tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/native-apps Latest Native Apps content from Econsultancy 2017-01-10T14:42:41+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68690 2017-01-10T14:42:41+00:00 2017-01-10T14:42:41+00:00 How three travel brands deliver superior customer service Nikki Gilliland <p>This reflects how the travel sector is leading the way in terms of customer experience innovation. KPMG even commented that “within this sector there is something of an arms race, as companies work hard to woo the more affluent passenger or customer, in particular.”</p> <p>So what exactly are travel brands doing?</p> <p>Here’s a look at a few examples.</p> <h3>Service via social media</h3> <p>Marriott hotels is one brand with a great social media presence.</p> <p>In fact, it has increased its focus in this area with its recently launched M-Live Studio in London – a centre for creating real-time content and generating social engagement with consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2921/M_Live.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="354"></p> <p>Instead of simply reacting to users on Twitter or responding to customer demand, M-Live enables the brand to seek out and tap into conversations online and increase levels of personalisation.</p> <p>It does this by talking about cultural and topical subjects, as well as promoting motivational and inspirational content to engage users. Meanwhile, Marriott often puts its customers in the spotlight, by sharing and replying to those who post positive travel stories online. </p> <p>This might sound like run-of-the-mill <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65478-how-20-top-uk-retailers-handle-social-customer-service/" target="_blank">social service</a>, but Marriott’s laser focus in this area is what makes it stand out from competitors. </p> <p>A <a href="https://www.lireo.com/how-customer-service-can-impact-your-business-infographic/" target="_blank">2015 study</a> found that customers who feel engaged by companies on social media are likely to spend up to 40% more with them than other customers. For travel brands, this extends to loyalty, with travellers even more likely to return if an experience is positive.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Bill Marriott: Take the vacation you deserve; in the end it makes you more fulfilled. <a href="https://t.co/JgRzPZvab9">pic.twitter.com/JgRzPZvab9</a></p> — Marriott Internat'l (@MarriottIntl) <a href="https://twitter.com/MarriottIntl/status/813809710822354944">December 27, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Retail experiences</h3> <p>While there has been a decline in the high-street travel agent, with online booking services becoming the most popular way to book holidays, we’ve also seen an increase in the demand for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/intensive-mastering-customer-experiences/">immersive customer experiences</a>.</p> <p>Virgin Holidays is one brand that has reacted to this by rolling out V Room, its travel outlet concept, in multiple shopping centres across the UK.</p> <p>Designed to look and feel like an airport lounge, V Room aims to provide the one-to-one experience of a travel agent but elevates it to create a truly unique customer experience.</p> <p>With an intangible product, travel brands are recognising the importance of making experiences come alive for consumers. V Room does just that, aiming to give visitors a slice of a Virgin Holiday before they’ve even booked.</p> <p>With a bar for cocktail tasting and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67834-why-virtual-reality-is-the-ultimate-storytelling-tool-for-marketers/" target="_blank">VR technology</a> to give people a view of a destination – it focuses more on the immersive aspect than the actual transaction or booking process.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2923/V_Room.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="399"></p> <h3>Practical functionality </h3> <p>As well as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67952-five-tourism-websites-guaranteed-to-give-you-wanderlust/" target="_blank">inspiration and wanderlust</a>, many travel brands are realising the importance of reducing stress and hassle of holidays, using digital technology to help facilitate the customer journey. </p> <p>Singapore Airlines uses its mobile app to do just that, relaunching it with a real focus on simplifying the customer experience. Now, users can access an integrated flight schedule, see real-time updates on flight statuses and keep track of loyalty rewards.</p> <p>While it's not unusual for airlines to have their own apps, Singapore Airlines has shown its intent to innovate – also launching a separate app specifically for the Apple Watch.  </p> <p>This also demonstrates the brand’s understanding of its customer base, with the airline clearly targeting the aforementioned affluent traveller.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X8embLqZTb0?wmode=transparent" width="600" height="338"></iframe></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>For many travel brands, a superior customer experience is often the key to long-term success.</p> <p>By meeting or even pre-empting the needs and desires of travellers, be it through social media engagement, immersive technology, or even <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68678-the-impact-of-artificial-intelligence-on-the-travel-industry/" target="_blank">artificial intelligence</a> - many will increase positive brand sentiment and the chances of long-term customer loyalty.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68688 2017-01-09T14:42:12+00:00 2017-01-09T14:42:12+00:00 Four key features to appreciate about Google Trips Nikki Gilliland <p>Google Trips is designed to be every traveller’s ‘personal tour guide’ – but what sets it apart from other travel apps?</p> <p>Here’s a look at some of its key features.</p> <h3>Organisation in one place</h3> <p>While Google Flights wants to disrupt sites like Kayak and Skyscanner (i.e. the places people go to book), Google Trips aims to take the reins immediately after this point, helping travellers to plan and organise their holidays.</p> <p>Once users sign in using their Gmail accounts, the app provides a list of past trips as well as future ones, keeping things like hotel and flight details all in one place. </p> <p>As you might expect, with the same style and design of Google's 'Nearby' search funtion, it's pretty easy to use. And this convenience appears to be one of its biggest selling points – not to mention a reason existing Google account holders might naturally feel inclined to download the app.</p> <p>With more than <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2016/02/01/gmail-now-has-more-than-1b-monthly-active-users/" target="_blank">1bn monthly active users</a>, Gmail gives Trips a ready and waiting audience. So unlike other travel apps such as TripAdvisor or Lonely Planet, it offers the unbeatable incentive of tapping into a service many of us already use and adding a whole heap of extras on top.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2883/Google_Trips_3.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="532"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2884/Google_Trips_4.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="532"></p> <h3>Inspiration </h3> <p>Curating travel plans is not Google Trips’ only draw. It’s also designed to offer inspiration, using its ‘Things to Do’ feature to offer a wealth of information about hotspots, restaurants and pretty much everything you need to know about an area.</p> <p>The amount of detail offered is impressive. Again, unsurprising considering Google's gargantuan pool of data.</p> <p>Google has certainly covered all bases, ensuring users will reach for the app during both advanced planning and while in-the-moment.</p> <p>Users can map out daily itineraries, delving down into deeper information such as walking distances and even how long tourists typically spend in locations. There's also a nice real-time element, too. If you’re using it online, the app will update weather conditions, offer relevant suggestions and even give random recommendations if you fancy going off the beaten track.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2887/Google_Trips.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="532"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2889/Google_Trips_2.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="532"></p> <h3>Map integration and utility</h3> <p>Another significant feature of Google Trips is the map function, which allows users to easily access Google Maps directly from the app. </p> <p>This functional aspect is very welcome. While many people already use Google to discover nearby places, the tech giant is clearly hoping to be a one-stop travel shop, so to speak, joining the dots in the over-arching 'Google' user experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2885/Google_Trips_5.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="532"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2886/Google_Trips_6.PNG" alt="" width="300" height="532"></p> <h3>Offline feature</h3> <p>Lastly, one of my favourite features in Google Trips is the fact that it can be used offline.</p> <p>Users have the option to download itineraries and information to refer to at a later date, solving the problem of international data charges - one reason many people fail to use travel apps while abroad.</p> <p>I've only recently discovered that Google Maps can actually be downloaded already - a fact which Google apparently doesn't like to advertise too much. With Google Trips, however, this comes to the forefront, with the feature being nicely highlighted to let users know that it is there.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ign2GmVEflw?wmode=transparent" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>So, will Google Trips spell trouble for the likes of TripAdvisor?</p> <p>With popularity and loyalty towards the latter already being well-established, Google might have its work cut out convincing travellers that it can provide the same kind of knowledge and travel expertise. Likewise, let's not forget that Google Trips does not allow bookings from within the app, meaning the user experience will be disrupted at this point.</p> <p>Having said that, with its attention to detail, there's a lot to entice users back. Data is obviously where its real strengths lie, and combined with a familiar interface and easy-to-use design, it could mean a successful step up for Google's travel presence.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68641 2016-12-20T14:00:00+00:00 2016-12-20T14:00:00+00:00 Mobile marketing in 2017: Five expert predictions Nikki Gilliland <p>If you want to learn more about mobile marketing, be sure to check out the following resources from Econsultancy:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/mobile-marketing/" target="_blank">Mobile Marketing Training</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/mobile-user-experience-mobile-marketing/" target="_blank">Mobile UX (User Experience) &amp; Marketing Training</a></li> </ul> <h3>1. Contextual marketing</h3> <p><strong>Carl Uminski, Co-Founder &amp; COO at SOMO Agency:</strong></p> <p>I foresee a greater emphasis on context for marketing through third party or OS level apps. </p> <p>Apple’s emphasis on providing access to third parties through its owned services such as Maps, Siri and iMessage in iOS10 creates a new opportunity to market to people during the process of performing an activity – and these ‘contextuals’ are likely to be more easy to convert than via reach alone. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2430/Mobile_marketing.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="363"></p> <h3>2. Location-based services</h3> <p><strong>Martin Harrison, head of strategy at Huge:</strong></p> <p>Location-based services. Simple things like being able to see, split and pay the bill via mobile.</p> <p>Obviously, there will be a huge amount of badly targeted 10% off offers, but the road to hell is paved with good intentions, isn’t it?</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2427/Splittable.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="388"></p> <h3>3. Smart speakers</h3> <p><strong>Carl Uminski, SOMO Agency:</strong></p> <p>The launch of Google Home and the continuing success of Alexa provide new platforms for users to engage with brands via voice.</p> <p>Voice interfaces will continue to grow and grow in 2017, particularly with the launch of Pixel, Google Home and Alexa’s continuing improvement. </p> <p>Brands that aren’t in some way embracing the different interactions afforded by voice when compared to touch will lose out as it becomes more ingrained in consumer behaviour and starts to dominate specific types of interaction, such as commands, searches and questions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2428/Echo.JPG" alt="" width="450" height="452"></p> <h3>4. Integrating UX</h3> <p><strong>Steffan Aquarone, author of Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-marketing-best-practice-guide/">Mobile Marketing Best Practice Guide</a></strong></p> <p>I think a lot more mobile teams will be better organised to be able to work with user experience in mind.</p> <p>Constantly testing, getting feedback, building better products and then getting stuff out there - rather than trying to just plan and launch like in the late 2000s.</p> <p>I also see many of the principles of good product design becoming increasingly relevant to the way modern organisations organise themselves.</p> <h3>5. Push notifications</h3> <p><strong>Martin Harrison, Huge</strong></p> <p>I think push notifications could be the new pop-ups, with the caveat that some are useful, therefore the ones that are not useful will be even more infuriating.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2429/Push_notification.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="439"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68614 2016-12-19T15:30:00+00:00 2016-12-19T15:30:00+00:00 Why HotelTonight’s holiday campaign is a humorous hit Nikki Gilliland <p>While most marketing focuses on ‘family togetherness’ at this time of year, HotelTonight is instead promoting the idea that, sometimes, there’s such a thing as <em>too much</em> family time.</p> <p>It was originally launched for Thanksgiving in the US, but it’ll stay relevant throughout Christmas.</p> <p>Here’s just three reasons why it works so well.</p> <h3>Goes against tradition</h3> <p>HotelTonight offers consumers the chance to book last minute hotel rooms via its app or mobile website, similar to the likes of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67402-how-hotels-com-uses-email-to-keep-me-as-a-loyal-customer/" target="_blank">Hotels.com</a> or LateRooms.</p> <p>In contrast to the aforementioned examples, HotelTonight doesn’t tend to focus on inspirational travel content.</p> <p>Instead, it boldly takes a different tack.</p> <p>This year, its "Visit, Don't Stay” campaign is based on the simple idea that you might not want to stay with your family at Christmas time.</p> <p>It has created a variety of funny print ads to demonstrate why.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2204/HotelTonight_1.JPG" alt="" width="390" height="785"></p> <p>Choosing to go against the sickly-sweet theme of family togetherness, it cleverly takes the simple and highly relatable idea – that we might have to put up with family rather than enjoy seeing them – and runs with it. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2205/HotelTonight_2.JPG" alt="" width="390" height="786"></p> <p>It gets the balance right, too.</p> <p>The anti-family feeling comes off as jovial rather than hateful or serious, conveniently promoting the brand's promise of a room whenever you need it.</p> <h3>Gets consumers involved</h3> <p>Alongside humorous print and video ads, HotelTonight has been rolling out efforts to engage consumers on social media.</p> <p>This is in the form of a competition, whereby users are asked to explain their own reasons for not staying the night at a family member’s house, with the best (or worst) winning HotelTonight credits as a rewards.</p> <p>Using the hashtag #HotelTonight on Facebook and Twitter, it’s easy to get involved, with a presence on multiple platforms leading to high visibility and increased awareness of the brand. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FHotelTonight%2Fposts%2F1170087673026775%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="391"></iframe></p> <h3>Creates something memorable</h3> <p>With most travel brands going for an experience-led approach – building on the idea that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68428-how-travel-brands-are-capturing-millennial-interest-on-mobile/" target="_blank">millennials in particular crave adventure and spontaneit</a>y – HotelTonight’s focus on humour makes a nice change.</p> <p>With CMO, Ray Elias, suggesting that the company’s competition is “big brands with deep war chests that have been advertising for years” – its clearly designed to be disruptive. Its highly visual nature sets it apart.</p> <p>Others try to do this by creating a distinctive tone of voice. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68375-airbnb-how-its-customer-experience-is-revolutionising-the-travel-industry/" target="_blank">AirBnB</a> is welcoming and reassuring, for example, while <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68201-how-hostelworld-uses-video-to-connect-with-target-audience-of-young-travellers/">HostelWorld</a> is overly comical. </p> <p>However, words are limited in the “Visit, Don’t Stay” campaign.</p> <p>In fact, the video ads include no spoken words whatsoever.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ya9Tzl0LUYo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>A bold image and tagline of “Family overload?” is all that’s needed, resulting in a simple but memorable message.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/o88DK3IF90M?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>So, if you’re one of those people who’s a bit concerned about staying with the family in a few weeks’ time – at least you can take comfort in these gloriously relatable ads.</p> <p><em><strong>Now read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68154-16-ad-examples-that-prove-print-isn-t-dead/">16 ad examples that prove print isn't dead </a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68644 2016-12-16T10:37:23+00:00 2016-12-16T10:37:23+00:00 All the digital news stories you missed this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>Yahoo admits to data hack</h3> <p>Yahoo has admitted that 1bn user accounts may have been affected in a hacking attack dating back to 2013.</p> <p>Separate to the 2014 attack that affected 500m Yahoo accounts, it is said to the biggest data breach of all time.</p> <p>Yahoo has linked the hacking to state-sponsored activity, and has urged account users to change passwords and security questions.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2470/Yahoo_Mail.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="333"></p> <h3>Facebook introduces 360-degree live video</h3> <p>Facebook Live and Facebook 360-degree video used to be separate mediums.</p> <p>This week, Facebook has announced the two can now be integrated, with the introduction of 360 video to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/" target="_blank">Facebook Live</a> experience.</p> <p>The first ever example has been produced in partnership with National Geographic, giving users an immersive look at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnatgeo%2Fvideos%2F10154187427528951%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Simpsons show Starbucks appreciation with animated shorts</h3> <p>Who knew the Simpsons were such big fans of Starbucks?</p> <p>It’s been revealed that three of the show’s writers have created a mini-series especially for the coffee chain.</p> <p>Since spending over three years drinking lattes and draining the internet at a Los Angeles branch of Starbucks, Joel Cohen, Rob LaZebnik and John Frink decided to create an animation for the Wi-Fi landing page.</p> <p>The series, titled ‘1st and Main’, is made up of eight weekly animated shorts, each about 60 to 90 seconds long.</p> <p>You can catch it on the Starbucks website soon, or via stores' Wi-Fi portals from January.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/i8O1XqVop2o?wmode=transparent" width="940" height="529"></iframe></p> <h3>Facebook to hire a head of news</h3> <p>On the back of intense scrutiny over fake news, Facebook is now looking to hire an “experienced news executive” to help combat the problem.</p> <p>The person, with over 20 years of experience required, will be the “public-facing voice of Facebook and its role in the news ecosystem”.</p> <p>Despite Facebook repeatedly denying its role as a news organisation in the past, this is perhaps the first real hint that it is finally accepting the idea.</p> <h3>Apple adds hundreds of new emojis</h3> <p>Whether you love them or hate them, there’s now more <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66547-three-ways-brands-are-using-emojis/" target="_blank">emojis</a> than ever before.</p> <p>This week, Apple unveiled hundreds of new ones along with its iOS 10.2 software update.</p> <p>Along with exotic animals and popular food (including the long-awaited avocado), there are also more professions such as the teacher, scientist and pilot.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2472/new_emojis.JPG" alt="" width="350" height="362"></p> <p>Oh, and let’s not forget the perfect emoji to sum up 2016… the black heart.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2473/Black_heart_emoji.JPG" alt="" width="217" height="179"></p> <h3>Amazon makes first-ever UK drone delivery</h3> <p>Amazon has revealed that it made its first-ever delivery by drone last week, 13 minutes after it was ordered.</p> <p>Part of a trial for Prime Air, it successfully delivered a bag of popcorn and an Amazon Fire TV stick to a man named Richard in Cambridgeshire – who just so happens to live near the drone depot.</p> <p>With strict government regulations in the UK, Amazon is limited in terms of how it can test the service, however, the delivery marks the brand’s intent to hit its 2018 target for widespread launch.</p> <h3>Twitter launches live video </h3> <p>As part of its latest update, Twitter has unveiled a new feature that lets users broadcast live.</p> <p>The feature is ‘powered by Periscope’ - the live streaming app that Twitter acquired for an undisclosed sum last year.</p> <p>Now, as long as users have Periscope installed on their phone, anyone can broadcast live directly within the Twitter app.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2475/Twitter_Go_Live.JPG" alt="" width="480" height="452"></p> <h3>Tinder on your telly box</h3> <p>If Corrie or the Queen’s Speech gets a bit too dull this Christmas, why not spice things up with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67563-how-tinder-has-changed-ecommerce/" target="_blank">a bit of Tinder</a>?</p> <p>The dating app is now available to use on Apple TV, meaning users can swipe right with their Siri remote (and the support of the entire family).</p> <p>Part of Tinder’s efforts to grow and diversify its user-base, it has described it as the “same dynamite swiping experience you know and love - just bigger, better and streaming live from your living room.”</p> <p>Merry Christmas, Nan.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sDIgGqS1VGU?wmode=transparent" width="746" height="420"></iframe></p> <h3>JustEat devours HungryHouse</h3> <p>JustEat is hoping to expand its presence in the food delivery market by buying its biggest UK rival, Hungry House.</p> <p>It is paying £200m for the company, with the promise of a further £40m if it hits performance targets. </p> <p>The deal is still to be cleared by the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), but if so, it will rapidly accelerate JustEat’s growth.</p> <p>In a separate deal, JustEat has also announced the acquisition of the Canadian company, SkipTheDishes, for a reported £66.1m.</p> <h3>Chicken Connoisseur goes viral</h3> <p>We love a bit of silly social media news, so what better way to finish off this week’s roundup than by celebrating the viral success of the chicken connoisseur?</p> <p>If you haven’t discovered him yet, he’s a young man who goes around sampling London’s ‘pengest munch’ in search of the city's best chicken shop.</p> <p>Since going viral, and even appearing on ITV London news, the aspiring food critic has seen his YouTube subscribers skyrocket to over 200,000.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C0_1g5FVYAc?wmode=transparent" width="520" height="293"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68636 2016-12-14T14:02:00+00:00 2016-12-14T14:02:00+00:00 Pizza Express, Channel 4 and TFL: Three examples of brand chatbots Nikki Gilliland <p>For now, let’s take a look at some of the latest examples to pop up, from three very different UK brands.</p> <h3>Pizza Express</h3> <p>Following on from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/" target="_blank">Domino's</a> and Pizza Hut, Pizza Express is the latest pizza chain to join the chatbot brigade.</p> <p>It has recently launched a bot as part of its Christmas marketing campaign, allowing restaurant diners to play the 'Dough Baubles' game via Messenger.</p> <p>By asking the bot to #shakethetree, customers will receive a personalised video along with the chance to win free pizzas as well as the restaurant’s famous dough balls. </p> <p>The game has already proved to be popular, with 75,000 people reportedly using it in first two weeks.</p> <p>Despite the bot mainly being promoted to diners in restaurants by a special code to scan on phones, I was also able to get involved simply by messaging Pizza Express on Facebook.</p> <p>There's not much to say about it other than that it's a fun bit of marketing - customers are likely to enjoy the light-hearted tone (and chance of a free meal).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2390/Pizza_Express_chat_bot.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="561"></p> <p>For Pizza Express, it is a great way to interact with consumers on social media as well as gain more in-depth data. Apparently, this bot only marks the start of the restaurant using the technology, with the brand also keen to adopt payment via Messenger in future.</p> <p>Of course, it is one thing to play a game via a chatbot, but will customers be as keen to use it to pay for food? A big stumbling block might be the public's willingness to put their trust in Facebook as a payment service. </p> <p>So far, it is unclear how many users have passed on card details via the platform, but with recent <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68332-should-marketers-be-more-concerned-about-facebook-s-video-metrics-faux-pas/" target="_blank">controversy over inflated metrics</a>, fake news, as well as a history of privacy issues, it might not be as many as brands might hope. </p> <p>However, regardless of whether the social commerce aspect takes off, Pizza Express’s success with #ShakeTheTree still shows that users are keen to use chatbots in different ways – <em>and</em> in different environments.</p> <p>What’s more, it is also hoping that the technology will help enhance its reputation for customer service, allowing the chain to easily respond to enquiries about opening hours and bookings. </p> <h3>Channel 4</h3> <p>A few months ago, Channel 4 created a Messenger chatbot to promote the second series of its acclaimed drama <em>Humans</em>.</p> <p>If you didn’t see the first series, the broadcaster also created an advert suggesting that robotic humans called ‘Synths’ were actually arriving in shops. This time around, its campaign is based around the notion that the Synths are malfunctioning. </p> <p>As well as an interview between the real editor-in-chief of the New Scientist and a fictional spokesperson from Persona Synthetics, other activity included placing trucks in cities across the country in pretence of being the “synthetic human collection service” for malfunctioning Synths.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9TrkZln4eyY?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>All of this marketing pointed people towards the <a href="http://www.personasynthetics.com/productrecall/" target="_blank">Persona Synthetics website</a>, where they can chat with Synths over Facebook Messenger.  </p> <p>Despite the fact that I’ve never even seen <em>Humans</em> before, I decided to check it out, resulting in a rather interesting conversation with ‘Walter’, my chosen Synth. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2420/Walter_3.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="526"></p> <p>And yes, things got weird, with Walter quickly playing up to his creepy robot persona.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2421/Walter_2.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="539"></p> <p>Some have suggested that Channel 4’s bot is a little self-indulgent, questioning whether or not the premise will be too confusing to viewers who haven’t seen the show - or a case of overkill for existing fans.</p> <p>However, I think it’s incredibly well done, and regardless of my awareness of the TV program it's definitely one of the best bots I’ve experienced.</p> <p>Most chatbots tend to have a limited amount of responses or say fairly basic things, but Walter definitely impressed with his creativity (and ability to tell a joke). That said, the conversation did seem to continue on the designated theme regardless of my responses.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2422/Walter_4.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="552"></p> <p>A great example of a chatbot being used for advertising purposes – it shows that the technology doesn’t have to be used purely for customer service.</p> <h3>TFL</h3> <p>Speaking of customer service, Twitter has recently announced the introduction of new chatbot features into its direct messaging service, designed to lure more brands into using it for this purpose.</p> <p>The features allows brands to set up automatic welcome messages whenever a user starts a conversation, as well as use quick replies to prompt the best ways to reply to a DM.</p> <p>One company to already get on board is Transport for London.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2388/TFL_bot.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>Now, travellers can instantly check the status of a tube line by clicking ‘check status now’ within a direct message. Even better, travellers can also subscribe to receive alerts, meaning that they’ll automatically be alerted whenever there is problem on the line.</p> <p>It’s a slick tool, and certainly makes sense for people who already use their phone (and Twitter) to check travel information on a daily basis. It also nicely prompts customers - when you search for a specific tube line, the 'provides support' description indicates the new feature is there.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2386/TFL_bot_4.png" alt="" width="350" height="622"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2387/TFL_bot_5.png" alt="" width="350" height="622"></p> <p>Another positive is that, even if you're talking to a specific line such as the Jubilee, you can also check the status of other lines in the same conversation.</p> <p>This will certainly be a time-saver for anyone who uses multiple tube lines within a single journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2389/TFL_bot_3.png" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <p>As well as creating a seamless customer experience, Twitter’s new bot feature is also an attempt to move conversations away from the public sphere into a private context, allowing for a greater exchange of information between brands and users.</p> <p>Likewise, with many brands now using Messenger for customer service, it is a strategic attempt from Twitter to catch up with Facebook's progress on bots.</p> <p>With many more predicted to launch in 2017, it'll certainly be interesting to see where chatbots reign supreme in 2017.</p> <p><em><strong>More chat about bots:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care" target="_blank">What are chatbots and why should marketers care?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots/" target="_blank">Five pioneering examples of how brands are using chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68458-why-chatbots-are-an-important-opportunity-for-retailers" target="_blank">Why chatbots are an important opportunity for retailers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68532-the-case-for-chatbots-being-the-new-apps-notes-from-websummit2016/" target="_blank">The case for chatbots being the new apps</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68613 2016-12-09T11:41:06+00:00 2016-12-09T11:41:06+00:00 Argos's 'Christmas Wishlist’ app: Clever Christmas marketing for kids Nikki Gilliland <p>Argos’s ‘My Christmas Wishlist’ has been around for the past couple of years, but having been recently been updated to include more gift ideas, I thought I’d give it a whirl.</p> <p>Here are my thoughts.</p> <h3>Traditional turns digital</h3> <p>It’s a bit sad to think that children don’t write Christmas lists anymore, however, that’s the basis of the Argos wishlist app.</p> <p>Designed for kids between the ages of three to seven, it allows them to pick the items they’d like from Santa whilst having fun with technology.</p> <p>Featuring the animated characters of Mo, Squidge, Gil, Fly, and Stik to help - it’s colourfully designed to engage little ones.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2185/Argos_App.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <h3>Setting it up</h3> <p>When you open the app, you are met with a fun synopsis of its various features, such as adding stickers and taking selfies.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2186/Argos_2.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2187/Argos_3.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>Having been designed for kids, it’s obviously quite easy to use, however it’s nice to have this guide to get you started.</p> <p>From here, you’re immediately prompted to edit the settings – the most important element for adults.</p> <p>This allows you to limit the amount of products kids can select, set a maximum price, as well as enter in your email address to receive the final wishlist or send it to family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2188/Argos_Settings.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2189/Argos_music_setting.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>The ability to stop kids from wanting <em>everything</em> they see is one feature that the old fashioned Argos catalogue does not have.  </p> <p>Another cool feature is the ‘grown-up calculator’, which prevents kids from tampering with the settings by asking a tricky maths question.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2190/calculator.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>Lastly, there’s the option to turn off music and sound effects, which is the biggest blessing of all.</p> <p>If you don’t, look forward to the pleasure of listening to the same neverending tune.</p> <h3>Creating the wish list</h3> <p>As I continued exploring the app, I was met with some nice touches of personalisation, such as the option to enter a name and choose an animated 'helper'.</p> <p>And now the adults have done their bit, it can be handed over to kids worry-free.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2193/Argos_5.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2195/Argos_7.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>With thousands of toys to choose from, everything is separated into brand categories such as ‘Barbie’ or ‘Lego’.</p> <p>Children can then browse the various items and add them to their wishlist.</p> <p>One thing that struck me was that there’s no real information about the toys themselves, other than a few images to swipe through.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2196/Argos_Barbie.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2197/Argos_Barbie_Pics.png" alt="" width="350" height="621"></p> <p>But then again, this is more of a negative for adult users, and certainly isn't something children are going to worry about.</p> <h3>Creative elements</h3> <p>Once the kids have selected the items they want from Santa, they can then choose to decorate the final wishlist.</p> <p>This is the most interactive part of the app and a feature that elevates it from a standard gift guide or brochure.</p> <p>Including stickers and a doodle function, kids can make it as personal (and messy) as they like.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2198/Argos_12.png" alt="" width="400" height="710"></p> <p>This feature also distracts from the ‘I want it now’ element and encourages children to get creative.</p> <p>Despite being digital, it also means the app is at least a little reminiscent of the traditional experience of writing to Santa.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>In terms of actual design or UX, the Argos wishlist isn't overly innovative. There are tonnes of apps out there that are far more slick.</p> <p>However, the difference is that there's normally a distinction between kids apps (for games or learning) and retail apps (for grown-ups).</p> <p>It's quite unusual to see a combination of the two.</p> <p>While the premise is quite basic, it is very easy to use, with plenty of fun and enjoyable interactive elements.</p> <p>Even the most simple features - such as the fart noise you hear while pressing the ‘back’ button - is likely to make kids want to use it.</p> <p>Sadly for parents, this might even continue once the gift selection part is over with.</p> <p><strong><em>Related artices:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/62865-six-ingredients-of-a-great-mobile-app/" target="_blank">Six ingredients of a great mobile app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">18 excellent features of Argos’s mobile app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67237-eight-examples-of-best-practice-on-argos-product-pages/" target="_blank">Eight examples of best practice on Argos product pages</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68558 2016-12-05T11:21:04+00:00 2016-12-05T11:21:04+00:00 Start Me Up! PresenceKit builds mobile apps in 48 hours Ben Davis <h3>In one sentence, what is your product/service? </h3> <p><a href="https://presencekit.com/">PresenceKit</a> builds commerce-optimised mobile apps for retailers that increase sales through SEO and app store optimization (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65980-app-store-optimisation-aso-for-google-play-and-apple-app-store/">ASO</a>), and it takes just two days thanks to its cloud-based technology.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2029/Screen_Shot_2016-12-02_at_13.30.09.png" alt="presencekit" width="500"></p> <h3>What problem(s) does it solve?</h3> <p>PresenceKit solves the problem of finding the time, money and resources to build a properly commerce-enabled mobile app at a time when <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68423-how-fashion-and-travel-are-leading-the-way-in-m-commerce/">m-commerce</a> is becoming a necessity for ecommerce businesses.</p> <p>App development costs can easily reach $1m excluding support and it can take months to develop, not to mention the time and effort it takes from the client to put the project together.</p> <p>PresenceKit builds an app that is live on the App Store or Google Play within 48 hours with next to no effort from the client.</p> <p>This app can then be improved piece by piece as we see where we need to enhance the user experience based on customer data.</p> <p>We then help take steps to optimize the app for maximized <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/search-marketing/">SEO</a> &amp; <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65980-app-store-optimisation-aso-for-google-play-and-apple-app-store/">ASO</a> benefits. PresenceKit is more of a sales partner than a technology partner, as our workflow is heavily data driven, and all actions are made with the ultimate goal of increasing sales.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2027/pk2.png" alt="presencekit app" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2028/pk1.png" alt="presencekit app" width="250"></p> <h3>What were the biggest challenges involved in building the tech or growing your team?</h3> <p>The major challenge, as with most startups, will be scaling the company into different markets while growing the team.</p> <p>At the same time, we have to keep our customers 100% happy. We have a lot to do in order to establish ourselves both externally and internally.</p> <h3>How will the company make money?</h3> <p>PresenceKit’s revenue model is based on a revenue sharing agreement with the clients for in-app sales.</p> <p>The revenue sharing agreement is based on three tiers. As the app revenues grow, PresenceKit decreases its commission percentage.</p> <h3>Who is in your team?</h3> <p>The PresenceKit team is a diverse mix of individuals from the east and west. Founded by Andreas Hassellöf in 2015, we’ve since grown to a team of 10 with members from five different countries and very diverse professional backgrounds.</p> <p>Our teams brings together experiences from large retail corporations, startups, mobile agencies, finance companies and more.</p> <p>Andreas himself is a technical entrepreneur with a passion for business. He has been coding since he was 10 and a technology-focused entrepreneur since 17 when he started his first company. </p> <p>His expertise includes <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/user-experience-and-interaction-design-for-mobile-and-web/">user experience</a>, online marketing, computer security, and financial systems.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2026/Andreas_-_PresenceKit.png" alt="andreas - presencekit" width="250"></p> <h3>Where would you like to be in one, three and five years' time?</h3> <p>In one year PresenceKit will have a presence in South-East Asia, the US and several European countries. We’ll have 70 employees spread across our four offices - Stockholm (HQ), US, Hong Kong, and the Philippines.</p> <p>PresenceKit will be well known within the retail industry, and we’ll be a growing thought leader in that sector. We will be signing 40 new clients a month. </p> <p>By 2019, we expect to be well established in South-East Asia, the US and Europe. Our team will have grown to 450 employees spread across our four offices.</p> <p>PresenceKit will be a clear thought leader in ecommerce around mobile markets, and will be widely represented in different areas of the retail industry.</p> <p>By 2021, PresenceKit will have expanded to African and South American markets as well. We will truly be a global platform for tackling m-commerce through technology to optimize sales on all fronts.</p> <p>PresenceKit will be at 800 employees now spread across offices in Africa and South America as well. Our brand will be heavily associated with trend-spotting and thought leadership across the world wide ecommerce industry.</p> <h3>Other than your own, what are your favourite websites/apps/tools?</h3> <p>Google Analytics, our guide to making both sales and development decisions.</p> <p>Microsoft Azure Mobile Engagements, you can’t use this brilliant tool without an app, and you can’t have an app without it.</p> <p>Google Firebase, more analytics and back-end for apps.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68587 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2016 ecommerce stats bonanza Nikki Gilliland <h3>Black Friday 2016 breaks US online sales records</h3> <p>Adobe has revealed that this year’s Black Friday shopping frenzy broke online sales records in the US, with $3.34bn being spent online and a 17.7% increase on sales last year.</p> <p>It also found that retailers who invested in mobile, email and social saw 30% more sales on average than those concentrating on just one or two channels.</p> <h3>Black Friday traffic up 220% on a normal day</h3> <p>Confirming the success of this year’s event is Qubit, which has analysed more than 50m visits from 120 UK and US retailers to discover how consumers reacted.</p> <p>The results show a huge increase in both traffic and revenue.</p> <p>When comparing Black Friday to a normal Friday, it found traffic was up 220%. Similarly, traffic increased 155% on Cyber Monday when compared to a normal sales day.</p> <p>The same goes for revenue, which was up 240% and 380% on the Friday and Monday respectively.</p> <h3>Lego is the top-selling toy</h3> <p>Adobe’s results from Black Friday show that Lego is still a hot favourite this festive season, with Lego Creator Sets coming out as the top-selling toy.</p> <p>This was closely followed by Razor electric scooters, Nerf guns, DJI Phantom Drones and Barbie Dreamhouse. </p> <p>With items under $300 being 20% more likely to sell out, this gives us a good indication of the toys parents need to snap up if they still want to get them in time for Christmas.</p> <p>The five bestselling electronics from Black Friday were Apple iPads, Samsung 4k TV’s, Apple’s MacBook Air, LG Televisions and Microsoft Xbox.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1970/Lego.JPG" alt="" width="536" height="345"></p> <h3>Travel companies see greater interest than in 2015</h3> <p>Data from Sojern shows that consumers spent more on travel this year than last, specifically taking advantage of Cyber Monday.</p> <p>On the Monday, there were 32% more searches for flights from the US compared to the week before. </p> <p>Similarly, while 2015 saw an increase in bookings of 9%, this Cyber Monday resulted in a jump of 21%.</p> <p>Out of the most searched for destinations, Italy, Japan and Colombia were in the top 10, while Canada, Haiti and US Virgin Islands were among the most-booked.</p> <h3>Consumers embrace mobile shopping</h3> <p>According to PayPal, Black Friday demonstrated the enormous growth of mobile shopping and its popularity with consumers.</p> <p>On Black Friday, one third of all PayPal payments were made on mobile devices, as PayPal handled $15,507 in payments per second.</p> <p>Cyber Monday resulted in similar activity, with PayPal seeing over 50% year-on-year growth in global mobile payments.</p> <p>Based on the data, it is also expecting more than 40% year-on-year growth in total payments.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1972/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Brits more confident in shopping on mobile</h3> <p>While results show that mobile overtook desktop as the most preferred shopping channel overall, data from ChannelAdvisor suggests that Brits are more at ease than US shoppers when it comes to following through on mobile purchases.</p> <p>Throughout the five-day sales period, 75% of shopping searches in the US took place on mobile devices, however, mobile accounted for less than one in two purchases.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the percentage of UK shopping searches on mobile platforms being slightly lower, more than three in five sales conversions took place on mobile.</p> <h3>1.2m app installs on Black Friday</h3> <p>Continuing the mobile trend, it seems there was a significant increase in retailers targeting consumers via mobile apps this year.</p> <p>According to Urban Airship, retailers sent 56% more holiday notifications in 2016 than in 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1966/App_notifications.png" alt="" width="624" height="469"></p> <p>The big difference this year was retailers embracing targeting, with 88% of notifications being highly targeted to shopper’s locations, preferences and behaviours. Only 12% of messages were broadcast to everyone.</p> <p>The data also shows daily app installs averaged more than 696,000 per day in November, up 24% from the average daily rate in October. </p> <p>On Black Friday itself, there was a peak of more than 1.2m app installs.</p> <h3>Gilmore Girls generates more excitement than Black Friday on social</h3> <p>The latest data from Spredfast shows that there was a huge increase in noise around Black Friday this year, with the event racking up 2.4m mentions on social media - over 1m more than in 2015.</p> <p>However, insight suggests this could be due to more interactions on social overall, rather than direct interest in the shopping event.</p> <p>Despite Black Friday trending in many of these countries last year, the hotly anticipated return of Gilmore Girls, and the hashtag #GilmoreGirlsRevival, came out on top in France, Italy, New Zealand, Ireland and Germany.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When everyone is hyped for black friday but you've been waiting 9 yrs for this day and it's because the <a href="https://twitter.com/GilmoreGirls">@GilmoreGirls</a> revival is today!!</p> — frayadawe (@frayadawe44) <a href="https://twitter.com/frayadawe44/status/802047855955505152">November 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Rise in footfall to UK high streets</h3> <p>Springboard has analysed where UK consumers did their shopping on Black Friday, measuring both online sales and footfall in high streets and retail parks.</p> <p>It found that, while online transactions rose on Saturday by 1.9%, they had dipped by 5.5% on Sunday compared to last year. Footfall also dipped by 0.6%.</p> <p>In terms of the entire weekend, online transactions rose by just 2.3%. </p> <p>Footfall declined by 0.5%, however the 1.4% uplift in footfall to high streets apparently demonstrates the increasing importance of leisure-based trips to retail destinations.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1967/Footfall.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="176"></p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68432-black-friday-2016-how-are-uk-retailers-optimising-search-landing-pages/"><em>Black Friday 2016: How are UK retailers optimising search landing pages?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers/"><em>Seven examples of Black Friday email marketing from retailers</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68577-the-whisky-exchange-increased-prices-on-black-friday-did-it-work/"><em>The Whisky Exchange increased prices on Black Friday: Did it work?</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68568 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 2016-11-29T11:42:12+00:00 Three reasons behind Dominos’ digital sales boost Nikki Gilliland <p>So, what’s behind the boost?</p> <p>Here’s a few reasons why Domino's is still taking a fairly hefty slice of the takeaway market, even in the face of competition with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68206-ubereats-vs-deliveroo-a-comparison-of-the-app-user-experience/" target="_blank">Deliveroo and UberEats</a>.</p> <h3>Embracing innovation</h3> <p>You might have seen Domino’s partaking in a number of unusual stunts this year. </p> <p>Despite occurring in other countries, many have resulted in UK media coverage due to their innovative and experimental use of new technology.</p> <p>The latest stunt involved a New Zealand couple getting their Domino’s pizza specially delivered by a drone - a result of the brand’s partnership with drone company, Flirtey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1812/Domino_s_Drone.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="471"></p> <p>Described by Domino's Group CEO and Managing Director, Don Meij, as a way to "avoid traffic congestion and safely reduce delivery time and distance" – it offered an exciting glimpse into the possibilities this type of tech could present in future. </p> <p>In a similar event in Australia, Domino’s trialled an autonomous robot designed to deliver pizzas at street-level without the need for human navigation. </p> <p>While it seemed even more gimmicky than the aforementioned drone example, it still demonstrated Domino’s intent to push the boundaries of fast-food delivery.</p> <h3>Utilising social</h3> <p>As well as large-scale technology, Domino’s has been ramping up efforts to make ordering as easy as possible through everyday social platforms.</p> <p>It created its very own <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/">social media chatbot, Dom the pizza bot</a>, allowing users to order via Facebook Messenger with a single word or emoji.</p> <p>This is not the only example of Domino’s capitalising on its large social following. </p> <p>It’s also been making use of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/" target="_blank">Facebook Live</a>, recently offering users the chance to win a year’s supply of pizza in a special art-themed online auction.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FDominosPizza%2Fposts%2F10157732659530453%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="646"></iframe></p> <p>Part of its campaign for the new Italiano range, it also allowed the brand to align online and offline marketing by transforming its stores into 'Pizz-Art Galleries'. </p> <p>Both of these examples show how Domino’s is keen to capture interest and excitement in the online spaces that its audience use the most.</p> <p>While it might not have generated many actual sales through Dom, the awareness it (or should I say he?) created was certainly valuable.</p> <h3>Improving mobile </h3> <p>Mobile is big business for the takeaway food market. <a href="https://www.comscore.com/Insights/Data-Mine/How-Food-Delivery-Services-Have-Kept-Customers-Reaching-For-The-Phone" target="_blank">Comscore reported</a> that 11m Brits visited one of the top three food delivery sites via a mobile device or PC during March of this year. </p> <p>What’s more, out of Domino’s 3m monthly users, around 70% are said to be mobile-only.</p> <p>Luckily for these customers, the brand made its website fully responsive in 2015 – a move that helped to <a href="http://internetretailing.net/2016/07/amazon-dash-dominos-pizza-online-changing-takeaway-food-delivery/" target="_blank">increase mobile conversions by an impressive 62%</a>. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1813/Dominos_mobile.JPG" alt="" width="200"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1814/Dominos_mobile_2.JPG" alt="" width="200"></p> <p>As well as this, it has introduced even more features to its popular mobile app, such as a one-touch ordering button for extra ease.</p> <p>Domino's also allows users to order via their Apple Watch or Amazon Echo device, taking an overarching ‘convenience-first’ approach rather than just a mobile one.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Despite the popularity of Deliveroo and Just Eat, Domino’s Pizza has retained its appeal to fast-food lovers.</p> <p>Combining an increasingly innovative approach to delivery with a confident social media strategy it remains in a strong position, with the online sales to prove it.</p>