tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/seo Latest SEO content from Econsultancy 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69028 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>UK search data shows surge in ‘snap election’ queries</h3> <p>Following on from the announcement of the snap general election this week, Hitwise has analysed how the UK responded online.</p> <p>Data shows there was a 2,000% increase in searches for Theresa May on print media sites, while three out of five searches on Tuesday 18th were about the election news. Most searches were in the form of questions, with the nation generally appearing unsure about what a ‘snap election’ actually means.</p> <h3>One fifth of retailers are failing to offer preferred delivery options</h3> <p><a href="http://ampersandcommerce.com/insights/yougov-consumer-survey-delivery-2017/" target="_blank">Research from Ampersand</a> has found that many of the UK’s biggest retailers are failing to offer next day delivery, despite a YouGov survey showing that 58% of people favour this method over any other.</p> <p>In comparison to 2014, Ampersand found that most people still favour next day delivery over click and collect and same day delivery, with preference for this increasing 6% within three years. </p> <p>Meanwhile, preference for same day delivery has gone from 21% in 2014 down to 12% this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5625/Ampersand.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <h3>UK add-to-basket rates on the up in Q4</h3> <p>Monetate's latest <a href="http://info.monetate.com/ecommerce_report_EQ4_2016.html" target="_blank">ecommerce report</a> has revealed that UK add-to-basket rates were 3.75% higher in Q4 2016 than a year previously. </p> <p>The report also shows that both global and UK conversion rates were lower this Q4 than in 2015. However, global and UK conversion rates saw its first increase since Q4 of 2015.</p> <p>Meanwhile, website visits via mobile continued to increase globally, with 44% of UK website visits coming from smartphones.</p> <h3>75% of UK consumers have not spoken to a chatbot</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://insights.ubisend.com/2017-chatbot-report" target="_blank">Ubisend</a> has uncovered the brand characters people would most like to see turned into chatbots. Compare the Market’s Meerkats topped the poll, followed by the Andrex puppies and Nespresso’s George Clooney. </p> <p>Other research found that 75% of UK consumers have not yet spoken to a chatbot, however, 57% of consumers are aware of what a chatbot is. </p> <p>Lastly, 35% want to see more companies adopting chatbots to solve their queries, with 68% citing ‘reaching the desired outcome’ as the most important factor in their experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5628/chatbots.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <h3>Expedia outperforms other travel brands with 7% market share</h3> <p>Conductor has released its first ever <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwis1ZyKnbXTAhXOaVAKHc0ZA4EQFggiMAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.conductor.com%2Frs%2F149-ZMU-763%2Fimages%2FConductor-Organic-Online-Market-Share-Report-Holiday-2016.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGO-bWF8Ak2EEpMJ7kZeecHFR3fjA" target="_blank">Organic Market Share</a> report, detailing the brands that excel at reaching consumers from organic search.</p> <p>In the travel category, Expedia was found to be the overall top performer, taking a 7% market share. Meanwhile, TripAdvisor dominates the ‘early stages’ of the consumer journey category with a 10% share. </p> <p>Data shows that airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains (including Hilton) have the potential to increase their visibility. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5627/Online_market_share.JPG" alt="" width="713" height="404"></p> <h3>Consumers prefer traditional advertising to digital</h3> <p>Research by Kantar Media has found that UK consumers feel significantly more positive about advertising on traditional platforms, such as TV and magazines, than they do about online formats.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% said they actively dislike seeing advertising on online video services and search engines, while 30% dislike being served ads in news and articles online. In contrast, only 13% and 14% of consumers dislike seeing ads in printed newspapers and printed magazines.</p> <p>With online ads predicted to account for more than half of all advertising spend in the next few years, this provides food for thought for brands.</p> <h3>Connected shopping driven by Generation Y </h3> <p>New research from Savvy suggests that the mass adoption of smartphones and social media has contributed to a fundamental change in the path to purchase.</p> <p>Data shows that Generation Y is driving changes in retail due to being constantly connected. 66% say they regularly use their smartphone to buy products and 49% regularly use their smartphones while in the supermarket. While this group represents around a third of shoppers at the moment, they are predicted to account for 47% by 2022.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5634/connected_shopper.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK marketers increase budgets in 2017</h3> <p>According to data from the Q1 2017 <a href="http://www.ipa.co.uk/page/ipa-bellwether-report#.WPnTjtLyuUk" target="_blank">IPA Bellwether Report</a>, marketing budgets increased in Q1 2017 with significant growth seen in internet and main media advertising categories.  </p> <p>The report suggests that the overall outlook for 2017/18 is positive, with 26.1% of companies suggesting growth in total budgets for the coming year. Meanwhile, ad spend is now predicted to grow 0.6%, replacing the previous forecast of -0.7%.</p> <h3>Only 55% of Brits associate Easter with religion</h3> <p>New <a href="https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/04/13/only-55-brits-associate-jesus-christ-easter/" target="_blank">research from YouGov</a> has found that Brits are more likely to think of Easter in relation to chocolate eggs than religious connotations. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,670 UK adults, only 55% said they personally associate Jesus with Easter, while 67% said they associate it with a bank holiday. Chocolate eggs is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s minds, with 76% associating this with Easter above anything else.</p> <p>In a separate study, Captify analysed found that Cadbury products dominate searches for chocolate eggs, with Crème Egg accounting for 29% of searches and Mini Eggs accounting for 18%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5626/YouGov.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="752"></p> <h3>Luxury ad spend predicted to shift online </h3> <p>Zenith's <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/product/advertising-expenditure-forecasts" target="_blank">latest report</a> suggests that expenditure on luxury advertising is set to recover, with growth predicted to occur due to an increase in online spend. Zenith predicts a 3.9% rise in 2017 – a welcome figure following a 0.5% decline in 2016.</p> <p>It also predicts that the internet will become the main luxury advertising medium in 2018, despite print currently being the principal medium, accounting for 32.7% of ad spend in 2016 compared to 25.8% for internet advertising.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 2017-04-21T12:55:00+01:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports (in addition to two sector-specific reports, B2B and Healthcare &amp; Pharma) across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are available under the following areas:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a> </strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Retail Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/retail-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Retail</a></strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68982 2017-04-21T09:59:55+01:00 2017-04-21T09:59:55+01:00 Five keys to managing your online reputation in Google search Marcus Tober <p>As so much of what people do online starts with search, a big part of managing your online reputation relates to search engines: trying to control and influence what appears when someone performs searches of your brand, key people and products and services.</p> <h4>It’s not just about driving out negative mentions</h4> <p>Most people assume that this is mainly about getting rid of negative content (such as in the UC Davis example) or pushing negative references lower while improving the rankings of positive material residing on your website or blog. But managing your online reputation goes beyond taking away negatives.</p> <p>You need to make sure that the information people are seeing about you is accurate, up to date and consistent across all regions and countries. And you should continually find ways of improving what appears so that it’s more engaging and paints a more desirable picture.</p> <p>Google decides what it shows in search engine results pages (SERPs) algorithmically based on hundreds of different factors. And the task for organisations who want to manage what appears for their brand is getting increasingly complicated.</p> <h4>It’s not just about the blue organic links in Google results</h4> <p>In addition to the traditional organic search results (the familiar blue links on search pages), Google now includes a whole array of other search real estate. Take a look at the image below which shows some of the elements that appear on page 1 for a brand search for “Netflix”. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5530/netlfix_search.jpg" alt="netflix search" width="800"></p> <p>So where do you start if you want to manage your online reputation in search? Here are five key considerations to inform your planning:</p> <h4>1. What SERP real estate are people seeing when they search for your brand?</h4> <p>First, it’s useful to conduct an audit of what people are seeing when they search for your brand keywords on Google and other search engines. In addition to the organic results there’s so many other elements that appear (as you can see from the Netflix example above). They range from universal search integrations (news, images, videos, maps, and shopping results) to<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64631-twitter-cards-in-the-right-place-at-the-right-time-to-create-a-new-kind-of-web/"> Twitter cards</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66672-semantic-search-the-future-of-search-marketing/">Google Knowledge Graph</a>, as well as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/paid-search-marketing-ppc-best-practice-guide/">paid search results</a> and a lot more.</p> <p>And don’t forget that you need to analyse what appears according to region, country, device and search query intent as all these could throw up different results.</p> <h4>2. Of those SERP elements that appear for your brand, which can you reasonably expect to own or control?</h4> <p>You can definitely own or have control over what is on your website, your company blog, how you are represented in industry profiles, your social profiles such as your company Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube page. All of these can find their way into search results pages, so it’s important to take stock of what they are.</p> <h4>3. How do you communicate your brand in those parts of the SERPs you can expect to own and control?</h4> <p>Next you need to ensure that everything on the pages you own or can control is on message. Is all the content up to date? Does it highlight the positive things you want target audiences to know about your company? Is what you are saying consistent across all the different elements – including images, videos, online slide presentations?</p> <h4>4. How do you maximize the visibility in the SERPs of elements you own or can control?</h4> <p>How do you push the parts you own and control higher up the search rankings pages so they are visible for brand searches? This is a huge subject and one which usually falls under the remit of your SEO consultant. It includes making sure that your web pages and properties are technically optimised – paying attention to areas such as site speed, load time, site structure, internal linking - as well as optimising the content on individual pages and earning backlinks and mentions from other sites, all which have an impact on the performance of a domain in search results. </p> <h4>5. How can you influence the parts you don’t own and control?</h4> <p>There are many elements in the results you don’t own or cannot directly control that could rank in the SERPs for your brand. This includes other sites that mention your company ranging from competitors to partners, industry publications, blogs and online forums and review sites.</p> <p>While you can’t directly control what they publish, you do have some influence. If something is incorrect or out of date you can consider contacting the website owner or author and asking them to correct it.  If there is a negative forum or social media post you can respond to it.</p> <p>Going back to the search real estate other than the organic links – here too, there are things you can influence. Examples include:</p> <ul> <li> <strong>Video results:</strong> the majority of video results integrated into the SERPs are from YouTube. Make sure you host your videos there and include clear meta tags and descriptions and upload transcripts to let Google know what they feature.</li> <li> <strong>Image results:</strong> ensure you optimise image assets on your website and social sites so they include brand search terms in captions, alt text and descriptions to increase their chances of appearing in image results. </li> <li> <strong>News results:</strong> have a media relations specialist managing the flow of company news to target media to influence the News results that show up when people search for your brand.</li> <li> <strong>Knowledge Graph:</strong> the Knowledge Graph (which appears on the right hand side of the SERP) is incredibly important. Much of the information it incorporates is taken from a brand’s website, social channels, Google My Business account and often from its Wikipedia listing.  You can influence it by ensuring logos, images, contact details, social profiles etc., are all correct and up to date.</li> <li> <strong>Site links:</strong> Google sometimes incorporates links to important pages on a brand’s website underneath the main organic blue link within the SERP. You can increase the chances that it incorporates site links to pages you want targets to see by creating a XML site map and using anchor text and alt text about those key pages that’s clear and informative.</li> </ul> <h4>In summary</h4> <p>Online reputation management in search should be on the agenda of every organisation that wants to have an online presence. It’s definitely not something that can be left to chance. Ideally you should devote time and resources to proactively cultivate it.</p> <p><strong><em>Now read:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65523-what-is-online-reputation-management-and-should-you-use-it/">What is online reputation management and should you use it?</a></em></strong></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3208 2017-03-21T12:28:11+00:00 2017-03-21T12:28:11+00:00 Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Marketing <p>Search Engine Optimisation [SEO] is becoming increasingly tricky - continuous innovations between the rival search engines, coupled with increased activity from your competitors, means that you have to identify the right strategy for your business to rank well.</p> <p>This SEO training course will enable you to build an organic search marketing strategy that will mean more of the right kind of visitors to your website, boost online conversions and stand out in today’s fiercely competitive online marketplace, ensuring the best possible return on investment.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3205 2017-03-21T12:25:24+00:00 2017-03-21T12:25:24+00:00 Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) - Advanced <p>SEO is a complex subject and for those wishing to move their knowledge beyond the basics, this course has been designed for the intermediate to advanced learner. There is lots to consider when optimising for maximum visibility through search. From key phrase research and query audits, to content strategy, page mark-up and site architecture. Getting all these things right is key to grabbing customers who know what they want, but not where to get it from.</p><p>Providing you with a structured process to improve your results from SEO, an industry expert will lead this one-day workshop, reviewing attendees' existing optimisation approaches, analytics and tools against their top-performing competitors and best practice.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68909 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 2017-03-17T13:00:16+00:00 10 spellbinding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Advertisers predicted to be defrauded by $16.4bn in 2017</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www.campaignbrief.com/2017/03/16/Ad%20Fraud_Report_The%26Partnership_mSIX_Adloox.pdf" target="_blank">report by The&amp;Partnership</a> suggests that the global cost of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68067-is-ad-fraud-the-21st-century-drug-trade/">advertising fraud</a> could have been significantly under-reported up until this point.</p> <p>While fraud is believed to cost advertisers $7.2bn globally each year, the real cost of ad fraud may have been as high as $12.48bn in 2016 (accounting for almost 20% of the $66bn spent on digital advertising).</p> <p>If advertising fraud continues to evolve at its current rate, this figure could potentially rise to $16.4bn in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4775/Ad_Fraud.jpeg" alt="" width="760" height="427"></p> <h3>A third of Brits would rather read a blog than a book</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">New research from Affilinet has found that one in three people in the UK say they read more online than they do in print.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In a survey of over 2,600 Brits, 32% confessed tospending more time reading online, with cookery, diet and nutrition recipes being the most likely category to search for.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">When asked about the reasons why, 61% said they prefer blogs because they are ‘cheaper’ than buying books, 58% stated that they are ‘more convenient’ and 49% said they ‘prefer short-form content rather than full books’.</p> <h3>42% of marketers agree that email relevance is hit and miss</h3> <p>A <a href="https://dma.org.uk/infographic/customers-want-relevance-marketers-need-content" target="_blank">DMA infographic</a> has highlighted how marketers are failing to create relevant emails, with 42% saying ‘some’ are relevant to the recipient at best. This is despite the fact that <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67734-three-key-charts-from-our-2016-email-marketing-census/">the medium remains an effective channel</a>, with email ROI increasing from £29.64 to £30.01 in the past year.</p> <p>DMA also suggests that one of the biggest stumbling blocks is a lack of content, with one in four marketers citing this as a major problem.</p> <p>As shown below, other issues preventing effective email is said to be a lack of strategy, a lack of data and data siloes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4776/DMA_email.JPG" alt="" width="630" height="539"></p> <h3>Poor communication results in nearly a quarter of missed deliveries</h3> <p>Research from Engage Hub has revealed that a lack of communication from delivery companies is the main reason UK consumers miss scheduled deliveries, with 23% of consumers saying poor communication has caused them to miss a delivery in the past 12 months.</p> <p>Other reasons include a parcel not arriving at the specified time and having no ability to reschedule the delivery time.</p> <p>When asked about the most important elements of the delivery process, 49% of UK consumers cited clear confirmation regarding delivery time, while 30% said updates from the delivery company in the event of any changes.</p> <h3>Top three searched-for luxury brands see 63.5% of online visits</h3> <p>In terms of the online market share, Hitwise has revealed that Michael Kors, Ralph Lauren and Coach are the most searched-for luxury brands.</p> <p>In fact, these three brands take 63.5% of the share of online visits to the luxury apparel industry as a whole. </p> <p>Meanwhile, data shows that Versace, Tom Ford and Yves Saint Laurent are a hit with millennials, as a large portion of their traffic is currently driven by consumers aged 18 to 34.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4777/Hitwise.jpg" alt="" width="703" height="390"></p> <h3>UK shoppers rate retail experiences as average</h3> <p>According to a <a href="http://www.zetaglobal-uk.com/linking-brand-digital-sophistication-with-customer-demands-whitepaper/?utm_source=media&amp;utm_campaign=cct_whitepaper_lpr&amp;utm_medium=pr" target="_blank">new report by Zeta Global</a>, only 40% of UK shoppers think their favourite retailers provide a good or great customer experience.</p> <p>This comes from a study of 3,000 UK adults, which also found that 48% of respondents considered their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68839-the-10-principles-for-creating-amazing-online-retail-experiences/">retail experience</a> to be merely ‘average’. Meanwhile, a further 11% believe that their favourite shops provide poor service.</p> <p>From this, it is clear that personalisation presents a huge opportunity for retailers to capture consumer loyalty, with almost two-fifths of shoppers saying they would be inclined to shop around if they received a personalised service.</p> <h3>Emotional context could make digital ads 40% more effective</h3> <p><a href="https://yahoo.tumblr.com/post/158393152734/emotional-context-could-make-digital-ads-40-more" target="_blank">According to Yahoo</a>, the emotional state of consumers can dramatically impact how receptive they are to advertising.</p> <p>With US and UK consumers reportedly feeling ‘upbeat’ 46% of the time, this is a key window for advertisers, with people said to be 40% more receptive to digital ads when they are in this mood.</p> <p>The study also found that when consumers are upbeat, they are 30% more likely to engage with native video content than when they are in any other emotional state. </p> <p>Lastly, consumers are 28% more likely to engage with content marketing and 21% more likely to engage with direct marketing when feeling happy.</p> <h3>Majority of marketers haven’t got to grips with mobile</h3> <p><a href="https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B6yVMKaNCUz6Qm9xMWxIcGpsZW8/view" target="_blank">A new report</a> by Mobile Marketing Association and RadiumOne has revealed that the majority of marketers are failing to tap into the way consumers use their mobiles.</p> <p>From interviews with over 300 senior marketers, two-thirds admitted that they’re not confident they've identified the most critical signals in their customers’ journey.</p> <p>What’s more, 61% aren’t fully confident in their ability to find new profitable customers, and 58% are not fully confident in their re-engagement efforts to prevent customer churn. </p> <p>In terms of the most valuable data, 29% of marketers cite content sharing from apps, 28% cite mobile site visits and 27% cite app installs as the best signals for improving mobile branding. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4779/MMA_report.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="236"></p> <h3>25 to 34 year olds 65% more likely to search for bank accounts</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that people aged between 25 to 32 are 65% more likely to search for a savings account than any other demographic. What’s more, men in this age group are 60% more likely to be saving compared to women.</p> <p>From an audience of 8.3m 25 to 34 years old consumers in the UK searching to switch banks, Hitwise suggests that the most popular banks to visit are Santander and Halifax, followed by Lloyds and Natwest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4780/Hitwise_2.jpg" alt="" width="599" height="376"></p> <h3>BMW drivers are the biggest retail spenders of any car owner</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://www2.viantinc.com/anatomy-of-an-auto-shopper-uk" target="_blank">study by Viant</a> has delved into the purchase habits and behaviour of major car brand owners in the UK. </p> <p>The report states that Fiat is the most popular car brand for millennials, with this age group 18% more likely to drive hatchbacks than non-millennials. BMW drivers are said to be the biggest retail spenders, being 54% more likely to shop at John Lewis and 2.3 times more likely to shop in Selfridges than Ford drivers.</p> <p>Lastly, Ford drivers reportedly spent £2,157 on flights over a period of six months, with their preferred airline being Emirates.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68892 2017-03-15T09:36:00+00:00 2017-03-15T09:36:00+00:00 A day in the life of... a client-side SEO specialist Ben Davis <p>And if you're looking for a new challenge in digital <a style="font-weight: normal;" href="https://jobs.econsultancy.com/">our jobs board</a> lists hundreds of open positions, and you can benchmark your own digital knowledge using our <a style="font-weight: normal;" href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-skills-index-lite/">Digital Skills Index</a>.</p> <h4>Please describe your job: What do you do?</h4> <p>I work as an SEO specialist for a digital-asset management provider in Amsterdam called Bynder.</p> <p>Bynder was born in 2013 out of a need for organisations to have an efficient way to share and organise online files, such as documents, images and videos. Since then the company has expanded across the globe, with offices in the US, the Netherlands, the UK, Spain and Dubai.</p> <p><em>Bynder's UI</em></p> <p><a href="https://www.bynder.com"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4650/bynder_screenshot.jpg" alt="bynder" width="640" height="348"></a></p> <h4>Whereabouts do you sit within the organisation? Who do you report to? </h4> <p>I am a member of our marketing team and report to our CMO Lidia Lüttin. However I have support from our dev team, as well as our copywriters and PPC team.</p> <h4>What kind of skills do you need to be effective in your role?</h4> <p>As you might expect, analytical/numerical skills are important in my role as they help me to make the most of my keyword research. The Bynder website is available in four different languages, and so I need to conduct regular keyword research in different languages for each country that we are targeting.</p> <p>Technical skills are also very important, as they allow me to identify technical obstacles to our search engine ranking improvement. For example, having knowledge of HTML, CSS and JSON-LD means that I know what I need to do to make sure that our site is technically optimised for search engines.</p> <p>Creative problem solving is also a key skill in my day-to-day. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/link-building-checklist-digital-marketing-template-files/">Link building</a> has become more difficult, as I think many sites (particularly news sites) want to appear impartial and so are sometimes reluctant to link to others. So it is important to be creative in the way that you acquire links.</p> <p>One of my most successful link-building strategies is to ask third-party tools that we use to write a case study on us (and then link to us). It may seem simple but I think it is a unique approach and it works.</p> <p>It may also seem an obvious one, but communication skills are key in SEO. To make the most out of SEO you need to educate everyone in the team on how what they are doing can also benefit your search engine ranking. This could be:</p> <ul> <li>the PPC team finding a new highly converting keyword and passing it back to SEO to target it organically too.</li> <li>the PR team focusing on securing links with their press releases.</li> <li>the content team making sure their content is search engine friendly, and letting me know when new content is published so that I can submit it to Google for indexing.</li> <li>the dev team making sure that they create pages in a way that improves page speed.</li> </ul> <h4>Tell us about a typical working day…</h4> <p>My typical working day would begin as follows: </p> <ul> <li>Get on a train from Leiden, where I live, to Amsterdam.</li> <li>Get in and read/respond to any messages that I have received overnight from our Boston office. </li> <li>Check on the organic performance of the past day, and report to the team if there are any significant fluctuations.</li> <li>Continue to create/edit content to target specific keywords.</li> <li>Chase up any link opportunities that we have, and continue to write content for those external sites too.</li> <li>Possibly run a site crawl using the Moz crawler and identify any new on-site issues that need to be fixed.</li> <li>Answer questions from the marketing team on what they need to do to make their content search engine friendly.</li> <li>If it's a Friday, we finish the day with a couple of Heinekens from our company bar and discuss the past week. </li> </ul> <p><em>Leiden (<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10662081">via </a></em><em><a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10662081">Erik Zachte</a>)</em></p> <p><em><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4651/LeidenOudeRijn.jpg" alt="leiden" width="600" height="417"></em></p> <h4>What do you love about your job? What sucks? </h4> <p>My favourite thing about working in SEO is the satisfaction of seeing how the changes you have made have helped to significantly improve search rankings. I also love it when I secure a great link on a great domain, giving the company great exposure and a healthy helping of ‘link juice’.</p> <p>As I think a lot of SEOs will agree, it can sometimes be frustrating if people don’t follow your recommendations. But this can be easily fixed with a quick chat to explain the potential benefit they are missing out on.</p> <p>More specifically, not being able to speak Dutch can be frustrating as I need help to translate my content. However I am taking three hours a week of Dutch lessons a week and hoping to get to a decent level of Dutch fairly soon.</p> <h4>What kind of goals do you have? What are the most useful metrics and KPIs for measuring success?  </h4> <p>The most important metric for me is number of organic sessions, as this is the best indicator of search visibility. After that, I look at the specific ranking positions of our target keywords, and after that, the number of leads resulting from organic traffic.</p> <h4>What are your favourite tools to help you to get the job done? </h4> <p>My main go-to tools are Google Analytics and Moz. Google Analytics is my preferred tool to analyse organic sessions and the Moz pro package has a number of tools that I find very useful.</p> <p>Moz's Open Site Explorer is a great way to identify the value of link opportunity. The Fresh Web Explorer mention tool also helps me to pick up Bynder mentions on the web so I can follow up for a link. The Fresh mention tool seems to pick up more mentions than Google Alerts, which makes sure that I can cover all possible link opportunities.</p> <p>The ranking tool helps me to keep track of our ranking positions for our target keywords across a range of languages and countries. I can also set Moz to send ranking updates to the team automatically.</p> <p>And finally, the new Moz crawling tool is very user friendly and requires very little data manipulation to get the insights I need.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4653/moz.jpg" alt="moz logo" width="200" height="200"></p> <h4>How did you get started in the digital industry, and where might you go from here? </h4> <p>I actually studied Law at university. But after I graduated I decided that I wanted to be involved in something that was new and growing, and I had always been interested in online marketing.</p> <p>Law is a great degree to do and I think the analytical skills that I learnt have really helped me in my online marketing career so far. After I finished my law degree I applied for a few jobs and got a digital marketing executive role in an online florist in London called Arena Flowers.</p> <p>There I was involved in a wide range of different marketing activities, and so I could get a good idea of the types of marketing that I enjoyed doing the most or found to be most valuable to the company. I could then use this experience to specialise in a specific type of marketing, which for me was SEO.</p> <p>When looking for a first job in digital marketing I think it is a good idea to go for a more generalist role. This gives you a broader understanding of online marketing channels, and helps you to understand how they are all interlinked. And as above, it gives you a chance to try out a range of different marketing channels and decide on the one you want to specialise in.</p> <h4>Which brands do you think are doing digital well? </h4> <p>I think Transferwise is doing really well. Their website is clear and easy to use, and this is especially important when people are dealing with money.</p> <p>And I’m not this first to say this, but MailChimp has one of the best user experiences I have seen. The options that you have available in your email campaigns are very clear, and this makes creating and sending email campaigns very easy.</p> <h4>Do you have any advice for people who want to work in the digital industry? </h4> <p>Meet as many people as possible. Try to go to meetups and contribute to Twitter chats. <a href="http://ecomchat.com/">#Ecomchat</a> is a great Twitter chat about ecommerce and online marketing generally, every Monday lunch time.</p> <p>The Google Analytics and AdWords exams have been free for a couple of years now, and are a great way to build up knowledge of Google marketing tools. Completing as many as possible also helps to demonstrate enthusiasm for online marketing.</p> <p><em><strong>Now download:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide/">Econsultancy SEO Best Practice Guide</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68886 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 2017-03-10T14:45:00+00:00 10 mega digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Correlation between spam rates and subscriber engagement</h3> <p>The latest report from Return Path highlights how industries that outperform the average on key email marketing metrics (like read rate, reply rate etc.) also see less email delivered to spam folders.</p> <p>While the <a href="https://returnpath.com/downloads/hidden-metrics-email-deliverability/?sfdc=70137000000MhwH" target="_blank">Hidden Metrics of Email Deliverability</a> shows that overall spam placement has increased slightly year on year  - from 13% in 2016 vs 12% in 2015 - levels of positive engagement have significantly improved.</p> <p>In terms of industries, the banking and finance and distribution and manufacturing categories saw just 6% of email delivered to spam folders, while this figure rose to 28% in the automotive category. </p> <p><em>Chart shows percentage of email delivered to spam folders</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4558/Spam_rate.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="353"></p> <h3>Generation X perform four in 10 family travel searches</h3> <p>New research from Bing Ads has revealed how families are searching for holiday inspiration and services online.</p> <p>The <a href="https://advertise.bingads.microsoft.com/en-us/insights/set-sail-for-family-travel-searches-and-clicks" target="_blank">report</a> shows that 59% of searches for family holidays are undertaken by women compared to 41% by men. Similarly, Generation X (those aged 35 to 59) perform four of every 10 searches.</p> <p>Other highlights from the report include how consumers are more likely to use mobile devices to search for inspiration and PCs or tablet devices to make a final reservation. Meanwhile, it appears consumers dream of visiting the beach all year long, meaning companies need to invest in year-round campaigns to capture this evergreen interest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4559/Bing_Ads.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="221"></p> <h3>Nine in 10 consumers concerned about how companies use personal data</h3> <p><a href="http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170307005123/en/Global-Study-Ten-Consumers-Concerned-Data-Security" target="_blank">New research</a> from Verint has found that while more consumers crave highly personalised customer service, they are also increasingly sceptical about how businesses collect and store personal data. </p> <p>From a study of more than 24,000 consumers, 80% said they like service that is personalised to their needs (which in turn relies on the use of customer data to deliver). </p> <p>However, 89% of consumers also want to know how companies keep their personal information secure, and 86% insist that they should know when their data is passed on to third parties.</p> <h3>Kinetic emails increase unique click rates by 18%</h3> <p>Experian’s Q4 2016 <a href="http://www.experian.com/marketing-services/email-benchmark-q4-2015.html" target="_blank">Email Benchmark Report</a> has revealed that kinetic emails – i.e. those that include interactive content like carousel navigation - see greater levels of engagement than any other kind.</p> <p>From analysis of seven brands in 2016, kinetic emails were found to increase unique click rates by as much as 18.3% and click-to-open rates by more than 10% compared to standard emails.</p> <p>The report also highlights that email volume increased 17.4% year-over-year, while metrics like click and transaction rates, revenue per email and average order volumes all remained relatively stable during the same period.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4557/Kinetic_emails.JPG" alt="" width="609" height="446"></p> <h3>British SMEs grow online exports by more than a third</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.paypal.com/stories/uk/open-for-business-paypal-reveals-online-exports-boom" target="_blank">PayPal</a> has revealed how small and medium-sized businesses benefitted from the record lows of the pound last year. </p> <p>SMEs in the UK saw their rate of growth treble to 34% year-on-year from July to December 2016. Similarly, while there was an uplift in PayPal sales for British businesses overall, the biggest impact was seen on small and medium-sized organisations, with the amount international shoppers spent with UK SMEs rising 13% per transaction in the last six months of 2016. </p> <p>Fashion and sports experienced the highest growth, with a 49% year-on-year increase in goods from these categories sold to international shoppers.</p> <h3>Native video ads boost ROI</h3> <p>Yahoo’s <a href="http://b2bmarketing.yahoo.net/yfp-state-of-native/infographic?utm_source=AYC&amp;utm_campaign=Q12017YFPStateofNative&amp;utm_medium=organic" target="_blank">State of Native</a> report suggests that native advertising continues to reign supreme, with the brand seeing exponential growth of native ad consumption in all regions and across all devices.</p> <p>Data from more than 74.5bn native ad impressions show that publishers have seen a 446.7% lift in eCPMs (effective cost per thousand ad impressions) on native video ad placements compared to display.</p> <p>The report also highlights how consumer engagement for specific apps and devices vary by time of day and location. For example, in the US, users spend the late afternoons and evenings on their smartphones, while their nights are spent on desktop. This is compared to other parts of the world, where nights are typically spent on smartphones. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4561/Yahoo.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="286"></p> <h3>Household gifts drive the biggest basket value for Mother’s Day</h3> <p>According to Criteo, Brits are still lacking in imagination when it comes to buying Mother’s Day gifts online.</p> <p>Data reveals that household gifts such as kitchen, laundry appliances and vacuums drive the biggest basket value for online sales. Similarly, gardening tools typically see a boost in sales with spring just around the corner. Last year, there was a 193% increase in units sold in the two week’s leading up to Mother’s Day.</p> <p>In 2016, it was suggested that we spent a total of <a href="http://www.cityam.com/235965/mothers-day-2016-brits-will-spend-928m-this-year-on-mothers-day-gifts" target="_blank">£928m on the day</a>, with this figure expected to rise even higher this year.</p> <h3>TV accounts for 94% of viewed video ads in the UK</h3> <p>New data from <a href="https://www.thinkbox.tv/News-and-opinion/Newsroom/TV-accounts-for-94-percent-of-video-advertising" target="_blank">Thinkbox</a> has revealed that TV accounted for 93.8% of video ads viewed in the UK in 2016. This is the equivalent of 18 minutes and 53 seconds a day.</p> <p>These figures are slightly down on 2015, when TV saw a share of 94.4%. However, other forms of video advertising saw far less engagement, with YouTube accounting for 0.7% of viewed video ads in 2016, while other online video (including Facebook) collectively accounted for 5.2%.</p> <p>The average person is said to have watched 20 minutes of video ads a day in 2016, while total daily video consumption increased to 4 hours, 37 minutes in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4562/Thinkbox.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="435"></p> <h3>Wearables now at an all-time high</h3> <p>The International Data Corporation has revealed that the global wearables market reached a new <a href="http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS42342317" target="_blank">all-time high</a> in the fourth quarter of 2016. In this period, 33.9m units were shipped, representing a year-on-year growth of 16.9%.</p> <p>A total of 102.4m wearable devices were shipped in 2016 – a figure up 25% year-on-year. Insight suggests this could be due to single purpose devices evolving into hybrid ones, fusing together multiple health and fitness capabilities with smartphone technology.</p> <p>In terms of brand dominance, Fitbit continued to reign supreme, with 22.5m shipments being made over the course of the whole year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4560/IDC_wearables.JPG" alt="" width="457" height="396"></p> <h3>64% of decision-makers say sales and marketing teams could be more aligned</h3> <p>According to a YouGov survey of 725 business leaders, commissioned by Huthwaite International, 92% of respondents believe sales and marketing teams should work closely together.</p> <p>Despite this fact, 64% also say that sales and marketing teams need to do more to facilitate this alignment. </p> <p>When it comes to the benefits of working more closely, 52% cited a consistent message delivered to clients and prospects, while 50% said the opportunity to gain new customers. Just 8% of respondents said they didn’t believe there was any benefit.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3125 2017-03-10T07:47:53+00:00 2017-03-10T07:47:53+00:00 Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Marketing - Singapore <p><strong style="color: #000000;">Learn the Best Practices of SEO Marketing From UK's Top Digital Marketing Research &amp; Training Company!</strong></p> <p>This intensive 2-day course enables you to plan and build an organic search engine optimization (SEO) strategy. The right SEO strategy brings the right kind of visitors to your website, boosts online conversions and helps you stand out in the fiercely competitive online space. The course also gives you the latest updates on the increasingly tricky nature of SEO as search engine continuously innovates and online competition heats up.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68856 2017-03-02T10:27:00+00:00 2017-03-02T10:27:00+00:00 How influencers can impact SEO: Q&A with Thomas Cook Airlines Nikki Gilliland <p>I recently spoke with Diego Puglisi, search marketing manager for <a href="https://www.thomascookairlines.com/">Thomas Cook Airlines</a>, to find out more about this topic, specifically related to his own experience of working with influencers. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4280/FullSizeRender.jpg" alt="" width="143" height="204"></p> <p>Here’s what he said.</p> <h4> <em>Econsultancy:</em> First, could you explain how working with social influencers can positively impact SEO?</h4> <p><em>Diego Puglisi:</em> SEO has changed drastically in the last five years - I think that’s what makes our profession one of the most exciting in the digital marketing sphere. </p> <p>Over this time, SEOs have had to find ways to adapt to various changes in order to retain competitiveness in the space, and influencer marketing has become one of the most natural directions to take. </p> <p>In the ‘dark ages’, brands used bloggers extensively, but in a rather unilateral and short-sighted way. Now, this relationship actually tends to have very little SEO in it – instead working in conjunction with social media, PR and the over-arching brand. </p> <p>With “mentions” becoming a potential ranking factor, links have lost importance, also making influencer marketing effective for more than just SEO. Moving away from an obsessive attention to link-building has been refreshing for us in the industry. It is now less isolated, with SEO in general becoming an integral part of an organic strategy, and one which also touches on other areas of our business.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Do you think influencers are more important or effective for travel brands compared to other industries?</h4> <p><em>DP:</em> I believe that influencers are just as important to travel as they are in any other vertical. </p> <p>However, I do think influencers can be even more effective in niches where communication is vital to engage and excite the audience. Here is where the travel industry utilises the true power of influencers – by capitalising on their ability to tell a story and promote a real experience.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>How does Thomas Cook Airlines typically collaborate with influencers?</h4> <p><em>DP:</em> Influencer marketing has become an integrated part of our over-arching marketing strategy. We have and continue to invest in influencers when it comes to the promotion of key destinations, new route launches, and brand sponsorships (such as Manchester and Brighton Pride). </p> <p>Lastly, we also typically collaborate when there is a new product to be promoted or one that would benefit from a review, such as James Martin’s new in-flight menu.</p> <h4> <em>E: </em>How do you go about choosing which influencers to work with, and how do you usually reach out to them?</h4> <p><em>DP:</em> Due to the high organisational complexity when working with influencers, identifying the right influencer is absolutely the key. Over the years, we have constantly refined our research and scoring approach. First, we tend to assess whether their audience is one we also need to target. To do this, we analyse their followers using tools, but we also directly speak to the influencer to ensure we are on the same page.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4296/thomas_cook_airlines.png" alt="" width="700" height="388"></p> <p>We also look at the influencer’s style - whether this suits our brand, our specific style of communication as well as our marketing objectives.</p> <p>We then look at the number of followers they have - but that alone is not enough. We understand the phenomenon of un-organic likes and followers, hence why we also look at engagement in the form of likes, shares and the types of comments they commonly receive on their posts.</p> <p>Last but not least, we evaluate influencers based on SEO metrics attached to their website, which often involves Domain Authority (Moz), Citation Flow and Trust Flow (MajesticSEO).</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Is there a typical structure you follow to build influencer relationships – i.e. in terms of compensation or payment?</h4> <p><em>DP:</em> Being a travel brand, we tend to take influencers on trips with us or offer to send them to a particular location they are keen to go to. This, together with any tailor-made and unique experiences we can offer them, generally compensates for the partnership. </p> <p>That being said, we make use of paid collaborations less frequently, mainly for specific high-tier campaigns or when we address to exclusive brand ambassadors. </p> <h4> <em>E:</em> Do you always create the content yourself or do you rely on influencers to do this?</h4> <p><em>DP:</em> It’s been a mix so far. We think that influencers should feel free to express their opinions according to their own style – this of course makes any campaign far more authentic. However, we tend to amplify content by ensuring that the tone of the brand also shines through. </p> <h4> <em>E: </em>How do you measure the results of a campaign?</h4> <p><em>DP: </em>The KPIs we set for our campaigns are a mix of social media engagement in the form of likes and shares, backlinks and mentions.</p> <p>We also measure rank changes from an SEO point of view as well as direct traffic to the site from the influencer’s content.</p> <h4> <em>E:</em> How do you ensure there is a good balance between authenticity and high authority?</h4> <p><em>DP:</em> Authenticity is a hard one to assess. How the influencer engages with his or her audience (in terms of replying to comments, likes and shares) could be an indicator, as well as the way content and opinions are expressed in the first place. </p> <p>Of course, if it’s clear an influencer is only interested in monetary gain, especially if it’s above and beyond the respect of their own audience, this is always a sign that it’s not the best fit, regardless of authority.</p> <p><strong><em>Further reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68815-becoming-an-influencer-notes-from-a-fledgling-travel-blogger/" target="_blank">Becoming an influencer: Notes from a fledgling travel blogger</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank"><em>Four key trends within the world of influencer marketing</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/"><em>The Rise of Influencers</em></a></li> </ul> <p><em>For more on SEO marketing, you can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/seo-best-practice-guide/" target="_blank">SEO Best Practice Guide</a>.</em></p>