tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/personalisation Latest Personalisation content from Econsultancy 2017-10-06T16:14:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69477 2017-10-06T16:14:00+01:00 2017-10-06T16:14:00+01:00 Digital transformation and CX maturity at GE Healthcare Life Sciences Ben Davis <p>Lopez Moreda discussed the company's tech platform roadmap and added some insight into how they designed personalised customer experiences for their many customer personas.</p> <h3>The need for digital transformation</h3> <p>The session began with a frank slide about the historical state of GE Healthcare Life Sciences infrastructure and the need for digital transformation. This breaks down into three areas – customer experience, system interaction and fragmented tech.</p> <ol> <li>Customer experience was hampered by non-targeted and non-responsive content, as well as poor content discovery.</li> <li>Multi-system interaction led to a disconnected experience with restricted marketing automation.</li> <li>Fragmented technology ecosystems were characterised by monolithic and customized systems, no support for multiple websites and low insights from marketing efforts.</li> </ol> <h3>The challenges of digital transformation: A stakeholder’s view</h3> <p>From a stakeholder view, this need for digital transformation was manifest as a variety of challenges. Customers were dealing with disconnected messaging, non-relevant and static content, multiple logins and an overall lack of contextual awareness.</p> <p>Marketers were just as hampered, by low community participation, few commercial insights and no personalisation capability. Content editors had no unified interface to rely on, were encountering duplicate content issues and an inability to link content with products.</p> <p>Lastly, developers were hindered by huge start-up time, a lack of design principles, content separation and an arduous build and deploy process.</p> <p>In a humorous aside, Lopez Moreda even admitted GE Healthcare Life Sciences was using Lotus Notes until recently.</p> <h3>Future state of digital transformation platforms</h3> <p>In order to address some of these challenges GE and their partners at EPAM looked to Marketo, Salesforce and Sitecore, allowing them to link together behavioural and sales data.</p> <p>Lopez Moreda described how GE's marketers are now aware when a prospect organisation comes back to one of the Life Sciences' websites, even if a call-to-action form isn’t filled out. The sales team can now see this information and prioritise their own outreach accordingly.</p> <h3>Defining a customer experience maturity model</h3> <p>In order to create a roadmap for platform integration and content personalisation, Lopez Moreda referred to a customer experience maturity model by Petersen, Person and Nash (shown below).</p> <p>Life Sciences sits somewhere in the middle of this model, with its digital transformation given the work of aligning channels, optimising and testing.</p> <p><em><strong>(Click to enlarge)</strong></em></p> <p><a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9413/cx_maturity.jpeg"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9413/cx_maturity.jpeg" alt="cx maturity model" width="800"></a></p> <p>In order to improve personalisation capability, the GE team began by sketching out personas, customer needs and journeys. From this came business KPIs, content planning, consideration of implicit versus explicit personalisation, and finally digital goals.</p> <p>However, Lopez Moreda pointed out that this was not necessarily a linear process and needed multiple revisions, with a particular bottleneck encountered when creating lots of different content for each persona. The hope is that further down the line more of this content will be created dynamically or even using some form of machine learning.</p> <h3>Types of personalisation</h3> <p>Sitecore, Life Sciences' personalisation software, enabled three types of personalisation, as shown in the slide below – rules-based (keyword and campaign driven), predictive (using rich behavioural data) and connected (integrated with CRM).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9414/pers.jpg" alt="types of personalisation" width="800"></p> <p>Lopez Moreda discussed how though this slide is conceptually quite easy to understand, it wasn't easy for IT to integrate these interactions.</p> <h3>Relevancy mapping</h3> <p>Part of defining customer journeys was a process Lopez Moreda called digital relevancy mapping. The grid below was used for each of four defined segments, in order to align content and goals to customer journey stage.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9418/cust_journey_stages.png" alt="customer journey stages" width="615"></p> <p>Once marketing goals had been finalised, they were weighted, with actions such as requesting a quote given heaviest value weighting and the act of downloading a document at the other end of the value scale.</p> <p>Other actions/goals included joining a loyalty club, registering for a webinar, asking an expert, signing up for email updates and updating your account.</p> <h3>Digital transformation outcome</h3> <p>The outcomes of platform integration and content personalisation were plentiful and addressed some of the key stakeholder concerns.</p> <ul> <li>The customer experience now benefits from responsive content delivery, a unified experience on all channels and connected backend processes.</li> <li>Best-of-breed systems have been integrated using an API approach, with Sitecore and Marketo complementing each other.</li> <li>Insights are made available to sales teams.</li> <li>Community participation has been enabled through new features and collaborations tools.</li> </ul> <p>Though examples of personalisation are fairly straightforward, such as offering different content to logged in loyalty club members, these sympathetic and reliable customer experiences are the upshot of much work on platform integration and journey planning.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69458 2017-10-02T15:30:00+01:00 2017-10-02T15:30:00+01:00 How Disney World has mastered customer experience Nikki Gilliland <p>Delivering a <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69269-17-stats-that-show-why-cx-is-so-important" target="_blank">great customer experience</a> might seem like an easy task for the ‘happiest place on earth’, but Disney uses much more to delight visitors than Mickey Mouse pancakes.</p> <p>Let's take a look at how we might learn from Disney’s approach to customer experience.</p> <h3>Making the mundane magical</h3> <p>Disney’s brand promise, i.e. what makes it most desirable as well as how it differentiates itself from others, has been the same since Walt Disney opened the first theme park in 1955. Essentially, it is to make magical experiences come alive, and to create happiness via these experiences.</p> <p>Now anyone who has visited a theme park before knows that ‘magic’ (or perhaps enjoyment or entertainment when it comes to non-Disney parks) is often quashed by the mundane. This means basic tasks like buying a ticket, queuing for rides, and if you are an international visitor – getting to the resort in the first place.</p> <p>Disney aims to deliver its brand promise by making even mundane details magical, and focusing on the unexpected ways it might bring happiness to customers.</p> <p>There are tonnes of ways Disney does this, but one in particular is to turn around any misfortune. For example, since recognising that children often queue up for rides only to find out that they aren’t tall enough – it now hands out special passes to enable disappointed kids to skip to the front on their next ride.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What do you think of today's <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DThink?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#DThink</a> tip? Learn more: <a href="https://t.co/ZOlST5KK2c">https://t.co/ZOlST5KK2c</a> <a href="https://t.co/62kXOJM4hY">pic.twitter.com/62kXOJM4hY</a></p> — Disney Institute (@DisneyInstitute) <a href="https://twitter.com/DisneyInstitute/status/908495587351449601?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 15, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The Disney brand promise is also a natural extension of its internal company culture, with Disney employees (or cast members as they’re known) embodying values such as openness, communication, and courtesy.</p> <p>One small but interesting example of this is how employees can become ‘language certified’, which means that they can then wear pins which indicate what languages they speak, in turn making it clear to guests that they can assist them if necessary.</p> <h3>Immersion is everything</h3> <p>Dedication to the little details means that Disney is about much more than just the rides – and in turn visitors want to entirely immerse themselves in its world. </p> <p>One way the company extends this immersion even further is through its hotels, which allow consumers to enjoy Disney from the moment they wake up to the moment they go to sleep. According to Skift, US hotels contributed $2.8bn in revenue in 2016, while occupancy rates reached 89%. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">The Disney Parks Moms Panelists share their top reasons why you should stay at a Walt Disney World Resort Hotel: <a href="https://t.co/bYbqmsHyqq">https://t.co/bYbqmsHyqq</a> <a href="https://t.co/xlNtk6H0P2">pic.twitter.com/xlNtk6H0P2</a></p> — Disney Parks (@DisneyParks) <a href="https://twitter.com/DisneyParks/status/902264787949674496?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>This is also something that Disney is heavily investing in, even going so far as to make ‘immersion’ the USP of a brand new hotel. At the D23 event earlier this year, it was announced that Disney is to open a “100% immersive” <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69374-star-wars-uses-ar-experiential-campaign-to-drive-people-in-store" target="_blank">Star Wars</a> hotel, which allows visitors to watch or participate in themed stories throughout their stay.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dJxDQVnOyx4?wmode=transparent" width="624" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>While it’s been pointed out that many hotels also have immersive qualities, such as the Legoland Hotel and the Wizarding World of Harry Potter – Disney seems intent on raising the bar. A scale 3D model of the park shows the intended attention to detail, with guests even reportedly seeing a depiction of outer space outside their windows instead of the real world.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9250/Star_Wars_hotel.JPG" alt="" width="560" height="311"></p> <h3>Unexpected moments of personalisation</h3> <p>With thousands of people attending its parks every day, creating a personal connection with visitors is a huge part of Disney’s CX strategy. </p> <p>Technology plays a critical part in delivering <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68285-six-things-to-consider-when-implementing-personalisation" target="_blank">personalisation</a>, specifically tools that help to both streamline and elevate the park and hotel experience. The MyMagic+ vacation planning system is one of the most notable examples, allowing visitors to plan and access information and perks such as advance ride booking and restaurant reservations.</p> <p>It also allows the brand to create a more seamless experience, with the MagicBand acting as a room key, park ticket, and even an optional payment method.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9251/Magic_Band.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="324"></p> <p>Meanwhile, MyMagic+ enables Disney to increase levels of personalisation – not only in the messages it sends via the mobile app, but also at particular touchpoints within the park and resort. For example, MyMagic+ members might see their name appear on a screen as they walk by (alongside the caption “it’s a small world”), or a photo taken on a ride might unexpectedly appear on the app (along with the option to buy).</p> <p>Unsurprisingly, the MyMagic+ system is continuously evolving, with reports suggesting that slimmer bands are in the works, as well as the possibility of the technology being transferred to smartphones at some point in the future.</p> <h3>Listening to customers</h3> <p>To complete the cycle, Disney uses ‘listening posts’ to assess the customer experience and identify which areas need to be improved upon.</p> <p>Unlike data which enables the brand to better target and engage consumers, listening posts allow Disney to understand the expectations, needs and wants of visitors. In turn, this can be used to address gaps in customer service or areas where the aforementioned ‘magic’ might be lacking. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">What do you think of today's <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WaltQuote?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#WaltQuote</a>? Get inspired with more <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WaltWisdom?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#WaltWisdom</a> here: <a href="https://t.co/p1yIu15L8c">https://t.co/p1yIu15L8c</a> <a href="https://t.co/bsn4Kug7qC">pic.twitter.com/bsn4Kug7qC</a></p> — Disney Institute (@DisneyInstitute) <a href="https://twitter.com/DisneyInstitute/status/908133202191155201?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 14, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Just like the previous example of children being given free queue passes, Disney continuously introduces features to improve the customer experience based on this feedback. For instance, it created subtle ‘Special Assistance’ passes for disabled guests, to take away the need for any potentially intrusive questions. Similarly, after discovering that visitors would often ask about the location of characters, it introduced the CHIP system (which stands for Character Hotline and Information Program) to let visitors find out where they are located at any given time,</p> <p>These are fairly small but significant details which visitors might not even think twice about. And yet without them, Disney and its customer experience might not be quite so magical.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9252/MM.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="412"></p> <p><em><strong>Now read:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67860-10-examples-of-great-disney-marketing-campaigns" target="_blank">1</a><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67860-10-examples-of-great-disney-marketing-campaigns" target="_blank">0 examples of great Disney marketing campaigns</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68372-how-cath-kidston-used-a-disney-tie-up-to-increase-its-customer-database/" target="_blank">How Cath Kidston used a Disney tie-up to increase its customer database</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3250 2017-09-22T12:13:14+01:00 2017-09-22T12:13:14+01:00 Creative Thinking for Digital Marketing <p>“Creativity is intelligence having fun” – Albert Einstein.<br> <br> </p> <p>Our highly interactive 1-day course introduces practical tools to help you think more creatively about your digital marketing challenges.  Your day will be filled with hands-on exercises and examples from many areas, but with a special focus on digital.  </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69425 2017-09-15T12:02:00+01:00 2017-09-15T12:02:00+01:00 10 remarkable digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Get stuck in…</p> <h3>Live stream engagement is on the rise</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/the-rise-of-live-streaming-2/" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a>, the amount of users engaging with live streams on social media has increased nearly 10%.</p> <p>Now, 28% of internet users have watched a live stream on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter in the past month – up from 20% in Q3 2016. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8992/GlobalWebIndex.JPG" alt="" width="720" height="540"></p> <h3>Data usage increases while lack of transparency remains high</h3> <p>A <a href="http://media2.bazaarvoice.com/documents/more-data-more-Problems-ebook.pdf?utm_source=press%20release&amp;utm_medium=PR&amp;utm_campaign=Ad%20Age%20Research" target="_blank">new study</a> by Bazaarvoice and AdAge has revealed how digital marketers view the impact and credibility of data partnerships. </p> <p>Despite an increase in data usage, it found that there is still a lack of transparency, with both the sources and quality of the data being misunderstood and mistrusted by marketers.</p> <p>While 95% of the marketers surveyed said that they employ first- and third-party data in their media plans, 64% are unsure about the origins of their data sources. What’s more, one quarter of brand marketers do not know how often their data sources are refreshed. </p> <p>Lastly, three out of four marketers said they are not confident that their data is reaching in-market consumers, and just 23% of agency buyers are fully confident that their third-party data partners deliver against KPIs.</p> <h3>Only 17% of new leads are converted as sales &amp; marketing teams struggle to align</h3> <p>A new study by <a href="https://www.dnb.co.uk/marketing/media/state-of-sales-acceleration.html" target="_blank">Dun &amp; Bradstreet</a> has revealed that there is huge disconnect between sales and marketing teams, with just 17% of new leads being converted into revenue as a result. </p> <p>57% of marketers say that understanding their target audience is a big challenge, and 56% say that an inability to find relevant and complete data holds them back.</p> <p>Meanwhile, 24% of salespeople say they don’t have enough time to research potential customers, and 35% say they are under more pressure to provide value in a digitally-led business.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8991/Dun_and_Bradstreet.JPG" alt="" width="423" height="438"></p> <h3>72% of consumers turn to Amazon to research products</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://kenshoo.com/e-commerce-survey/" target="_blank">Kenshoo</a>, Amazon is playing an increasing role in shopping discovery, as 72% of people say they visit Amazon to research products online.</p> <p>26% of Amazon users also admit to checking for alternatives, background information, and prices on the site when they are thinking about making a potential purchase in a physical store. Meanwhile, 51% say they usually refer back to Amazon to find out additional product information or to compare prices – even if they’re happy with the offering on another retail site.</p> <p>Lastly, 9% say that they often share interesting products that they find on Amazon with friends, colleagues, and family.</p> <h3>Millennials spend more time watching time-shifted content than live TV</h3> <p><a href="https://www.cta.tech/News/Press-Releases/2017/August/Millennials-Now-Watch-More-Time-Shifted-Content-Th.aspx" target="_blank">CTA</a> (Consumer Technology Association) has revealed that millennials’ interest in live TV is dwindling, with this demographic dedicating more time to watching content after it’s already aired.</p> <p>Millennials are now dedicating 55% of their TV-watching activity to ‘time-shifted’ content – either on streaming sites or on-demand platforms – compared to 35% of people aged over 35. </p> <p>Additionally, millennials are more likely to try content recommended by predictive recommendations, with 79% saying they've watched shows that have been suggested for them.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8990/CTA.JPG" alt="" width="491" height="491"></p> <h3>Personalisation generates 50% higher email open rate</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://www.yeslifecyclemarketing.com/campaign/benchmarks/vwo-subject-line-benchmarks" target="_blank">Yes Lifecycle Marketing</a> has revealed that brands are failing to use personalisation in email subject lines, despite a proven increase in open rates.</p> <p>It found that messages with personalised subject lines generated a 58% higher click-to-open (CTO) rate than emails without. However, just 1.1% of all emails sent in Q2 2017 had personalisation based on name in the subject line, while 1.2% were personalised based on other factors like browser behaviour or purchase history. </p> <p>In contrast, it appears marketers are largely focusing efforts on welcome messages, with 69% sending this type of email.</p> <h3>82% of global marketers say that predictive marketing is essential</h3> <p>Forrester’s <a href="https://rocketfuel.com/tlp/" target="_blank">latest study</a> has found that the majority of global marketers believe predictive marketing is essential.</p> <p>66% of marketers in a survey said that their customer and marketing data comes from too many sources to make sense of it. Consequently, 82% said predictive marketing is essential to keep up with competitors in future.</p> <p>The survey also found that 86% of global marketers plan to increase the use of AI to drive marketing insights in the next 12 months, and 80% said they will use AI to deliver consistent, optimised, cross-device content.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8988/Forrester.JPG" alt="" width="318" height="570"></p> <h3>Half of millennials prefer sales outreach via social media</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://getbambu.com/data-reports/q3-2017-how-to-optimize-for-social-selling/" target="_blank">Bambu</a> has revealed that millennials are keen to use social media to learn about new products and services, with 45% of this demographic more likely to prefer sales outreach via social than older generations.</p> <p>Bambu also found that 35% of people are more likely to buy from a sales representative who shares industry news and helpful content on social, and 22% say that this activity makes them more likely to follow that representative on social.</p> <p>Social selling is clearly more favourable than traditional methods such as cold-calling – just 9% of consumers say that the phone is their preferred way to hear from a company for the first time.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8987/Bambu.JPG" alt="" width="720" height="467"></p> <h3>81% of retailers anticipate a future as a media company</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://go.brightcove.com/marketing-future-of-retail" target="_blank">Brightcove</a>, an increasing number of brands are taking on traditional broadcasters by producing long-form, TV-style content. As a result, 81% of retailers say they anticipate transitioning into fully-fledged media companies in future.</p> <p>From a study of 200 retail businesses in the UK, France, and Germany, Brightcove found that 61% are already offering TV-style content services, and a further 33% have plans to do so within the next two years.</p> <p>There could be resistance from consumers, however, as Brightcove also found that 41% of consumers who have previously watched this kind of content say it is too ‘salesy’, while 30% say it is inauthentic.</p> <h3>Only 9% of people visit high-street travel agents</h3> <p>Finally, <a href="https://www.apadmi.com/travel-report-2017/" target="_blank">Apadmi</a> suggests that the high-street travel agent could be under threat, as just 9% of UK holidaymakers say they now visit travel agents in person to book their holiday. This comes from a survey of 1,000 people who have gone on holiday in the past 12 months.</p> <p>The study also revealed that just 4% of 18-24 year olds have visited their high street travel agents in recent times, while this rises to 18% for people over the age of 65.</p> <p>It’s not all gloom and doom for travel agents though. Apadmi also found that an increase in technology would attract consumers back to the high street, with 48% saying they would like to see travel agents invest in augmented reality and virtual reality so they can view destinations, hotels or transport in store.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69420 2017-09-14T11:39:11+01:00 2017-09-14T11:39:11+01:00 Inbound marketing vs. Account-based marketing: Diverging or aligning strategies? Riaz Kanani <p>I remember when <a href="https://medium.com/u/a845d2c84c23" target="_blank">Brian Halligan</a> and <a href="https://medium.com/u/d5d49189c3e7" target="_blank">Dharmesh Shah</a> were building Hubspot and created the terminology around inbound marketing. I was International Marketing Director at Silverpop at the time and had just launched its B2B marketing automation platform in UK and Europe.</p> <p>We had a huge content production team there and we knew that the people who consumed our content were much more likely to close than those who came in via other channels. Its biggest challenge though was the time it took to scale up and cut through in a competitive marketplace — we always needed to supplement it with other approaches.</p> <p>Today, most companies have some sort of inbound marketing strategy. Certainly more than have a formal account based marketing (ABM) strategy. Our experience at Radiate B2B is that even more sales teams use an account-based sales approach and have their own lists of prospects separate to marketing that they want to close.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8967/interest_over_time.png" alt="" width="700" height="248"></p> <p>An account-based approach is different to an inbound marketing-based approach. The way you plan is different and the way you implement them is different.</p> <p>It is not a case of either or though. While different, they do not compete. Inbound marketing and account-based marketing are complementary to each other.</p> <h3>What is inbound marketing?</h3> <p>Inbound marketing focuses on attracting customers with content that feels valuable and intuitive to the prospect. The major channels used are blogs, search engines, and social media. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8939/0-jAKGj5raA6fjZXlp.png" alt="Hubspot - Inbound Marketing" width="792" height="288"></p> <p>It most definitely does not interrupt or fight for a prospect’s attention. Though with the amount of content being produced by marketers this is becoming harder and harder and requiring higher quality and more personalised content to stand out (though by the nature of inbound this is usually limited to industry level rather than account level).</p> <p>Most of all it builds trust and positive brand equity with a prospect. </p> <p><em>To learn more on this topic, check out Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy">range of training courses</a> or download our new <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/content-strategy-best-practice-guide/">Content Strategy Best Practice Guide</a></em>.</p> <h3>What is account-based marketing (ABM)?</h3> <p>Traditionally <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/account-based-marketing-a-practical-guide/">account-based marketing</a> has been about marketing to a select few companies that are in your sweetspot and are extremely valuable.</p> <p>Today, technology is helping to scale this beyond a select few and up to a few hundred accounts. This has created a new and upsurging interest in the strategy and has been coined 'ABM', 'One to Few ABM', 'Named account ABM' or 'Industry ABM'. Eventually the terminology will converge of course but not so far.</p> <p>It has long existed in sales and has been growing within customer success teams also. As a result the strategy has moved beyond just marketing to be termed account-based everything or 'ABX'. Alignment across the three raises results significantly though there is detail within each that is not applicable across the board.</p> <p>Like inbound marketing, an account-based approach aims to build valued relationships with the aim of attracting a high value customer.</p> <p>The account-based approach looks to place content in front of a prospect rather than wait for a prospect to go looking for it however, relying on its highly personalised nature to cut through the noise and reduce any feeling of interruption. It then continues the engagement using what we at Radiate B2B believe to be a hyper personalised inbound marketing approach through to close and beyond when the prospect is now a client.</p> <p>As a result, account-based marketing uses offline, highly targeted display (programmatic, but not really), social media, websites, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/69420-inbound-marketing-and-account-based-marketing-friend-or-foe/edit/s">email marketing</a>, direct mail, telephone and face-to-face. Pretty much any channel can be adapted within an ABM approach. It is why ABM is sometimes called just good B2B marketing.</p> <p><em>To learn more on this topic, check out Econsultancy’s new <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/account-based-marketing-a-practical-guide/">Practical Guide to Account-Based Marketing</a>.</em></p> <h3>Diverging or aligning strategies?</h3> <p>So can they truly work together? There are aspects of both strategies that do align:</p> <ol> <li>The customer is at the centre.</li> <li>Valuable content powers them both  –  though with different approaches.</li> </ol> <p>But for the most part they do differ.</p> <ol> <li>Inbound marketing starts when a visitor looks for your content. An account-based approach requires you to go out into the world and talk to your ideal prospect directly, not wait for them to appear.</li> <li>Typically deal sizes will be larger for ABM than inbound marketing.</li> <li>Despite technological advances, ABM is still limited in scale versus inbound marketing so typically there will be a larger number of deals.</li> </ol> <h3>So which strategy is best?</h3> <p>The right approach clearly depends on who your company sells to. Obviously you are a company selling to businesses, but an account-based approach, even one using the latest techniques, does not work if the average lifetime value of your largest clients is small. In this scenario an inbound marketing approach is still the best approach.</p> <p>But what about in other scenarios?</p> <p>Account-based marketing works to close accounts in your sweet spot. These customers will typically be happier customers as they are aligned with your thinking and direction resulting in higher net promoter (NPS) or customer satisfaction scores. This in turn leads to significant numbers of advocates for your product driving more companies to your website.</p> <p>An outbound marketing approach is therefore the wrong approach and wasteful, but an inbound marketing approach will convert these incoming accounts at a much lower cost than an account-based programme.</p> <p>Combining inbound marketing and account-based marketing is also cost efficient. ABM requires hyper personalised content that speaks to an account’s needs, whilst traditional inbound marketing typically doesn’t have the same level of personalisation, it does aim to provide valuable content to attract prospects to the company. Content can be adapted to the needs of both strategies removing the need to create standalone content for both approaches.</p> <p>A further benefit is that these incoming accounts may lead you to new markets and territories fueling decision-making around expansion.</p> <p>So ABM and Inbound are indeed friends and work well together. In fact Hubspot, the home of inbound marketing, has not been shy investing in account-based businesses.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69403 2017-09-13T15:09:00+01:00 2017-09-13T15:09:00+01:00 Four ways travel brands can improve the customer experience Nikki Gilliland <p>I recently attended an event held by the DMA, where the topic of the day was how to increase levels of engagement and loyalty in the travel industry. Drawing on DMA’s research, here’s a summary of some key points to consider.</p> <h3>The gap between expectation and delivery</h3> <p>The <a href="https://dma.org.uk/research/customer-engagement-focus-on-travel" target="_blank">DMA’s new report</a> is based on a survey of over 2,000 UK consumers, with questions relating to the categories of travel accommodation, airlines, and price comparison sites.</p> <p>The first major finding cited by the event’s chairman, Scott Logie, was that consumers are more demanding. This is hardly surprising (and certainly not specific to travel), but he went on to suggest that there is still a huge gap between customer expectation and delivery.</p> <p>Essentially, travel brands are meeting customer demands to an extent, but with expectations of service and value rising so rapidly – it is difficult to keep up. Scott used the ‘razor blade’ metaphor to explain this, highlighting how consumers don’t necessarily need or expect multiple blades on a razor, but once one brand adds another, the only option for competitors is to beat it.</p> <p>That being said, the DMA found that functional features are the most important to consumers when choosing travel brands – 59% want value for money, 58% want convenience, and 58% want good customer service.</p> <p>Ultimately, this shows that operating honestly is a default expectation for consumers, not something they view as a selling point.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8789/Chart_9.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="546"></p> <h3>Brands offering greater value </h3> <p>So, which travel brands are delivering value? Here are a few examples of customer-centric brands and how they’re engaging consumers.</p> <p>US hotel chain Aloft has launched the world’s first emoji-powered room service. Called TiGi (which stands for ‘text it, get it’), it allows guests to choose between six packages, including ones specifically designed for a hangover or a day of sightseeing. Taking service to another level, it’s a good example of a brand meeting customer needs in a seamless and personalised way.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Lazy to call? Just text us with emojis from our special <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AloftTiGi?src=hash">#AloftTiGi</a> menu. It's our pleasure to serve you :) <a href="https://t.co/5BneeLKP68">pic.twitter.com/5BneeLKP68</a></p> — Aloft Bangkok (@AloftBangkok) <a href="https://twitter.com/AloftBangkok/status/749482814312153089">July 3, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>SeatFrog aims to increase visibility around the upgrade process, allowing customers to bid in an auction for a seat upgrade.</p> <p>As well as using technology to enhance the travel experience, it also takes away the sometimes random nature of the airline experience. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8790/seatfrog.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="397"></p> <p>Another brand to use transparency is Delta, which was the first airline to visibly map out luggage journeys. The Fly Delta mobile app now allows travellers to see their bag’s last scanned location, helping to dispel a common source of travel stress – the dreaded lost luggage.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8784/Delta.JPG" alt="" width="265" height="477"></p> <p>These examples show how brands can make the shift from meeting purely functional needs to creating long-lasting and deeper relationships with consumers. </p> <p>Of course, there is still a long way to go, with one of the biggest barriers to achieving this being trust. Scott suggested that highly transactional, tech-driven services can take away much-need warmth from travel brands. The DMA's research mirrors this, with around 50% of consumers saying they have some level of trust in brands. However, this falls to just 12% of people who say they trust a brand ‘very much’.</p> <h3>Brands driving loyalty</h3> <p>53% of consumers said that good service would keep them loyal to a hotel brand, even if they could get a cheaper deal elsewhere. Meanwhile, 40% said good deals and 39% said a rewards scheme would result in greater loyalty.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8788/chart_10.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="512"></p> <p>This shows that long-term loyalty is possible for travel brands, but the key to achieving it is delivering a service that takes into account the individual’s needs. So while personalisation is somewhat of a buzzword at the moment, it’s certainly something that consumers value.</p> <p>This is reflected in the reasons certain brands are favoured by consumers. The second-most favourite, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/" target="_blank">Booking.com</a>, was chosen because of its ability to personalise and tailor offers based on previous behaviour. Similarly, the biggest factor cited for British Airways was its superior rewards scheme.</p> <p>Outside of these, there are a few standout examples of brands succeeding when it comes to loyalty.</p> <p>Hilton and its Hilton Honours Program is particularly good, mainly because it allows consumers to make use of points in situations unrelated to the brand. Members can use them in restaurants and in shops, and even pool points to share with family and friends.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thank you <a href="https://twitter.com/HiltonHotels">@HiltonHotels</a> for the care package to recognize Lifetime Diamond status. Loyalty pays off and I appreciate it!! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hilton?src=hash">#Hilton</a> <a href="https://t.co/G5vCgh5apq">pic.twitter.com/G5vCgh5apq</a></p> — Jason Robertson (@robertson_jr3) <a href="https://twitter.com/robertson_jr3/status/887280659030519808">July 18, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Marriott is another hotel chain that is similarly innovative, this time using a beacon-driven loyalty scheme to allow people to earn rewards based on where they are. </p> <h3>New channels and technologies</h3> <p>Another way for travel brands to increase customer engagement is by meeting real-time demands based on various points in the customer’s journey.</p> <p>When it comes to the inspiration stage, where travellers are researching where to go and what to see, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66614-will-virtual-reality-revolutionise-the-travel-industry/" target="_blank">virtual reality</a> offers huge potential. The DMA found that 50% of consumers are interested in using a VR headset to see what a destination might look like in advance. Unsurprisingly, interest in VR is even higher among younger consumers. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8786/VR.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="518"></p> <p>Moving on to the booking process, and this is where <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots">chatbots</a> can help make the experience much more seamless. 52% of consumers say they’d use a <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68046-five-pioneering-examples-of-how-brands-are-using-chatbots" target="_blank">chatbot</a> to ask flight-related queries, while 38% say they’d be open to booking flights via a chatbot. This shows the demand for services that can be accessed in a native social environment, where consumers are already spending much of their time.</p> <p>The travel-phase is where data-sharing comes into play once again. However, this is an area which still poses a big barrier for brands. While 51% of consumers say they’d be happy to share their data in exchange for alerts, this is only once they realise what they'll get in return.</p> <p>In his summary of the research, Scott emphasised the importance of showing consumers the value of data-sharing. This is because while the appetite for personalisation is certainly there, concerns about privacy and misuse of data can often outweigh desire.  </p> <p>Finally, augmented reality presents a big opportunity for brands during the holiday phase. 45% of consumers say they’d be interested in using AR to find out informative facts about sites of interest.</p> <p>Carnival Cruises is already using this type of in-the-moment personalisation. Its cruise wristbands send tailored offers and recommendations to guests both on-board and off, based on where they are and what they’re interacting with during their trip.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8787/Carnival_Cruise_Line.JPG" alt="" width="548" height="308"></p> <h3>Key takeaways</h3> <p>So, let’s sum up some key takeaways.</p> <ol> <li>Consumers prioritise pragmatic needs, such as honesty, authenticity, value, and good service. Brands that do not meet these expectations (or view them as standard) run the risk of losing trust.</li> <li>Customer-centric brands create deeper relationships. Offering something of value (on top of the expected) can be the key to generating longer-term loyalty. </li> <li>Transparency is key when it comes to data-sharing. Personalisation can help to improve the customer experience, so it is important to communicate this value-exchange clearly with consumers.</li> <li>In-the-moment technology can take brands to the next level. VR, AR, and chatbots can enhance and improve the travel journey, engaging consumers when it matters most.   </li> </ol> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69207-how-six-travel-hospitality-brands-use-personalisation-to-enhance-the-customer-experience">How six travel &amp; hospitality brands use personalisation to enhance the customer experience</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69127-how-hotels-are-upping-the-fight-against-online-travel-agencies">How hotels are upping the fight against online travel agencies</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67658-how-hotels-can-personalize-the-customer-experience-to-compete-with-airbnb">How hotels can personalize the customer experience to compete with Airbnb</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69412 2017-09-11T11:25:00+01:00 2017-09-11T11:25:00+01:00 Six charities with excellent online donation user journeys Nikki Gilliland <p>It’s hard enough for charities to convince consumers to want to donate in the first place, never mind guiding them through the process – so which charities do it best? Here’s just six examples and the reasons why they’re so effective.</p> <h3>Charity: Water</h3> <p>Charity: Water’s website is one of my favourites in terms of design, using eye-catching imagery and informative content to nudge donations. It also makes giving very easy, letting users know that there are a variety of ways to get involved.</p> <p>Its donate button is easy to spot, including a nifty drop-down menu that instantly tells users there’s more than one option. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8840/charity_water.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="494"></p> <p>The main reason I like it is that it offers choice – and not just in terms of how often or how much to donate. It uses a fun and enthusiastic <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67941-10-nudge-tastic-examples-of-persuasive-copywriting-from-charities/" target="_blank">tone of voice to encourage</a> people to fundraise in a variety of ways. </p> <p>In fact, it lets users decide, allowing them to set up a bespoke campaign page detailing exactly how. Charity:Water also makes it as easy as possible for people who don’t have the time or inclination to fundraise, giving them a ready-made campaign page that lets people ask for donations in place of birthday gifts.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8841/charity_water_2.JPG" alt="" width="700" height="551"></p> <h3>American Heart Association</h3> <p>According to a survey, <a href="https://www.blackbaud.com/files/support/helpfiles/bestpractices/donationforms/donationform.htm" target="_blank">65% of organisations</a> require online donors to click three or more times to make a donation. This undoubtedly results in an increase of people abandoning their journey. </p> <p>The American Heart Association’s donation page is a great example of how to counteract this. It uses a one-page form to simplify the donation process. What’s more, it automatically fills in elements of the page, pre-setting suggested amounts to reduce form filling.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8842/AHA.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="661"></p> <p>Research also shows that suggesting gift amounts leads to bigger donations. This is perhaps because people might use the suggested amount as a minimum, whereas they might select a lower amount if left to their own devices.</p> <p>Finally, American Heart Association has an integrated Amazon Pay feature to let users pay in a single click if they are logged in their account, making donating as quick and easy as <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/66534-three-lessons-all-retailers-can-learn-from-amazon" target="_blank">buying something on Amazon</a>.</p> <h3>Cancer Research UK</h3> <p>According to PSA’s annual report, text donations fell by 7m last year. However, it’s been suggested that this was due to a reduction in marketing spend, with PSA also predicting that it will rise again in 2017.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69132-how-cancer-research-is-using-smart-technology-to-drive-fundraising" target="_blank">Cancer Research UK</a> heavily promotes text donations, allowing users to give £3 by texting a code. While the website itself does not overtly promote the feature (you need to click through to ‘other ways to donate’ to find it) – it is very clearly explained here.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8843/cancer_research_uk.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="487"></p> <p>Text donation is certainly one of the most user-friendly options, with charities able to capitalise on user’s spontaneity and in-the-moment urge to give. </p> <p>Cancer Research UK’s easy UX is also continued onto its mobile site. It has recently integrated Apple Pay, meaning users can give money in just two steps. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8844/IMG_1677.PNG" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <h3>Macmillan </h3> <p>Another cancer charity with a great mobile user journey is Macmillan. On its website, the donation process is a little bit lengthy – the three-step process feels like harder work than others I’ve mentioned.</p> <p>However, its mobile site is a different story. After clicking ‘donate’ on the homepage, you are taken you to a page with three ways to give money – either by credit card, PayPal or text. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8846/IMG_1678.PNG" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <p>The text feature is particularly cool. By tapping the screen, users are immediately taken to a draft text message where the number is already pre-filled. Again, while text donations are one of the easiest ways to donate, this ensures that all friction is removed, as the user does not even have to enter in the phone number.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8847/IMG_1679.PNG" alt="" width="400" height="711"></p> <h3>Red Nose Day</h3> <p>Red Nose Day is an annual event where people up and down the country hold events and activities to raise money for charity. But how exactly does the charity collect all the cash?</p> <p>Its website allows fundraisers to pay in their money online. The process is pretty quick and easy, taking users through a straightforward payment process – similar to that of any slick ecommerce site.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the charity also allows people to donate all year round, prompting them to do so throughout its site. Here, I particularly like how suggested donations correspond to what they can achieve. This encourages consumers to take action, also acting as proof that the money is put to good use.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8848/Red_nose_day.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="478"></p> <p>On to donating, and Red Nose Day offers one of the best experiences. A one-page, responsive form – it enables users to quickly complete the process without any real hassle. It also clearly and concisely explains its Gift Aid option – one element which perhaps might confuse people.</p> <p>While most websites promote Gift Aid as a tiny tick-box, this approach is great way to promote transparency and ensure understanding.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8849/GiftAid.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="550"></p> <h3>Alzheimer’s Society</h3> <p>Finally, the Alzheimer’s Society taps into emotive elements to help drive consumers through the donating process, by asking whether or not people would like to donate in memory of someone.</p> <p>This adds an element of personalisation to the often one-sided experience of giving to charity, with Alzheimer’s Society making the process more meaningful.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8851/Alzheimers_2.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="594"></p> <p>It also separates the user journey into single or monthly donations, which is effective for avoiding any confusion or anxiety about recurring payments. The various payment provider logos also help to instil trust and reassurance in consumers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8850/Alzheimers.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="377"></p> <h3>Key points:</h3> <p>So, what can we learn from the aforementioned examples? Here are a few takeaways.</p> <p><strong>1. Provide options</strong>. Giving consumers multiple ways to raise money helps to spur on action and involvement. A ready-made form like Charity:Water’s ‘birthday pledge’ makes it as easy as possible.</p> <p><strong>2. Reduce steps</strong>. It’s important to make the donating process as simple as possible, ensuring it takes just a few clicks. Similarly, pre-filling forms is a great way to streamline the process.</p> <p><strong>3. Think mobile</strong>. A mobile optimised site should be standard, but extra features like ‘tap to text’, Apple Pay, and a native form can massively enhance the user experience.</p> <p><strong>4. Add personalisation</strong>. Giving consumers the option to donate in memory of someone helps to prompt donations, but more than this, it also helps to create a meaningful connection between the charity and consumers. </p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69391-how-five-charities-convey-purpose-through-tone-of-voice">How five charities convey purpose through tone of voice</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68014-how-charities-can-win-at-the-zero-moment-of-truth/">How charities can win at the Zero Moment of Truth</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67451-the-smartest-experiential-charity-marketing-campaign-you-ll-see-this-year/">The smartest experiential &amp; charity marketing campaign you'll see this year</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69408 2017-09-08T09:24:38+01:00 2017-09-08T09:24:38+01:00 Birchbox's UK Managing Director on content, personalisation & forays into physical retail Nikki Gilliland <p>I recently caught up with Savannah Sachs, who is Birchbox’s UK managing director, to gain more insight into this – plus her perspective on personalisation, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/measuring-roi-on-influencer-marketing">influencers</a>, and <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/customer-experience/">customer experience</a>. Here’s a run-down of our conversation.</p> <h3>Using content to shape the customer experience</h3> <p>I first asked whether Birchbox sees content as a key differentiator, and something that sets it apart from competitors. Savannah agreed, explaining exactly how this is the case in relation to the brand’s ‘try, learn, and buy’ business model. </p> <p>It all starts with the monthly subscription box, she said, with customers signing up and filling in a beauty profile that includes details such as skin and hair type, beauty concerns, and individual style. From this data, Birchbox is able to send customers five beauty samples every month. </p> <p>The customer experience doesn’t end there. This is where the ‘learn’ part comes in, as each box contains tips and tricks relating to the products inside. This then continues across all of Birchbox’s social and digital channels, allowing customers to tap into content related to the products they’re using in real-time.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">How To: shape your brows with a brow pencil <a href="https://t.co/AkBr8rfNHu">https://t.co/AkBr8rfNHu</a> <a href="https://t.co/GvxDJ70zWt">pic.twitter.com/GvxDJ70zWt</a></p> — Birchbox (@BirchboxUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/BirchboxUK/status/877188062543065088">June 20, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Savannah explained that this is important because – while beauty is part of their life – customers are also likely to be busy and looking for more convenient ways to make beauty easy and fun. </p> <p>Finally, the ‘buy’ part of the business model is how the brand offers a really seamless path to purchase, with its relating ecommerce store offering an easy way for customers to buy full-sized items they might have tried in a box.</p> <blockquote> <p>We really see Birchbox as offering a 360-degree customer experience, with content being one of its core elements.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Creating personalisation that disappears</h3> <p>So where does personalisation come into play?</p> <p>Savannah explained how the beauty profile allows Birchbox to serve the most relevant content to individual customers. By stipulating what beauty products will suit them or that they’d like to try, Birchbox is able to tailor products and recommendations, also meaning each person will get a different box to their best friend, for instance.</p> <p>Alongside the benefit for customers, this also gives Birchbox’s brand partners a really powerful opportunity to target new customers.</p> <p>For example, Birchbox recently worked with Estee Lauder to specifically target a younger demographic in the UK. It sent products to customers between the ages of 24 and 34, as Estee Lauder particularly wanted to focus on millennials. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8809/estee_lauder.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="516"></p> <p>As well as introducing younger consumers to something they might not have considered before, the initiative was hugely beneficial for Estee Lauder, allowing it to align a new product launch and marketing strategy with a super-targeted demographic. </p> <p>Birchbox also takes a channel-by-channel approach to personalising content. For example, it recognises that Instagram Stories is more fun and playful, so it uses this channel to post raw, unedited, and spur-of-the-moment content. </p> <p>In contrast, it typically uses a more educational approach for its online blog, perhaps taking a deep-dive on a specific product. Essentially, it takes into account how long users spend on a particular channel as well as what they’re looking for from each.</p> <p>Another example of this is how Birchbox recently created a personalised email campaign focusing on skin type.</p> <p>Customers are able to pick a product in their beauty box each month – in July, it was offering the chance to pick between two different shades of a Benefit tint. In order to help customers choose the right shade for them, each email contained an image of a woman with a skin tone that matched the customer’s own, based on data from their beauty profile. From this, they could then easily see which product might look the best on them, without too much thought or deliberation.</p> <p>This is an example of what Birchbox calls ‘personalisation that disappears’.</p> <blockquote> <p>It is seamless, easy and feels right. It doesn’t require any work from the customer other than filling in their beauty profile – we then make use of that data throughout the customer journey.</p> </blockquote> <h3>The importance of user generated content</h3> <p>User-generated content is also critical for Birchbox. Savannah explained how the brand considers its subscribers to be its influencers, and a powerful way to help its growth. This is because Birchbox drives a good amount of acquisition organically, but also because word-of-mouth helps to make its paid acquisition activity much more efficient. </p> <p>In order to generate this type of content, the brand is focused on creating a monthly box experience that customers love and will want to share with friends on their social channels. In also means asking questions like ‘what’s going to make this month's box design super Instagrammable?’ or ‘why would a person feel proud to show this off?’</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8806/Birchbox_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="500"></p> <p>Next, it focuses on amplifying this organic word of mouth – and that’s typically been done via Facebook and Instagram, where the brand focuses the majority of its paid acquisition work. That being said, Birchbox is not entirely against using paid influencers to help attract new customers, doing so on a relatively small scale.</p> <p>Interestingly, Savannah said that the reason that it prefers user-generated content over paid influencers is all down to targeting. It aims to target a different kind of customer than other traditional beauty brands. </p> <p>Instead of the ‘beauty junkie’ – someone who is knowledgeable, trend-aware, and who follows all the top influencers – Birchbox is going after the ‘beauty majority’.</p> <p>This is because while the beauty junkie spends a lot of her disposable income on cosmetics, research indicates that she only makes up about 20% of women. In contrast, the more casual beauty consumer – who is willing to invest but needs help to figure out what’s right for her – makes up the rest. This consumer truly values having Birchbox as a sort of ‘beauty editor best friend’, to recommend and steer her in the right direction. </p> <blockquote> <p>In terms of appealing to this customer profile, Birchbox strives to be approachable, meaning it makes more sense to focus on the everyday woman rather than the expert influencer.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Translating the CX offline</h3> <p>Birchbox has a physical retail store in New York City, with imminent plans to open one in Paris. </p> <p>I asked Savannah how Birchbox is able to translate the customer experience into physical retail, especially considering that part of its USP is all about the convenience of delivery and laid-back discovery. In this sense, will customers seek out physical stores? </p> <p>Savannah assured me that, as a company which is about driving discovery and purchase online, Birchbox will always be digital-first. However, taking into consideration everything it has learned about its customer-base, it also realised that it has something quite unique to offer in terms of a bricks and mortar experience. </p> <p>The main innovation of its physical stores is that it does in fact mirror the online shopping experience. Its stores are merchandised by product type and category rather than brand. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8804/Birchbox_bricks_and_mortar.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="442"></p> <p>The reason being is that it does not believe the beauty majority has enough expertise to walk into a department store, with tens of thousands of products merchandised by brand, and know where to start. Instead, the beauty majority walks into a store and thinks ‘I’d love to get a new mascara’ or ‘I’ve never used a highlighter – where do I begin?’. </p> <p>It’s much easier to go to a shelf with all the mascaras side by side, to touch and try and compare. And albeit without the touch element, that’s exactly how customers navigate online shopping. </p> <blockquote> <p>An online customer will click into make-up, then eyes, then mascara – they would not typically navigate by brand. Our key innovation is bringing that online experience and navigation into the brick and mortar store – to make it easy for the customer to find the right product for them.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Channels of focus</h3> <p>I finished by asking Savannah where Birchbox’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/topics/content-marketing-and-strategy">content strategy</a> might be heading next. </p> <p>Interestingly, she cited Facebook Live as a big focus. The brand currently streams on the platform once a week, typically using a casual, Q&amp;A-style format to encourage interaction. Videos are always fronted by Birchbox employees to make it feel authentic and approachable. </p> <p>It’s clear the channel is proving successful. Birchbox now sees about 4x the engagement on Facebook Live than it does for other types of Facebook content. What’s more, its Facebook Live content is getting about 5x the views and engagement as it did a year ago.  </p> <p>A recent Facebook Live called ‘Three ways to mermaid’ generated 18,000 views, proving that there is an appetite for this kind of fun and lightweight content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FBirchboxUK%2Fvideos%2F1415131011870060%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <p>Finally, mobile is also an incredibly important focus for Birchbox, with 65% of UK traffic coming from mobile devices. Savannah emphasised that everything the brand does from a content perspective has to be mobile-first. While cutting down on copy, making sure images are optimised, and limiting vertical scroll is not rocket science, these elements are vital to the customer experience.</p> <p>Similarly, in order to truly engage customers, the content needs to be relevant to where they’re going to view it, and that is increasingly on a smartphone. </p> <blockquote> <p>Something that’s core to our overall strategy, but specifically in terms of digital content and social, is making sure everything we do is optimised for mobile.</p> </blockquote> <p><em><strong> Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69016-why-beauty-brands-are-betting-on-augmented-reality">Why beauty brands are betting on augmented reality</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68689-how-the-beauty-industry-is-embracing-the-internet-of-things">How the beauty industry is embracing the Internet of Things</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry">Seven ways social media is shaping the beauty industry</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69386 2017-09-05T12:00:00+01:00 2017-09-05T12:00:00+01:00 How Uber-competitor Curb used location-based targeting to drive app downloads Nikki Gilliland <p>Bought out by Verifone in 2016, which is the credit card company that supports payments in many of New York City’s yellow cabs, Curb is a new company that allows users to hail or pre-book with professional cab-drivers operating in US cities.</p> <p>Now in 65 different locations, Curb has recently ramped up its online efforts – specifically using a location-based social strategy to target new customers. Here’s a bit more on its recent campaign and a few reasons why location-based advertising has worked.</p> <h3>Targeting on social platforms</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/uber-demographics/" target="_blank">Global Web Index</a>, 65% of Uber’s audience is made up of 16 to 34 year-olds, while just 6% of its users are over 55. Unsurprisingly, this younger demographic is also the most active on social media, with 87% of people aged 18 to 29 also using Facebook, and 59% of this age range also using Instagram.</p> <p>The decision to focus on these two platforms in particular was a no-brainer for Curb. And with bad-feeling towards Uber <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68865-will-bad-pr-lead-uber-to-destruction" target="_blank">increasing in recent months</a>, the company seized the opportunity to tempt existing customers away from the brand.</p> <p>Curb teamed up with data-driven company Taptica to launch a social campaign across Facebook and Instagram, targeting relevant Android and iOS users in key locations. The brand also used an incentive, offering promotional codes for $5 or $10 off first rides. </p> <p>Discounting tends to be an effective tactic when it comes to tempting customers to try a new service, but perhaps even more so considering Curb typically costs a few dollars more than Uber. This is because the company charges an extra service fee as well as the fact it uses standard taxi fares calculated by a meter - and encourages tips. This might put-off customers who are used to Uber’s lower prices, however Curb does not use surge pricing – which means it can also work out much cheaper overall.</p> <p>Regardless, the discount-strategy certainly worked here – the incentive reportedly resulted in a 2.5X increase in app engagement.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fgocurb%2Fposts%2F10155405386850552&amp;width=500" width="500" height="268"></iframe></p> <h3>Location-based incentives</h3> <p>Alongside money-off, Curb’s campaign also utilised a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67418-what-is-location-based-advertising-why-is-it-the-next-big-thing/" target="_blank">location-based strategy</a>, honing on specific aspects of US cities.</p> <p>By mentioning popular events or features exclusive to each or corresponding places, the ads were able to effectively pique the interest of people who live and work nearby. This type of ad also helps to create a much more personal connection, with users recognising that it is relevant to something unique to them. Or at least a little more so than a standard ad. </p> <p>Curb already uses locations in this way on its own social media channels, where it often mentions daily or weekly events, but this is usually to target existing users in bigger cities like New York or Chicago.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Get a Curb ride to the <a href="https://twitter.com/CopernicusCtr">@CopernicusCtr</a> this weekend for <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Chicago?src=hash">#Chicago</a>'s annual <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TasteofPolonia?src=hash">#TasteofPolonia</a> festival! <a href="https://t.co/UowwN7GaQb">https://t.co/UowwN7GaQb</a></p> — Curb (@gocurb) <a href="https://twitter.com/gocurb/status/902227281250279424">August 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>In order to engage with new customers in cities where the app is less popular, Curb widened its radar – serving ads to people within a 50-mile radius of certain locations.</p> <p>Meanwhile, to create a large-scale campaign but also save on costs, it used a joint-city approach where possible. This meant that it targeted relevant customers in similar cities, without over-spending on any one place. </p> <h3>The results</h3> <p>Curb’s social campaign has contributed to the company’s recent growth. According to <a href="http://www.mobilemarketer.com/news/taxi-app-curb-drives-300-install-growth-with-location-based-social-strateg/503238/" target="_blank">Mobile Marketer</a>, it drove a 300% increase in app downloads, while targeting customers within a 50-mile radius drove five times more app installs. </p> <p>The Curb app moved from number 46 to 23 in the Google Play Store chart, and finally, the brand added 12 more locations since the three-month campaign ended.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fgocurb%2Fposts%2F10155326731200552%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="485"></iframe></p> <h3>What can we learn?</h3> <p>You could argue that Curb’s recent growth is a possible sign of resistance against Uber, but as the aforementioned results show, the campaign itself is not to be sniffed at.</p> <p>So, why did the ads resonate so much?</p> <p>Recent studies suggest that irrelevance is the main reason why consumers choose to use ad blockers, with 49% of people saying that ads are too irrelevant or annoying. To counteract this, marketers need to make campaigns as pertinent as possible – and using location is a great way to do this.</p> <p>It’s easy to scroll past an ad for a random product or brand, but less so to bypass the name of nearby place – especially if it is your home. The fact that Curb’s ads were tailored to where users live and work surely resulted in more engagement than they would if they were generic ads about the brand. </p> <p>There are limits to this kind of targeting of course. The line between relevant or personalised and an invasion of privacy can be rather thin. While targeting based on city-location is one thing, it might be a whole different story if Curb started using specific journey-based data to target customers.</p> <p>Interestingly, Facebook has just announced that it is to take targeting a step further by serving ads to households rather than individuals. This means that it will recommend brands or products that it thinks a co-habiting couple or the entire family would be involved with, such as travel or large technology items. </p> <p>Beside the point here, perhaps, yet it does show how brands might be reaching social media users in future. And for Curb - a company aiming to compete with a giant like Uber (who also has masses of data at its fingertips) – it’s a sign that creativity <em>and</em> caution will remain key to success.  </p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67830-young-users-aren-t-fans-of-targeted-social-ads-report/">Young users aren't fans of targeted social ads: Report</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/67704-four-useful-tips-for-making-online-ads-relevant-personal">Four useful tips for making online ads relevant &amp; personal</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69394 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 2017-09-01T12:18:43+01:00 10 stupendous digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please enjoy.</p> <h3>McGregor generates the most social media engagements</h3> <p>He might have lost in the ring, but data from <a href="http://www.4cinsights.com/news/" target="_blank">4C Insights</a> has revealed that Conor McGregor was victorious in generating online media conversation.</p> <p>McGregor saw more than 3,294,078 Facebook and Twitter engagements on fight night, which includes tweets, retweets, replies and likes. In comparison, Mayweather generated 2,986,484 engagements, highlighting McGregor’s ability to generate mass hype and media discussion.</p> <p>The fight amassed 889,705 engagements on Facebook and Twitter in the week leading up to it, before a massive surge on the night itself saw engagements rise 605% to 6,280,562.</p> <h3>Small businesses falling behind on digital transformation</h3> <p><a href="https://www.g2crowd.com/blog/small-business/introducing-crowd-views-iii-small-business-technology/" target="_blank">G2 Crowd</a>’s third quarterly report has revealed that small business owners are failing to effectively market their businesses in a digital world. Research found that 24% of businesses are still largely investing in either newspaper ads and/or billboards, while only 19% of respondents are spending money on Google AdWords. </p> <p>That being said, the report suggests that technology is an area of focus for small businesses interested in scaling growth, with 47% planning to increase IT spending this year.</p> <h3>Number of hours spent checking email decreases 27%</h3> <p>According to Adobe’s third annual <a href="https://blogs.adobe.com/conversations/2017/08/consumers-are-still-email-obsessed-but-theyre-finding-more-balance.html" target="_blank">email survey</a>, people are checking their work and personal email less frequently than they were in 2016.</p> <p>The overall number of hours spent on email per day decreased 27% from last year. Specifically, there was a 28% decrease in consumers checking email messages from bed in the morning, with more than a quarter of consumers now waiting until they get to the office to check their inboxes. </p> <p>The report also suggests one in five consumers never check email outside of normal work hours, and nearly half don’t or rarely check while they’re on holiday. </p> <p>However, this is not the case for millennials. More than half of 18-24 year olds still check their email while in bed in the morning, and 43% of millennials aged 25-34 admit to doing the same.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8676/Adobe.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="311"></p> <h3>Google and Alexa make up 90% of voice commerce market share</h3> <p>The news that Amazon and Google are joining forces could mean big things for voice commerce, according to insight from Walker Sands.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of consumers own a voice controlled device, while 20% plan to purchase within the next year. Together Google and Alexa make up approximately 90% of the market share. </p> <h3>US social ads failing to drive conversions</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://civicscience.com/facebook-ads-affect-purchases-snapchat-twitter-instagram-combined/" target="_blank">CivicScience</a> has found that ads on social platforms like Facebook and Instagram are failing to convert users. </p> <p>In a survey of over 1,900 US consumers, just 1% of respondents aged 13 and older said they have previously made a purchase based on a Snapchat ad, and only 4% said they have bought anything after seeing an Instagram ad. Overall, 45% said that they have never purchased anything based on ads they saw from social media sites, and over a third said they don’t use social media.</p> <p>Facebook was found to be the most influential channel for purchasing behaviour, with 16% of consumers buying a product based on a Facebook ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8675/CivicScience.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="394"></p> <h3>Personalisation brings footwear brand 64% increase in ROI </h3> <p>Dune London has revealed that it’s seen a 64% increase in return on investment per customer after personalising its media to real people, in partnership with <a href="http://info.conversantmedia.eu/dune-london" target="_blank">Conversant</a>.</p> <p>Instead of targeting segments or cookies, Dune tailored messages to individual customer’s specific needs and interests. This involves showing complementary products post-purchase, and tailoring ads according to what kinds of products a customer tends to browse and buy the most.</p> <p>As well as a 64% increase in ROI per customer, personalisation also led to a 33% increase in messaged conversion rate.</p> <h3>Push notifications boost in-app spending by 16%</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/leanplums-analysis-reveals-push-notifications-increase-in-app-spend-16-and-drive-96x-more-users-to-buy-300510182.html?tc=eml_cleartime" target="_blank">Leanplum</a>, push notifications can lead to a significant increase in mobile conversions.</p> <p>The Insights to Mobile Revenue report states that push notifications can boost in-app spending by 16% – driving nearly 10 times more users to make a purchase compared to those who did not receive one.</p> <p>Research also found that promotional push notifications sent on a Saturday resulted in over twice as many purchases than notifications sent on Thursday. Meanwhile, push notifications sent during the late afternoon lead to 2.7 times more purchases than any other time of day.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8674/Leanplum.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="509"></p> <h3>One in nine marketers will spend more than £100,000 on influencers in the next year</h3> <p>New research from Takumi has revealed that one in nine marketers plan to spend in excess of £100,000 on influencer marketing in the next 12 months.</p> <p>39% of professionals say they will spend up to £10,000, while a further fifth predict their budget to fall somewhere between £10,000 and £100,000. In contrast, just 4% say they plan to forgo influencer campaigns entirely. </p> <p>This shows the extent to which influencer marketing has grown in popularity, with 26% of marketers now believing it is a more effective way to target consumers than traditional advertising. 43% agree that it is more effective, but only for millennial audiences.</p> <h3>‘In the moment’ searches are on the rise</h3> <p><a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/consumer-insights/consumer-immediate-need-mobile-experiences/?utm_medium=email&amp;utm_source=promo&amp;utm_team=twg-us&amp;utm_campaign=20170829-twg-micro-moments-email-B&amp;utm_content=cta&amp;mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiWlROaE16STJaVE00TkdJdyIsInQiOiI3cVpldDV6cml6S1wvbHlhM0t1SjJzckdyUVZseGQ1NmtjeVwvUmtQXC9mYUVQTmExOEJOZFRNUWJmRkxVcUR0Z0JmcDZNaGMrbFVWNzlDQ2dxYjNia0hjc2FXeEZqd2IwUHFOdVo5N3p5Zk1QM0MxdjBXU1NxUktkNDZ1dVdQWlM0aSJ9" target="_blank">Google research</a> has found that consumers are more impatient than ever before, with increasing expectations for brands to immediately meet their needs. </p> <p>Searches related to ‘same-day shipping’ have grown more than 120% since 2015. Similarly, searches for ‘open now’ have tripled over the past two years, while searches for ‘store hours’ have dropped.</p> <p>Lastly, Google found that travel-related searches for ‘tonight’ and ‘today’ have grown more than 150% on mobile, reflecting consumer demand for spontaneous and in-the-moment bookings.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8673/Open_Now.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="454"></p> <h3>Consumers more likely to make frivolous purchases on touchscreens</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969698917300024" target="_blank">new study</a> has revealed that consumers are more likely to make purchases when browsing on a touchscreen device, especially when it comes to things they don’t necessarily need.</p> <p>This is because touchscreens create more experiential thinking in users, while desktops evoke rational consideration. </p> <p>An experiment found that participants were more inclined to buy a restaurant gift card than a grocery gift card on a touchscreen, while desktop users favoured the opposite. In this sense, desktop elicits a similar response to shopping in-store, where a series of logical steps means we are less likely to be driven by emotions or impulse.</p>