tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/payments-2 Latest Payments content from Econsultancy 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68767 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 2017-02-07T10:28:08+00:00 How retailers are targeting mobile shoppers this Valentine’s Day Nikki Gilliland <p>With last-minute and on-the-move gift buying a real (if somewhat depressing) phenomenon, retailers need to ensure they are meeting the demand.</p> <p>With this in mind, here’s how retailers are targeting Valentine’s Day shoppers on mobile.</p> <h3>Debenhams</h3> <p>Debenhams is targeting consumers early this year, sending out a Valentine’s Day email before the end of January. With a growing number of people <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/article/consumers-prefer-marketing-offers-via-email-over-social-media-according-to-new-study/" target="_blank">using smartphones to check email</a>, this tactic is effective for prompting mobile shoppers.</p> <p>With a focus on gift guides, the creative is a fairly standard affair.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3584/Debenhams_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3583/Debenhams_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Debenhams is already promoting Valentine’s Day quite heavily on its mobile site, too, using a prominent homepage banner.</p> <p>However, the banner sends users straight to the lingerie category rather a general category page. Which is an odd move, as it could be sending mobile shoppers towards items they might not be interested in, which is potentially very disruptive.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3586/Debenhams.JPG" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3587/Debenhams_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Luckily, it also promotes an ‘Editor’s Picks’ article from the Debenhams blog, which points consumers to the various other items on offer.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3588/Debenhams_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Firebox </h3> <p>Firebox is another adopter of Valentine’s Day-themed emails, using a humorous tone and personalisation elements to tempt consumers into clicking through to the mobile site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3595/Firebox_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Unfortunately, the mobile experience is less than inspiring.</p> <p>All Valentine’s Day items are lumped into a single category (with no filters for him or her, etc.)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3595/Firebox_email.JPG" alt="" width="250">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3598/Firebox_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>This means users are required to endlessly scroll through potential gift ideas, which could quickly lead to boredom and higher abandonment rates.</p> <p>It would make sense to incorporate some kind of sorting system, at the very least, to help channel mobile browsing.</p> <h3>H&amp;M</h3> <p>H&amp;M is not promoting February 14 too heavily on mobile, choosing instead to include subtle category banners towards the bottom of the homepage.</p> <p>The curated children’s category is an original approach, which nicely balances out its focus on stereotypical Valentine’s Day gifts elsewhere.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3600/H_M.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>Again, lingerie seems to be a big theme, with an email that oddly relates ‘luxurious’ to skimpy underwear. </p> <p>With no indication of any other related categories, this could lead mobile users to assume it's the only option from H&amp;M.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3601/H_M_subject_line.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="61"></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3602/H_M_email.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>Last year, sales of flowers increased by a whopping 220%, making it the biggest Valentine’s Day category of all.</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, many retailers have cottoned on to this, with the likes of Tesco using the category to drive sales on mobile.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3603/Tesco_1.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3604/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>While the homepage banner is restrained, Tesco is ramping up the incentives by offering free delivery and a free vase if you order online.</p> <p>I also noticed that Tesco is now prompting customers to sign up for alerts when new items come into or back into stock – a tactic which could help to turn mobile browsers into buyers at a later date.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3605/Tesco_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Thorntons</h3> <p>Despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68535-thorntons-fudges-site-relaunch-asks-customers-to-re-register/" target="_blank">relaunch marred by migration problems</a>, Thorntons is hoping to bounce back with an effective Valentine’s Day campaign.</p> <p>The creative is one of the most appealing I’ve seen, capitalising on pretty imagery and the sleek new design of its mobile site.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3606/Thorntons_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3607/Thorntons.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>The navigation is somewhat of a mixed bag, however.</p> <p>While there is the option to sort the Valentine's Day category by best sellers or price, there's no option to filter by type of gift, meaning users are left scrolling or searching elsewhere on-site.</p> <h3>House of Fraser</h3> <p>House of Fraser has nicely incorporated Valentine’s Day on its mobile site, making gifts front and centre on the homepage.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3608/House_of_Fraser.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3609/House_of_Fraser_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>It’s also one of the easiest mobile browsing experience I’ve come across, breaking down categories by gender and price. Likewise, it allows users to further filter by type of gift.</p> <p>Instead of bombarding users with a particular category (e.g. lingerie) or lumping all items together, it aids the mobile journey and nicely showcases relevant items.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3610/House_of_Fraser_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <h3>Lush</h3> <p>Lastly, Lush is a good example of how to use seasonal holidays to drive sales.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3611/Lush.JPG" alt="" width="250"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3614/Lush_2.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> <p>By creating a specific range of products for Valentine’s Day and promoting it across all channels, it aims to capture consumer attention and increase spending (even though mobile users might not even be browsing for this reason).</p> <p>I particularly like how the creative does not mention 'gifts', meaning that consumers won’t be discouraged from buying regardless of relationship status.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3613/Lush_3.JPG" alt="" width="250"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68517 2017-01-27T14:28:59+00:00 2017-01-27T14:28:59+00:00 What is Zelle and why haven't you heard of it? Arliss Coates <p>It could be that banking is about to take a major and disruptive step toward digital, but how are digital transactors supposed to catch on to Zelle without a prior marketing campaign?</p> <p>Though it was in August of 2016 that the Wall Street Journal first broke word of the banks' coming "<a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/americas-biggest-banks-have-a-new-name-for-their-venmo-killer-zelle-1472047872">Venmo-killer</a>," spasmodic coverage by a few publications in August and October has slackened to total media silence in the time since.</p> <p>My own cursory quizzing of colleagues and tech-savvy friends on the existence of Zelle mostly confirms what one might expect: no one has heard of this thing.</p> <p>As advertising in American banking goes, Zelle's understated introduction to the world is a definite departure from the norm; JPMorganChase, promoting a payment feature much like Zelle, though exclusively for Chase customers, launched a sweepstakes to promote awareness, while Bank of America takes care to promote the updates to its mobile app with large red letters on the <a href="https://www.bankofamerica.com/">BoA homepage</a>.</p> <p>As TechCrunch reported in October, the current list of banks enrolled in the Zelle program includes the United States' four largest - JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Citigroup - as well as Ally Bank, BB&amp;T, BECU, Capital One, Fifth Third Bank, FirstBank, First Tech Federal Credit Union, Frost Bank, Morgan Stanley, PNC, USAA, and U.S. Bank.</p> <p>That's an impressive lineup!</p> <p>But more importantly, most <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/safety_net/2015/02/venmo_security_it_s_not_as_strong_as_the_company_wants_you_to_think.html">Venmo users</a> don't know why Venmo needs fixing. As it happens, the near ubiquitous app has two major security problems:</p> <h4>Account theft</h4> <p>Venmo is an app, and apps live on phones. Because users often leave themselves logged into Venmo, fortunate phone thieves sometimes find themselves in possession of more than just an expensive device.</p> <p>Worse still, Venmo users who connect their credit cards, debit cards and/or routing numbers to the app may find themselves robbed of larger sums than just their Venmo balances.</p> <p>Cases like that of <a href="https://www.scu.edu/is/secure/blog-news-and-events/blog-posts/is-venmo-safe.html">Chris Grey</a>, a New York web developer who discovered the theft of $2,850 from his routing number-linked Venmo account, should give pause to those looking for easier ways to transact from their mobile phones.</p> <h4><strong>The bogus check method</strong></h4> <p>As others have pointed out, Venmo is not instantaneous, though it would like you to believe that it is.</p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/3108/venmo_screenshot-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="829"></p> <p>Its "so-and-so has paid you <em>x</em> for <em>y</em>" message leads many to believe that transactions performed through the app move money the moment a user presses the pay button. In fact, Venmo transactions take a couple of days to process, and are therefore more similar to checks than to QuickPay systems like the one Chase bank provides its customers for intra-bank use.</p> <p>Taking advantage of this common misunderstanding of Venmo's operating procedure, fraudsters cheat vendors the same way one would with a bogus check.</p> <p>The practice of "paying" for a service, receiving the service, and then cancelling payment before the transaction can be processed is the reason Venmo encourages users to limit their use of the app to transferring funds between friends, relatives, and trusted acquiantances.</p> <h4><strong>What Zelle's pitch <em>should </em>be</strong></h4> <p>By being a non third-party service, Zelle largely solves the former problem, and by being truly instantaneous in its transactions, completely solves the latter. It's hard to see how adopting Zelle <em>wouldn't</em> be a good idea.</p> <p>This makes the decision by Zelle's backers not to inform the public of Venmo's flaws through an information campaign an odd one. The PayPal-owned app already defends itself from a position of strength, enjoying a good amount of brand loyalty from its users, as Fortune <a href="http://fortune.com/2014/11/04/venmo-makes-payments-easy/">points out</a>.</p> <p>Furthermore, Venmo's customer base is millennial. Even without <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/10/millennials-really-dont-like-big-banks-thats-going-to-disrupt-the-financial-services-world/425799/">millennial antipathy</a> to the banking sector, the 18-40 year old market is notoriously tough to win over.</p> <p>Digital marketers, take note - it will be an instruction to watch how this banking alliance tackles a tough set of marketing problems after a bad start.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68623 2016-12-09T12:57:00+00:00 2016-12-09T12:57:00+00:00 10 juicy digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Don't forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for further insight.</p> <p>Now, let's get straight to it.</p> <h3>British retail to gain a boost from ‘fly-in’ shoppers</h3> <p>According to lastminute.com, London stores are set to get a big boost from Spanish and Italian travellers this weekend, with many taking the opportunity to shop while travelling during Europe’s Immaculate Conception public holiday. </p> <p>Data suggests that that 11% of Spaniards and 10% of Italians that booked to travel through the site will arrive in London this weekend.</p> <p>Combined with the weak pound, this makes the UK capital the top destination for international shoppers.</p> <h3>Emails proven to be effective for prompting purchases after abandonment</h3> <p>Abandoned-basket emails are key to encouraging consumers to complete a transaction according to Experian’s Q3 Email Benchmark Report.</p> <p>It found that customers who receive multiple abandonment emails are 2.4 times more likely to complete a transaction than customers who receive only one.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2285/Experian_Report.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="441"></p> <h3>75% of retailers aren’t listening to customer feedback</h3> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.ecommera.com/retail-superhero/" target="_blank">latest research</a> from eCommera, there is an increasing gap between retailers’ perceptions of the customer experience and the actual reality. </p> <p>In interviews with 500 European retailers, 99% claimed to measure customer loyalty, but only 25% said they use customer feedback to do so. Instead, the majority rely on the number or value of purchases.</p> <p>Large businesses in particular appear to be failing here, with retailers that have a turnover of over £500m per annum claiming 38% of customers are ‘loyal’.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers find misleading business info from search</h3> <p>A new survey from Yext has revealed how critical inaccuracies in online business data is misleading consumers.</p> <p>In a survey of 2,000 consumers, eight in ten reported encountering incorrect information about a business when searching online, with 43% of consumers saying that this was not a rare occurrence.</p> <p>The research also found 65% of large UK businesses have incorrect addresses listed online, with 33% listing incorrect phone numbers. </p> <h3>Over half of minority groups feel under-represented in UK ads</h3> <p>The ‘Reflecting Modern Britain’ report by Lloyds has discovered that just 47% of consumers in the UK feel accurately portrayed in advertising.</p> <p>With just 19% of people featured in ads coming from minority groups, there still appears to be a lack of fair representation in the media.</p> <p>The report shows that, while disabled people represent 17.9% of the population, just 0.06% feature in the ads included in the study. </p> <p>Similarly, 0.29% of single parents feature in ads, despite the fact that they make up 25% of the population.</p> <p>Lastly, 35% of survey respondents feel the Asian community did not feature enough in ads, and 31% thought mixed race people were under-represented.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2286/Lloyds_study.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="511"></p> <h3>Local businesses prefer to advertise on Facebook </h3> <p>A new report by Borrell Associates has found that local businesses favour Facebook over any other social media platform to advertise.</p> <p>In a survey of 7,564 US businesses that had recently purchased local advertising, 84% now have a social media presence - a figure up from just 57% in 2011.</p> <p>From this percentage, 96% are on Facebook, with 80% having their own Facebook page and 62% buying Facebook ads.</p> <p>Just 51% of local businesses on social media have a Twitter account and 34% use Instagram.</p> <h3>31% of consumers use smartphones to click-through and buy from email </h3> <p>The DMA’s Consumer Email Tracker 2016 report has found that email remains the most-used medium for reaching consumers.</p> <p>Furthermore, 51% of consumers access emails with a smartphone. This percentage also rises to 69% for younger respondents, meaning that smartphones have overtaken desktop as the primary way for young people to access email.</p> <p>The report also found that 41% of millennials have two email addresses, with one often used as a ‘ghost’ account to screen marketing messages.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2287/Millennial_emails.jpg" alt="" width="560" height="750"></p> <h3>‘Chewbacca Mom’ is the most viewed Facebook Live video of 2016</h3> <p>It’s that time of year again, when brands look back at the biggest and most talked-about moments of the year.</p> <p>Facebook has just revealed the top ten most viewed Facebook Live videos, with ‘Chewbacca Mom’ taking the top spot.</p> <p>The top five include:</p> <ol> <li>Candace Payne: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/candaceSpayne/videos/10209653193067040/">Chewbacca Mom</a> </li> <li>Ted Yoder: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/tedyoder/videos/10153787061705895/">Soundscapes</a> </li> <li>Buzzfeed: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BuzzFeed/videos/10155300775200329/">Countdown to the next presidential election</a> </li> <li>Atlanta Buzz: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/atlbuzz/videos/10155052739929832/">People are lining up to hug police officers in Dallas</a> </li> <li>NBC News: <a href="https://www.facebook.com/NBCNews/videos/1562519697101388/">Election results</a> </li> </ol> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FcandaceSpayne%2Fvideos%2F10209653193067040%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=400" width="400" height="400"></iframe></p> <h3>46% of millennials plan to Christmas shop from their smartphone</h3> <p>Catchpoint has revealed how UK consumers are doing their Christmas shopping this year, with younger consumers three times more likely to use their smartphone than older consumers.</p> <p>A big reason appears to be convenience and lower stress levels, with 42% of millennials saying that shopping on their smartphone would result in a happier Christmas gift shopping experience compared to just 29% of older shoppers.</p> <p>Regardless of age, Catchpoint also discovered that bed is the preferred location for shopping online, followed by a desk during a lunch break.</p> <p>Interestingly, a third of millennials also cite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68560-five-compelling-reasons-to-offer-free-wi-fi-in-store" target="_blank">lack of Wi-Fi</a> as a reason they’d be put off from Christmas shopping in-store. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2288/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Facial tracking reveals John Lewis to be the most engaging Christmas ad</h3> <p>John Lewis’s ‘Buster the Boxer’ is officially the most engaging festive ad, according to the results of a Realeyes study which measures viewers’ emotions by tracking facial expressions.</p> <p>The study involved measuring the emotional reactions of 4,450 people who watched a total of 65 ads.</p> <p>Taking the top spot with 94.8% on the emotionally compelling scale was John Lewis, narrowly beating The Body Shop’s Jungle Bells, which scored 94.1%.</p> <p>While the latter was the highest scoring ad among men, the Robert Dyas’ spoof of the Buster ad was found to be the most engaging for women.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68590 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 2016-12-02T10:31:15+00:00 10 dazzling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s roundup is unashamedly festive, with news about Christmas shopping, social media conversation, consumer trust and more.</p> <p>Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more trusty insight.</p> <h3>85% of UK consumers to buy half of their Christmas gifts online</h3> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68587-black-friday-cyber-monday-2016-ecommerce-stats-bonanza/" target="_blank">Black Friday and Cyber Monday</a> out of the way, Tryzens has revealed that the majority of UK consumers will shop for Christmas online this year.</p> <p>A survey found that 85% of UK consumers will buy at least half their gifts online, while 56% will shop via their smartphones and tablets.</p> <p>22% of people are also reported to have started their Christmas shopping in October and 33% in November.</p> <p>Lastly, a very eager 5% started way back in January 2016.</p> <h3>Over 50% of top UK sites use at least one content recommendation engine</h3> <p>The New Yorker recently stopped using <a href="http://www.8ms.com/2014/02/20/rise-content-recommendation-engines/" target="_blank">content recommendation engines</a> – or monetization platforms known for their 'Around the Web' suggestions – due to allegations that they potentially support questionable content.</p> <p>However, SimilarTech has found that they are in widespread use both in the UK and US.</p> <p>Over 50% of top media sites in the UK use one or more them, and 75 out of 100 biggest online publications do the same.</p> <p>In fact, going against the assumption that they are going out of favour, the number of sites using content recommendation engines appears to be growing.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1992/Number-of-Sites-Using-Taboola-and-Outbrain---Top-10k-sites.png" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>Christmas conversation hits social peak on 1st December</h3> <p>New insight from Carat UK suggests we’re less excited about Christmas this year, with a 5% decrease of Christmas mentions on Twitter.</p> <p>However, while figures suggest that 45% of people start to feel excited about Christmas ahead of December, it only become socially acceptable to start posting from 1st December, demonstrated by the fact that Christmas tweets increased by a whopping 65% on the same day last year.</p> <p>As a result of the collective excitement on 1st December people start planning which gifts to buy people, though 46% of shoppers are said to leave present buying to the second half of the month.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1991/Social_Christmas.JPG" alt="" width="710" height="385"></p> <h3>Delivery options to determine choice of retailers</h3> <p>According to Shutl, retailers need to rely on more than reputation to ensure sales this Christmas.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,070 online shoppers, 95% said they would consider going to another retailer if a site couldn’t offer a delivery that suited their needs. Likewise, 41% said they’d definitely shop elsewhere if the last mile delivery wasn’t right for them.</p> <p>With 42% of shoppers having higher online delivery expectations than in 2015, the pressure for retailers is on.</p> <h3>Married male millennials are the most engaged consumers, apparently</h3> <p>A study by Affinion has delved into the engagement levels of consumers all over the world.</p> <p>In a Customer Engagement Score of between one and 100, millennials were found to have the highest.</p> <p>Those that were married also reported higher engagement levels, with an average score of 67 compared with 64 in singletons.</p> <p>Likewise, males are the most engaged gender, reporting a stronger bond with their banks and mobile phone providers.</p> <h3>M&amp;S named as the UK’s favourite Christmas shop</h3> <p>New research from Rakuten Marketing has revealed that Marks &amp; Spencer is officially the nation’s favourite Christmas shop, with nearly a third of Brits planning to spend the most there this December.</p> <p>In second position is Boots, and despite a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68484-the-top-10-most-shared-christmas-ads-of-all-time" target="_blank">strong advertising presence at this time of year,</a> John Lewis comes in third.</p> <p>The survey found that just 27% of British consumers make gift purchase decisions based on a brand’s Christmas TV ad campaign. Instead, 33% say they use retailer websites to source information, and 31% say recommendations from family and friends.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1994/M_S.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>31% of shoppers abandon baskets due to complicated payment processes</h3> <p>In a survey of 1,000 UK adults, PPRO Group has discovered that online merchants are failing to offer customers their preferred payment option, resulting in 31% of consumers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">abandoning purchases at the checkout</a>.</p> <p>The survey also found that, this Christmas, 61% of consumers will be buying gifts online at home while watching TV, while 13% will shop from their smartphones while lying in bed.</p> <p>Bad news for employers - 17% also admit they will be buying their Christmas gifts online while at work.</p> <h3>UK sees higher online conversation rates than US </h3> <p>The Ecommerce Quarterly report from Monetate has revealed that UK retailers are faring better when it comes to online conversions.</p> <p>It found that the UK is converting more than the US for the second year in a row, taking into account figures from both 2015 and 2016.</p> <p>What’s more, while add-to-basket rates have dropped in the US, the UK’s has steadily increased. </p> <p>Average order value also saw month-on-month improvement in the UK throughout the last year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1993/Monetate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="142"></p> <h3>User-generated content results in greater consumer trust</h3> <p>A new report by Olapic has found that user-generated images are much more likely to generate consumer trust than those created by marketers.</p> <p>In a survey of more than 4,500 active social media users in the US and Europe, 46% of people said they would place trust in user generated content, with just 27% saying they’d trust content created by brands. Only 5% said they would trust straight-forward advertising. </p> <p>In terms of the preferred forms of user generated content, 52% cited photos as the best, ahead of 27% for video and 12% for written content.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1995/Starbucks_UGC.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="479"></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68587 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 2016-12-01T14:56:00+00:00 Black Friday & Cyber Monday 2016 ecommerce stats bonanza Nikki Gilliland <h3>Black Friday 2016 breaks US online sales records</h3> <p>Adobe has revealed that this year’s Black Friday shopping frenzy broke online sales records in the US, with $3.34bn being spent online and a 17.7% increase on sales last year.</p> <p>It also found that retailers who invested in mobile, email and social saw 30% more sales on average than those concentrating on just one or two channels.</p> <h3>Black Friday traffic up 220% on a normal day</h3> <p>Confirming the success of this year’s event is Qubit, which has analysed more than 50m visits from 120 UK and US retailers to discover how consumers reacted.</p> <p>The results show a huge increase in both traffic and revenue.</p> <p>When comparing Black Friday to a normal Friday, it found traffic was up 220%. Similarly, traffic increased 155% on Cyber Monday when compared to a normal sales day.</p> <p>The same goes for revenue, which was up 240% and 380% on the Friday and Monday respectively.</p> <h3>Lego is the top-selling toy</h3> <p>Adobe’s results from Black Friday show that Lego is still a hot favourite this festive season, with Lego Creator Sets coming out as the top-selling toy.</p> <p>This was closely followed by Razor electric scooters, Nerf guns, DJI Phantom Drones and Barbie Dreamhouse. </p> <p>With items under $300 being 20% more likely to sell out, this gives us a good indication of the toys parents need to snap up if they still want to get them in time for Christmas.</p> <p>The five bestselling electronics from Black Friday were Apple iPads, Samsung 4k TV’s, Apple’s MacBook Air, LG Televisions and Microsoft Xbox.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1970/Lego.JPG" alt="" width="536" height="345"></p> <h3>Travel companies see greater interest than in 2015</h3> <p>Data from Sojern shows that consumers spent more on travel this year than last, specifically taking advantage of Cyber Monday.</p> <p>On the Monday, there were 32% more searches for flights from the US compared to the week before. </p> <p>Similarly, while 2015 saw an increase in bookings of 9%, this Cyber Monday resulted in a jump of 21%.</p> <p>Out of the most searched for destinations, Italy, Japan and Colombia were in the top 10, while Canada, Haiti and US Virgin Islands were among the most-booked.</p> <h3>Consumers embrace mobile shopping</h3> <p>According to PayPal, Black Friday demonstrated the enormous growth of mobile shopping and its popularity with consumers.</p> <p>On Black Friday, one third of all PayPal payments were made on mobile devices, as PayPal handled $15,507 in payments per second.</p> <p>Cyber Monday resulted in similar activity, with PayPal seeing over 50% year-on-year growth in global mobile payments.</p> <p>Based on the data, it is also expecting more than 40% year-on-year growth in total payments.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1972/mobile_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="370"></p> <h3>Brits more confident in shopping on mobile</h3> <p>While results show that mobile overtook desktop as the most preferred shopping channel overall, data from ChannelAdvisor suggests that Brits are more at ease than US shoppers when it comes to following through on mobile purchases.</p> <p>Throughout the five-day sales period, 75% of shopping searches in the US took place on mobile devices, however, mobile accounted for less than one in two purchases.</p> <p>Meanwhile, despite the percentage of UK shopping searches on mobile platforms being slightly lower, more than three in five sales conversions took place on mobile.</p> <h3>1.2m app installs on Black Friday</h3> <p>Continuing the mobile trend, it seems there was a significant increase in retailers targeting consumers via mobile apps this year.</p> <p>According to Urban Airship, retailers sent 56% more holiday notifications in 2016 than in 2015.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1966/App_notifications.png" alt="" width="624" height="469"></p> <p>The big difference this year was retailers embracing targeting, with 88% of notifications being highly targeted to shopper’s locations, preferences and behaviours. Only 12% of messages were broadcast to everyone.</p> <p>The data also shows daily app installs averaged more than 696,000 per day in November, up 24% from the average daily rate in October. </p> <p>On Black Friday itself, there was a peak of more than 1.2m app installs.</p> <h3>Gilmore Girls generates more excitement than Black Friday on social</h3> <p>The latest data from Spredfast shows that there was a huge increase in noise around Black Friday this year, with the event racking up 2.4m mentions on social media - over 1m more than in 2015.</p> <p>However, insight suggests this could be due to more interactions on social overall, rather than direct interest in the shopping event.</p> <p>Despite Black Friday trending in many of these countries last year, the hotly anticipated return of Gilmore Girls, and the hashtag #GilmoreGirlsRevival, came out on top in France, Italy, New Zealand, Ireland and Germany.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When everyone is hyped for black friday but you've been waiting 9 yrs for this day and it's because the <a href="https://twitter.com/GilmoreGirls">@GilmoreGirls</a> revival is today!!</p> — frayadawe (@frayadawe44) <a href="https://twitter.com/frayadawe44/status/802047855955505152">November 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Rise in footfall to UK high streets</h3> <p>Springboard has analysed where UK consumers did their shopping on Black Friday, measuring both online sales and footfall in high streets and retail parks.</p> <p>It found that, while online transactions rose on Saturday by 1.9%, they had dipped by 5.5% on Sunday compared to last year. Footfall also dipped by 0.6%.</p> <p>In terms of the entire weekend, online transactions rose by just 2.3%. </p> <p>Footfall declined by 0.5%, however the 1.4% uplift in footfall to high streets apparently demonstrates the increasing importance of leisure-based trips to retail destinations.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1967/Footfall.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="176"></p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68432-black-friday-2016-how-are-uk-retailers-optimising-search-landing-pages/"><em>Black Friday 2016: How are UK retailers optimising search landing pages?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68573-seven-examples-of-black-friday-email-marketing-from-retailers/"><em>Seven examples of Black Friday email marketing from retailers</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68577-the-whisky-exchange-increased-prices-on-black-friday-did-it-work/"><em>The Whisky Exchange increased prices on Black Friday: Did it work?</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68326 2016-10-17T14:54:56+01:00 2016-10-17T14:54:56+01:00 Three brands succeeding in connecting online and offline experiences Ben Davis <h3>Topshop</h3> <p>Topshop's recent '<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68305-runway-to-retail-how-fashion-brands-are-introducing-see-now-buy-now/">Retail to Runway</a>' initiative integrated London Fashion Week (LFW) with the retailer's stores and digital properties.</p> <p>For its young audience, Topshop is truly a multichannel experience (with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66389-what-does-the-ideal-click-and-collect-service-look-like/">click and collect</a>, free WiFi in store, a social-enabled ecommerce app with barcode scanner), but Retail to Runway took this a step further.</p> <p>The launch played out as follows: </p> <ul> <li>Consumers could watch the Topshop catwalk show livestreamed on Topshop.com and on playback thereafter.</li> <li>Pieces from the show were available to buy immediately in selected stores, online and a pop-up showspace.</li> <li>The Topshop website ran plenty of editorial about LFW and allowed consumers to sign up for updates via email.</li> <li>The Topshop app provided notifications to users of all the LFW news.</li> </ul> <p>The merging of online and offline continues apace at Topshop, with the identity of the website (with its quick turnover of content and integrated social) matching the feel of the Topshop stores.</p> <p>Topshop plans to debut a 100% shoppable range at the next Fashion Week in February 2017, as it makes fashion ever more accessible, both online and offline.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9496/Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_16.54.29.png" alt="topshop unique" width="615" height="304"></p> <h3>Hilton</h3> <p>Whilst <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68375-airbnb-how-its-customer-experience-is-revolutionising-the-travel-industry/">Airbnb gets the plaudits in travel</a> for a unique UX including its peer review system, Hilton is fighting back.</p> <p>By adding functionality to the Hilton HHonors app, the hotelier is removing some of the more frustrating elements of using hotels.</p> <p>Users can choose a room in selected hotels and check in via the app, unlock rooms with their app's digital key, and book a cab via Uber.</p> <p>Customer service with a smile at the front desk can always be compromised in a busy period, but these app improvements help to empower customers to customise and control their own experiences, beyond the online booking journey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9526/Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_17.33.24.png" alt="hilton app" width="615" height="622"> </p> <h3>Starbucks</h3> <p>It's easy to dismiss Starbucks as just another big brand example of great CX - don't they just have plenty of money to throw at digital technology?</p> <p>Such an attitude would do an immense disservice to a brand that has been at the forefront of online/offline experiences for a number of years.</p> <p>Starbucks was the first store to widely offer free Wi-Fi and is, of course, known for letting customers dwell (which has become the default for all coffee shops).</p> <p>The coffee giant nailed mobile payment &amp; loyalty early, with its app that uses a barcode system launching in 2009.</p> <p>A staggering 21% of US transactions take place via the app and in 2015 the brand launched <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66997-starbucks-new-click-collect-app-is-it-any-good/">click-and-collect coffee</a> for those that don't want to wait in line.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-30/starbucks-takes-its-pioneering-mobile-phone-app-to-grande-level">Chart via Bloomberg</a></em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9527/Screen_Shot_2016-09-23_at_18.31.18.png" alt="starbucks mobile sales at 21%" width="615" height="414"></p> <p>Starbucks' digital marketing reaches into stores, too. Just a few initiatives include: </p> <ul> <li>The brand has used location-based app notifications (seen below),</li> <li>Starbucks' famous music playlists are available exclusively to rewards members on Spotify, where users can suggest their own tracks for in-store.</li> <li>An active <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/email-ecrm/">email marketing</a> and social media programme pushes seasonal specialities and offers to rewards members.</li> </ul> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/0789/Location-Based-Mobile-Marketing-Example.jpg" alt="starbucks notification" width="350"></p> <p>Overall, Starbucks' investment in stores (<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67085-starbucks-new-london-digital-concept-store-puts-focus-on-customer-experience/">including concept stores</a>) is just as impressive as its investment in its digital capabilities, making it a truly multichannel brand.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68366 2016-10-12T09:46:00+01:00 2016-10-12T09:46:00+01:00 Ecommerce checkouts: What payment options do users want? Nikki Gilliland <p>But what about payment preferences?</p> <p>I’ve recently been questioning whether people do actually care if a site has a one-click buy option.</p> <p>If the process is quick, transparent and easy - does it really matter?</p> <p>According to <a href="https://www.paypal.com/uk/webapps/mpp/stories/media-resources" target="_blank">new research from PayPal</a>, the answer appears to be yes.</p> <p>Here’s a closer look at the stats and the reasons why payment technology is still in demand during checkout.</p> <h3>Changing behaviour of consumers</h3> <p>In a study of 2,000 small businesses and more than 2,000 consumers, PayPal found that there was a stark contrast between retailers’ lack of innovation and the way consumers now browse and shop.</p> <p>Despite the rising popularity of digital wallets, contactless payments and smartphones, 44% of small businesses have reportedly never reviewed their payment methods.</p> <p>As a result, many could be missing out on sales.</p> <p>In fact, mobile shopping could be the biggest factor here, with this area growing at nearly four times the rate of overall online spending in the UK.</p> <p>What’s more, despite a fifth of consumers most frequently buying online using a smartphone, just 17% of small businesses are said to have mobile-optimised websites and just 4% have a mobile app.</p> <p>Last year, we wrote about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66997-starbucks-new-click-collect-app-is-it-any-good" target="_blank">Starbucks Order and Pay</a> – just one example of a brand using dedicated <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68192-how-can-mobile-payment-actually-improve-customer-experience/" target="_blank">mobile payment</a> app to streamline customer service.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9828/Starbucks_Order_and_Pay.JPG" alt="" width="607" height="531"></p> <p>Despite PayPal’s research focusing on smaller businesses, Starbucks is still a good case for what mobile technology can enable.</p> <p>With its in-built wallet and GPS tracker, it makes ordering a coffee as easy as can be.</p> <p>Some might question whether buying a coffee was really that hard to begin with.</p> <p>And they would be right, yet it still goes to show how much value consumers today place on convenience.</p> <h3>Reasons behind <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67120-12-ways-to-reduce-basket-abandonment-on-your-ecommerce-site/" target="_blank">abandoned checkouts</a> </h3> <p>While long-winded forms and surprise delivery charges also contribute, a lack of payment options could be the reason behind many abandoned baskets.</p> <p>According to PayPal’s study, 63% of consumers admit to abandoning an online purchase in the last three months due to being unable to pay the way they wanted.</p> <p>Again, this goes back to convenience.</p> <p>Being able to store your bank details or access a real-time payment method means faster and more spontaneous purchases – without the need to locate or enter in your debit or credit card details.</p> <p>Below are two examples of the payment section on ecommerce sites.</p> <p>Oasis' inclusion of PayPal means I am just a couple of clicks away from completing a purchase.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9829/Oasis_PayPal.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="422"></p> <p>While H&amp;M doesn't currently accept PayPal (though it is soon to introduce the feature), it does offer users the chance to save their card details for future purchases.</p> <p>Furthermore, it gives customers the option to pay via an invoice and the chance to defer payment for a month.</p> <p>These aren't necessarily convenient options for first-time customers, particularly on mobile where form filling is a pain, but could encourage repeat purchases from customers who have already setup an account.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9830/H_M_checkout.JPG" alt="" width="339" height="832"></p> <h3>Capitalising on new technology </h3> <p>Just as PayPal isn’t the only payment service provider, there are many other companies utilising new technology to offer consumers even more options.</p> <p>Zapp is one such company that has recently caught my eye.</p> <p>It is a mobile payment service like Apple Pay or Pingit, however, Zapp takes away the need for a digital wallet by allowing consumers to buy with their bank’s own mobile banking app.</p> <p>It will be interesting to see whether it takes off.</p> <p>While it does require banks and retailers to partake, the ability to collect greater amounts of data means that it is likely to appeal.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Lloyds, Halifax &amp; Bank of Scotland to launch Pay by Bank app mobile payments. They join Barclays, which is set to launch this Autumn.</p> — Zapp (@ZappPayments) <a href="https://twitter.com/ZappPayments/status/740830433441644544">June 9, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>For consumers, the ability to view bank details (like account balance etc.) at the point of purchase could be an added incentive.</p> <p>Then again, it could put off those who prefer <em>not</em> to see money leaving their account.</p> <h3>In conclusion…</h3> <p>While there are many factors that can make or break a good UX, this latest research suggests that retailers should not underestimate or ignore payment preferences.</p> <p>As technology advances, so will consumer expectations, meaning that retailers of all sizes should take heed.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67982 2016-06-22T11:47:00+01:00 2016-06-22T11:47:00+01:00 Apple Pay developments herald the era of contextual commerce Prosper Williams <p>The first wave involved migrating offline experiences to a website, while the second involved optimizing website experiences for mobile (Apps).</p> <p>And with recent announcements by Google, Facebook (Messenger) and now Apple, it is clear the third wave will be about optimizing apps for a few core pillar platforms that integrate other products and services into a tightly woven experience. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/A3r72C4PM1s?wmode=transparent" width="420" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>This is a significant and disruptive transition, not only for technology incumbents, but for traditional businesses and consumers too.</p> <p>Just like we have built policies, processes and competencies around the web and then mobile, organizations will need to do the same for platforms, but with one caveat.</p> <p>These experiences will be delivered in an environment curated and controlled by a third party, and thought will need to be given not only to how we roll out products and services in the future, but how we maintain our relationship with the end consumer, when essentially we are delivering an experience through an intermediary.</p> <p>Whilst the above is game-changing in nature (particular over the medium to long term) as someone employed in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-transformation-in-the-financial-services-sector-2016/">financial services</a>, I believe Apple’s decision to extend Apple Pay to the web browser also has the potential to be pretty significant and in quicker time, too. </p> <h3>Enhancements in experience design </h3> <p>Essentially Apple Pay on the web will give ecommerce players and all digital incumbents a new lens through which to view experience design. </p> <p>Since the first ecommerce site was launched back in 1992, the generic ecommerce interface has hardly changed. We still employ shopping carts, catalogues, panels and web pages.</p> <p>Yet all of our digital experiences outside commerce have changed.</p> <p>From Tinder, to Uber and Airbnb, customer-obsessed startups are providing fast, simple, personal and enchanting user experiences which are driving growth. </p> <p>And with the introduction of Apple Pay for the web, traditional digital incumbents can now deliver streamlined, frictionless user experiences which do the same.</p> <h3>The rise of contextual commerce </h3> <p>By shortening and in some cases eliminating the purchase stage of the conversion funnel, Apple is not just removing the disconnect in the experience customers have from cart to checkout.</p> <p>The company is unlocking opportunities for merchants to seamlessly implement “one click” payment options for the web/mobile web, image-heavy social media sites like Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and brick and mortar locations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.apple.com/uk/apple-pay/"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6342/Apple_Pay.png" alt="" width="800" height="508"></a></p> <p>This change (in parallel with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65307-five-retailers-using-nfc-and-rfid-to-enhance-shopping-but-do-they-work/">Near Field Communications technology</a> and the adoption of APIs) has the potential to provide a channel agnostic solution that completely condenses what can be an unnecessarily extended customer journey.</p> <p>Giving brands the ability to provide integrated omni-channel experiences in real-time, as consumers discover, evaluate and purchase our products. </p> <h4>Example: Integrated real-time engagements</h4> <p>Imagine being at work, and a colleague has just walked in with the Apple Watch, which you have been thinking about purchasing for some time.</p> <p>Instead of asking her specifics about the device, you tap the watch with your smartphone (both your phone and the watch have NFC-enabled capabilities), and immediately all the information related to the watch, such as price, reviews, similar products, as well as the ability for you to purchase the watch there and then and have it shipped to your home, are communicated to your mobile device. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/6343/apple_pay_nfc.jpg" alt="" width="848" height="565"></p> <p>As pointed out by thought-leaders such as Noz Urbina, the introduction of Apple Pay for the web will enable scenarios like the above.</p> <p>Encouraging brands not just to think in terms of online and offline, but instead to focus on integrated real-time engagements, as we deliver user experiences, which allow customers to consider, evaluate and purchase our products simultaneously, at any point along the customer journey.</p> <p>And all without the hassles that came along with earlier forms of payment, such as scrawling a signature on a piece of paper, or spending minutes on end registering to a website. </p> <h3>Loyalty </h3> <p>Finally, beyond being just a payment platform, Apple Pay will provide significant value in regards to loyalty, as brands use it as a mechanism for extending <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65435-what-is-customer-lifetime-value-clv-and-why-do-you-need-to-measure-it/">customer lifetime value</a>.</p> <p>How many of us have online interactions with brands that bear no connection with in-flight contextual data about us or our ongoing relationships with those brands.</p> <p>Tying this data in with the actual marketing and sales platform is a golden opportunity, and this is what the introduction of Apple Pay for the web facilitates. </p> <p>Ultimately this is an experience that could/should be managed by our financial services providers, but with no legacy systems to build upon I believe Apple, Google, or maybe even Samsung will be most aptly placed to facilitate this relationship. </p> <h3>Conclusion</h3> <p>Payment platforms such as Apple Pay are ushering in a new era of digital experience design.</p> <p>The emphasis will no longer be on optimising each stage of the funnel and driving customers towards the shopping cart, but on using technology to create magical frictionless experiences, taking into account what customers are going to feel and what they would want to share. </p> <p>By simplifying and stripping the friction out of the checkout process, not only does Apple Pay increase the likelihood of conversion, the platform changes the mind-set of digital product owners.</p> <p>This will free us up to really think through what the customer is going to have to experience, in order to unlock a growth partnership with our brands. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67768 2016-04-22T09:41:33+01:00 2016-04-22T09:41:33+01:00 How to gear towards mobile commerce success Georges Berzgal <p>While the US tech giant had already launched Apple Pay for in-app purchases on iOS mobile apps and physical stores last year, this move will make mobile shopping even easier.</p> <p>It enables consumers who shop online using an iPhone or iPad Safari browser to make a purchase at the push of a button with Apple Pay and TouchID.</p> <p>It points to a world where consumers can shop from wherever they are without the frustration of filling out fiddly forms on a phone or having to wait for lengthy security checks processed over slow network connections.</p> <p>Ovum predicts that <a href="http://www.shopsafe.co.uk/news/significant-mcommerce-growth-predicted/11552">2bn m-commerce transactions will take place globally</a> in 2019, 452m more than in 2014.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/4219/mobile_commerce.jpg" alt="" width="848" height="566"></p> <p>Closer to home, a major tipping point was recently reached.</p> <p>For the first time ever, UK online retail sales made through smartphones and tablets <a href="http://internetretailing.net/2016/03/tipping-point-more-than-half-of-online-sales-made-on-mobile-says-imrg/">exceeded those made over desktop and laptops in Q4 2015</a>, according to IMRG.</p> <p>Figures like this mean that retailers cannot afford to merely ‘experiment’ in mobile or ignore it entirely.</p> <p>And we must be aware that consumers expect us to cater to whatever device they’re using or even the accessories they’re wearing while on the move.</p> <p>In addition, when referring to mobile, we can no longer limit the conversation to phones or tablets.</p> <p>We have to include smartwatches and even the latest car models, featuring screens with access to the internet (e.g. <a href="http://www.apple.com/uk/ios/carplay/">Apple CarPlay</a> or <a href="https://www.android.com/auto/">Android Auto</a>).</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ht8yzpIV9M0?wmode=transparent" width="615" height="346"></iframe></p> <p>So what does being mobile-ready entail and require of a retailer? Commerce marketers might want to consider the following:</p> <h3>1. Be mobile responsive</h3> <p>It wasn’t so long ago that all web content was designed with a laptop screen in mind.</p> <p>Today, one of the biggest mistakes a brand can make is not being mobile responsive.</p> <p>Many retailers are now catering to mobile, so if your website and emails aren’t mobile-ready and easy to navigate, customers aren’t going to persevere and will go to a competitor.</p> <p>Research found that if your email doesn’t look good on a mobile device, <a href="https://litmus.com/blog/the-how-to-guide-to-responsive-email-design-infographic">80% of customers will simply delete it and 30% will actually unsubscribe</a> from future correspondence with you.</p> <p>By optimising the look of mobile websites and emails, you will enhance the overall user experience, drive more click-throughs, improve conversion rates, and reduce unsubscribes and spam complaints.</p> <h3>2. Be inclusive</h3> <p>With such a diverse range of mobile devices now available, it’s important to cater to every consumer, whether they’re using the most basic feature phone, smartphone or tablet.</p> <p>Retailers should recognise these preferences and run a multi-part campaign, which sends emails in a text and an HTML version.</p> <p>Many brands also drive substantial value from transaction-based services over SMS, or push notifications in apps.</p> <p>For example, a customer receives an order confirmation via email, followed by an SMS with the expected arrival time or dispatch information.</p> <p>Some brands like to go one step further, using both SMS and email simultaneously to ensure the optimal <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics/">customer experience</a>, no matter which device the consumer is using.</p> <h3>3. Adopt a ‘mobile first’ approach to the customer experience &amp; integrate it with the wider business</h3> <p>It’s crucial that mobile is connected to the consumer’s full experience with a retailer.</p> <p>For example, if a consumer responds to an in-store promotion and sends a text in order to receive a discount, the brand needs to acknowledge this and personalise the communication that follows.</p> <p>Initially, this means referencing the shop that the text was sent from in future emails.</p> <p>As more data is collected about the individual, the communications should become more targeted, reflecting device usage, personal preferences and shopping behaviour. </p> <p>Linkages between device usage (mobile, laptop, desktop) should be seamless for the customer. Connect online and offline activities and merchandising.</p> <p>For example, ensure that your high-street stores are aware of any promotions you launch for mobile users.</p> <p>If your stores are unaware of a current campaign and refuse to accept a promotion code, it will result in a very negative experience for the customer.</p> <p>Retailers that are geared up for mobile customers are the ones that are best placed to secure sales.</p> <p>If you are going to invest in mobile, don’t do it half-heartedly.</p> <p>Be mindful that consumers are still using a range of devices and channels to make purchases and continue to cater to the shopping preferences of all customers.</p> <p>Interestingly, we have just polled 2,000 UK consumers about their multi-device shopping habits and found some exciting results which I will share in my next blog post. So stay tuned!</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/67730 2016-04-12T09:52:00+01:00 2016-04-12T09:52:00+01:00 Fintech startup Mondo provides slick, impressive UX: Review Martin Jordan <p>Just 136 days after its initial alpha launch, the public beta for the <a href="https://getmondo.co.uk/">Mondo banking app</a> launched on 17 March.</p> <p>It launched with an iOS-only app – I’ve been informed the Android version is on its way.</p> <p>Having registered for the app I was immediately put in a queue to wait for my card.</p> <p>Mondo has cleverly incentivised this process by giving each applicant a unique referral link. Every person that subsequently signed up to Mondo off the back of my link enabled me to jump up the queue a few places.</p> <p>My 170 Equator colleagues did me proud and thanks to them I went from position 23,000 to one in under half an hour!</p> <p>Once I reached the top it took 12 hours for the app to activate itself and that’s when I was allowed to add funds.</p> <p>However, rather than using scanning technology for ID, such as passports, driver’s licence , etc. as I thought it might, the app took my details in a traditional fashion. The flash of innovation came in the final stage of setup. </p> <p>In order to open a Mondo account, I would have to transfer a minimum of £100.</p> <p>Though I could have done the transfer manually using my Santander app, instead Apple Pay enabled a seamless bank transfer using only my fingerprint.</p> <p>Well, 10 seconds later, and I had opened a Mondo account.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3856/mondo_1.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3857/mondo_2.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="444">  </p> <p>After 48-hours, the screen changed to let me register the fact that my card had arrived...</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3858/mondo_3.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="445"></p> <p>I liked the thick blue envelope and the orangey colour of the card; the sleeve reminded me to protect my number if I did decide to share my adventures in Future Banking.</p> <p>Which of course I did. (#geek)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3859/mondo_4.jpg" alt="" width="299" height="400"></p> <p>And I was in! The simple transaction screen details current balance, the day’s spend and recent transactions.</p> <p>I have to give it to Mondo. Its app is clever, it’s lean, there’s no messing about, it’s fully functional and needs no further authentication layer to get in.</p> <p>Once I open the app I can see all my transactions without tapping in another password.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3860/mondo_5.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="445"></p> <p>When I buy something with my new Mondo card it’s like any other normal transaction, though at this moment in time it makes use of a Prepay Mastercard debit card.</p> <p>This means that it does not come with a sort code or account code on the card, but it does have a Pin (which was texted to me) and contactless.</p> <p>I was most impressed with my purchase history with Mondo – on one occasion when making an online purchase, the Mondo app registered five seconds faster than the confirmation from the online retailer’s site!</p> <p>And every other transaction has appeared on my phone screen within two to three seconds. Speedy or what?</p> <p>Also, if Mondo recognises a store it will brand the icon next to the payment, and if it can’t it will categorise the item (e.g. ‘Eating Out’ or  ‘Groceries’).</p> <p>It also lets me add notes and photos to purchases, which give me a fuller picture of my spending activities.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3861/mondo_6.png" alt="" width="225" height="400"></p> <p>What’s more, I can categorise expenditure. For example, if I classify items as expenses, Mondo can collate these making it easy for me to hand into my boss.</p> <p>Dig a little deeper and I can see all purchases made over a certain amount, by ‘Merchant’ or by ‘Category’.</p> <p>And there’s even a handy graph that lets me track spend and income habits as an easy line graph.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3862/mondo_7.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="444">  <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/3863/mondo_8.jpg" alt="" width="250" height="444"></p> <h3>Other bits…</h3> <p>Like with other banking apps, you can now send money by text. Nothing too novel there but this bit is all secured by Touch ID.</p> <p>You can chat to customer service staff at any time through a conversation window, sending images if necessary. They’re pretty fast at getting back too.</p> <p>They’ll respond through the chat window and through your email.</p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Ok, so it’s not a full banking app yet but the platform shows incredible promise.</p> <p>Mondo has thought long and hard about the user experience, maximising the phone’s power where it can, cutting out paper almost completely (you still need the card) and making the interface incredibly intuitive.</p> <p>There are still some simple things Mondo could have done to make it even slicker but it may be working on this or may be stymied by financial regulation.</p> <p>I hope that, in time, it becomes a learning app – learning not just from your own behaviour, but from all users.</p> <p>I enjoy the wit and humour injected into the app and did not feel that it was inappropriate for a serious banking app.</p> <p>In terms of performance, the app is very fast, never stalls and purchases come through incredibly quickly.</p> <p>I think there’s a bright future here. The big banks need to watch this one intently!</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67202-what-s-the-future-for-big-banks-in-a-fintech-world/"><em>What's the future for big banks in a FinTech world?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66246-are-banking-websites-in-need-of-an-update/"><em>Are banking websites in need of an update?</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-transformation-in-the-financial-services-sector/"><em>Digital Transformation in the Financial Services Sector Report</em></a></li> </ul>