tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/strategy-operations Latest Strategy & Operations content from Econsultancy 2017-12-12T17:30:00+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69664 2017-12-12T17:30:00+00:00 2017-12-12T17:30:00+00:00 China: Why digital marketing is changing along with a millennial middle class Kestrel Lee <p>As millennials have grown up in a world with search, mobile devices and social media, these new consumers are driving demand for all types of new and innovative products, services, technology and content. Their numbers are staggering as the size of the millennial consumer base in China alone <a href="https://www.jwtintelligence.com/2013/09/meet-the-bric-millennials/">outnumbers the entire population of the United States</a>.</p> <p>After decades of brand and product advertising, most brands and products have little mystery or appeal to consumers, especially the Y-generation or millennials. They have little patience for exaggerated forms of advertising messaging, as they can find out the truth about a brand online via Google or via their friends.</p> <p>The sad truth is that such consumers trust search and friends not brands, because age-old advertising has drifted too much from brand and product reality.</p> <h3>Brand reality</h3> <p>To appeal to these consumers, brands and advertising professionals need to inject much more brand reality and emotional triggers, as well as considering media.</p> <p>According a <a href="http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/asia-pacific/meet_the_chinese_consumer_of_2020%20">2012 McKinsey study</a>, this new emerging millennial middle class are far more emotional in the way they spend and brands needs to refine their marketing strategies. Brands must shift their own marketing strategies to keep pace with them.</p> <p>Replacing a more cost-conscious frugal generation, McKinsey stated that this 400-million-strong mainstream consumer class is by far more self-indulgent, individualistic and will form 51% of the urban population in China by 2020.</p> <p>For them to consider a product, millennials have to first endorse the activities and beliefs of the brand, and they prefer brands with an emotional mission who give back to society. A June 2013 study by Telefonica in Spain revealed this consumer segment in China and the rest of the world remains most optimistic and supportive of brands and causes to better the world.</p> <h3>Advertising reality</h3> <p>Being real about what the brand is and what its product does is a given. Based on Daniel J. Edelman Group’s constantly updated <a href="http://www.edelman.com/insights/intellectual-property/8095-exchange/%20">8095 global millennial studies</a>, millennial consumers are heavily influenced by search, social and peer-created content about brands and products they prefer. They are also consuming such content on mobile most of the times, while imposing and influencing their brand preferences on their friends, families and even their elders at home or in the office.</p> <p>Thus a new advertising reality has emerged for brands wishing to target millennial consumers born from 1980s onwards in China. According to an Accenture’s 2017 <a href="https://www.accenture.com/ae-en/insight-redesigning-retail-next-generation%20">shopper study</a>, 70% of Chinese Millennials and Gen Z consumers prefer buying products directly via social media over other channels. The global average is 44%.</p> <p>These Chinese millennials experience online, mobile, social and outdoor advertising and content marketing on their mobile devices almost all at the same time. Chinese in their 20s and 30s <a href="http://www.scmp.com/news/china/article/1993787/taobao-looks-young-creativity-growth%20">are the driving force</a> behind ecommerce platforms like Taobao, while integrating it with the in-store shopping experience i.e. O2O or online to offline.</p> <p>This has created two types of shopping behavior in China.</p> <p>“Showrooming” is a millennial consumer trend where customers visit a store to check out what they want, then go online to find out more and buying the product via ecommerce.  There’s also “webrooming” where millennial customers read every available online source and ask all their friends before heading to a store to make a purchase.</p> <h3>Merging expertise</h3> <p>Such choice, convenience and easy access via mobile and internet shopping means that people can browse online even within stores, for price comparisons and for making purchase and delivery decisions.</p> <p>And that’s why marketers and agencies have to merge expertise and ideas for branding, retail marketing and social media engagement in order to survive in this new China consumer landscape. If not, they may soon reach their Kodak moment.</p> <p>If you are keen to know more about launching your brand in China via digital marketing and ecommerce, please check out <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/in/Singapore">Econsultancy’s courses</a>, as well as <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69578-what-western-brands-need-to-know-before-joining-china-s-massive-ecommerce-economy">my recent presentation</a> in Singapore on social commerce in China.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69640 2017-12-11T15:00:00+00:00 2017-12-11T15:00:00+00:00 Three benefits of making employees spend time in the trenches Patricio Robles <p>Lyft's move comes at a key time: the company has seen its fortunes rise as its chief competitor, Uber, dealt with <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68865-will-bad-pr-lead-uber-to-destruction">bad headline after bad headline in 2017</a>, denting its reputation with customers. But Lyft isn't the only company that is seeking to capitalize by requiring its employees to work on the front lines of the business.</p> <p>For example, Automattic, the company behind the popular WordPress open-source content management system, requires all of its new employees to start in customer support. Matt Mullenweg, Automattic's CEO, once explained:</p> <blockquote> <p>All new employees work with the dedicated support team before starting their primary job. Making everyone work in support forces everyone to take customers seriously, which we should since they pay our salaries. Despite my distaste for it, the idea of making all employees participate in support, regardless of their distaste, was fantastic.</p> </blockquote> <p>While requiring employees to serve time in the trenches has been most commonly seen at startups, companies of all shapes and sizes should consider the virtues of this approach. Here are potential benefits of it:</p> <h3>Employees gain empathy for customers, their colleagues and other key stakeholders.</h3> <p>More and more organizations are applying human-centered approaches to how they develop their products and services and operate their businesses. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68503-what-is-design-thinking/">Design thinking</a>, for instance, is increasingly popular.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68942-why-systems-and-empathy-is-the-future-for-agencies">Empathy</a>, for obvious reasons, is a foundational component of virtually all human-centered methodologies and requiring that all employees serve on the front lines of the business can be a highly effective way to help them develop empathy for customers, their coworkers and other key stakeholders who are either served by the business or impacted by it. After all, this makes a reality of the idea that you can't truly understand (and thus empathize with) another person until you've walked a mile in his or her shoes.</p> <h3>Employees gain insight into the business and its operations.</h3> <p>In many companies, especially those that have more than a handful of employees, it's very easy for employees to become isolated from the rest of the business and its operations. They come to work each day, perform a handful of specific functions and rarely have exposure to the parts of the business they don't touch.</p> <p>This can be detrimental for a variety of reasons. For instance, when employees don't have a good sense of how the functions they perform affect other employees – in other words, they can't see the forest for the trees – it can result in inefficiencies such as redundancy.</p> <h3>Employees have the opportunity to help improve the business.</h3> <p>Great ideas often come from unexpected places and in the context of a business, every employee has the potential to be source of great ideas. Unfortunately, many companies don't take full advantage of their employees' brain power.</p> <p>Putting all employees on the front lines can change that as it not only gives employees – many of whom will have fresh eyes – the opportunity to see the business from a different perspective but also invites them to think about their experience and contribute the ideas they generate through it.</p> <p><em><strong>Further reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/how-marketers-learn">How marketers learn</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69643 2017-12-08T09:30:00+00:00 2017-12-08T09:30:00+00:00 Four key traits of ‘human’ brands Nikki Gilliland <p>So, how do brands stop sounding like businesses, and start showing some humanity? Here are a few characteristics brands should strive to display, along with a few examples.</p> <h3>Speak like a real person</h3> <p><a href="http://www.geomarketing.com/76-percent-of-consumers-have-used-voice-commands-on-digital-devices" target="_blank">One in three US consumers</a> are said to have used voice commands on their mobile phone or tablet. We’re certainly becoming used to these human-like interactions with brands, and communication only looks set to become more natural in future.</p> <p>But of course, not everyone has this technology at their disposal. Most brands rely on broadcast techniques to communicate to customers. And while websites, social media, and email marketing might be run by human beings, it’s still easy to revert to formal or unnatural language – especially if the service or <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69621-four-simple-tips-to-make-boring-copy-more-exciting" target="_blank">product is similarly boring</a>. </p> <p>Not only can this frustrate and alienate consumers, but this kind of copy is also just harder to read. This doesn’t mean brands should go overboard and do the opposite – <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/67886-word-on-the-street-four-tips-for-using-slang-in-marketing" target="_blank">using slang</a> or emoji in marketing can be a tricky thing to master. Instead, the key is to create content that aligns with natural speech.</p> <p>Pret a Manger has been criticised for veering into overly-friendly copy, but there’s no denying that it sounds distinctly human. Instead of merely talking about its products, it often puts them in the context of everyday life, addressing the consumer directly so that it is ever easier to relate.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Hands up if you’ve waited until December for your first Christmas Sandwich (we admire your willpower) <a href="https://t.co/kpGWfMARni">pic.twitter.com/kpGWfMARni</a></p> — Pret (@Pret) <a href="https://twitter.com/Pret/status/936550469467488258?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 1, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Another example of Pret's human tone of voice can be found on its customer service page, which encourages customers to ‘talk to Pret’ – something that you’d usually do to a friend and not a brand.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0937/Talk_to_Pret.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="494"></p> <h3>Be on hand to help</h3> <p>Customer service is an important way for brands to boost their reputation and increase loyalty. However, this is often one area where brands are guilty of being cold and decidedly ‘business-like’ - despite the preference for human interaction. According to Accenture, <a href="https://www.accenture.com/us-en/insight-digital-disconnect-customer-engagement" target="_blank">83% of US consumers</a> are said to prefer dealing with human beings over digital channels, with the majority being left frustrated over ‘human-less’ services.</p> <p>Customers don’t want to talk to humans <em>only</em> when problems arise either. One brand with an effective service strategy is Lush, which is well-know for being friendly and chatty to customers both in-store and on social. Naturally, the brand’s commitment to ethical and sustainability-related issues helps to further its reputation as a brand that cares, but without its level of care for the <em>customer </em>– I doubt this would ring so true.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Lush customer service is honestly something else. I've never come across more deliriously happy staff in my life.</p> — kharis. (@kharismg) <a href="https://twitter.com/kharismg/status/916770401186996226?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 7, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Consumers also wish for this kind of human help and support to be transferred to the digital space, such as an online shop assistant to offer product advice. This example from Truly Concierge shows the value it can bring, with an assistant on hand to narrow down gifts instead of leaving users to browse (and potentially abandon their journey).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0941/Truly.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="407"></p> <p>With resources often the biggest barrier to services like this, one answer is to look to artificial intelligence. But doesn’t this negate the ‘human’ aspect entirely?</p> <p>In theory, yes, but it also appears that brands who use artificial intelligence can generate greater levels of consumer trust – as long as there is transparency. In other words, a customer is far more likely to trust a brand (and carry on with an interaction) if they know upfront they’re talking to a bot rather than a human. What’s more, brands can further this by knowing when to step in and let a human take over.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0940/KLM.JPG" alt="" width="273" height="524"></p> <h3>Show your flaws</h3> <p>Most brands strive to create a brand identity – a key set of characteristics that help to differentiate them from others. However, not many brands allow margin for error, meaning flaws or weaknesses are never usually part of this identity. </p> <p>This is not necessarily a good thing, and not to go all 'Oprah Winfrey' on you – but surely flaws are what make us human in the first place? Consequently, brands that do display or admit fault can be more appealing to the rest of us mere mortals, because it makes them seem honest and authentic. </p> <p>Interestingly, it can also help to sell a product. One of the most well-known examples of this is Stella Artois’s tagline of “reassuringly expensive”, which simultaneously includes both positive and negative elements. But by brazenly admitting that it costs more than other beers, it naturally leads the consumer to assume it must be worth it. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0942/Stella.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="316"></p> <p>Admitting fault is not always a deliberate marketing ploy. It can also be a necessity when a brand makes a mistake or inadvertently creates a backlash. In this instance, however, saying <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/66380-how-brands-can-say-sorry-like-they-mean-it" target="_blank">sorry like you mean it</a> can also help to boost a brand’s reputation rather than merely remedy it.</p> <p>In 2015, Airbnb published an apology letter in response to allegations that racial discrimination was taking place on its platform. Not only did it say sorry for being slow to take action, but it also followed it up with an investigation and a number of changes to combat the issue. In doing so, Airbnb showed it was capable of admitting fault – but also that it cares enough to try and turn it around. Since, it has continued to work on and update its policy.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0938/Airbnb_1.JPG" alt="" width="450" height="528"></p> <h3>Tap into emotional data</h3> <p>We appear to be moving towards an automated world, with brands increasingly drawing on data to target and engage consumers. However, instead of focusing on demographics and other faceless data, brands are also tapping into so-called ‘emotional data’ to create stronger relationships.  </p> <p>This means tapping into the emotions of consumers to create relevant, engaging, and human experiences.</p> <p>Last year, eBay created the first-ever ‘emotion-powered’ pop-up, which used biometric sensors to monitor which items created the strongest emotional reaction in customers. Jaguar did a similar thing with its #FeelWimbledon campaign, which analysed the crowd’s mood and emotional response to the tennis.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">1/2 It’s your last chance to <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/FeelWimbledon?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#FeelWimbledon</a> - we’re giving away 2 No 1 Court tickets. Hit before 1pm to play the game <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/JaguarResponse?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#JaguarResponse</a> <a href="https://t.co/Z3leAsDy9g">pic.twitter.com/Z3leAsDy9g</a></p> — Jaguar UK (@JaguarUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/JaguarUK/status/885755767214678016?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 14, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>These campaigns aren’t necessarily ground-breaking in terms of what they offer customers, however they both show how emotion can be used as a form of intelligence.</p> <p>With understanding a key part of what it means to be human, brands have a much greater chance of forging long-term relationships with customers if they are willing to show it.</p> <p><em><strong>Further reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/69622-four-ways-brands-build-loyalty-engagement-without-using-points">Four ways brands build loyalty and engagement (without using points)</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/915 2017-12-04T04:11:51+00:00 2017-12-04T04:11:51+00:00 Digital Cream Singapore <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Exclusive to 80 senior client side marketers, <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy's Digital Cream</strong> is one of the industry's landmark events for marketers to:</p> <ul style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">convene and network with like-minded peers from different industries</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">exchange experiences</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">compare benchmark efforts</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">explore the latest best practice</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">discuss strategies</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">learn from others who face the same challenges with suppliers, technologies and techniques. </li> </ul> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">In a personal and confidential setting (It's Chatham House Rules so what's said at Digital Cream, stays at Digital Cream), the roundtable format is a quick and sure-fire way to find out what's worked and what hasn't, an invaluable opportunity to take time out and come back to the office full of ideas.</p> <h3 style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004e70;">Roundtable Format</h3> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">There are 8 roundtable topics and each delegate chooses 3 table topics most relevant to you, each session lasting about an hour and fifteen minutes. Each roundtable is independently moderated and focuses on a particular topic discussing challenges or areas of interest nominated by the table's attendees in the time available. This level of input ensures you get the maximum out of your day.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Digital Cream has been devised by the analysts and editors at Econsultancy in consultation with the most senior digital buyers in the world and runs in London, New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Attendees pick three tables choices from the following full list of topics offered (extra topics will be removed at a later stage. If there is a topic you'd like to discuss which is not listed here, you can suggest it while registering):</strong> </p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">1. Agile Marketing - Develop a more responsive &amp; customer-centric approach</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">2. Content Marketing Strategy</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">3. Customer Experience Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">4. Data-Driven Marketing &amp; Marketing Attribution Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">5. Digital Transformation - People, Process &amp; Technology</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">6. Ecommerce</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">7. Email Marketing - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practice</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">8. Integrated Search (PPC/SEO) - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practice</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">9. Joining Up Online &amp; Offline Channels and Data</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">10. Marketing Automation - Best Practice &amp; Implementation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">11. Mobile Marketing</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">12. Online Advertising - Retargeting, Exchanges &amp; Social Advertising</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">13. Real-Time Brand Marketing - Using Data &amp; Technology To Drive Brand Impact</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">14. Social Media Measurement &amp; Optimisation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">&gt;&gt;</strong> <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">View past Digital Cream event photos (source: facebook page)</strong><br></strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><strong>Sydney:</strong> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154912352109327" target="_blank">2017</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10153875617599327" target="_blank">2016</a>, <a style="font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153124439974327.1073741873.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">2015</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10152376029704327" target="_blank">2014</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151725724774327" target="_blank">2013</a> | <strong>Singapore:</strong> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10155069279939327" target="_blank">2017</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154046657279327" target="_blank">2016</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153214103704327.1073741876.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">2015</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10152487608199327" target="_blank">2014 (Nov)</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10152137747464327" target="_blank">2014 (May)</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151817214799327" target="_blank">2013</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151167137219327" target="_blank">2012</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10150363493464327" target="_blank">2011</a></p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152276242849327.1073741856.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Melbourne 2014</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152209218799327.1073741854.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Hong Kong 2014</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151742484614327" target="_blank">Shanghai 2013</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151537967569327" target="_blank">Hong Kong 2013</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151123484509327" target="_blank">Shanghai 2012</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151118803064327" target="_blank">Australia 2012</a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:ConferenceEvent/914 2017-12-04T03:39:30+00:00 2017-12-04T03:39:30+00:00 Digital Cream Sydney <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Exclusive to 80 senior client side marketers, <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Econsultancy's Digital Cream</strong> is one of the industry's landmark events for marketers to:</p> <ul style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">convene and network with like-minded peers from different industries</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">exchange experiences</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">compare benchmark efforts</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">explore the latest best practice</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">discuss strategies</li> <li style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">learn from others who face the same challenges with suppliers, technologies and techniques. </li> </ul> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">In a personal and confidential setting (It's Chatham House Rules so what's said at Digital Cream, stays at Digital Cream), the roundtable format is a quick and sure-fire way to find out what's worked and what hasn't, an invaluable opportunity to take time out and come back to the office full of ideas.</p> <h3 style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004e70;">Roundtable Format</h3> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">There are 8 roundtable topics and each delegate chooses 3 table topics most relevant to you, each session lasting about an hour and fifteen minutes. Each roundtable is independently moderated and focuses on a particular topic discussing challenges or areas of interest nominated by the table's attendees in the time available. This level of input ensures you get the maximum out of your day.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;">Digital Cream has been devised by the analysts and editors at Econsultancy in consultation with the most senior digital buyers in the world and runs in London, New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Shanghai, Singapore and Hong Kong.</p> <p style="border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">Attendees pick three tables choices from the following full list of topics offered (extra topics will be removed at a later stage. If there is a topic you'd like to discuss which is not listed here, you can suggest it while registering):</strong> </p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">1. Agile Marketing - Develop a more responsive &amp; customer-centric approach</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">2. Content Marketing Strategy</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">3. Customer Experience Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">4. Data-Driven Marketing &amp; Marketing Attribution Management</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">5. Digital Transformation - People, Process &amp; Technology</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">6. Ecommerce</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">7. Email Marketing - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practice</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">8. Integrated Search (PPC/SEO) - Trends, Challenges &amp; Best Practice</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">9. Joining Up Online &amp; Offline Channels and Data</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">10. Marketing Automation - Best Practice &amp; Implementation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">11. Mobile Marketing</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">12. Online Advertising - Retargeting, Exchanges &amp; Social Advertising</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">13. Real-Time Brand Marketing - Using Data &amp; Technology To Drive Brand Impact</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;">14. Social Media Measurement &amp; Optimisation</p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;"><strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">&gt;&gt;</strong> <strong style="border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">View past Digital Cream event photos (source: facebook page)</strong><br></strong></p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><strong>Sydney:</strong> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154912352109327" target="_blank">2017</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10153875617599327" target="_blank">2016</a>, <a style="font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153124439974327.1073741873.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">2015</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10152376029704327" target="_blank">2014</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151725724774327" target="_blank">2013</a> | <strong>Singapore:</strong> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10155069279939327" target="_blank">2017</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154046657279327" target="_blank">2016</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153214103704327.1073741876.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">2015</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10152487608199327" target="_blank">2014 (Nov)</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10152137747464327" target="_blank">2014 (May)</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151817214799327" target="_blank">2013</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151167137219327" target="_blank">2012</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10150363493464327" target="_blank">2011</a></p> <p style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; font-variant: inherit;"><a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152276242849327.1073741856.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Melbourne 2014</a>, <a style="border: 0px; font-weight: inherit; font-style: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; color: #004dcc; font-variant: inherit;" href="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152209218799327.1073741854.90732954326&amp;type=3" target="_blank">Hong Kong 2014</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151742484614327" target="_blank">Shanghai 2013</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151537967569327" target="_blank">Hong Kong 2013</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151123484509327" target="_blank">Shanghai 2012</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Econsultancy/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10151118803064327" target="_blank">Australia 2012</a></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:Report/3008 2017-11-27T11:33:00+00:00 2017-11-27T11:33:00+00:00 Internet Statistics Compendium Econsultancy <p>Econsultancy’s <strong>Internet Statistics Compendium</strong> is a collection of the most recent statistics and market data publicly available on online marketing, ecommerce, the internet and related digital media. </p> <p><strong>The compendium is available as 11 main reports across the following topics:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/advertising-media-statistics">Advertising</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/content-statistics">Content</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/customer-experience-statistics">Customer Experience</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/web-analytics-statistics">Data and Analytics</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/demographics-technology-adoption">Demographics and Technology Adoption</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/ecommerce-statistics">Ecommerce</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/email-ecrm-statistics">Email and eCRM</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/mobile-statistics">Mobile</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/search-marketing-statistics">Search</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/social-media-statistics">Social</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/strategy-and-operations-statistics">Strategy and Operations</a></strong></li> </ul> <p>Updated monthly, each document is a comprehensive compilation of internet statistics and digital market research with data, facts, charts and figures. The reports have been collated from information available to the public, which we have aggregated together in one place to help you quickly find the internet statistics you need - a huge time-saver for presentations and reports.</p> <p>There are all sorts of internet statistics which you can slot into your next presentation, report or client pitch.</p> <p><strong>Sector-specific data and reports are also available:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong><a title="B2B Internet Statistics Compendium" href="http://econsultancy.com/reports/b2b-internet-statistics-compendium">B2B</a><br></strong></li> <li><strong><strong><a title="Financial Services and Insurance Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/financial-services-and-insurance-internet-statistics-compendium/">Financial Services and Insurance</a></strong></strong></li> <li> <strong><a title="Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals Internet Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/healthcare-and-pharmaceuticals-internet-statistics-compendium/">Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals</a></strong><strong> </strong> </li> <li><strong><a title="Retail Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/retail-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Retail</a></strong></li> <li><strong><a title="Travel Statistics Compendium" href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/travel-statistics-compendium/" target="_self">Travel</a></strong></li> </ul> <p><strong>Regions covered in each document (where data is available) are:</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Global</strong></li> <li><strong>UK</strong></li> <li><strong>North America</strong></li> <li><strong>Asia</strong></li> <li><strong>Australia and New Zealand</strong></li> <li><strong>Europe</strong></li> <li><strong>Latin America</strong></li> <li><strong>MENA</strong></li> </ul> <p>A sample of the Internet Statistics Compendium is available for free, with various statistics included and a full table of contents, to show you what you're missing.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3374 2017-11-21T16:17:38+00:00 2017-11-21T16:17:38+00:00 Psychology for Digital Marketing <p>Dive into the world of psychology and discover how it could help you to develop more successful digital marketing campaigns. We’ll discuss tonnes of fascinating insights during this 1-day course and explore how you could use them in your digital marketing!</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69581 2017-11-16T10:00:00+00:00 2017-11-16T10:00:00+00:00 Four reasons you may need to rebrand your business Nikki Gilliland <p>Then again, if executed correctly, rebranding can result in far superior benefits. Here’s a run-down of some of the biggest advantages, along with a few examples of companies that have successfully rebranded (or are currently in the midst of doing so). </p> <h3>To reach a new demographic</h3> <p>It’s easy for brands to get put into a box, especially if they have been around for a long time. They might only be remembered for a particular advertising campaign, or thought of in relation to a certain age range or demographic.</p> <p>Old Spice is one example of a brand that suffered with this issue, largely due to its stereotypically-macho advertising campaigns from the 1950’s. It also tended to use older gentlemen in its ads, leading to the common assumption that it a deodorant brand only your dad or grandad would use.</p> <p>In order to combat this preconception, Old Spice decided to rebrand in 2010, rolling out a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67102-the-dangerous-art-of-using-humour-in-marketing" target="_blank">humour-driven ad campaign</a> to engage a younger audience. Using the tagline “smell like a man, man” – it amusingly repositioned itself as a product for desirable younger men. It also cleverly aired its first advert during the coveted Super Bowl time-slot – ideal for reaching its new target market.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/owGykVbfgUE?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Since its rebrand, Old Spice has further built on its youthful image, releasing a slew of campaigns in a funny, quirky, and offbeat tone. It’s resulted in success too, with the sales of the brand jumping significantly after the first campaign. </p> <h3>To repair a reputation</h3> <p>Bad press used to be known as tomorrow’s fish and chip paper. However, today’s digitally-focused world means that negative social sentiment and reviews can stick around much longer, gradually damaging a brand’s reputation in the long-term.</p> <p>Even worse when a documentary examining the effects of its product gains popularity. This happened to McDonalds with the release of Supersize Me, which fuelled negativity towards to the brand relating to issues like nutritional value and how it markets to children.</p> <p>Combined with reports of meagre wages and unfair hours, McDonalds found itself losing out to competitors like Chipotle.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0009/0484/supersize_me.JPG" alt="" width="400" height="573"></p> <p>While it did not undertake a typical rebrand – as neither its logo or brand design changed – McDonalds did attempt to counteract this by implementing changes both internally and externally over the course of 18 months. </p> <p>First, it started to tweak its menu, promoting the high-quality nature of its beef and placing greater focus on salads and other healthy menu options. It also launched the ‘Our Food, Your Questions’ campaign, which was centred around answering specific concerns and worries over the production and nutritional value of its food.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Have a question about our food? The floor is yours. <a href="http://t.co/T9W0r3CQVK">http://t.co/T9W0r3CQVK</a></p> — McDonald's (@McDonalds) <a href="https://twitter.com/McDonalds/status/521676837429080064?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 13, 2014</a> </blockquote> <p>Interestingly, McDonalds’ rebranding exercise did not come to an end with this campaign. In the past few years, it has continued to make changes in order to reposition itself as a relevant and modern fast food chain. From stripped-back packaging to new cashless technology in restaurants, its continual evolution shows that ‘rebranding’ can be a subtle and ongoing process.</p> <h3>To reclaim a brand identity</h3> <p>Instead of a brand’s own wrong-doing, reputations can sometimes be damaged due to negative associations with a certain type of consumer. Burberry is one of the most high-profile examples of this, with the once-premium fashion label becoming more associated with ‘chav culture’ throughout the late nineties and early noughties.</p> <p>Another is Stella Artois, whose ‘reassuringly expensive’ brand promise (meaning that it was premium, but worth a higher price point) clashed with retailer’s marketing strategies. In order to increase footfall, supermarkets began to sell cans of Stella – which was also known to be of a higher alcohol percentage) at <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64782-how-to-use-discounting-without-harming-your-business" target="_blank">heavily discounted prices</a>. As a result, Stella became associated with binge drinking culture, chosen by ‘lager louts’ for its strength and cheap price point.</p> <p>In order to re-establish and strengthen its original brand purpose, Stella created a new range of beers under the softer Artois name. With a new 4% lager, it counteracted associations with binge drinking, and introduced a cider option to attract a wider audience.</p> <p>Following on from this, Stella Artois also launched the ‘Thing of Beauty’ campaign to re-claim its premium status. This was particularly clever, as instead of changing the product itself, it aimed to change the way consumers drank it. Its ‘9 step preparation’ element emphasised that it is a drink to be savoured. Meanwhile, with ads depicting sophisticated and smartly-dressed drinkers, it began to re-align itself with a luxury lifestyle and turn away from laddish culture.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/s6_h0HUSZ_Y?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>To boost sales</h3> <p>Rebranding can also be an effective way to differentiate a company in a competitive market, giving consumers a reason to choose it over a rival – especially if sales are dwindling.</p> <p>Two of America’s largest retail chains, Target and Walmart, are both based around offering customers good value. Previously, Target has used its brand communication in order to create a point of difference, telling consumers that they can “Expect More. Pay Less”. This helps to instil confidence in consumers, and in comparison with Walmart’s “Save Money. Live Better”, also promotes the idea that its products are of a better quality.</p> <p>However, Target has been suffering from poor sales in recent months, announcing recently that it will execute a new brand strategy to claim back market share. In the face of increasing competition from Amazon, it is set to discontinues a number of its most famous brand lines, and introduce 12 new ones including an athleisure line and homeware. Meanwhile, It’s also remodelling its US stores to give customers a better and more streamlined shopping experience. </p> <p>Will the strategy work? This remains to be seen, but with other retailers like Sears and JC Penney shutting down stores in the face of dwindling sales – Target is clearly hoping a bold rebrand will be the key to winning back consumer favour.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Today’s the day! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HearthAndHand?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HearthAndHand</a> with Magnolia is available <a href="https://twitter.com/Target?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Target</a> &amp; on their website! We had fun designing it &amp; can’t wait for you to see! <a href="https://t.co/q2dL3PNv3Z">pic.twitter.com/q2dL3PNv3Z</a></p> — Joanna Gaines (@joannagaines) <a href="https://twitter.com/joannagaines/status/927190486187757570?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 5, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p><em><strong>Related reading</strong>:</em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68402-boss-life-how-avon-is-rebranding-to-target-a-new-generation">Boss life: How Avon is rebranding to target a new generation</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63099-five-tips-for-a-successful-rebrand/">Five tips for a successful rebrand</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3354 2017-11-13T03:06:13+00:00 2017-11-13T03:06:13+00:00 Fast Track Digital Marketing - Singapore <p>This intensive 3-day course is a great place to start your digital marketing training. The course gives you a complete overview of the exciting areas of digital marketing, knowledge on how to effectively leverage the new media and integrate them into your overall marketing strategy.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:TrainingDate/3352 2017-11-10T08:41:33+00:00 2017-11-10T08:41:33+00:00 Masterclass in Lead Generation - Singapore <p>B2B (Business-to-business) brands are increasingly turning to digital marketing tactics to generate leads, build demand, grow opportunities, engage prospects, and retain customers. As B2B marketing is significantly different from B2C marketing, this workshop aims to specifically address the unique issues and challenges faced by B2B marketers on digital platforms and social media.</p> <p>This 2-day intensive workshop explores how digital marketing can help B2B companies to fill the sales funnel with qualified leads, engage prospects in the buying journey, nurture leads, integrate with sales efforts and measure results.</p>