Legal

Influencers face crisis of confidence in light of CMA investigation

Last week, the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) announced that it has launched an investigation into influencers who fail to disclose that they were compensated to post content on behalf of brands.

“Social media stars can have a big influence on what their followers do and buy. If people see clothes, cosmetics, a car, or a holiday being plugged by someone they admire, they might be swayed into buying it,” George Lusty, the CMA’s Senior Director for Consumer Protection, stated. “So, it’s really important they are clearly told whether a celebrity is promoting a product because they have bought it themselves, or because they have been paid or thanked in some way by the brand.”

Confusion, chaos in the GDPR’s first week

The GDPR hasn’t even been the law of the land in Europe for a full week and it is already causing confusion and chaos in parts of the digital economy.

Here are the headlines you need to know about as the impact of the GDPR starts being felt.

GDPR Day 1: complaints filed against Google and Facebook

After months of anticipation and preparation, on Friday, the GDPR went into effect and privacy advocates, eager to put the law to the test, wasted no time challenging the practices of the internet’s two biggest names.

Hours after the GDPR became the law of the land, a non-profit organization called None Of Your Business (NOYB) lodged complaints against Google and Facebook, including Facebook subsidiaries Instagram and WhatsApp, with four different European authorities.

Anorak will use Open Banking to sell life insurance

For years, upstart fintechs have aimed to create innovative experiences that deliver value to consumers, often at the expense of entrenched financial institutions. 

One of the ways they have accomplished this is by using a variety of techniques to retrieve their users’ data from the financial institutions they bank with.

The GDPR claims its first victims

The GDPR goes into effect later this month and GDPR compliance efforts are well underway. For example, users of online services around the world are receiving notifications of updated terms of service and privacy policies.

Some of the updates contained in these agreements are significant. Facebook-owned WhatsApp, for instance, has increased its minimum age to 16. Snapchat isn’t abandoning users under 16, but it is changing how some of its features work for its under-16 userbase.

What Facebook and Instagram’s big API changes could mean for brands

In response to the ongoing scandal over its data collection, usage and sharing policies, Facebook has announced a slew of its changes to the Facebook and Instagram APIs. These APIs, or application programming interfaces, allow third parties to build applications that interact with Facebook and Instagram. 

The changes have the potential to affect a number of players that participate in the Facebook and Instagram ecosystems, including brands.