tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/performance-marketing Latest Performance marketing content from Econsultancy 2016-12-01T12:12:39+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68578 2016-12-01T12:12:39+00:00 2016-12-01T12:12:39+00:00 The Weather Company on programmatic, ad fraud, and how extreme conditions affect business Olivia Solon <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> What proportion of The Weather Company’s ad sales are done programmatically?</h4> <p><em>Jeremy Hlavacek:</em><strong> </strong>There are two sales channels at The Weather Company. We have our direct sales organization and then I run the side of the business where we put our inventory up for sale through online platforms and exchanges.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1975/Jeremy_Hlavacek.png" alt="" width="246" height="194"></p> <p>It’s about half and half at the moment and the trend is towards more programmatic. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How do you make sure that your programmatic sales don’t cannibalize direct sales?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> We’ve spent a great deal of time looking at yield and pricing across the two channels. From our point of view it doesn’t matter if an advertiser wants to buy through a human being and a handshake or a technology platform as long as the inventory is priced appropriately.</p> <p>The second part is that both me and the gentleman who runs direct sales report to the Chief Revenue Officer, who can see the performance of both channels and make strategic decisions.</p> <p>He may want one client to buy through automated platforms and another to buy through direct sales channels, maybe because of the client relationship or the type of buy they want to execute, but both divisions are on equal footing. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Some media companies think of using programmatic for unsold inventory. What do you make of that?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> That’s an outdated way of looking at the business. At this point we see lots of premium advertisers who want to use automation technology to execute their buys.</p> <p>As long as the price works with the yield model we have no problem with that.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1976/weather_channel_map.png" alt="" width="800" height="413"></p> <p>We are finding that inventory can be worth even more when we sell it through automated platforms. When a buyer uses a DSP [demand side platform] they can get very precise with the impressions they want to buy so they get good return on investment. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What data points can you use to target consumers more accurately?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> As a weather company we are unique in that we have many first-party data sets, primarily weather and location data.</p> <p>If a beverage advertiser wants to advertise they can use typical programmatic tools to identify the audience of, say, young men between 25 and 35 on the weekend when they are more likely to drink beer.</p> <p>We can then tell them when it is hot and sunny in New York City that’s a good time to run Budweiser ads for drinking a beer on the beach or whatever.</p> <p>Or if it’s cold and stormy in Chicago but it’s football season, it might be a good time to run a beer ad with a different message like “stay inside and watch the game with your friends and enjoy a Budweiser.” </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Earlier this year the east coast of the United States had to deal with Hurricane Matthew, how does such a major weather event affect your job?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> To really understand how publisher yield management works for digital properties a hurricane is a great unusual use case.</p> <p>In media traditionally lots of planning goes into forecasting inventory, understanding how many impressions you’ll have and selling those out in advance. That works well for our direct sales business.</p> <p>However, when a hurricane, snow storm, heatwave, tornado or other major weather event hits, it’s not unusual for us to see anywhere from a 200% to a 400% increase in traffic.</p> <p>It’s almost impossible to forecast that with enough precision to sell directly, so it’s really beneficial to have programmatic as we can immediately put that inventory up for sale in an exchange and monetize it. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What is the biggest challenge facing the programmatic industry?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> One problem that has arisen in this space is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67659-three-things-that-show-the-scale-of-the-ad-fraud-challenge/">ad fraud</a>. Companies running the exchanges have perhaps been a little bit liberal in terms of who they let into that exchange.</p> <p>This means advertisers are spending good money on properties that are either very long tail, have non-human traffic or might not have highly viewable ads. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How does this affect your own business?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> The good news is that advertisers are getting a lot more serious about that issue to the benefit of companies like Weather, which can offer premium inventory at scale without any of the worries of fraud, viewability and non-human traffic.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1977/weather_channel_map_2.png" alt="" width="800" height="399"></p> <p>We can give advertisers what they want: efficiency through automation and targeting through data. We want people to buy real legitimate impressions.  </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How can the problem of ad fraud be solved?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> It’s gone on in media for a long time if we’re honest – from the early days of TV and print. That’s why third-party verification companies like Nielsen were invented, to track exactly what was served.</p> <p>This is just a case of the programmatic industry growing up and recognizing it needs to be held to the same standard as other media.</p> <p>When it was a new and disruptive emerging industry maybe it didn’t matter as much, but now $20bn+ is being spent in programmatic ad technology it’s not okay to say, “We’re going to let this slide.” The stakes are too high.  </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What are some of the innovations in programmatic?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> It really grew out of web display inventory and the targeting technology has been pushed to the limit, but there is a huge opportunity in mobile.</p> <p>On the web side we have cookie targeting, but that doesn’t exist for mobile in-app inventory.</p> <p>We know there are huge audiences there, but advertisers haven’t figured out how to use data to target yet, so they are dumping most of their dollars into Facebook or Google.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How do you solve the mobile targeting problem?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> To me the key is data. Look at web. People used to buy impressions blindly and would use the site as a proxy.</p> <p>So to reach young men they would probably buy ESPN, but then you would also reach women who may not be in your target so would be wasting your dollars.</p> <p>Weather.com, the New York Times and other brands also have large audiences of young men. So we need to move away from contextual targeting where companies’ brands represent the audience towards truly defined audience targeting. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> What’s the future of programmatic?</h4> <p><em>JH:</em> In 2017 we’re looking at ways to apply our data across all media. Display is great but social advertising, outdoor advertising and TV advertising are very powerful.</p> <p>There’s no reason why our data shouldn’t be effective across all channels, but it’s early days. The operational systems behind all these media channels are very different from what we do to put an ad on a website.</p> <p>That’s an area where the industry needs to get smarter. Once you master the ad serving technology, you can then think about targeting programmatically. </p> <p><em>For more information on this topic, check out these resources:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/"><em>A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/"><em>The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/"><em>Programmatic Training Course</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68564 2016-11-28T15:13:35+00:00 2016-11-28T15:13:35+00:00 2016: The good, the bad and the future of digital marketing Blake Cahill <p>However, while some of my “predictions” turned out to be fairly accurate, there have also been more than a few surprises over the last 12 months.</p> <p>Here are a couple of the most unexpected trends that have taken off this year, two of the biggest digital disappointments and my personal trend pick for 2017.</p> <h3>The surprise revival of silent video</h3> <p>One of the most unexpected trends that made a real comeback this year was silent video. Over <a href="http://www.smartinsights.com/mobile-marketing/mobile-marketing-analytics/mobile-marketing-statistics/">80% of internet users own a smartphone</a>, but average video viewing time is <a href="http://www.campaignlive.com/article/facebooks-everson-agencies-lagging-mobile-creative/1388780">1.7 seconds</a>, meaning consumers are in rapid consumption mode and marketers have had to become even savvier at grabbing their attention.</p> <p>What this means is there’s a real need for content that packs a punch at the beginning of the clip. If you only have a miniscule amount of time to grab a customer’s attention before they scroll past, then the video needs to have an immediate hook.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/glX_vgRCmKE?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <p>A perfect example of this is the social media clip that Apple pushed out following the release of the new iPhone 7. The advert is completely silent and simplistic in nature, with each frame changing every 0.5 seconds. </p> <p>In an age where most of us have our smartphones on silent, Apple has managed to discover a way to capture our attention in the most straight-forward of ways.</p> <h3>Hail to the community managers</h3> <p>2016 has also become the year of the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/online-community-management/">community manager</a>. It’s common for brands to think of social as a one trick pony, but the brands that are succeeding on social don’t just have someone schedule 10 tweets a day and like the occasional @ comment. </p> <p>The brands that allow their community managers to become the human face of the company add an extra dimension to their social media capabilities and provide the consumer with a real sense of personality.</p> <p>Some brands that really know how to do this are Innocent Drinks, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/61946-how-tesco-uses-facebook-twitter-pinterest-and-google/">Tesco</a>, Virgin Trains and <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2015/12/010/10-of-the-most-brilliant-customer-service-exchanges-ever-seen-on/">Oreo</a>. They understand the importance of employing empowered community managers and with any luck, 2017 should see more brands following in their footsteps.</p> <h3>The problem with live content</h3> <p>Of all the successes and surprises in 2016, some of the newer marketing methods are still proving problematic.</p> <p>One of these is live content – it just isn’t working out. Despite the potential, all too many brands still don’t seem to realise how to properly manage live content. </p> <p>Maybe the production value is too low, the content is too tedious, the functionality is broken... Ultimately, without a high value exchange, live content is never going to have any impact with consumers.</p> <p>One example of a brand that has really nailed live content, however, is <a href="http://www.experian.com/blogs/news/about/creditchat/">Experian</a>. It holds straight-forward, weekly chats via YouTube Live, Snapchat and <a href="http://www.experian.com/blogs/news/about/creditscope/">Periscope</a> to talk directly with consumers about their money worries.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FExperianUK%2Fvideos%2F1062124017192953%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="665"></iframe></p> <p>Experian understands that for live content to work, companies need to accept that what a brand thinks is interesting for customers is rarely what they will actually spend time watching.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, read about <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">10 pioneering examples of brands using Facebook Live</a>.</em></p> <h3>Where are the iBeacons?</h3> <p>Back in 2014, I was convinced that retail use of iBeacons would swiftly take centre stage in our marketing strategies. </p> <p>We all <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65221-ibeacon-trials-13-brands-trying-to-find-a-use-case/">saw the </a><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65221-ibeacon-trials-13-brands-trying-to-find-a-use-case/">potential</a> and several big brands got on board – <a href="https://blog.virgin-atlantic.com/t5/Our-Future/Virgin-Atlantic-lights-the-way-with-Apple-s-iBeacon-technology/ba-p/26359">Virgin</a> used them in its Heathrow airport lounges and Macy’s rolled them out in over 800 stores to track customer movements <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/article/macys-taps-ibm-watson-to-improve-in-store-shopping-app/">in-store</a>, push product recommendations and discounts and to inform shoppers about sale items.</p> <p>But despite these examples, they just haven’t made it to the mainstream yet. </p> <p>Despite predictions that 85 of the top 100 retailers would be using them by the end of 2016, only 3% of retailers had implemented beacon technology by 2015 and only 16% had plans to implement them in the near <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/shane-paul-neil/is-ibeacon-marketing-fina_b_10508218.html">future</a>.</p> <p>So what’s the hold up? Well, they can be hard to manage and maintain from a logistical point of view, as all beacon marketing requires user opt-in and customers just aren’t sold on it yet. </p> <p>This could change in 2017 but my bet is that it’ll be a slow process before they start to become a standard part of our marketing efforts.</p> <h3>The democracy of content</h3> <p>Enough about 2016, let’s look to the future.</p> <p>In 2017, brands need to be able to engage and connect with their customers better than ever before (one nice example of this is Philips’ <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBGcW5AtKyg">Every Day Hero</a> campaign). Nowadays however, companies aren’t just competing with another brand’s marketing anymore; they’re competing with the entire internet and this is where it starts to get tricky.</p> <p>Any company hoping to inspire consistent engagement has to accept that consumers now have access to tools (like <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/boomerang-from-instagram/id1041596399?mt=8">Boomerang</a> and <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/hyperlapse-from-instagram/id740146917?mt=8">Hyperlapse)</a> that can result in better, more engaging pieces of video content than the stuff many of the brands are developing themselves.</p> <p>Earlier this year, a survey found that 85% of users find visual user-generated content (UGC) more influential than brand photos or <a href="http://www.adweek.com/socialtimes/why-consumers-share-user-generated-content-infographic/639636">videos</a>. Another report found shoppers who interact with UGC are <a href="https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/278152">97% more likely to convert</a> with a retailer than customers who do not.</p> <p>What this means is we can expect to see a huge surge in marketers working with UGC in 2017. It’s nothing new (Burberry launched its <a href="http://artofthetrench.burberry.com/">Art of Trench</a> website back in 2009 for example), but I wouldn’t be surprised if it quickly becomes a much more common feature of brand campaigns.</p> <p>So roll on 2017. I’m looking forward to finding out if I’m right!</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68539 2016-11-17T14:28:23+00:00 2016-11-17T14:28:23+00:00 How are disruptive brands redefining marketing? Nikki Gilliland <p>We’ve gathered insight from six executives from the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/top-100-disruptive-brands-2016/" target="_blank">Top 100 Disruptive Brands</a> list, a report produced in association with Marketing Week.</p> <p>You can watch the full interviews in the video below – or read on for a summary of what they said.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/191140074" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>Focusing on the right channel</h3> <p>While startups are typically small in terms of budget and scale, Justin Basini, the co-founder and CEO of Clear Score, explained how this doesn’t necessarily mean you have to put limitations on your marketing model. </p> <p>Or, that digital channels have to be the only way forward.</p> <blockquote> <p>What’s unique and different about the way we approach marketing at Clear Score is that we have focused from our earliest days on how we get to scale as quickly as possible.</p> <p>Ironically, we didn’t do any of the normal startup marketing that you might expect, like Facebook, PPC, Google.</p> <p>We went straight onto TV – and the reason we could do that was because we had a bunch of people around the table and we’d raised enough money to really go into the market hard.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Capitalising on word-of-mouth</h3> <p>Copa90 is a company that relies on the enthusiasm of its audience to further its own marketing. </p> <p>Building on word-of-mouth recommendations and online search interest, CTO James Kirkham described how it uses its own content as the biggest tool in its arsenal.</p> <blockquote> <p>So much of Copa90's marketing is built around our own shows. They are flagship pieces that fans look to find themselves - they have their own viewerships and become marketing properties in their own right. </p> </blockquote> <p>For Eren Ozagir, founder and CEO of Push Doctor, the unique nature of his company’s product creates a similarly unique approach to marketing.</p> <blockquote> <p>I know people think ‘marketing healthcare has been done for years and years’. </p> <p>Yes, as an insurance product, but not as a fully packaged digital experience. And so, there are very few people that have been pushing the boundaries on Facebook to directly acquire customers [in this way]. </p> </blockquote> <h3>Using personalisation and education</h3> <p>Many of the executives interviewed spoke about how their marketing models are based on delivering something of value.</p> <p>For Kirsty Emery, the co-founder of Unmade, this is creating promotional videos to help guide customers as well as raise awareness about what the company does.</p> <blockquote> <p>For us, because the customer is involved in every single area... we have to be able to talk to them and show them how to go along this process.</p> <p>A lot of what we do is very visual and dynamic, so we make a lot of videos to help our customers, so they can see how to use the site, where to click, what to do, etc. </p> </blockquote> <p>Similarly, Andy Hobsbawm, co-founder and CEO of Evrythng, focuses on tapping into people’s interest but <em>lack</em> of knowledge in the technology sector.</p> <blockquote> <p>The way we approach marketing is shaped a lot by the market itself, which is in a certain stage of evolution.</p> <p>So, because it’s emerging, and people’s understanding of the Internet of Things and the possibilities of smart products is changing all the time – part of what we do is rooted in education.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Investing wisely</h3> <p>Finally, Stephen Rapoport, founder of Pact, takes a much more measured approach.</p> <p>Focusing on performance marketing, he explains how having a detailed and comprehensive plan for investment is the key to the company’s growth. </p> <blockquote> <p>I know exactly what the return on investment of every pound I spend will be and over what period of time. </p> <p>That is incredibly powerful because it means we can make trading decisions in real time, about where our next marketing pound is spent, and exactly what we need to optimise for at that point in time – whether it is payback, ROI, top line growth. </p> <p>If you look at the coffee brands with who we are competing and we are a speck of dust in terms of size and budget and resource. All we have is nimbleness and insight.</p> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68405 2016-11-15T13:56:48+00:00 2016-11-15T13:56:48+00:00 The programmatic hiring challenge: How to find and retain talent? Ben Davis <p>Here are some thoughts on the issue.</p> <h3>Writing new and tricky job descriptions</h3> <p>Whether a publisher developing their own sell-side team or an advertiser hiring a buying team skilled in targeting audiences, this stuff is (fairly) new.</p> <p>Many of these organisations are at a standing start and need to find employees that understand sophisticated platforms and their integration.</p> <p>Working with specialist recruiters may be vital in the first instance.</p> <h3>Finding people with soft skills and technical nous</h3> <p>For programmatic sales jobs, you ideally need a mix of two personalities.</p> <p>The most suitable candidates are media-sales people who are smart enough to understand programmatic disruption and are motivated by continually evolving technology.</p> <p>Likewise, when hiring more tech-minded people to work in operations, you should also look for <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64780-have-changes-in-modern-marketing-led-to-a-soft-skills-revolution/">softer skills</a>, awareness of customer needs and of the bottom line.</p> <p>With programmatic advertising often challenging existing advertiser behaviours, new hires need to have this combination of soft skills and technical nous in order to educate customers.</p> <p>On the buy-side, too, whether agency or in-house, candidates must understand about getting the most bang for buck, but will also be tasked with defining and documenting best practice, collaborating with other teams and educating internally.</p> <p>What does this look like in the real world?</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Great communication:</strong> The ability to convey fairly abstract concepts and tell the story of programmatic both to stakeholders and the wider industry.</li> <li> <strong>Strategic thinking:</strong> Long term understanding of customer objectives within the programmatic world but also as a part of wider marketing and advertising.</li> <li> <strong>Media planning experience:</strong> Knowledge of ad formats, viewability, inventory, data management platforms etc.</li> <li> <strong>Measurement and optimisation experience:</strong> Tracking, troubleshooting and reporting.</li> </ul> <h3>Investing time and money in staff</h3> <p>Even when you find the right person for your team, the intricacies of different platforms means it takes time before they bed in.</p> <p>The danger for companies is that they get into a cycle of recruiting, training and then losing people from programmatic roles.</p> <p>Staff retention is important for any company trying to innovate with media. Recent emphasis on the role company culture plays in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital transformation</a> has meant many organisations have invested in this area.</p> <p>From the use of personal devices, to remote working, more money for training and office perks, as well as finding <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/effective-leadership-in-the-digital-age/">the right digital leaders</a> that can both inspire and listen to the workforce.</p> <p>Short-termism is the enemy here.</p> <h3>Doing a good PR job for programmatic</h3> <p>One of the problems remains an issue of PR.</p> <p>Media has no problem in attracting intelligent young people away from other industries or studies, but to what extent is programmatic advertising a draw?</p> <p>Agencies and the advertising industry as a whole perhaps need to paint a better picture of this new technology, one that hasn't yet fulfilled its potential but may shape the future of advertising and creative.</p> <p><em>For more information on this topic, see:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65677-a-super-accessible-beginner-s-guide-to-programmatic-buying-and-rtb/"><em>A super accessible beginner’s guide to programmatic buying and RTB</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/"><em>The CMO's Guide to Programmatic</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/"><em>Programmatic Training Course</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68423 2016-10-21T11:45:54+01:00 2016-10-21T11:45:54+01:00 How fashion and travel are leading the way in m-commerce Gregory Gazagne <p><a href="http://www.deloitte.co.uk/mobileuk/">Deloitte’s Mobile Consumer Survey</a> found that UK citizens look at their smartphones over a billion times a day, declaring that “no other personal device has had the same commercial and societal impact as the smartphone, and no other device seems likely to.”</p> <p>Around the same time in late September the IAB released its ‘<a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20160927005394/en/Three-Quarters-Mobile-Users-World-Purchases-Smartphones-Tablets">Mobile Commerce: A Global Perspective</a>’ survey, which found that three-quarters (75%) of smartphone and tablet users say they have purchased a product or service on their smartphone or tablet in the past six months, and nearly a quarter (23%) buy on mobile devices on a weekly basis.</p> <p>As the retail industry rapidly adapts to mobile usage, at Criteo we’re able to analyse millions of online sales in real time, on all devices and from thousands of brands across all industries.</p> <p>With this front-row seat to the very latest in mobile commerce, we’re especially interested in looking at the way different retail industries are keeping pace with the rate of change.</p> <p>Because of the specific challenges facing them, we’ve seen that the fashion industry in particular is blazing a trail in smartphone targeting, including cross-channel strategies, and travel is making its mark by providing superior customer experience/ better conversions via apps.</p> <p>What’s driving these industries to lead in these areas – and what can others learn from them?</p> <h3><strong>The rise of the ‘Smartphonista’</strong></h3> <p>Last month’s New York-London-Milan-Paris Fashion Weeks saw the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/30/us-vogue-editors-ridiculous-fashion-shows-changed-bloggers">old guard of print fashion journalism clash with the fashion world’s new digital influencers</a>, who rely on blogging platforms and Instagram to communicate with their thousands of followers.</p> <p>Their argument is symptomatic of a wider trend: that smartphones are revolutionising the way the fashion industry markets and sells its wares, and this is causing headaches for traditional media – but driving strong results on digital channels.</p> <p>According to Criteo <a href="http://www.criteo.com/resources/fashion-flash-report-2016/">data</a>, clothes have quickly become the premier mobile purchase in the UK, with 55% of online fashion purchases now being made through mobile (smartphones or tablets), and four out of 10 of all fashion purchases in the UK being made through smartphones.</p> <p>This makes fashion shoppers that purchase on smartphones (who we’ve coined ‘Smartphonistas’) a particularly valuable audience for fashion retailers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/0592/criteo_slide.png" alt="" width="800"></p> <p>Mobile is perfect for this kind of off-the-cuff purchase, allowing consumers to browse flash sales on their phone, shop while watching TV, or buy an article of clothing on a whim.</p> <p>In addition to impulse, these purchases can also be driven by social connections and social influence (as evidenced by the rise of the fashion bloggers so vilified by Vogue).</p> <p>Social media – particularly Snapchat, Instagram and Pinterest – appears to strongly influence clothing purchases on mobile.</p> <p>Heavy Snapchat users are 139% more likely to buy clothes on mobile than the average Brit, while heavy Instagram (113%) and Pinterest (83%) users are also much more likely than average to buy clothing on mobile, according to <a href="http://www.criteo.com/resources/a-portrait-of-mobile-performance/">Criteo’s Portrait of Performance report</a>.</p> <p>Despite all this, acquiring new fashion customers is notoriously hard.</p> <p>What’s more, it can take several purchases before a customer earns you a profit, and turning new customers into loyal buyers takes finesse.</p> <p>In response to these challenges, fashion retailers are starting to recognise what products drive the best response on what device.</p> <p>For example, fashion shoppers favour small screens for low-risk items (T-shirts etc.) and products they don't need to try on (e.g. accessories).</p> <p>In addition, the new breed of Smartphonistas often use multiple devices on the path to purchase, so retailers are starting to track more effectively across devices in order to send the right message to the right person, at the right time.</p> <p>Nadya Birca, Senior Digital Marketing Manager at New Look told us that the key to successfully engaging with the Smarphonista is to recognise that he or she expects a truly cross-channel experience:</p> <p>“With mobile usage soaring in the UK, the experience we’re aiming to deliver on mobile is significant for our interactions with customers both on- and off-line.</p> <p>"When browsing on mobile we shouldn’t expect users to purchase straight away - allowing them a seamless navigational exploration, and later consideration experience, is what should drive any mobile commerce business focus.”</p> <h3><strong>Destination App</strong></h3> <p>As the 36th annual <a href="http://wtd.unwto.org/en">World Tourism Day</a> reminded us at the end of last month, the tourism industry continues to drive positive social, cultural, political and economic impacts worldwide.</p> <p>In many countries, including the UK, the travel industry is feeling the positive impact of the rise of smartphone use.</p> <p>Criteo’s latest Travel Flash Report shows that one in five Brits now browse for travel options on their mobile phones, and close to one-third of online travel bookings worldwide took place on mobile devices in Q2 2016 (up 24% from the year before).</p> <p>During the same period, smartphones captured nearly one in five online travel bookings.</p> <p>But that’s not all – the travel industry, more than most other verticals, is seeing particular success when it comes to mobile apps.</p> <p>According to our data, with investment in in-app tracking and advertising, committed travel advertisers are seeing a surge of bookings made from apps.</p> <p>Apps generated 57% of mobile bookings in Q1 2016, up from 40% in Q3 2015.</p> <p>Over the past two years, travel brands that invested in their apps saw constant growth in app bookings from 12% to now over half of all mobile bookings. </p> <p>For one-night stays, apps have a clear lead over other devices or platforms, with nearly three in four app bookings made for one-night stays.</p> <p>The most effective travel mobile strategies encourage app installs with services that really make a difference:</p> <ul> <li>Personalising recommendations based on searches, selection criteria, past travels and wish lists</li> <li>Sending up-to-date, useful and non-intrusive notifications (e.g., check-in reminders, traffic, delays, alternatives, cancellation, nearby offers)</li> <li>Offering better deals on your app to temporarily capture downloads and bookings, but be consistent to sustain them</li> <li>Enabling one-click bookings with intelligent auto-fill of personal details (while highlighting payment security)</li> </ul> <p>App bookings are on a roll, and we can see that merchants who invested in and promoted apps early are now reaping the benefits. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68347 2016-09-29T01:00:00+01:00 2016-09-29T01:00:00+01:00 Seven ways to supercharge your data-driven marketing Jeff Rajeck <p>Nine out of ten put it in their first three, more than any other topic.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9633/data-driven.png" alt="" width="565" height="315"></p> <p>But what are marketers actually doing with their data?<strong><br></strong></p> <p>What tips can professionals give for those who may be just starting out with data-driven marketing?</p> <p>To find out, Econsultancy recently held roundtable discussions at our fifth annual Digital Cream Sydney.  </p> <p>There, client-side marketers from across the industry discussed trends, best practices, and the issues they are currently facing.</p> <p>The roundtables were moderated by subject matter experts from the industry. Participants brought their own experiences, questions, and challenges to the table for open discussion.</p> <p>Here are the highlights from the discussion at the Data Driven Marketing &amp; Marketing Attribution Management table.</p> <h3>1. Use personas and customer journey mapping for attribution modeling</h3> <p>We now live in an omnichannel world. People often use the web, social media, mobile, and search before buying something.  </p> <p>How can marketers determine the right amount to invest in each channel?</p> <p>Participants agreed that doing so, also known as attribution modeling, is one of the toughest tasks marketers now face.</p> <p>Figuring out which channels drive awareness, which help with research, and which lead to conversions is not easy - even with all the data in the world.</p> <p>While attendees admitted that there is 'no silver bullet' for determining the right model, delegates suggested that using customer experience data can help.</p> <p>They said that <strong>creating audience personas and then mapping each customer journey can provide insight into the path-to-purchase for different customers.</strong>  </p> <p>This can then provide the foundation for the elusive attribution model which helps marketers allocate their spending for optimal results.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9626/data-driven__Custom_.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>2. Avoid using personas for more granular data-driven marketing</h3> <p>While the customer-centric approach may work for modeling attribution, delegates agreed that<strong> personas and customer journey maps were not so useful when doing more personalised data-driven marketing.</strong></p> <p>That is, when buying programmatic media or providing on-site personalisation, broad segments and models do not help.  </p> <p>Instead, attendees stated that <strong>marketers should use an individual's behavior to deliver relevant ads and personalised content.</strong>  </p> <p>What a person has viewed or purchased previously is much more likely to attract their attention in the future than something which fits a particular persona, one participant argued.</p> <h3>3. Look at <em>your</em> data when optimizing</h3> <p>Another dilemma marketers often face is how to optimize their website and ad buying based on outside trends.</p> <p>Recently, there have been many charts showing that mobile traffic is outpacing web traffic. Does this mean that marketers should go 'mobile first'?</p> <p>Not at all said the delegates. While it is useful to be aware of the trends in mobile, video, and messaging, <strong>marketers should prioritise their own customers' behaviours to help form strategies.</strong></p> <p>As an example, at one table on the day, there were some marketers who said that mobile usage was plateauing while others said that tablet traffic is becoming increasingly important to them.</p> <p>So, the recommendation is that marketers should first keep a close eye on the trends in their own data before making any drastic changes as a result of industry reports.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9627/data-driven2__Custom_.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>4. Use data for more than just conversions</h3> <p>Marketers these days are typically required to produce data to justify their budget.  </p> <p>Metrics such as cost-per-acquisition (CPA) and return on ad spend (ROAS) are commonly used by the business to gauge performance.</p> <p>Because of the need to demonstrate that marketing spend matters to the business, <strong>attendees agreed that most of the effort spent on marketing attribution and data-driven marketing is used to lower customer acquisition costs</strong>. </p> <p>However, delegates also agreed that we now have the data to do much more. <strong>Data should also be used, they argued, to improve customer retention and loyalty.</strong></p> <p>Doing so will, in turn, increase the lifetime value of customers and improve the bottom line, albeit in a less direct way.</p> <p>Marketers should, therefore, look for opportunities to use data for customer experience and resist the tendency to look for the immediate gratification of a lower CPA.</p> <h3>5. The best third-party data is from sites where users log in</h3> <p>While marketers tend to have a good handle on the data from their own sites (first-party data), many are still wondering about the value of data from other sites (third-party data).</p> <p>This concern was made apparent because, when asked, only around 10-15% of marketers at the tables admitted using a data management platform (DMP) as a 'single source of truth' about their customers.</p> <p>The reasons for hesitating are well-founded. Many third-party data services guess at aspects of users' identities from the sites they visit or activities they have done in the distant past.</p> <p>Attendees asserted, however, that <strong>sites which require users to log in can provide much higher-quality third-party data.</strong></p> <p>Specifically, Google and Facebook can both link extensive browsing and posting behaviour to a particular person.  </p> <p>For this reason, delegates said that such sites do offer third-party data worth using for advertising and analytics.</p> <p>Interestingly, one participant noted, both Google and Facebook are also starting to offer data which allows brands to track consumers offline.</p> <p>That is, they will know whether someone has entered a particular location (e.g. a store) after viewing an ad on their platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9628/data-driven3__Custom_.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></p> <h3>6. Aim to make small changes with insights from data</h3> <p>While most of the day's discussions were positive, one negative aspect of data-driven marketing emerged. </p> <p>Even with insights from data,<strong> delegates admitted that it was rare that recommendations based on data were actually implemented</strong>.</p> <p>Data was more likely, they said, to be used for retrospective reporting and business-oriented statistics.</p> <p>One way around this, one participant suggested, is to adopt a more 'agile' way of working.</p> <p>What this means is that marketing teams should avoid gathering vast amounts of data in an attempt to influence strategic decisions.  </p> <p>Instead, <strong>marketers should use insights to drive incremental changes on a frequent, tactical basis.</strong></p> <p>In this way, the 'agile' approach will change an organisation's approach to marketing iteratively over time and have a much higher likelihood of succeeding.</p> <h3>7. The biggest hurdle? Finding the right people.</h3> <p>In previous years, marketers have lamented about quality of marketing technology and the difficulty of obtaining data to drive marketing strategy.</p> <p>While these are still concerns, <strong>delegates this year said that their biggest challenge was finding the right people to drive data-driven marketing initiatives.</strong></p> <p>Attendees agreed that that finding people who could interpret data both technically and commercially was really hard. Additionally, these people are critical for getting insights out of data.</p> <p>Newly-hired data scientists are often too technical and abstracted from the operational business to help. Experienced marketers, though familiar with the business, often lack the statistical modeling skills to extract new insights from data.</p> <p>One suggested approach is for marketing teams to recruit analysts with business acumen and data crunching skills.  </p> <p>But in lieu of staffing up with the right people,<strong> participants felt that marketers could also take a more active role in interrogating the data themselves for insight. </strong></p> <p><strong><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9630/data-driven4__Custom_.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"></strong></p> <h3>A word of thanks...</h3> <p>Econsultancy would like to thank all of the marketers who participated on the day and especially our Data Driven Marketing &amp; Marketing Attribution Management table moderators,<strong> Beaudon McLaren, APJ Ecommerce Manager at Symantec</strong> and <strong>Ashley Friedlein, President of Centaur Marketing &amp; Founder of Econsultancy.</strong></p> <p>We hope to see you all at future Sydney Econsultancy events!</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/9632/moderators__Custom_.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="533"> </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68321 2016-09-27T14:02:20+01:00 2016-09-27T14:02:20+01:00 Making the business case for programmatic advertising Seán Donnelly <h3><strong>1. Consumer trust</strong></h3> <p>Firstly, and perhaps most importantly, is the issue of trust.</p> <p>Before the advent of the World Wide Web and in particular the universal ability to publish, there was an asymmetrical relationship between sellers and consumers, particularly when it came to selling high value or technical products such as motor cars.</p> <p>One side (the seller) was fully informed, and the other side (the consumer) was partially in the dark.</p> <p>This balance has now shifted. Consumers are now far more educated about what they are purchasing.</p> <p>In many cases, they may have just as much information as a seller, along with a means to report on their experiences via blogs, social media or review engines like TrustPilot and TripAdvisor.</p> <h3><strong>2. Fragmented consumer attention</strong></h3> <p>The second reason may be due to the availability of media and the devices where media is consumed, leading to a fragmentation of consumer attention.</p> <p>It’s not as easy to capture their attention now via newspaper, radio and television advertisements. </p> <p>Consider the well-worn example of the average Londoner’s 45-minute tube journey where they are exposed to more than 130 advertisements, featuring over 80 different products.</p> <p>In an entire day, the average Londoner is may be exposed to 3,500 – 7,000 marketing messages according to some sources.</p> <p>In addition, as channels proliferate, it is becoming easier for marketers to create and distribute content.</p> <p>At the same time, because so much media has been democratised, it has also become easier for people to create and distribute cat videos.</p> <p>This makes it incredibly difficult for marketers to cut through the noise, which creates a requirement for marketers to focus on value, quality and relevancy as very few can make volume, quantity and reach work.</p> <p>And so marketers have a new priority, to be able to deliver the right message, via the right medium, at the right time.</p> <p>To make things even trickier, they need to be able to do this at scale.</p> <h3><strong>Enter programmatic</strong></h3> <p>Programmatic advertising may be the key to help marketers overcome this challenge.</p> <p>It's a fairly new addition to some marketers' toolkits and for this reason there is a long tail of marketers that haven’t taken the time to understand the opportunity. </p> <p>I recently attended a programmatic workshop delivered by Head of Digital at Disrupt the Market Ltd and Econsultancy trainer Andy Letting to get a better understanding of the opportunities that programmatic offers.</p> <h3><strong>Problems solved</strong></h3> <p>According to Andy, programmatic solves two key business challenges.</p> <p><strong>Firstly,</strong> both buyers and sellers of digital media struggle with the complexity involved in digital media transactions.</p> <p>Planners can easily spend hours manually sorting through available inventory and discovering prices to begin negotiating deals with the sellers or publishers.</p> <p>And publishers compete for these sales in a cumbersome, highly manual agency-created RFP process that keeps them at arms-length from advertisers.</p> <p>Programmatic brings efficiency in terms of insertion orders, pricing negotiations and the back and forth which traditionally accompanied negotiations.</p> <p>Secondly, programmatic also solves the problem of where media is bought. </p> <p>Marketers didn't always know if the media purchased was on websites that were relevant to their brand. There was little control.</p> <p>Now, in theory, marketers have the ability to reach the right person, in the right place with the right product so they no longer need to focus on volume. </p> <p>According to Andy:</p> <blockquote> <p>We can focus on quality rather than quantity. This is where programmatic stands out... Marketers can now use their time planning rather than negotiating. Agencies can use what was negotiation time for planning and optimisation.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Programmatic as part of a wider integrated approach to marketing</h3> <p>So if programmatic advertising is such a boon for marketers, how come some organisations have been slow to integrate it into their other marketing activities?</p> <p>According to Andy, programmatic has really only become mainstream relatively recently.</p> <p>“Programmatic has been around for a long time but it has only really become mainstream in the last two years.</p> <p>"Publishers have got their acts together and developed programmatic solutions so it's still early days. Programmatic this year is expected to reach over £2.5bn in spend. That's 10% of total UK advertising spend so it is making a real impact. </p> <p>"In terms of maturity, I think channels will (eventually) evolve into programmatic channels so if you think of radio and TV, this is only starting. Digital media buying is at the forefront of this.</p> <p>"I believe when we go into above-the-line activity programmatically, that's where we will see another shift in gear because then you'll get senior executives understanding programmatic as it's touching a world that they are immersed in and understand more than digital."</p> <h3>Towards making programmatic part of other brand building activities</h3> <p>On the subject of above-the-line activity, I asked Andy if programmatic can be used for big brand ideas.</p> <p>Andy advised that for any campaign that's part of brand activation, there should be an element of programmatic as it is a useful tool for testing.</p> <p>“Brands should know or at least have a good understanding of their customer. There is no reason why you can’t build a customer subset to examine via programmatic in an attempt to understand them better. That's a good enough reason for doing it."</p> <p>This suggests that programmatic could be used to test messaging either before or during a live campaign.</p> <p>As well as offering results in its own right, programmatic can be used to capture real time insights that can be used to make campaign updates.  </p> <p>“If you can bring that insight back in to contribute to your view of the customer, you can keep developing your understanding and hopefully strengthen that customer relationship.” </p> <h3>Getting started and reconsidering the traditional budget cycle</h3> <p>Ultimately, programmatic should be focused on the customer.</p> <p>This means pulling together skill sets within the organisation to reach that customer in ways that haven't been done before. </p> <p>According to Andy, this means that marketers can’t start doing programmatic on their own. They will need brand buy in and support and will also require the support of legal and data teams.</p> <p>“If you take an FMCG company that manages multiple brands, how to immerse programmatic (into marketing activities) might be to test programmatic with a single brand to put the building blocks in place and take other stakeholders on a journey.”</p> <p>If programmatic can be used to capture insights and update campaigns once they are live, then this might suggest that the traditional budget cycle is old hat.</p> <p>If that’s the case, marketers will need to work more closely with their Financial Controller to develop a new approach that empowers them to adjust budgets and campaigns to take advantage of clearly defined opportunities. <br> </p> <h3>Getting on top of programmatic</h3> <p>Econsultancy runs regular <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/programmatic/">programmatic workshops</a> to help marketers cement their understanding of the programmatic landscape.</p> <p>If you already have an understanding of programmatic and want to look at some of the wider strategic use cases and challenges to be aware of, Econsultancy has published a number of reports on the subject:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/">CMO’s Guide to Programmatic</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/programmatic-branding/">Programmatic Branding, Driving Upper Funnel Engagement</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/programmatic-marketing-beyond-rtb/">Programmatic Marketing: Beyond RTB</a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-role-of-dmps-in-the-era-of-data-driven-advertising/">The Role of DMPs in the Era of Data-Driven Advertising</a></li> </ul> <p>Econsultancy also regularly <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-cmo-s-guide-to-programmatic/search/?only=BlogPost&amp;q=programmatic">publishes blogs on the subject of programmatic</a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68256 2016-09-06T14:06:47+01:00 2016-09-06T14:06:47+01:00 RIP innovation: How your company culture is killing marketing creativity Chloe Young <p dir="ltr">In a fast-moving marketing landscape where new channels and platforms appear almost monthly, do marketers run the risk of losing opportunities because they haven’t yet been proven?</p> <h3 dir="ltr">What are the barriers to investment in digital marketing?</h3> <p dir="ltr">An <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/marketing-budgets/">annual study by Oracle Marketing Cloud and Econsultancy</a> asked marketers: “What is preventing your company from investing more in digital marketing?”</p> <p dir="ltr">The 2016 results showed clearly that, along with restricted marketing budgets, inability to measure ROI, short staffing and company culture were top obstacles.</p> <p dir="ltr">Crucially, the drive for strict ROI impacts the other factors, as without concrete figures decision makers are unwilling to increase budgets.</p> <p dir="ltr">This impacts staffing and forces continued reliance on traditional marketing, creating a vicious cycle.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8792/marketing_budgets.png" alt="" width="639" height="437"></p> <h3 dir="ltr">Is your company culture risk-averse or innovation-friendly?</h3> <p dir="ltr">In a risk-averse culture, innovation is stifled by the overwhelming need to demonstrate ROI. But innovation requires people, and hiring the right people requires budget.</p> <p dir="ltr">With budget hanging on ROI, you find yourself stuck in limbo, unable to bring innovators into the team who can explore new channels, and bring positive change.</p> <p dir="ltr">Your organisational culture should enable, support and catalyse change.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/effective-leadership-in-the-digital-age">Research</a> has shown that digital leaders see clear differences between companies with a digital culture and those without in their ability to adapt, innovate and create.</p> <p dir="ltr">To gauge the current state, Oracle Marketing Cloud and Econsultancy asked marketers to agree or disagree with the statement: “We reserve a proportion of budgets for more innovative but untried marketing activities.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0007/8793/agree_with_these_statements_.png" alt="" width="700" height="467"></p> <p dir="ltr">At one extreme, a third (33%) of respondents disagreed with the statement, with 8% replying ‘strongly disagree’.</p> <p dir="ltr">These companies can be said to have risk-averse marketing strategies with little room for innovation.</p> <p dir="ltr">At the other end, 35% agreed to some extent that there was room in their budgets for trying new marketing activities, with 3% replying ‘strongly agree’. The remaining third (32%) were neutral.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s clear that newer marketing opportunities are not always enthusiastically grasped and explored.</p> <p dir="ltr">But by relying too heavily on what has worked in the past, marketers run the risk of falling behind in today’s fast-moving marketing landscape.</p> <p dir="ltr">What worked yesterday may be no good tomorrow. Ongoing marketing success requires an open mind and the ability to adapt.</p> <p dir="ltr">That’s why it’s essential to set aside time and budget for charting new frontiers.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">New channels pose a challenge to ROI reliance </h3> <p dir="ltr">Some channels are perceived as more measurable than others. Established formats like email and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide/">PPC</a> win out over newer disciplines like mobile, personalisation and video. </p> <p dir="ltr">This illustrates the danger of being driven purely by ROI. All indicators now point to mobile and video as the current and next big things in consumer consumption. </p> <p dir="ltr">Mobile now counts for 25-29% of consumer time on media, and yet our survey of marketers found that respondents are spending only 4% of their digital marketing budgets on mobile marketing.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP advertising group:</p> <blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Underinvestment in mobile... is due to a lack of clarity around the measurement of mobile advertising, particularly in the ‘walled garden’ ecosystems of Facebook and Google.</p> <p dir="ltr">Creativity on mobile is one thing, but measurement is another; people are not sure of the ROI.</p> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Only 18% of respondents said their ability to measure ROI was good for mobile marketing for acquisition, and 15% for mobile marketing for engagement/retention.</p> <p dir="ltr">Between them, Facebook and Google have 70% of marketing share, with a higher penetration than desktop.</p> <p dir="ltr">So it’s clear that marketers must put more budget into these emerging channels. A lack of innovation here will quickly see brands falling out of step with consumer behaviour. </p> <h3 dir="ltr">Shop Direct case study </h3> <p dir="ltr">Investing in mobile doesn’t have to be a stab in the dark. As the channel matures, clear examples of brand success are beginning to emerge.</p> <p dir="ltr">Shop Direct, the UK’s second-largest online retailer, ploughed budget into Facebook’s suite of advertising products for its Black Friday campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">It moved customers through every part of the funnel, from awareness (via Instagram and Facebook videos), to consideration (through retargeting video viewers), to conversion with Facebook dynamic product ads.</p> <p dir="ltr">The results speak for themselves: a 20x return on investment, and Shop Direct's most successful sales day ever.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">What next: ROI vs Innovation?</h3> <p dir="ltr">The good news is that marketers are a dynamic and forward-thinking bunch of people.</p> <p dir="ltr">Already, over a third of companies have room in their budget for innovation, with a core 3% leading the pack.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, there is still much room for improvement. Perhaps due to restrictive budgets and risk-averse company culture, mobile, marketing automation and personalisation are yet to make it into the top ten priorities for budget increases.</p> <p dir="ltr">But the industry is waking up to the importance of other new approaches like social media acquisition and video advertising; 60% and 58% plan to increase investment in these channels, respectively.</p> <p dir="ltr">The marketing landscape and consumer behaviour continue to rapidly evolve. The field will belong to those who can maintain established ROI-led activities, and exploit rich new opportunities as they unfold.</p> <h3 dir="ltr">Takeaways</h3> <ul> <li> <p>Commitment to ROI is crucial but can be a dampener on marketing innovation.</p> </li> <li> <p dir="ltr">Restricted budgets, lack of staff and a risk-averse company culture are the key obstacles to investment in digital marketing.</p> </li> <li> <p dir="ltr">Your organisational culture should enable, support and catalyse change.</p> </li> <li> <p>Newer channels like video and mobile are forcing marketers to innovate in order to keep up with consumer behaviour.</p> </li> <li> <p dir="ltr">Ongoing success relies on ability to balance 'safe' ROI-driven activities with innovation and new approaches.</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">Find out how marketing budgets are changing, and how to extract maximum value from yours!</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Download: <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/marketing-budgets/">Marketing Budgets 2016: Part of the Modern Marketing Actionable Insights Series</a>.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68228 2016-08-31T11:04:34+01:00 2016-08-31T11:04:34+01:00 How The Financial Times is dealing with the problem of ad blocking Nikki Gilliland <p>You can watch the interview in full here, and I've also summarised her answers below.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MUoHJ-y0GcI?list=PL1-kPkZBw50FexVdl4i94-lQdSVnsN7A1&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>The FT's innovative approach</h3> <p>While some sites have started to completely block access to anyone using the software, The FT is taking a different approach.</p> <p>One of multiple strategies, it has recently started to serve a partial view of the site to anyone using ad-blocking software, by blurring or missing out portions of text.</p> <p>Essentially, this serves as a visual-representation of what ad blocking does to the business revenue overall. </p> <h3>Getting users to understand the impact</h3> <p>Instead of merely shutting out readers, The FT’s strategy aims to get consumers interested and engaged in what is an industry-wide problem.</p> <p><a href="https://pagefair.com/blog/2015/ad-blocking-report/" target="_blank">Adobe estimated</a> that ad-blockers cost publishers nearly $22bn in 2015, and according to Sacha, consumers can often be unaware of the large-scale impact.</p> <h3>A consumer-focused solution</h3> <p>There is no single solution to the problem of ad-blocking, however The Financial Times is striving to bring back the focus onto the consumer.</p> <p>In doing so, it aims to create a two-way conversation – recognising the pitfalls for both publishers and their audiences – to ultimately find a solution for all.</p> <p><em>Sacha is among the expert speakers at Econsultancy's <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> event in London on September 21.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68227 2016-08-25T11:52:00+01:00 2016-08-25T11:52:00+01:00 What is the Financial Times' approach to programmatic advertising? David Moth <p>Sacha Bunatyan, global B2C marketing director at the Financial Times, is among the expert speakers who will be in attendance.</p> <p>Ahead of Get With The Programmatic, we spoke to Sacha to get her views on how the FT uses programmatic and how the technology has impacted the marketing industry. </p> <p>You can watch her answers in full in this video, and I’ve also summarised them below.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UEZ89uB1bLs?list=PL1-kPkZBw50FexVdl4i94-lQdSVnsN7A1&amp;wmode=transparent" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>How has the FT used programmatic to promote the brand and sell subscriptions?</h3> <p>According to Sacha, programmatic advertising is hugely important to The FT, as demonstrated by the fact that it recently appointed Elli Papadaki as head of programmatic sales.</p> <p>Furthermore, The FT’s chief data officer sits on the board of directors and the company employs more than 30 <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67203-data-analysts-vs-data-scientists-what-s-the-difference/">data scientists and analysts</a>.</p> <p>To ensure this analytical talent is not wasted, the subscriptions and ad sales teams work closely together using “one set of data, one set of segmentation.”</p> <p>At Get With The Programmatic, Sacha will be able to discuss a programmatic campaign that resulted in a 300% uplift in subscriptions versus the average week. </p> <h3>What do you think makes for an effective programmatic campaign?</h3> <p>Sacha said that effective campaigns require the right balance of a strong message combined with effective use of media.</p> <p>The data and insights that come out of each campaign should then be evaluated to aid ongoing optimisation and improve decision-making.</p> <h3>How do you think agencies should be responding to brands bringing programmatic in-house?</h3> <p>The thorny question of how agencies fit into the programmatic landscape is one that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66639-the-boom-of-the-programmatic-gong/">we’ve discussed a lot in the past</a>.</p> <p>Sacha said there is “no one-size-fits-all approach”, and the trend at the moment is for businesses to take greater control of their data in order to better understand their audiences.</p> <p>At the same time Sacha describes the agency role as “multifaceted”, with the core expertise being in connecting brands with the right media.</p> <p>In future she predicts that we’ll see a hybrid solution where brands will invest more in core competencies and link up with agencies for key partnerships around specific projects or campaigns.</p> <p>For The FT, a good agency partner is one that can offer a custom, tailor-made approach.</p> <p><em><strong>To learn more about the FT’s approach to automated media buying, come to <a href="http://conferences.marketingweek.com/mc/programmatic/getwiththeprogrammatic">Get With The Programmatic</a> in London on September 21st.</strong></em></p>