tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/payments-2 Latest Payments content from Econsultancy 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69036 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 2017-04-27T10:52:19+01:00 Six ways Aldo’s new mobile site streamlines the shopping experience Nikki Gilliland <p>Designed to make shopping more seamless across all channels, the mobile site in particular has got customer convenience in mind. Here are six features that deliver on the promise.</p> <h4>Prominent imagery and reviews</h4> <p>One major focus of Aldo’s redesign has been making it easier for mobile users to gain a more detailed view of the product – recognising that even in-store shoppers would like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/9366-ecommerce-consumer-reviews-why-you-need-them-and-how-to-use-them/" target="_blank">customer reviews and ratings</a>.</p> <p>Reviews are now a prominent feature on all product pages, including information about general sizing, calf size and width. It even allows customers to give feedback on where or how they have worn the item – e.g. ‘wear it for prom or party’ – to give reviews much more depth.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5715/Product_pages_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Alongside this, imagery is now at the forefront with photo galleries showcasing products from multiple angles. As well as giving a better view of the product, this also makes the mobile site look much more slick and polished.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5716/Product_pages.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>Social tie-ins </h4> <p>Today, <a href="http://www.fourthsource.com/social-media/social-media-shopping-next-step-retail-21641" target="_blank">more than half of consumers</a> who follow a brand on social media say they do so to research products and find inspiration. In line with this changing user behaviour, Aldo has introduced user-generated content into its mobile site, with an Instagram feed embedded directly into the homepage.</p> <p>Not only does this draw on the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">power of influencers</a>, but it also helps to drive additional purchases, with the ‘Shop the look’ feature including multiple products in one image.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5717/Shop_the_Look.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>In-store convenience</h4> <p>Recognising the fact that not everyone who browses online will want to checkout, the ‘Find a Store’ feature lets users locate the product to buy offline.</p> <p>Using geo-locational technology, it is super quick and easy to locate the store that’s nearest to you. With information on store opening times and an indication of how many items are in stock, it’s a highly effective way of driving offline conversions based on mobile interest. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5718/Find_a_store_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>True-Fit technology</h4> <p>In a bid to <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68477-how-six-online-retailers-are-combatting-wrong-size-returns/" target="_blank">reduce returns</a>, Aldo is another retailer to integrate True Fit – technology that helps customers find the right size.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5719/TrueFit_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>By asking users the brand and size of a shoe that fits them particularly well, it is then able to tell them whether an item will be true to size, or whether to scale up or down.</p> <p>According to research, 60% of consumers say that they would be willing to provide information like this if it meant they'd be guaranteed the perfect fit first time. When it comes to shopping on mobile in comparison to in person, this reassurance can massively increase the likelihood of a transaction.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5720/True_Fit_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h4>Post-purchase tracking</h4> <p>Of course, the customer journey does not end after the point of purchase, which is nicely highlighted by Aldo’s easy tracking feature.</p> <p>Instead of hiding it within a help or customer service section, this is located towards the bottom of the landing page, with large font to catch the user’s attention.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5721/Easy_tracking.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>As well as being useful post-purchase, it is also likely to instil confidence in those in the early browsing stages, indicating that the brand is focused on delivering good customer service.</p> <h4>Simplified checkout  </h4> <p>Multiple forms or mandatory sign-ups are likely to increase <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">basket abandonment rates</a>, and when it comes to mobile, customers have even less time for complicated processes.</p> <p>Aldo’s redesign has simplified this experience, giving users the option for a guest checkout as well as condensing everything into a single page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5722/Checkout_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Upfront delivery information and returns policies are also helpful for providing reassurance throughout the process, driving customers towards that all-important final purchase.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68465-eight-features-to-appreciate-on-fat-face-s-new-ecommerce-site/">Eight features to appreciate on Fat Face’s new ecommerce site</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66644-how-debenhams-site-redesign-led-to-ecommerce-sales-growth/" target="_blank">How Debenhams' site redesign led to ecommerce sales growth</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68969 2017-04-07T12:00:00+01:00 2017-04-07T12:00:00+01:00 Four ways technology could impact restaurants in the future Nikki Gilliland <p>Today, <a href="https://pos.toasttab.com/restaurant-technology-industry-report" target="_blank">57% of consumers</a> agree that technology in restaurants improves their guest experience. And while we’ve already seen the introduction of apps and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68800-pizza-express-launches-booking-chatbot-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank">bots from restaurant chains</a>, this only marks the start of how technology might further impact the hospitality industry in years to come.</p> <p>Of course, it might not be such a smooth transition. Oracle’s <a href="https://www.traveldailynews.com/post/consumer-attitudes-on-emerging-technologies-and-their-impact-on-future-hospitality-experiences" target="_blank">Restaurant 2025</a> report suggests that consumers could find some tech a step too far, with 40% saying that being served by a robotic machine would feel invasive or strange.</p> <p>With this in mind, here’s a run down of a few examples of innovative restaurant technology that has already arrived, as well as how it could evolve in future.</p> <h3>Voice for payments and billing</h3> <p>According to Barclaycard, <a href="https://www.thecaterer.com/articles/369040/impatient-diners-want-fast-service-and-better-payment-technology-in-restaurants" target="_blank">37% of diners</a> prioritise quick service in restaurants over menu or value for money, meaning that convenient payment options are becoming increasingly popular.</p> <p>With many restaurants introducing apps that allow customers to order and pay without the need for a waiter, this demand is being met.</p> <p>Take <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68889-wetherspoons-launches-order-and-pay-app-is-it-any-good" target="_blank">Wetherspoons’ Order and Pay</a>. This is a particularly interesting example, however, as it changes more than just the payment experience. Taking away the need for any social interaction at all, some have suggested it spells the end of traditional pub culture. A rather dramatic view, perhaps, especially when you consider how many other well-known chains, like Wahaca and Jamie’s Italian, are using similar technology.</p> <p>Meanwhile, other London restaurants like Rum Kitchen and Salt Yard are also incorporating bill-splitting apps, making payment even easier for big groups.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Click here to download our Order &amp; Pay app, available for iPhone and Android<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/OrderAndPay?src=hash">#OrderAndPay</a><a href="https://t.co/sN3tSWoS6s">https://t.co/sN3tSWoS6s</a></p> — J D Wetherspoon (@jdwtweet) <a href="https://twitter.com/jdwtweet/status/842013848987148290">March 15, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>So how will this develop in future?</p> <p><a href="http://www.restaurantbusinessonline.com/news/starbucks-adopt-voice-recognition-ordering" target="_blank">Restaurant Business says</a> that voice could be the next step, reporting that several San Francisco-based eateries are already experimenting with a Google-supported system involving voice and facial recognition. Instead of asking for the bill and manually paying, all diners will need to say is “I’ll pay with Google” before being automatically charged. </p> <p>With suggestions that Starbucks and McDonalds are also introducing voice recognition into their apps in 2017, it could be here before you can say ‘happy meal’.</p> <h3>Staff using wearable technology</h3> <p>While smartwatches are most commonly used by consumers to track diet and fitness, we could see more restaurants utilising wearable tech in order to facilitate better customer service.</p> <p>Recently, Danny Meyer, the founder of Shake Shack, announced a partnership with Apple Watch that will integrate the technology into front-of-house service in a New York restaurant. Managers and sommeliers will constantly be alerted and informed via the watch, with information being sent about VIP guests, menu changes and complaints. </p> <p>In future, Oracle suggests that we could also see this technology infiltrating kitchens, with the Internet of Things enabling staff to ‘talk’ to appliances while they work.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5257/wearable.jpg" alt="" width="720" height="480"></p> <h3>Robot service</h3> <p>Robots taking over the world was once the storyline for every mediocre sci-fi movie, but it could now be the reality for the modern service industry at the very least.</p> <p>Self-service machines have overtaken humans in many restaurant chains, however this could also extend to the preparation and creation of food itself.</p> <p>Last year, Momentum Machines – a tech startup behind a fully autonomous burger-making machine - applied for a permit, indicating that it is to open a robot-only restaurant. While it’s hard to find any details on its progress or even if it's going ahead, this example shows that robots have the potential to replace both servers and chefs.</p> <p>With the prediction that <a href="http://uk.businessinsider.com/machines-may-replace-half-of-human-jobs-2016-2?r=US&amp;IR=T" target="_blank">50% of jobs</a> could be at risk from robots, it could also be a scary glimpse into the future.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5258/robot_waiters.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="560"></p> <h3>Virtual reality experiences</h3> <p>Lastly, while the likes of Heston Blumenthal has been experimenting with dining as a sensory experience for years, it’s now going beyond what’s on the actual plate, with virtual reality being used to transport diners to another place entirely.</p> <p>Samsung is one of the first tech brands to get on board, rolling out its Gear VR glasses to restaurants that want to create more than just a bog-standard meal.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5259/Samsung_VR.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="339"></p> <p>Even more mind-bending is Project Nourished, a New York-based tech company which builds solutions for ‘fine dining without concern for caloric intake or other health-related issue’. In other words, it uses tech to trick us into thinking we’re eating foods we're not.</p> <p>It’s as bonkers as it sounds. But what’s even crazier is that we can do this, yet we can’t make aeroplane food taste nice. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68891 2017-03-15T11:37:14+00:00 2017-03-15T11:37:14+00:00 Realising the potential of mobile analytics [infographic] Nikki Gilliland <p>According to research by Google and Econsultancy, leading marketers are 75% more likely than the mainstream to have moved to a more holistic model of measurement in the last two years. What’s more, leading marketers are 83% more likely to than their peers to include cross-device data. </p> <p>Of course, the latter doesn’t just mean looking at <em>what</em> consumers are buying, but taking into consideration all moments that matter in order to gain a complete view of the consumer journey. And more importantly: using it to inform decision-making.</p> <p>For further information on this, you can download Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/driving-growth-with-measurement-in-a-mobile-world/" target="_blank">Driving Growth with Measurement in a Mobile World</a> report, published in association with Google. You can also check out more related stats in the Google infographic below.</p> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/infographics/mobile-measurement-potential-drive-growth.html" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4638/infographic.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="3297"></a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68889 2017-03-14T14:26:58+00:00 2017-03-14T14:26:58+00:00 Wetherspoons launches ‘Order and Pay’ app: Is it any good? Nikki Gilliland <p>While a few restaurant chains have introduced similar apps before, it’s a bold move by Britain’s biggest pub chain, with the potential to change service in its famous watering holes forever. But will it catch on? More to the point, is it any good? Here are my thoughts. </p> <h3>Ordering made easy</h3> <p>The premise of Order and Pay is exactly as it sounds. In a nutshell, it allows you to peruse the menu, order and pay without the need for any interaction with staff. </p> <p>It’s very simple to use. When you download the app, it will automatically detect your location, allowing you to select the Wetherspoons you are in or view a list of pubs nearby. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4613/Spoons_1.png" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4612/Spoons_3.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>You can then view the food and drinks menu, before selecting your table and what you would like to order. With the option to pay via PayPal or debit card, checking out is fuss free, and an automatic system takes any discounts or offers into consideration on your behalf.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4614/Spoons_menu_2.png" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4615/Spoons_9.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>What are the benefits?</h3> <p>Wetherspoons describes its app as an ‘innovative solution’ for everyone from families to large groups of mates. If you are dining with children, for instance, you won’t have to leave them alone at the table. Similarly, it also takes away the need to navigate a packed pub with a massive tray of drinks.</p> <p>Of course, it also provides you with a great excuse to be lazy as well as to avoid any social interaction with employees. Naturally then, some have suggested that it will bring a sad end to the inherently social experience of going to the pub, where queuing at the bar is part and parcel of it all - just like Wetherspoons' sticky carpets or its gut-busting breakfasts.</p> <p>On the flip side, there’s the argument that it can only improve the experience for customers. We can all relate to waiting ages to be served or trying to locate a soggy menu – why risk that scenario when you can avoid it entirely? While the technology can only take you so far - with service still reliant on staff once the order has been taken - there’s no doubt that the technology facilitates a much more streamlined experience in the initial stages.</p> <p>One of the biggest benefits is also the fact that it draws greater attention to what you are actually ordering. For example, you might go to the bar and order a glass of wine and a main meal without thinking much about price or nutritional info. With the app, however, you are presented with the various prices, sizes, calories and optional extras before checking out.</p> <p>Granted, if you're eating in a Wetherspoons, you probably don't care <em>that</em> much, but it could still help some customers make more considered and better informed choices.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4616/Spoons_14.png" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4617/Spoons_15.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>What other features does it offer?</h3> <p>The Order and Pay aspect of the app is undoubtedly its main draw, however it has a few additional features that are also worthy of a mention.</p> <p>First, it includes a reorder option that conveniently lets you order the same again – pretty handy when there are lots of you. Secondly, a comprehensive allergen and nutrition menu lets you view detailed information at a glance, although it's not really mobile optimised.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4618/Spoons_10.png" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4611/Spoons_6.png" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>There's also a decent amount of information on top of the actual menu, including an ‘about’ section on the specific pub you’re in, as well as its contact details and opening times. You can build a list of your favourite Wetherspoons, too, which is a feature that regulars are sure to appreciate.   </p> <h3>Will it catch on?</h3> <p>There’s no doubt that the Order and Pay app is something of a novelty – its introduction is likely to be met with intrigue by many of Wetherspoon’s younger visitors. However, it has to be said that it isn't actually that useful for the fit and able customer. Instead, it’s more likely to help people who have trouble carrying drinks or queuing up for long periods of time – perhaps an older demographic that, ironically, will naturally be less likely to use it.</p> <p>Regardless, by simply taking away the hassle of queuing, it may well to appeal to all generations. </p> <p>With bar staff also still ready and willing to take orders at the bar, it’ll be interesting to see whether customers will use the technology once the novelty has worn off.</p> <p><em><strong>More about apps:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68872-five-excellent-features-of-uswitch-s-energy-switching-app/" target="_blank">Five excellent features of uSwitch’s energy-switching app</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68729-a-review-of-litsy-the-social-media-app-for-book-lovers/" target="_blank">A review of Litsy: The social media app for book lovers</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68688-four-key-features-to-appreciate-about-google-trips/" target="_blank">Four key features to appreciate about Google Trips</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68206-ubereats-vs-deliveroo-a-comparison-of-the-app-user-experience/" target="_blank">UberEats vs. Deliveroo: A comparison of the app user experience</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68857 2017-03-03T10:43:00+00:00 2017-03-03T10:43:00+00:00 Device-centric analytics might be giving you inaccurate conversion rates Nikki Gilliland <p>Here are a few more key points from <a href="http://www.criteo.com/resources/cross-device-commerce-report-h2-2016/">Criteo’s report</a>, illustrating why retailers should take multiple devices into consideration. </p> <h3>The danger of undervaluing consumers</h3> <p>First, the report highlights how retailers should forgo a device-centric analytics strategy for a user-centric one. Instead of a singular point of view, the latter enables a comprehensive understanding of the entire consumer journey, including browsing behaviour and intent. </p> <p>If retailers merely concentrate on behaviour from a single device, they could be missing out on vital information such as at what point shoppers are abandoning their basket, or what might increase the chances of a conversion. With one-third of purchase journeys taking place across multiple devices, retailers could also be miscalculating key metrics.</p> <p>What’s more, the report found that conversion rates are on average 1.4 times higher from cross-device measurement than those seen through a device-centric approach – retailers risk highly undervaluing and therefore underinvesting in consumers as a result.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4297/Criteo_1.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="675"></p> <h3>Helping to optimise the consumer experience </h3> <p>So what can a user-centric view give us? In short - greater accuracy. </p> <p>Criteo found that consumers actually view more products, add more items to basket, and checkout more than traditional analytics might suggest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4298/Criteo_2.JPG" alt="" width="712" height="656"></p> <p>With a cross-device strategy, retailers can utilise this information, becoming better equipped to optimise the overall <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67168-so-what-exactly-does-customer-experience-cx-mean/">consumer experience</a>. For instance, in the context of targeted offers and discounts or promoting one-click checkout – both factors that could help to encourage a mobile purchase.</p> <p>Similarly, the idea that people use their smartphone to research before only buying on desktop should be buried. This is no longer the case for the majority of consumers, with mobile being continuous and ever-present regardless of the device the final purchase is made on.</p> <h3>Cross-device shopping seen in all categories</h3> <p>In terms of retail categories, it appears that no one is exempt from the multi-device consumer journey. While fashion consumers remain some of the biggest adopters of smartphone shopping, all types of retailers are seeing an increase in mobile transactions.</p> <p>Interestingly, sporting goods has seen one of the biggest leaps, with its mobile share of transactions growing 30% year-on-year, overtaking mass merchants and health and beauty.</p> <p>Now, as many sports brands aim to capture consumer interest through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/online-community-management/">community management</a> and social media, it’s not unusual for product discovery to occur in spaces other than a main ecommerce site. Take Nike or Adidas Originals, for example. The latter is well-known for driving interest in new product launches through <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68785-how-adidas-originals-uses-social-media-to-drive-sales/" target="_blank">creative content on social</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4299/Criteo_3.JPG" alt="" width="708" height="674"></p> <h3>Apps outperforming mobile browsers</h3> <p>Lastly, with retailers capturing 55% of transactions via apps versus 45% on mobile, Criteo suggests that retailers should invest in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66837-three-points-to-consider-when-developing-a-mobile-app-strategy/" target="_blank">mobile apps</a> wherever possible. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4300/Apps_Criteo.JPG" alt="" width="569" height="335"></p> <p>That being said, transactions are not the only reason to invest in them. </p> <p>Now, more consumers are using apps in conjunction with the physical shopping experience, using them in-store to redeem discounts, compare prices and read reviews. With mobile playing a role in all parts of the consumer journey - from browsing to purchasing - this means retailers must ensure the user experience is consistent and seamless.</p> <p>Not <em>only</em> for mobile, of course, but across all devices and platforms.</p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68369-five-ways-to-improve-your-cross-device-marketing/" target="_blank">Five ways to improve your cross-device marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67132-cross-device-tracking-in-the-affiliate-channel-which-method-is-best/" target="_blank">Cross-device tracking in the affiliate channel: Which method is best?</a></em></li> </ul> <p><em><strong>For more on this topic, be sure to check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/topics/mobile/" target="_blank">mobile research</a>.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68767 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 How retailers are targeting mobile shoppers this Valentine’s Day Nikki Gilliland <p>With last-minute and on-the-move gift buying a real (if somewhat depressing) phenomenon, retailers need to ensure they are meeting the demand.</p> <p>With this in mind, here’s how retailers are targeting Valentine’s Day shoppers on mobile.</p> <h3>Debenhams</h3> <p>Debenhams is targeting consumers early this year, sending out a Valentine’s Day email before the end of January. With a growing number of people <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/article/consumers-prefer-marketing-offers-via-email-over-social-media-according-to-new-study/" target="_blank">using smartphones to check email</a>, this tactic is effective for prompting mobile shoppers.</p> <p>With a focus on gift guides, the creative is a fairly standard affair.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3584/Debenhams_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3583/Debenhams_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Debenhams is already promoting Valentine’s Day quite heavily on its mobile site, too, using a prominent homepage banner.</p> <p>However, the banner sends users straight to the lingerie category rather a general category page. Which is an odd move, as it could be sending mobile shoppers towards items they might not be interested in, which is potentially very disruptive.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3586/Debenhams.JPG" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3587/Debenhams_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Luckily, it also promotes an ‘Editor’s Picks’ article from the Debenhams blog, which points consumers to the various other items on offer.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3588/Debenhams_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Firebox </h3> <p>Firebox is another adopter of Valentine’s Day-themed emails, using a humorous tone and personalisation elements to tempt consumers into clicking through to the mobile site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3595/Firebox_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Unfortunately, the mobile experience is less than inspiring.</p> <p>All Valentine’s Day items are lumped into a single category (with no filters for him or her, etc.)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3595/Firebox_email.JPG" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3598/Firebox_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>This means users are required to endlessly scroll through potential gift ideas, which could quickly lead to boredom and higher abandonment rates.</p> <p>It would make sense to incorporate some kind of sorting system, at the very least, to help channel mobile browsing.</p> <h3>H&amp;M</h3> <p>H&amp;M is not promoting February 14 too heavily on mobile, choosing instead to include subtle category banners towards the bottom of the homepage.</p> <p>The curated children’s category is an original approach, which nicely balances out its focus on stereotypical Valentine’s Day gifts elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3600/H_M.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Again, lingerie seems to be a big theme, with an email that oddly relates ‘luxurious’ to skimpy underwear. </p> <p>With no indication of any other related categories, this could lead mobile users to assume it's the only option from H&amp;M.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3601/H_M_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="61"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3602/H_M_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>Last year, sales of flowers increased by a whopping 220%, making it the biggest Valentine’s Day category of all.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, many retailers have cottoned on to this, with the likes of Tesco using the category to drive sales on mobile.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3603/Tesco_1.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3604/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>While the homepage banner is restrained, Tesco is ramping up the incentives by offering free delivery and a free vase if you order online.</p> <p>I also noticed that Tesco is now prompting customers to sign up for alerts when new items come into or back into stock – a tactic which could help to turn mobile browsers into buyers at a later date.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3605/Tesco_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Thorntons</h3> <p>Despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68535-thorntons-fudges-site-relaunch-asks-customers-to-re-register/" target="_blank">relaunch marred by migration problems</a>, Thorntons is hoping to bounce back with an effective Valentine’s Day campaign.</p> <p>The creative is one of the most appealing I’ve seen, capitalising on pretty imagery and the sleek new design of its mobile site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3606/Thorntons_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3607/Thorntons.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>The navigation is somewhat of a mixed bag, however.</p> <p>While there is the option to sort the Valentine's Day category by best sellers or price, there's no option to filter by type of gift, meaning users are left scrolling or searching elsewhere on-site.</p> <h3>House of Fraser</h3> <p>House of Fraser has nicely incorporated Valentine’s Day on its mobile site, making gifts front and centre on the homepage.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3608/House_of_Fraser.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3609/House_of_Fraser_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>It’s also one of the easiest mobile browsing experience I’ve come across, breaking down categories by gender and price. Likewise, it allows users to further filter by type of gift.</p> <p>Instead of bombarding users with a particular category (e.g. lingerie) or lumping all items together, it aids the mobile journey and nicely showcases relevant items.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3610/House_of_Fraser_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Lush</h3> <p>Lastly, Lush is a good example of how to use seasonal holidays to drive sales.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3611/Lush.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3614/Lush_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>By creating a specific range of products for Valentine’s Day and promoting it across all channels, it aims to capture consumer attention and increase spending (even though mobile users might not even be browsing for this reason).</p> <p>I particularly like how the creative does not mention 'gifts', meaning that consumers won’t be discouraged from buying regardless of relationship status.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3613/Lush_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68517 2017-01-27T14:28:59+00:00 2017-01-27T14:28:59+00:00 What is Zelle and why haven't you heard of it? Arliss Coates <p>It could be that banking is about to take a major and disruptive step toward digital, but how are digital transactors supposed to catch on to Zelle without a prior marketing campaign?</p> <p>Though it was in August of 2016 that the Wall Street Journal first broke word of the banks' coming "<a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/americas-biggest-banks-have-a-new-name-for-their-venmo-killer-zelle-1472047872">Venmo-killer</a>," spasmodic coverage by a few publications in August and October has slackened to total media silence in the time since.</p> <p>My own cursory quizzing of colleagues and tech-savvy friends on the existence of Zelle mostly confirms what one might expect: no one has heard of this thing.</p> <p>As advertising in American banking goes, Zelle's understated introduction to the world is a definite departure from the norm; JPMorganChase, promoting a payment feature much like Zelle, though exclusively for Chase customers, launched a sweepstakes to promote awareness, while Bank of America takes care to promote the updates to its mobile app with large red letters on the <a href="https://www.bankofamerica.com/">BoA homepage</a>.</p> <p>As TechCrunch reported in October, the current list of banks enrolled in the Zelle program includes the United States' four largest - JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup - as well as Ally Bank, BB&amp;T, BECU, Capital One, Fifth Third Bank, FirstBank, First Tech Federal Credit Union, Frost Bank, Morgan Stanley, PNC, USAA, and U.S. Bank.</p> <p>That's an impressive lineup!</p> <p>But more importantly, most <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/safety_net/2015/02/venmo_security_it_s_not_as_strong_as_the_company_wants_you_to_think.html">Venmo users</a> don't know why Venmo needs fixing. As it happens, the near ubiquitous app has two major security problems:</p> <h4>Account theft</h4> <p>Venmo is an app, and apps live on phones. Because users often leave themselves logged into Venmo, fortunate phone thieves sometimes find themselves in possession of more than just an expensive device.</p> <p>Worse still, Venmo users who connect their credit cards, debit cards and/or routing numbers to the app may find themselves robbed of larger sums than just their Venmo balances.</p> <p>Cases like that of <a href="https://www.scu.edu/is/secure/blog-news-and-events/blog-posts/is-venmo-safe.html">Chris Grey</a>, a New York web developer who discovered the theft of $2,850 from his routing number-linked Venmo account, should give pause to those looking for easier ways to transact from their mobile phones.</p> <h4><strong>The bogus check method</strong></h4> <p>As others have pointed out, Venmo is not instantaneous, though it would like you to believe that it is.</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/3108/venmo_screenshot-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="829"></p> <p>Its "so-and-so has paid you <em>x</em> for <em>y</em>" message leads many to believe that transactions performed through the app move money the moment a user presses the pay button. In fact, Venmo transactions take a couple of days to process, and are therefore more similar to checks than to QuickPay systems like the one Chase bank provides its customers for intra-bank use.</p> <p>Taking advantage of this common misunderstanding of Venmo's operating procedure, fraudsters cheat vendors the same way one would with a bogus check.</p> <p>The practice of "paying" for a service, receiving the service, and then cancelling payment before the transaction can be processed is the reason Venmo encourages users to limit their use of the app to transferring funds between friends, relatives, and trusted acquiantances.</p> <h4><strong>What Zelle's pitch <em>should </em>be</strong></h4> <p>By being a non third-party service, Zelle largely solves the former problem, and by being truly instantaneous in its transactions, completely solves the latter. It's hard to see how adopting Zelle <em>wouldn't</em> be a good idea.</p> <p>This makes the decision by Zelle's backers not to inform the public of Venmo's flaws through an information campaign an odd one. The PayPal-owned app already defends itself from a position of strength, enjoying a good amount of brand loyalty from its users, as Fortune <a href="http://fortune.com/2014/11/04/venmo-makes-payments-easy/">points out</a>.</p> <p>Furthermore, Venmo's customer base is millennial. Even without <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/10/millennials-really-dont-like-big-banks-thats-going-to-disrupt-the-financial-services-world/425799/">millennial antipathy</a> to the banking sector, the 18-40 year old market is notoriously tough to win over.</p> <p>Digital marketers, take note - it will be an instruction to watch how this banking alliance tackles a tough set of marketing problems after a bad start.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68623 2016-12-09T12:57:00+00:00 2016-12-09T12:57:00+00:00 10 juicy digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Don't forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight.</p> <p>Now, let's get straight to it.</p> <h3>British retail to gain a boost from ‘fly-in’ shoppers</h3> <p>According to lastminute.com, London stores are set to get a big boost from Spanish and Italian travellers this weekend, with many taking the opportunity to shop while travelling during Europe’s Immaculate Conception public holiday. </p> <p>Data suggests that that 11% of Spaniards and 10% of Italians that booked to travel through the site will arrive in London this weekend.</p> <p>Combined with the weak pound, this makes the UK capital the top destination for international shoppers.</p> <h3>Emails proven to be effective for prompting purchases after abandonment</h3> <p>Abandoned-basket emails are key to encouraging consumers to complete a transaction according to Experian’s Q3 Email Benchmark Report.</p> <p>It found that customers who receive multiple abandonment emails are 2.4 times more likely to complete a transaction than customers who receive only one.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2285/Experian_Report.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="441"></p> <h3>75% of retailers aren’t listening to customer feedback</h3> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.ecommera.com/retail-superhero/" target="_blank">latest research</a> from eCommera, there is an increasing gap between retailers’ perceptions of the customer experience and the actual reality. </p> <p>In interviews with 500 European retailers, 99% claimed to measure customer loyalty, but only 25% said they use customer feedback to do so. Instead, the majority rely on the number or value of purchases.</p> <p>Large businesses in particular appear to be failing here, with retailers that have a turnover of over £500m per annum claiming 38% of customers are ‘loyal’.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers find misleading business info from search</h3> <p>A new survey from Yext has revealed how critical inaccuracies in online business data is misleading consumers.</p> <p>In a survey of 2,000 consumers, eight in ten reported encountering incorrect information about a business when searching online, with 43% of consumers saying that this was not a rare occurrence.</p> <p>The research also found 65% of large UK businesses have incorrect addresses listed online, with 33% listing incorrect phone numbers. </p> <h3>Over half of minority groups feel under-represented in UK ads</h3> <p>The ‘Reflecting Modern Britain’ report by Lloyds has discovered that just 47% of consumers in the UK feel accurately portrayed in advertising.</p> <p>With just 19% of people featured in ads coming from minority groups, there still appears to be a lack of fair representation in the media.</p> <p>The report shows that, while disabled people represent 17.9% of the population, just 0.06% feature in the ads included in the study. </p> <p>Similarly, 0.29% of single parents feature in ads, despite the fact that they make up 25% of the population.</p> <p>Lastly, 35% of survey respondents feel the Asian community did not feature enough in ads, and 31% thought mixed race people were under-represented.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2286/Lloyds_study.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="511"></p> <h3>Local businesses prefer to advertise on Facebook </h3> <p>A new report by Borrell Associates has found that local businesses favour Facebook over any other social media platform to advertise.</p> <p>In a survey of 7,564 US businesses that had recently purchased local advertising, 84% now have a social media presence - a figure up from just 57% in 2011.</p> <p>From this percentage, 96% are on Facebook, with 80% having their own Facebook page and 62% buying Facebook ads.</p> <p>Just 51% of local businesses on social media have a Twitter account and 34% use Instagram.</p> <h3>31% of consumers use smartphones to click-through and buy from email </h3> <p>The DMA’s Consumer Email Tracker 2016 report has found that email remains the most-used medium for reaching consumers.</p> <p>Furthermore, 51% of consumers access emails with a smartphone. This percentage also rises to 69% for younger respondents, meaning that smartphones have overtaken desktop as the primary way for young people to access email.</p> <p>The report also found that 41% of millennials have two email addresses, with one often used as a ‘ghost’ account to screen marketing messages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2287/Millennial_emails.jpg" alt="" width="560" height="750"></p> <h3>‘Chewbacca Mom’ is the most viewed Facebook Live video of 2016</h3> <p>It’s that time of year again, when brands look back at the biggest and most talked-about moments of the year.</p> <p>Facebook has just revealed the top ten most viewed Facebook Live videos, with ‘Chewbacca Mom’ taking the top spot.</p> <p>The top five include:</p> <ol> <li>Candace Payne: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/candaceSpayne/videos/10209653193067040/">Chewbacca Mom</a> </li> <li>Ted Yoder: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/tedyoder/videos/10153787061705895/">Soundscapes</a> </li> <li>Buzzfeed: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BuzzFeed/videos/10155300775200329/">Countdown to the next presidential election</a> </li> <li>Atlanta Buzz: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/atlbuzz/videos/10155052739929832/">People are lining up to hug police officers in Dallas</a> </li> <li>NBC News: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/NBCNews/videos/1562519697101388/">Election results</a> </li> </ol> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FcandaceSpayne%2Fvideos%2F10209653193067040%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h3>46% of millennials plan to Christmas shop from their smartphone</h3> <p>Catchpoint has revealed how UK consumers are doing their Christmas shopping this year, with younger consumers three times more likely to use their smartphone than older consumers.</p> <p>A big reason appears to be convenience and lower stress levels, with 42% of millennials saying that shopping on their smartphone would result in a happier Christmas gift shopping experience compared to just 29% of older shoppers.</p> <p>Regardless of age, Catchpoint also discovered that bed is the preferred location for shopping online, followed by a desk during a lunch break.</p> <p>Interestingly, a third of millennials also cite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68560-five-compelling-reasons-to-offer-free-wi-fi-in-store" target="_blank">lack of Wi-Fi</a> as a reason they’d be put off from Christmas shopping in-store. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2288/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Facial tracking reveals John Lewis to be the most engaging Christmas ad</h3> <p>John Lewis’s ‘Buster the Boxer’ is officially the most engaging festive ad, according to the results of a Realeyes study which measures viewers’ emotions by tracking facial expressions.</p> <p>The study involved measuring the emotional reactions of 4,450 people who watched a total of 65 ads.</p> <p>Taking the top spot with 94.8% on the emotionally compelling scale was John Lewis, narrowly beating The Body Shop’s Jungle Bells, which scored 94.1%.</p> <p>While the latter was the highest scoring ad among men, the Robert Dyas’ spoof of the Buster ad was found to be the most engaging for women.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68590 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 10 dazzling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup is unashamedly festive, with news about Christmas shopping, social media conversation, consumer trust and more.</p> <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more trusty insight.</p> <h3>85% of UK consumers to buy half of their Christmas gifts online</h3> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68587-black-friday-cyber-monday-2016-ecommerce-stats-bonanza/" target="_blank">Black Friday and Cyber Monday</a> out of the way, Tryzens has revealed that the majority of UK consumers will shop for Christmas online this year.</p> <p>A survey found that 85% of UK consumers will buy at least half their gifts online, while 56% will shop via their smartphones and tablets.</p> <p>22% of people are also reported to have started their Christmas shopping in October and 33% in November.</p> <p>Lastly, a very eager 5% started way back in January 2016.</p> <h3>Over 50% of top UK sites use at least one content recommendation engine</h3> <p>The New Yorker recently stopped using <a href="http://www.8ms.com/2014/02/20/rise-content-recommendation-engines/" target="_blank">content recommendation engines</a> – or monetization platforms known for their 'Around the Web' suggestions – due to allegations that they potentially support questionable content.</p> <p>However, SimilarTech has found that they are in widespread use both in the UK and US.</p> <p>Over 50% of top media sites in the UK use one or more them, and 75 out of 100 biggest online publications do the same.</p> <p>In fact, going against the assumption that they are going out of favour, the number of sites using content recommendation engines appears to be growing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1992/Number-of-Sites-Using-Taboola-and-Outbrain---Top-10k-sites.png" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>Christmas conversation hits social peak on 1st December</h3> <p>New insight from Carat UK suggests we’re less excited about Christmas this year, with a 5% decrease of Christmas mentions on Twitter.</p> <p>However, while figures suggest that 45% of people start to feel excited about Christmas ahead of December, it only become socially acceptable to start posting from 1st December, demonstrated by the fact that Christmas tweets increased by a whopping 65% on the same day last year.</p> <p>As a result of the collective excitement on 1st December people start planning which gifts to buy people, though 46% of shoppers are said to leave present buying to the second half of the month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1991/Social_Christmas.JPG" alt="" width="710" height="385"></p> <h3>Delivery options to determine choice of retailers</h3> <p>According to Shutl, retailers need to rely on more than reputation to ensure sales this Christmas.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,070 online shoppers, 95% said they would consider going to another retailer if a site couldn’t offer a delivery that suited their needs. Likewise, 41% said they’d definitely shop elsewhere if the last mile delivery wasn’t right for them.</p> <p>With 42% of shoppers having higher online delivery expectations than in 2015, the pressure for retailers is on.</p> <h3>Married male millennials are the most engaged consumers, apparently</h3> <p>A study by Affinion has delved into the engagement levels of consumers all over the world.</p> <p>In a Customer Engagement Score of between one and 100, millennials were found to have the highest.</p> <p>Those that were married also reported higher engagement levels, with an average score of 67 compared with 64 in singletons.</p> <p>Likewise, males are the most engaged gender, reporting a stronger bond with their banks and mobile phone providers.</p> <h3>M&amp;S named as the UK’s favourite Christmas shop</h3> <p>New research from Rakuten Marketing has revealed that Marks &amp; Spencer is officially the nation’s favourite Christmas shop, with nearly a third of Brits planning to spend the most there this December.</p> <p>In second position is Boots, and despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68484-the-top-10-most-shared-christmas-ads-of-all-time" target="_blank">strong advertising presence at this time of year,</a> John Lewis comes in third.</p> <p>The survey found that just 27% of British consumers make gift purchase decisions based on a brand’s Christmas TV ad campaign. Instead, 33% say they use retailer websites to source information, and 31% say recommendations from family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1994/M_S.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>31% of shoppers abandon baskets due to complicated payment processes</h3> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK adults, PPRO Group has discovered that online merchants are failing to offer customers their preferred payment option, resulting in 31% of consumers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">abandoning purchases at the checkout</a>.</p> <p>The survey also found that, this Christmas, 61% of consumers will be buying gifts online at home while watching TV, while 13% will shop from their smartphones while lying in bed.</p> <p>Bad news for employers - 17% also admit they will be buying their Christmas gifts online while at work.</p> <h3>UK sees higher online conversation rates than US </h3> <p>The Ecommerce Quarterly report from Monetate has revealed that UK retailers are faring better when it comes to online conversions.</p> <p>It found that the UK is converting more than the US for the second year in a row, taking into account figures from both 2015 and 2016.</p> <p>What’s more, while add-to-basket rates have dropped in the US, the UK’s has steadily increased. </p> <p>Average order value also saw month-on-month improvement in the UK throughout the last year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1993/Monetate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="142"></p> <h3>User-generated content results in greater consumer trust</h3> <p>A new report by Olapic has found that user-generated images are much more likely to generate consumer trust than those created by marketers.</p> <p>In a survey of more than 4,500 active social media users in the US and Europe, 46% of people said they would place trust in user generated content, with just 27% saying they’d trust content created by brands. Only 5% said they would trust straight-forward advertising. </p> <p>In terms of the preferred forms of user generated content, 52% cited photos as the best, ahead of 27% for video and 12% for written content.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1995/Starbucks_UGC.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="479"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68587 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2016 ecommerce stats bonanza Nikki Gilliland <h3>Black Friday 2016 breaks US online sales records</h3> <p>Adobe has revealed that this year’s Black Friday shopping frenzy broke online sales records in the US, with $3.34bn being spent online and a 17.7% increase on sales last year.</p> <p>It also found that retailers who invested in mobile, email and social saw 30% more sales on average than those concentrating on just one or two channels.</p> <h3>Black Friday traffic up 220% on a normal day</h3> <p>Confirming the success of this year’s event is Qubit, which has analysed more than 50m visits from 120 UK and US retailers to discover how consumers reacted.</p> <p>The results show a huge increase in both traffic and revenue.</p> <p>When comparing Black Friday to a normal Friday, it found traffic was up 220%. Similarly, traffic increased 155% on Cyber Monday when compared to a normal sales day.</p> <p>The same goes for revenue, which was up 240% and 380% on the Friday and Monday respectively.</p> <h3>Lego is the top-selling toy</h3> <p>Adobe’s results from Black Friday show that Lego is still a hot favourite this festive season, with Lego Creator Sets coming out as the top-selling toy.</p> <p>This was closely followed by Razor electric scooters, Nerf guns, DJI Phantom Drones and Barbie Dreamhouse. </p> <p>With items under $300 being 20% more likely to sell out, this gives us a good indication of the toys parents need to snap up if they still want to get them in time for Christmas.</p> <p>The five bestselling electronics from Black Friday were Apple iPads, Samsung 4k TV’s, Apple’s MacBook Air, LG Televisions and Microsoft Xbox.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1970/Lego.JPG" alt="" width="536" height="345"></p> <h3>Travel companies see greater interest than in 2015</h3> <p>Data from Sojern shows that consumers spent more on travel this year than last, specifically taking advantage of Cyber Monday.</p> <p>On the Monday, there were 32% more searches for flights from the US compared to the week before. </p> <p>Similarly, while 2015 saw an increase in bookings of 9%, this Cyber Monday resulted in a jump of 21%.</p> <p>Out of the most searched for destinations, Italy, Japan and Colombia were in the top 10, while Canada, Haiti and US Virgin Islands were among the most-booked.</p> <h3>Consumers embrace mobile shopping</h3> <p>According to PayPal, Black Friday demonstrated the enormous growth of mobile shopping and its popularity with consumers.</p> <p>On Black Friday, one third of all PayPal payments were made on mobile devices, as PayPal handled $15,507 in payments per second.</p> <p>Cyber Monday resulted in similar activity, with PayPal seeing over 50% year-on-year growth in global mobile payments.</p> <p>Based on the data, it is also expecting more than 40% year-on-year growth in total payments.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1972/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Brits more confident in shopping on mobile</h3> <p>While results show that mobile overtook desktop as the most preferred shopping channel overall, data from ChannelAdvisor suggests that Brits are more at ease than US shoppers when it comes to following through on mobile purchases.</p> <p>Throughout the five-day sales period, 75% of shopping searches in the US took place on mobile devices, however, mobile accounted for less than one in two purchases.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the percentage of UK shopping searches on mobile platforms being slightly lower, more than three in five sales conversions took place on mobile.</p> <h3>1.2m app installs on Black Friday</h3> <p>Continuing the mobile trend, it seems there was a significant increase in retailers targeting consumers via mobile apps this year.</p> <p>According to Urban Airship, retailers sent 56% more holiday notifications in 2016 than in 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1966/App_notifications.png" alt="" width="624" height="469"></p> <p>The big difference this year was retailers embracing targeting, with 88% of notifications being highly targeted to shopper’s locations, preferences and behaviours. Only 12% of messages were broadcast to everyone.</p> <p>The data also shows daily app installs averaged more than 696,000 per day in November, up 24% from the average daily rate in October. </p> <p>On Black Friday itself, there was a peak of more than 1.2m app installs.</p> <h3>Gilmore Girls generates more excitement than Black Friday on social</h3> <p>The latest data from Spredfast shows that there was a huge increase in noise around Black Friday this year, with the event racking up 2.4m mentions on social media - over 1m more than in 2015.</p> <p>However, insight suggests this could be due to more interactions on social overall, rather than direct interest in the shopping event.</p> <p>Despite Black Friday trending in many of these countries last year, the hotly anticipated return of Gilmore Girls, and the hashtag #GilmoreGirlsRevival, came out on top in France, Italy, New Zealand, Ireland and Germany.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When everyone is hyped for black friday but you've been waiting 9 yrs for this day and it's because the <a href="https://twitter.com/GilmoreGirls">@GilmoreGirls</a> revival is today!!</p> — frayadawe (@frayadawe44) <a href="https://twitter.com/frayadawe44/status/802047855955505152">November 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Rise in footfall to UK high streets</h3> <p>Springboard has analysed where UK consumers did their shopping on Black Friday, measuring both online sales and footfall in high streets and retail parks.</p> <p>It found that, while online transactions rose on Saturday by 1.9%, they had dipped by 5.5% on Sunday compared to last year. Footfall also dipped by 0.6%.</p> <p>In terms of the entire weekend, online transactions rose by just 2.3%. </p> <p>Footfall declined by 0.5%, however the 1.4% uplift in footfall to high streets apparently demonstrates the increasing importance of leisure-based trips to retail destinations.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1967/Footfall.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="176"></p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68432-black-friday-2016-how-are-uk-retailers-optimising-search-landing-pages/"><em>Black Friday 2016: How are UK retailers optimising search landing pages?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers/"><em>Seven examples of Black Friday email marketing from retailers</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68577-the-whisky-exchange-increased-prices-on-black-friday-did-it-work/"><em>The Whisky Exchange increased prices on Black Friday: Did it work?</em></a></li> </ul>