beach all year long, meaning companies need to invest in year-round campaigns to capture this evergreen interest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4559/Bing_Ads.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="221"></p> <h3>Nine in 10 consumers concerned about how companies use personal data</h3> <p><a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170307005123/en/Global-Study-Ten-Consumers-Concerned-Data-Security" target="_blank">New research</a> from Verint has found that while more consumers crave highly personalised customer service, they are also increasingly sceptical about how businesses collect and store personal data. </p> <p>From a study of more than 24,000 consumers, 80% said they like service that is personalised to their needs (which in turn relies on the use of customer data to deliver). </p> <p>However, 89% of consumers also want to know how companies keep their personal information secure, and 86% insist that they should know when their data is passed on to third parties.</p> <h3>Kinetic emails increase unique click rates by 18%</h3> <p>Experian’s Q4 2016 <a href="http://www.experian.com/marketing-services/email-benchmark-q4-2015.html" target="_blank">Email Benchmark Report</a> has revealed that kinetic emails – i.e. those that include interactive content like carousel navigation - see greater levels of engagement than any other kind.</p> <p>From analysis of seven brands in 2016, kinetic emails were found to increase unique click rates by as much as 18.3% and click-to-open rates by more than 10% compared to standard emails.</p> <p>The report also highlights that email volume increased 17.4% year-over-year, while metrics like click and transaction rates, revenue per email and average order volumes all remained relatively stable during the same period.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4557/Kinetic_emails.JPG" alt="" width="609" height="446"></p> <h3>British SMEs grow online exports by more than a third</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.paypal.com/stories/uk/open-for-business-paypal-reveals-online-exports-boom" target="_blank">PayPal</a> has revealed how small and medium-sized businesses benefitted from the record lows of the pound last year. </p> <p>SMEs in the UK saw their rate of growth treble to 34% year-on-year from July to December 2016. Similarly, while there was an uplift in PayPal sales for British businesses overall, the biggest impact was seen on small and medium-sized organisations, with the amount international shoppers spent with UK SMEs rising 13% per transaction in the last six months of 2016. </p> <p>Fashion and sports experienced the highest growth, with a 49% year-on-year increase in goods from these categories sold to international shoppers.</p> <h3>Native video ads boost ROI</h3> <p>Yahoo’s <a href="http://b2bmarketing.yahoo.net/yfp-state-of-native/infographic?utm_source=AYC&amp;utm_campaign=Q12017YFPStateofNative&amp;utm_medium=organic" target="_blank">State of Native</a> report suggests that native advertising continues to reign supreme, with the brand seeing exponential growth of native ad consumption in all regions and across all devices.</p> <p>Data from more than 74.5bn native ad impressions show that publishers have seen a 446.7% lift in eCPMs (effective cost per thousand ad impressions) on native video ad placements compared to display.</p> <p>The report also highlights how consumer engagement for specific apps and devices vary by time of day and location. For example, in the US, users spend the late afternoons and evenings on their smartphones, while their nights are spent on desktop. This is compared to other parts of the world, where nights are typically spent on smartphones. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4561/Yahoo.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="286"></p> <h3>Household gifts drive the biggest basket value for Mother’s Day</h3> <p>According to Criteo, Brits are still lacking in imagination when it comes to buying Mother’s Day gifts online.</p> <p>Data reveals that household gifts such as kitchen, laundry appliances and vacuums drive the biggest basket value for online sales. Similarly, gardening tools typically see a boost in sales with spring just around the corner. Last year, there was a 193% increase in units sold in the two week’s leading up to Mother’s Day.</p> <p>In 2016, it was suggested that we spent a total of <a href="http://www.cityam.com/235965/mothers-day-2016-brits-will-spend-928m-this-year-on-mothers-day-gifts" target="_blank">£928m on the day</a>, with this figure expected to rise even higher this year.</p> <h3>TV accounts for 94% of viewed video ads in the UK</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.thinkbox.tv/News-and-opinion/Newsroom/TV-accounts-for-94-percent-of-video-advertising" target="_blank">Thinkbox</a> has revealed that TV accounted for 93.8% of video ads viewed in the UK in 2016. This is the equivalent of 18 minutes and 53 seconds a day.</p> <p>These figures are slightly down on 2015, when TV saw a share of 94.4%. However, other forms of video advertising saw far less engagement, with YouTube accounting for 0.7% of viewed video ads in 2016, while other online video (including Facebook) collectively accounted for 5.2%.</p> <p>The average person is said to have watched 20 minutes of video ads a day in 2016, while total daily video consumption increased to 4 hours, 37 minutes in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4562/Thinkbox.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="435"></p> <h3>Wearables now at an all-time high</h3> <p>The International Data Corporation has revealed that the global wearables market reached a new <a href="http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS42342317" target="_blank">all-time high</a> in the fourth quarter of 2016. In this period, 33.9m units were shipped, representing a year-on-year growth of 16.9%.</p> <p>A total of 102.4m wearable devices were shipped in 2016 – a figure up 25% year-on-year. Insight suggests this could be due to single purpose devices evolving into hybrid ones, fusing together multiple health and fitness capabilities with smartphone technology.</p> <p>In terms of brand dominance, Fitbit continued to reign supreme, with 22.5m shipments being made over the course of the whole year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4560/IDC_wearables.JPG" alt="" width="457" height="396"></p> <h3>64% of decision-makers say sales and marketing teams could be more aligned</h3> <p>According to a YouGov survey of 725 business leaders, commissioned by Huthwaite International, 92% of respondents believe sales and marketing teams should work closely together.</p> <p>Despite this fact, 64% also say that sales and marketing teams need to do more to facilitate this alignment. </p> <p>When it comes to the benefits of working more closely, 52% cited a consistent message delivered to clients and prospects, while 50% said the opportunity to gain new customers. Just 8% of respondents said they didn’t believe there was any benefit.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68787 2017-02-13T10:06:07+00:00 2017-02-13T10:06:07+00:00 Why did Poundland’s ecommerce trial fail? Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why exactly did it fail? Here’s a bit of insight into the story.</p> <h3>Failure to convert existing shoppers</h3> <p>Having opened its first ever store over 25 years ago, Poundland is built on a tried and tested formula. The reason behind its success is that it knows exactly what its customers want and it unashamedly delivers it. </p> <p>Its stores – a mainstay on most UK high streets – boast bargain multipacks of everything from batteries to fizzy sweets. Though it famously uses tricks of the trade in order to keep its prices so low, such as ‘re-engineering’ products to shrink the size or quantity of items, faithful customers appear well aware of this fact, maintaining that it offers better value than other stores or budget supermarkets.</p> <p>With the arrival of its online shop, Poundland failed to recognise that most existing customers do not typically use it like a standard or large supermarket. </p> <p>The buying process seems much more fractured – people are likely to pop in simply to check out what bargains are in that week or to pick up a specific item. Meanwhile, Poundland's appeal also surely lies in the joy of coming across a surprise find.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Yes <a href="https://twitter.com/Poundland">@Poundland</a> mate, you've knocked it out of the park with this lifesaver. ONE ENGLISH POUND, GUYS. <a href="https://t.co/VNfdqkmHn8">pic.twitter.com/VNfdqkmHn8</a></p> — Ebony L Nash (@Ebzo) <a href="https://twitter.com/Ebzo/status/825332268893868032">January 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Further to this, new research from Shoppercentric has found an increase in the ‘little and often’ trend, with 16% of grocery shoppers rarely doing a main shop – a figure 6% higher than it was in 2016.</p> <p>All in all, it seems unlikely that consumers would be able to replicate this reliable experience online. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3738/Shoppercentric.JPG" alt="" width="240" height="532"></p> <h3>Delivery costs</h3> <p>As the likes of Sainsbury’s and Tesco launch new initiatives to offer one-hour delivery in London, shipping remains an important sales tactic for most of the big supermarkets.</p> <p>Most consumers are prepared to pay for this convenience, as prices typically fall in line with the supermarket’s wider positioning. In contrast, Poundland’s online delivery costs are somewhat at odds with its overall approach to value, coming in at £4 unless a customer spends over £50.</p> <p>With the average spend in Poundland said to be around £4.72, it seems unlikely that consumers would be willing to pay double for the privilege of getting their goods delivered. What's more, it seems even unlikelier that shoppers would ever be able to reach a £50 shop.</p> <p>Without enough of an incentive in this area, it's unsurprising that existing customers remain satisfied with shopping in-store.</p> <h3>Lack of focus</h3> <p>Lidl was named as the fastest-growing retailer in 2016, with Aldi and Lidl accounting for 10% of the total supermarket spend in the UK. Both have famously avoided venturing into the online sphere, instead choosing to focus on physical expansion with investment in stores and warehouses.</p> <p>It’s certainly been a successful strategy, with some suggesting Poundland could have similarly benefitted from this laser-focus on its physical presence instead of forcing a multi-channel approach.</p> <p>That being said, with the recent launch of <a href="http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/whats-on/shopping/poundland-now-opening-clothing-stores-12545933" target="_blank">dedicated clothing stores</a> for its Pep &amp; Co range, it does appear to be investing somewhat in this area. Again, perhaps herein lies the problem, resulting in a fractured or shallow focus across the board.</p> <h3>Mixed user experience</h3> <p>Finally, while the online user experience is somewhat irrelevant now - with a lack of interest in the overall concept overriding design – it is still interesting to note a few errors. </p> <p>On the positive side, the site appears to be very simple to use, with intuitive navigation and guest checkout facilitating an easy experience.</p> <p>Conversely, certain features like the ‘Shuffle’ tool are a bit baffling.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3737/Shuffle.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="465"></p> <p>Attempting to replicate the experience of finding surprise bargains in-store, this ‘new, fun way to shop’ on-site offers up a random selection of items.</p> <p>However, instead of providing users with a novel or entertaining experience, it negates the way people naturally want to shop online, making the whole process much more time-consuming and muddled than it should be.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>The aforementioned shuffle feature is perhaps a good reflection of why Poundland's ecommerce venture failed to work. Ultimately, it’s just a bit misjudged. </p> <p>Poundland’s expansion into ecommerce was done in spite of the needs of its core customer. And while a multichannel approach is undoubtedly the goal of many big retailers – it’s no use if the demand isn’t there in the first place.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66602-do-supermarkets-know-what-online-customers-want/" target="_blank">Do supermarkets know what online customers want?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64799-are-supermarkets-missing-seo-opportunities/" target="_blank">Are supermarkets missing SEO opportunities?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68355-how-online-grocery-retailers-are-capitalising-on-the-need-for-convenience/" target="_blank">How online grocery retailers are capitalising on the need for convenience</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68799 2017-02-10T14:11:00+00:00 2017-02-10T14:11:00+00:00 10 epic digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, let’s get straight to it.</p> <h3>Technology is holding back half of UK retailers</h3> <p>Retailers are still struggling to harness the power of new technology, according to the latest research from eCommera and Coleman Parkes.</p> <p>In a study of 200 UK retailers with revenue of over £100m, 46% of respondents said their tech stack is inhibiting growth. Consequently, 64% plan to increase investment in 2017.</p> <p>When it comes down to the reasons why, retailers cited website stability, customer experience and analytics as the three areas that require greater focus. This proves that - while retailers might have invested in the latest tech – many are unable to implement it correctly.</p> <h3>Pepsi Super Bowl ad generates most media conversation</h3> <p>4C has revealed the Super Bowl moments that ignited social media, with both Lady Gaga and Pepsi overshadowing the game itself.</p> <p>There were over 37m engagements around the event in total, including conversation about teams, players, and performers.</p> <p>Tom Brady earned 2.5m engagements, while Lady Gaga gained 5.5m engagements for her impressive performance. Meanwhile, Pepsi was the most talked about brand ad, garnering 708,089 engagements.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3826/Pepsi.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="234"></p> <h3>UK searches for mini-breaks up a fifth year on year</h3> <p>The Spring Travel Insights report from Bing Ads has revealed the travel destinations Brits are currently searching for.</p> <p>With a spike driven by Valentine’s Day and the approaching spring bank holiday, searches for mini or short breaks are up nearly a fifth year on year. Spa breaks are similarly popular, making up 23% of searches.</p> <p>Mobile is also a key driver, with 31% of mini-break search volume coming from a smartphone or tablet.</p> <h3>More consumers search eBay for iPads than roses for Valentine’s Day</h3> <p>In more Valentine’s Day news, eBay has revealed that Valentine’s gifts are increasingly moving from the practical to the experiential, as shoppers search for more unusual and imaginative gift ideas.</p> <p>This time last year, searches in eBay’s Travel &amp; Holidays category surged by 55%, while interest in its Art category rose by 60%. Further to this, interest in event tickets and books rose by 57% and 39% respectively.</p> <p>Even traditional gifts like roses have been eclipsed by practical items like the iPad, which saw a 31% spike in search interest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3830/ebay.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="479"></p> <h3>One in ten marketers admit their emails are irrelevant</h3> <p>New <a href="https://dma.org.uk/article/marketer-email-tracker-2017-launch" target="_blank">research from the DMA</a> highlights how vital emails are to marketing strategies, with 95% of marketers agreeing that they are ‘important’ or ‘very important’.</p> <p>Despite this, only 9% say that all their emails are relevant to customers, and 38% say that ‘some’ are relevant at best.</p> <p>For marketers, ‘lack of strategy’ remains the biggest concern, followed by ‘lack of data’ and ‘data silos’. It’s not all bad news, however, as last year’s biggest concern of ‘limited internal resources’ has dropped out of the top three.</p> <p>With over half of consumers having considered deleting their email account, it is up to marketers to strive to provide greater relevance and value.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3827/DMA.JPG" alt="" width="711" height="342"></p> <h3>AI marketing spend predicted to hit $2bn by 2020</h3> <p>A new report from Qubit and IDC predicts that marketing spend on artificial intelligence technology will grow by 54% from $360m in 2016 to $2bn by 2020.</p> <p>A large factor in this prediction is the belief that traditional tools like A/B testing and predictive analytics are flat lining. Similarly, the suggestion that marketers are struggling with the sheer volume and variety of consumer data, leading to inaccuracies and errors.</p> <p>Consequently, while marketers are still failing to grasp AI effectively, marketing spend looks set to boom.</p> <h3>Quality more important than price for grocery shoppers</h3> <p>New research from Shoppercentric has highlighted the changing expectations of grocery shoppers, as high quality produce overtakes competitive pricing in terms of importance.</p> <p>Now, 54% of consumers say quality produce is the most critical factor, while 49% cite price.</p> <p>Other changing behaviour includes how often consumers shop, with the ‘little and often’ trend increasing 5% since 2016. Lastly, the rise of mobile continues, with 27% of shoppers using their smartphone to shop in the past month – a rise of 3% from last year. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3828/Shoppercentric.JPG" alt="" width="599" height="233"></p> <h3>5.5bn people predicted to be using mobile phones by 2021</h3> <p>According to a new report from Cisco, more people will be using mobile phones in 2021 than bank accounts and landlines.</p> <p>Due to strong growth in mobile users, smartphones and IoT connections - combined with network speed improvements and mobile video consumption - mobile data traffic is predicted to grow sevenfold.</p> <p>Cisco also forecasts that there will be 12bn mobile-connected devices by 2021 – a figure up from 8bn in 2016. Lastly, the total number of smartphones is expected to account for more than half of all devices and connections in the world.</p> <h3>46% of consumers influenced by social video</h3> <p>In a survey over 5,500 consumers, the Science of Social Video has found that people spend an average of six hours a week watching video content on social media networks.</p> <p>67% of respondents said that this figure had increased over the course of the past year, while 60% said that it’s likely to continue to rise.</p> <p>The survey also highlights how social video can impact purchasing decisions, with 46% saying they had made a purchase as a result of watching a branded video on social media, while 32% had considered doing so.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3829/Social_minutes.JPG" alt="" width="582" height="332"></p> <p><em>(Minutes of social video consumers watch per day)</em></p> <h3>Omni-channel sales restricted by security concerns</h3> <p>A new survey from Aspect has found that security concerns about social media could be preventing sales.</p> <p>69% of consumers have security concerns over payment or personal details, while 60% have concerns over social media channels being at risk of phishing attempts or fraudulent profiles.</p> <p>While social media channels are still widely used for research purposes, purchases are generally carried out elsewhere, with a majority of consumers being unwilling to pay via communication channels like Facebook, WhatsApp or Instagram.</p> <p>On the other hand, consumers are increasingly confident in paying via mobile applications, with 75% saying they are happy to do so.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68744 2017-01-27T09:56:00+00:00 2017-01-27T09:56:00+00:00 What’s behind the decline in ebook sales? Nikki Gilliland <p>Interestingly, this doesn’t seem to be a generational trend.</p> <p>People under 30 are just as likely to disregard ebooks - a fact reflected by a <a href="http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/financial-reporting/article/72047-adult-books-sales-fell-in-first-half-of-2016.html" target="_blank">35% drop in digital sales of young adult fiction</a> during the first half of 2016, and cemented by an increase of 7.4% in paperback sales of the same genre.</p> <p>So, what’s behind the ebook decline?</p> <h3>A switch-off from social media</h3> <p>Despite being known as the ‘always on’ generation, millennials don’t actually want to be glued to a screen 24/7. </p> <p>In fact, a large proportion of young people are feeling inclined to switch off due to the constant pressure to be active on social media. Ofcom recently found that <a href="https://www.ofcom.org.uk/about-ofcom/latest/media/media-releases/2016/cmr-uk-2016" target="_blank">34% of internet users have voluntarily gone offline</a> at some point for this very reason.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3393/Ofcom.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="309"></p> <p>In line with this is a greater desire to spend less time on digital devices as a whole.</p> <p>Despite advancements in technology making ebook screens thinner and lighter than ever before - mimicking the paper-thin nature of print - the very concept of reading on an electronic device is still a step too far for some. </p> <p>Unlike watching a film, having the option to read print over digital means that many people will naturally revert back to the latter, thereby stemming the sales of ebook devices and digital books.</p> <h3>Desire for a physical customer experience</h3> <p>Research has shown that the implicit understanding of how far along you are in a story increases the enjoyment of reading a physical book. In contrast, the inability to visualise progress arguably makes using an ebook a somewhat shallow and unsatisfactory experience.  </p> <p>Similarly, the tactile element, not only of reading a physical book, but browsing and buying within a real bookstore is also preferable.</p> <p>We’re constantly being told that consumers crave an immersive, interactive shopping experience. As a result, more and more online retailers are meeting the demand by entering into the physical realm.</p> <p>Amazon – a retailer that has dominated the book industry in recent years – opened its first ever bricks-and-mortar book shop in 2015. Waterstones has also stopped selling the Kindle in its UK stores, instead choosing to use the space for hardback and paperback books.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3392/Amazon_Books.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="421"></p> <p>It’s not just large or established brands that are noticing the demand for print either. The trend has trickled down to new and startup businesses, with many combining the best of both digital and traditional publishing.</p> <p>Meanwhile, with just <a href="https://printonpaper.com/10-steps-becoming-media-magnate/" target="_blank">32% of people trusting mainstream news</a> media, companies like AuthorHouse and Print on Paper are tapping into this distrust (and the simultaneous demand for print) by allowing anyone to self-publish books and print their own newspapers.</p> <h3>Popularity of audiobooks</h3> <p>It’s not just a resurgence for print that has contributed to less interest in ebooks. Alongside an increase in physical book sales, interest in audiobooks has also skyrocketed in recent years. </p> <p>Audiobooks are said to be the fastest-growing format in publishing, with <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/23/business/media/audiobooks-turn-more-readers-into-listeners-as-e-books-slip.html?_r=0" target="_blank">sales rising 35.3%</a> in the first half of 2016. So, why the sudden surge?</p> <p>Meeting the desire for less screen time without compromising on the immersive nature of storytelling, audiobooks are the perfect solution for the aforementioned digital fatigue. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Listen to 'Goodnight Smartphone' free on Audible, then give you &amp; your phone a rest tonight. <a href="https://t.co/QITBOI2WbI">https://t.co/QITBOI2WbI</a> <a href="https://t.co/WY9XJLmQl3">pic.twitter.com/WY9XJLmQl3</a></p> — audible.co.uk (@audibleuk) <a href="https://twitter.com/audibleuk/status/823960768920113152">January 24, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Moreover, with cars now including Bluetooth as standard, plus smartphones overtaking laptops as the primary device for getting online – consumers are increasingly turning to audiobooks in place of reading or even listening to music. </p> <p>Lastly, it’s also been suggested that we’re are moving towards an ‘agnostic’ channel experience, whereby consumers see little difference between audio, visual and textual platforms, as long as they are able to become fully immersed in the story.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>While there is still a place for ebooks in certain contexts, such as travel or in spontaneous need, it’s hard to foresee digital book sales bouncing back to where they once were.</p> <p>Of course, this does not mean that consumers are forgoing digital text entirely – rather that the onslaught of online news, magazines, social media and messaging is more than enough.</p> <p>When it comes to reading a good book, this spells great news for traditionalists.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68652 2016-12-22T09:50:00+00:00 2016-12-22T09:50:00+00:00 Ecommerce in 2017: What do the experts predict? Nikki Gilliland <p>If you’d like to learn more about ecommerce, book yourself into one of the following training courses from Econsultancy:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/fast-track-ecommerce-online-retailing/">Ecommerce and Online Retailing Training</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/conversion-optimisation/">Conversion Optimisation - How to Deliver Digital Growth Training</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/usability-and-persuasion-in-ecommerce/">Usability and Persuasion in E-commerce Training</a></li> </ul> <h3>Seamless customer experience</h3> <p><strong>Matt Curry, Head of Ecommerce at LoveHoney:</strong></p> <p>I think we'll be seeing a lot more zero-friction experiences. The recent announcement of Amazon Shop is a good example of this in the real world, but online we'll be doing everything we can to get out of the way of someone trying to order.</p> <p>Everything from seamless identification, automated intelligent orders, native payments in the browser and on IoT devices, to sites that customise their UI on the fly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2533/Amazon_Go.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="456"></p> <h3>Data-driven marketing</h3> <p><strong>James Gurd, Owner of Digital Juggler:</strong></p> <p>I’m not going to get excited yet by IoT and VR – I know they’re already established in some markets, but I just can’t see mass adoption coming in the UK yet, and especially not in retail ecommerce. </p> <p>For me, marketing automation based on product lifecycles and user-level behaviour will become more and more apparent.</p> <p>We’ll see less bucket emails and more targeted communication, which has been happening over the past few years but at a slow rate.</p> <p>I think ecommerce specialists are growing in maturity and confidence, so data driven decision-making is becoming more of a norm, even though opinions and ‘it’s good practice’ do still influence many decisions.</p> <h3>Mobile rewards </h3> <p><strong>James Gurd:</strong></p> <p>Mobile payment still threatens to break free but it hinges on successfully integrating loyalty programs and rewards. </p> <p>So far brands like Starbucks have nailed it, and 2016 has seen some other high profile brands like Kohls push in this area. What’s lacking to make me confident 2017 is <em>the year,</em> is one of the big tech/payment companies resolving loyalty across a wide range of merchants.</p> <h3>Personalisation of shopper bots</h3> <p><strong>Depesh Mandalia, CMO of ToucanBox:</strong></p> <p>The emergence of bots and apps which provide a convenience shopping play will be a growing trend in 2017. Both Apple and Facebook are investing here with a view to enabling brands to deploy shopper bots that can create personalised recommendations.</p> <p>Personalisation has lacked an element of context in the past, but a bot could both dig deep into a customer's history and ask questions in real-time to better tailor products.</p> <p>While I can order items on my Amazon Echo, it doesn't yet have awareness of my history to better tailor my requests. Asking Echo "buy some vests for my son", it should ask contextual questions like 'how old?' or 'what size?', but should also check my browsing/purchase history to tailor those results.</p> <p>Having an in-home shopping assistant could be a huge advantage for retailers to connect in a more intimate manner with potential and new customers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2529/Amazon_Echo.JPG" alt="" width="590" height="336"></p> <h3>Uptake of A/B testing</h3> <p><strong>Paul Rouke, founder &amp; CEO, PRWD:</strong></p> <p>The free-to-use Google Optimize is going to bring a significant increase in both the awareness (and uptake) of A/B testing amongst retailers.</p> <p>With this, my word of warning for retailers would be - when a tool is free, there is less value placed on the importance of having the correctly skilled people available to get the most out of the tool. </p> <p>A/B testing carried out intelligently (and even strategically), requires a multidisciplinary team with hypotheses underpinned by user research, data analysis and heuristics. </p> <p>Ensure that your business doesn’t end up with “all the gear, but no idea” when it comes to A/B testing in 2017.</p> <h3>Wearables</h3> <p><strong>Matt Curry:</strong></p> <p>Now that Mobile is by far the largest driver of traffic and revenue, we have to presume the next device type will be wearables.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2528/wearables.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>The re-invented HIPPO </h3> <p><strong>Paul Rouke:</strong></p> <p>An increasing amount of humility being exhibited by retailers, as they evolve to becoming customer-centric. </p> <p>The re-invented <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68080-it-s-time-to-reinvent-the-hippo" target="_blank">HIPPO </a>characteristics will continue to be harnessed by businesses and individuals as egotism, opinion and “what competitors are doing” are slowly removed from decision making around how we improve our user experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2530/HIPPO.JPG" alt="" width="544" height="303"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68633 2016-12-13T11:17:11+00:00 2016-12-13T11:17:11+00:00 How Britain's favourite brands are attracting consumers this Christmas James Collins <p>Our recent research revealed that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68590-10-dazzling-digital-marketing-stats-from-this-week/" target="_blank">Marks &amp; Spencer is the UK’s favourite Christmas shop</a>. Of the 2,000 consumers we surveyed, 28% said they will spend the most on gifts at M&amp;S this month, with Boots, John Lewis, Next and House of Fraser making up the rest of the top five.</p> <p>Attracting Christmas shoppers pays off for these brands, and not just in the short term. Our survey also revealed that 84% of UK shoppers plan to carry on spending in their chosen stores after the Christmas season has ended.</p> <h3>The modern consumer journey</h3> <p>The top five brands are ones which UK shoppers have known and loved for a long time. Although the stores aren’t new, their methods of attracting customers have changed dramatically since the stores were founded.</p> <p>These changes have been driven by the transformation of consumer behaviour. According to research by Webloyalty &amp; Conlumino, the average consumer typically used around two touchpoints during their path to purchase in the year 2000. By 2015, this had increased to around five.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2364/christmas-shoppers-on-smartphone.jpg" alt="Christmas shoppers on smartphone" width="800" height="450"></p> <p>Shoppers are interacting with more touchpoints across more marketing channels and devices than ever before.</p> <p>But which of these is having the biggest impact on consumer choice, and how are Britain’s favourite brands making the most of it?</p> <h3>The famous Christmas TV ad campaign</h3> <p>Despite the big budgets and hype, our research found that only 27% of people make a purchase based on brands’ TV adverts alone.</p> <p>This may seem a small percentage in return for the huge investment in TV ads, but no channel performs in a silo. As multi-device ownership increases – according to the IAB’s 2015 Full Year Digital Adspend Results, there are an average of 8.3 connected devices per home – the ways to reach consumers increase too.</p> <p>For a TV advert to be most effective, it must be part of a multichannel campaign delivering consistent messaging across channels and devices. </p> <p>John Lewis – whose Christmas campaign is often the most talked about – is taking this multichannel approach seriously, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68512-john-lewis-combines-tv-ad-with-snapchat-lens-and-email/">combining both on and offline experiences</a>.</p> <p>Buster the Boxer soft toys and picture books are on sale, and the brand has partnered with Snapchat to produce a custom filter, created bespoke Twitter stickers, and offered an Oculus Rift VR experience in the Oxford Street flagship store. </p> <p>The brand’s creative multichannel approach pays off. Speaking before the release of this year’s campaign, John Lewis’ head of marketing, Rachel Swift, said that the Christmas TV ad campaign is the store’s most profitable return on investment. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sr6lr_VRsEo?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Advice from friends and family</h3> <p>Our survey found that 31% of people listen to advice from friends and family about where to purchase Christmas gifts from.</p> <p>Social media is the modern equivalent of word of mouth. Today’s brands understand the importance of using social media as part of a multichannel campaign.</p> <p>For example, M&amp;S has ‘Mrs Claus’, the star of its TV ad, taking over its Twitter account, has created the hashtag #lovemrsclaus, and has even designed its own Mrs Claus emoji.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">A delightful morning full of giving (and receiving) awaits. Stay tuned... <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/LoveMrsClaus?src=hash">#LoveMrsClaus</a> <a href="https://t.co/au6wzme7AC">pic.twitter.com/au6wzme7AC</a></p> — M&amp;S (@marksandspencer) <a href="https://twitter.com/marksandspencer/status/806770300905848833">December 8, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>According to Waggener Edstrom, from 4–20 November 2016, M&amp;S clocked up 43,376 mentions across social media, second only to John Lewis (which had a huge 203,199).</p> <p>Again the scale of the social buzz surrounding these big campaigns helps hammer home the importance of creating a campaign that is active across multiple channels.</p> <h3>Browsing a retailer’s own website</h3> <p>Our survey results also showed that 33% of shoppers browse a brand’s own website to help them decide where to buy gifts. So, it’s essential to make sure people can navigate around your site easily.</p> <p>Next’s online Christmas store is a prime example of so many retail websites at this time of year – there’s an obvious Christmas section in the main navigation, ‘gifts for…’ category pages, Secret Santa guides, the list goes on. It’s easy for consumers to find what they’re looking for in whatever way that suits them.</p> <p>But this on-site experience is only beneficial if people are actually visiting your website in the first place. Attracting relevant traffic isn’t just about the short term tactics, like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers/">the barrage of Black Friday emails</a> we experienced last month.</p> <p>Campaigns that focus on the long term, like partnerships with relevant blogs and online magazines, can help you attract more of your target customers over a longer period of time. </p> <p>The tricky thing is measuring the impact of campaigns like this. If a customer reads your Christmas gift guide on their favourite fashion blog and then visits your website a few days later, last-click measurement won’t acknowledge the contribution of the content campaign. </p> <p>Brands, including some of those in our top five, are moving towards attributed measurement to help them understand the value of marketing channels that appear earlier in the user journey.</p> <p>House of Fraser, for example, saw an 83% rise in the number of affiliate touchpoints awarded commission when it moved away from the last-click model.</p> <p>This view of the full user journey allowed House of Fraser to recognise the touchpoints that were driving customers to its website on a longer term basis.</p> <h3>Saving money with vouchers and loyalty schemes</h3> <p>Finally, we found that 44% of consumers are encouraged to buy from a store if they know they can use a voucher code, and 23% are persuaded by the chance to build up loyalty points.</p> <p>Boots is a great example of a store that uses vouchers and loyalty points well. You can quickly find offers on voucher and cashback sites, the brand’s Advantage Card is extremely popular, and its 3-for-2 offers at Christmas practically fill the store.</p> <p>Typically, online vouchers are associated with short-term gains at the last click – arguably perfect for the Christmas push. But it’s important to understand the incremental value that vouchers offer.</p> <p>As our survey shows, they can prompt shoppers to choose one brand over another. Vouchers can also add value across the whole user journey: We found a 22% uplift in revenue from voucher sites when taking earlier touchpoints into account, rather than just last click.</p> <p>So, we’ve seen that the modern consumer journey is complex. Christmas shoppers are influenced by lots of different touchpoints – there’s no one channel that trumps them all. The UK stores that win the Christmas retail battle are the ones that target their audience across all the relevant channels available to them.</p> <p>The brands that truly win at this time of the year, however, are the ones that understand the importance of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65435-what-is-customer-lifetime-value-clv-and-why-do-you-need-to-measure-it/">lifetime value</a>. Attracting customers and encouraging them to buy Christmas gifts is only the first step.</p> <p>Retailers that succeed are those that use their data cleverly to help them make the most of the 84% of Christmas shoppers who intend to shop at their chosen store again – and attract as many of the remaining 26% as possible.</p> <p>Having a rounded understanding of the user journey, and the many touchpoints that users encounter both pre- and post-purchase, allows you to test and discover what messages to use – and when – to encourage more customers to return again and again.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68431 2016-10-28T14:06:05+01:00 2016-10-28T14:06:05+01:00 How to combine attribution and segmentation data to achieve marketing success James Collins <p>Ultimately, being shrewd about how you segment your marketing data gives you the opportunity to become more effective at targeting the right people at the right time.</p> <p>Here, I share just some of the ways you can use attribution and segmentation to unlock even more value from your marketing efforts.</p> <p><strong><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0493/different-customer-groups-shopping-online.jpg" alt="Different customers shopping online" width="800" height="500"></strong></p> <h3>Understand the journeys of converting <em>and </em>non-converting users</h3> <p>As the name suggests, the data captured by traditional CRM systems is based on <strong>customers</strong>: On people who have completed a conversion.</p> <p>However, there will always be far more people browsing your products and services only to walk away.</p> <p>It’s here, in these non-converting journeys, that marketers are able to uncover where their efforts are falling flat.</p> <p>Effective user journey analysis and attributed reporting provides you with not only an understanding of the behaviour of people who buy from you but also those people who come to your site and do not purchase.</p> <p>Armed with this information, you can identify the marketing channels that aren’t helping attract or convert your chosen customer segments well enough.</p> <p>You can then experiment with cutting back spend in those areas and reallocating budget to other more effective channels.</p> <h3>Discover what activities attract new customers</h3> <p>One of the most common uses of segmentation is to provide a <strong>distinction between new and existing customers.</strong></p> <p>Segmentation allows you to distinguish between these two types of customers, while attributed reporting and user journey analysis helps you understand their typical behaviours.</p> <p>This combination then gives you the power to experiment and discover which channels are most effective at attracting each type of customer.</p> <p>How might user behaviour differ between these two segments? You might expect that new customers are exposed to your brand through channels like display and non-navigational search.</p> <p>On the other hand, existing customers might visit your website more often directly, through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/email-census/">email marketing</a>, or a branded, more specific, search.</p> <p>Once you have the data to prove (or disprove) these assumptions, you’ll have an idea of where to focus your marketing efforts.</p> <p>For example, if you want to attract more new customers, you’ll know which channels, and which combination of channels, to test first.</p> <h3>Reach your different customer groups in the most effective ways</h3> <p>Effective segmentation should also allow you to <strong>determine between different groups of customers based on their demographic or behavioural characteristics.</strong></p> <p>Analysing your attributed reporting data by customer segment allows you to formulate and test marketing campaigns specific to your different customer groups, rather than put out an ineffective ‘one-size-fits-all’ campaign and hope for the best.</p> <p>To give a simple example to put this into context, say you’re a travel company and you’ve identified two of your common customer types:</p> <p><strong>Active Retirees</strong></p> <ul> <li> <strong>Description:</strong> older holidaymakers who have the free time and money to enjoy travel.</li> <li> <strong>Relevant products:</strong> cruises, package holidays, tours.</li> <li> <strong>User journey:</strong> don’t regularly use social media, conduct a lot of online research before making final choice, often complete purchase offline.</li> <li> <strong>Effective marketing campaigns: </strong> display advertising, affiliate partnerships, email marketing campaigns well in advance of peak booking time offering in-store discount.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Affluent Singles</strong></p> <ul> <li> <strong>Description: </strong> spontaneous decision makers with money to burn.</li> <li> <strong>Relevant products: </strong> last minute group holiday deals.</li> <li> <strong>User journey: </strong> impulse purchasers with short lead time, engage with social media regularly.</li> <li> <strong>Effective marketing campaigns: </strong> targeted social media advertising offering limited-time group discount.</li> </ul> <p>In this example, ‘Active Retirees’ tend to have more touchpoints in their path to purchase than ‘Affluent Singles’.</p> <p>Given this data, you can then try targeting your Active Retirees well in advance with an in-store discount across the various platforms that work for them.</p> <p>At the same time, you can test cutting back on the number of different touchpoints used to engage with Affluent Singles, who convert last-minute regardless, to see if you get better results.</p> <h3>Learn how to market to customers with high lifetime value</h3> <p>Segmentation can also allow you to <strong>group customers based on their purchasing habits.</strong></p> <p>For example, one-time purchasers, occasional purchasers, and regular purchasers with a high lifetime value.</p> <p>Using the Active Retirees example again, let’s say that your attributed reporting shows that a retargeting campaign had only a minor impact on these customers’ decisions to purchase their first holiday.</p> <p>In this way, it doesn’t appear to be a profitable a campaign.</p> <p>However, when you analyse the attributed data over an extended period of time, you may find that these same customers come back to make additional purchases further down the line, making them fall into your high lifetime value segment.</p> <p>You may also find that they return using what we might call ‘free’ channels (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/search-marketing/">SEO</a>, email, or direct), interacting with fewer touchpoints each time.</p> <p>When judging the value of the initial retargeting campaign across the entire lifetime value of these customers, the associated ROI becomes much greater.</p> <p>Only by using segmentation and attribution in combination can you gain this insight and judge the performance of your campaigns effectively.</p> <p>This then gives you the power to experiment and get better at targeting the right people in the right ways.</p> <h3>Use attribution to unlock the value that’s right under your nose</h3> <p>By <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66996-the-three-stages-of-attribution-that-are-crucial-to-success/" target="_blank">harnessing the power of attributed reporting data</a>, marketers can better understand the intricacies of the true value of their efforts.</p> <p>By segmenting that data in astute ways, marketers are given the opportunity to test, evaluate, and ultimately get better at targeting their most valuable customers.</p> <p>When talking about attribution, the conversation is immediately drawn into the algorithm, with little regard as to the additional benefits it can bring to all of your marketing channels.</p> <p>The advice I’ve provided here hopefully demonstrates that using the data to enhance insight presents a huge opportunity for marketers.</p>