tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/user-experience-and-usability Latest User Experience and Usability content from Econsultancy 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68817 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 How brands are targeting business travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>According to a <a href="http://hotelmarketing.com/index.php/content/article/booking.com_survey_reveals_top_causes_of_business_travel_stress" target="_blank">survey from Booking.com</a>, 93% of business travellers feel stressed at some point during their journey - unsurprising given the amount of logistics involved. From planning to managing expenses, and even without taking into account the actual work that needs to done, there’s a whole heap of hassle that goes along with corporate travel.</p> <p>For brands, this traveller presents a unique opportunity. </p> <p>Not only is there less need to dazzle and delight with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">inspirational marketing</a>, but thanks to the deep pockets of corporate companies, the budget can often be sizeable. Meanwhile, with a positive experience likely to result in repeat trips, business travel could prove to be a lucrative market.</p> <p>Here’s how a few brands are setting their sights on it.</p> <h3>Airbnb</h3> <p>The ‘Airbnb for business’ program launched in 2015, signalling the brand’s intent to capture interest from corporate travellers, all the while proving how popular alternative accommodation has become.</p> <p>The service allows companies to integrate their business travel itineraries, giving them a full run-down of where employees are staying and how much they’re spending. More recently, Airbnb has introduced a feature that allows employees to book on behalf of colleagues, making the service even more streamlined.</p> <p>Since it launched, the program has enjoyed a period of growth, however <a href="https://skift.com/2016/11/04/small-companies-have-embraced-airbnb-for-business-travel/" target="_blank">recent data</a> suggests that this could be slowing – mainly due to the companies choosing Airbnb spending as little as possible on short trips. Similarly, Airbnb for business is only seeing real success in cities where the hotel prices are notoriously high.</p> <p>Airbnb is naturally trying to combat this by promoting longer stays and group trips, even offering £40 in travel credit, in order to encourage higher spend.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3951/Airbnb.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="320"></p> <h3>Booking.com</h3> <p>With a reported one in five customers using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/" target="_blank">Booking.com</a> for business travel, it’s no surprise the brand decided to launch its own business travel platform.</p> <p>Designed to make the research and planning stage as easy as possible, it places a big focus on peer-to-peer reviews, sorting through the data to find accommodation that is ‘business traveller tested and approved’.  </p> <p>This customer-centric approach is continued across the board, and reflected in the online UX.</p> <p>After completing a simple registration, users can filter the search by ‘business interest’ like fitness centre or free cancellation. Arguably, the platform doesn't offer anything that much different to the main Booking.com platform, however the ability for company managers or administrators to coordinate plans for others is a key differentiator.</p> <p>Since its launch, there have been suggestions that the brand will expand its business offering into flights - though there's been no sign of this so far.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3952/Booking.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>STA</h3> <p>With millennials forecast to make up half of the workforce by 2020, the stereotype of the middle-aged business traveller no longer applies.</p> <p>STA is tapping into this notion, launching a business travel brand to target young people with a desire to combine both business and pleasure.</p> <p>Alongside young people starting their own business, students travelling for internships or first jobs, it also targets people who want to tag on a holiday at the end of a work trip.</p> <p>With <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2016/05/05/millennials-are-prioritizing-experiences-over-stuff.html" target="_blank">78% of millennials</a> choosing worthwhile experiences over possessions, it’s no surprise that this demand exists. It also bodes well for STA, with the move helping the brand to stay relevant to young people as they move into the workplace.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Need a <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/visa?src=hash">#visa</a>?. We can help you find out if you need one! Speak to our experts to find out more businesstravel@statravel.co.uk <a href="https://t.co/sbH3xH0RzE">pic.twitter.com/sbH3xH0RzE</a></p> — STA Travel Business (@STABusiness) <a href="https://twitter.com/STABusiness/status/825335372343308289">January 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marriot</h3> <p>STA isn’t the only travel brand to target business travellers with the promise of an experience.</p> <p>Marriot’s Renaissance Hotels brand recently launched a new campaign to do just that. Called ‘The Navigator’s Table’, the video series features TV chef Andrew Zimmern from “Bizarre Foods”, and involves chefs and entrepreneurs offering insight and opinions on regional dishes. </p> <p>Essentially, it is designed to appeal to the modern business traveller – someone who is curious, and who wants to get as much out of a business trip as possible.</p> <p>The frequency with which business travellers travel is largely the reason behind this marketing push. For a large hotel chain like Marriot, a single ‘authentic experience’ could result in multiple and repeat bookings in future – reason enough to pay them more attention.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7UUT15kQG1A?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68814 2017-02-16T11:15:00+00:00 2017-02-16T11:15:00+00:00 How utilities brands use social media for reputation management Nikki Gilliland <p>Before we go any further, what exactly is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65523-what-is-online-reputation-management-and-should-you-use-it/" target="_blank">online reputation management</a>? Well, though it largely comes under the umbrella of social media monitoring, this practice can also involve dealing with online reviews, producing content and general <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66439-three-ways-community-management-drives-loyalty-for-charities/" target="_blank">community management</a>.</p> <p>In this article, I will specifically be focusing on how utility companies use social media channels for reputation management.</p> <h3>Basic principles</h3> <p>Online reputation management on social media refers to <em>how</em> brands respond to customer conversation.</p> <p>For example, if people are complaining or even praising a service, but the brand remains entirely unresponsive – this can have a detrimental effect on its overall reputation. </p> <p>Here are a few basic rules for effective management:</p> <ul> <li>Monitor mentions</li> <li>Respond quickly</li> <li>Be transparent</li> <li>Prepare for a crisis</li> <li>Address criticism</li> </ul> <p>Let’s look at a few examples of utility brands putting the above into practice.</p> <h3>Hawaiian Electric</h3> <p>Not many electricity suppliers have an Instagram account, let alone use it to effectively communicate with customers, but Hawaiian Electric is different.</p> <p>When a storm hit shores in 2014, it utilised the channel to let customers know about areas of power outage and repairs, as well as reinforce messages about safety. It has since continued to do this, expanding its strategy to incorporate general posts relating to the local community. </p> <p>By using a visual medium like Instagram, the brand is able to project a positive image and reassure customers in the process. </p> <p>After all, while it might be useful to hear that a company is repairing a broken electricity pole, seeing a photo of it in action is far more powerful.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3927/Hawaiin_Electric.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="489"></p> <h3>SSE</h3> <p>Figures from Citizens Advice revealed that SSE received the lowest number of customer service complaints last year, making it the top energy company overall for customer satisfaction.</p> <p>A big contributing factor appears to be the way it handles queries and criticism on social media, with a fast response time and polite tone of voice across the board.</p> <p>This is particularly evident on the brand’s Facebook page, where it ‘typically replies within an hour’. And although complaints are still common, the brand’s approach appears to be effective for calming angry customers. </p> <p>With <a href="http://blogs.forrester.com/kate_leggett/15-03-03-consumer_expectations_for_customer_service_dont_match_what_companies_deliver" target="_blank">77% saying</a> that valuing the customer's time is the most important thing a company can do – a fast response is one of the most effective ways for brands to ensure that they can maintain and improve a positive reputation.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3928/SSE_energy.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="469"></p> <h3>PSEG</h3> <p>PSEG – a gas and electric company based in New Jersey – shows that social media can be used for brand reputation management in alternative ways.</p> <p>In 2014, it started planning for an infrastructure upgrade to replace 250 miles of gas line - a project that would result in a lot of upheaval for local residents.</p> <p>Instead of an announcement on its website, PSEG chose to use micro-targeted Facebook ads in order to let people know what was going to happen and how it would affect them.</p> <p>When users clicked on an ad, they were taken to a specific page where they’d be able to select and view a work schedule and relating disruption.</p> <p>By utilising social media in this way, not only did PSEG demonstrate transparency, but it also pre-empted its customers' needs.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3929/PSEG.JPG" alt="" width="540" height="716"></p> <h3>Ovo</h3> <p>Brand Q&amp;A’s on Twitter are always risky. A few years ago, British Gas suffered a huge backlash from angry customers over price hikes, leaving the social media team with egg on its face and even more of a negative reputation than before.</p> <p>On the other hand, this type of activity can work well for smaller brands. Ovo is one brand that has utilised an ‘always on’ strategy to monitor brand mentions and successfully draw in new customers, often using Q&amp;As to highlight the shortcomings of competitors. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We came here to have breakfast and help our customers. And we've just finished our toast. <a href="https://t.co/Bcr3QYnRGP">pic.twitter.com/Bcr3QYnRGP</a></p> — OVO Energy (@OVOEnergy) <a href="https://twitter.com/OVOEnergy/status/828513583000592387">February 6, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>Despite its overall approach to social media being far more appealing than most utility companies – using a conversational and personal tone – Ovo has not had an entirely positive couple of years.</p> <p>Having failed to compensate customers for missed or late appointments, the company recently agreed to pay £58,000 to charity instead of undertaking formal enforcement action.</p> <p>While the experience has undoubtedly tarnished its reputation, Ovo’s charitable donation and intent to improve customer service is part and parcel of online reputation management in action.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68789-how-smart-switching-energy-apps-are-tapping-into-customer-need/" target="_blank">How smart-switching energy apps are tapping into customer need</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65478-how-20-top-uk-retailers-handle-social-customer-service/"><em>How 20 top UK retailers handle social customer service</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68808 2017-02-16T10:00:00+00:00 2017-02-16T10:00:00+00:00 UK retailers still failing to meet web accessibility standards Chris Rourke <p>With so many barriers in store, shopping online from the comfort of your home is an attractive option. Furthermore, under the Equality Act 2010 all retailers must provide access to their goods online as well as in store. </p> <p>We decided to review the online accessibility of six well known UK retailers to identify the main barriers for online shoppers with disabilities.</p> <p>The chosen retailers were:</p> <ol> <li><a title="Accessibility Review of Online Retailers Part 1: Boots" href="http://uservision.co.uk/2017/01/accessibility-review-boots/" target="_blank">Boots</a></li> <li><a title="Accessibility Review of Online Retailers Part 2: Mothercare" href="http://uservision.co.uk/2017/01/accessibility-review-mothercare/" target="_blank">Mothercare</a></li> <li><a title="Accessibility Review of Online Retailers Part 3: House of Fraser" href="http://uservision.co.uk/2017/01/accessibility-review-house-off-fraser/" target="_blank">House of Fraser</a></li> <li><a title="Accessibility Review of Online Retailers Part 4: Joules" href="http://uservision.co.uk/2017/01/accessibility-review-joules/" target="_blank">Joules</a></li> <li><a title="Accessibility Review of Online Retailers Part 5: Tesco" href="http://uservision.co.uk/2017/01/accessibility-review-tesco/" target="_blank">Tesco</a></li> <li><a title="Accessibility Review of Online Retailers Part 6: Not on The High Street" href="http://uservision.co.uk/2017/01/accessibility-review-not-on-high-street/" target="_blank">Not on the High Street</a></li> </ol> <h3>How did we measure/review online accessibility?</h3> <p>To evaluate the accessibility of a site we audit them against the Web Consortium Accessibility Guidelines from the W3C. Also known as <a title="Web Consortium Accessibility Guidelines from the W3C" href="https://www.w3.org/WAI/intro/wcag.php" target="_blank">WCAG 2.0</a>, these guidelines help to improve web accessibility and are the best way to ensure the site serves the widest audience.</p> <p>We followed a typical shopping journey to assess how the retailers approached accessibility on their sites. This included:</p> <ul> <li>Homepage and search</li> <li>Browse (including any product category and product range pages)</li> <li>Selection (product page and basket)</li> <li>Payment (delivery and payment details)</li> </ul> <p>We focused on the major aspects of WCAG 2.0 Level AA, including important factors such as keyboard accessibility and screen reader compatibility. Items we looked out for included:</p> <ul> <li>Use of <strong>headings</strong> </li> <li>Alt text for <strong>images</strong> </li> <li>Availability of<strong> skip links</strong> </li> <li>Inclusion of a <strong>visible focus</strong> </li> <li>Access to <strong>forms</strong> </li> <li>Use of <strong>ARIA</strong> to provide greater context</li> <li>Access of <strong>pop ups / modal windows</strong> </li> <li><strong>Colour contrast</strong></li> <li>Navigating around is in a <strong>logical order</strong> </li> <li> <strong>Links</strong> are meaningful and describe their purpose</li> </ul> <h3>What were the common barriers?</h3> <p>We gained a good insight into the main barriers disabled users face when shopping online. There were several common themes and unfortunately all of the sites failed to meet the Level AA of the WCAG 2.0 guidelines.</p> <p>This means that disabled users would face difficulty in buying a product on each site, with half of the sites completely inhibiting users at certain points in their journey. The main accessibility problems are described below, with examples from across the sites.</p> <h3>Visible focus</h3> <p>This navigational technique highlights where the user is on the page visually. This is essential for sighted users who rely on visual cues to navigate with a keyboard.</p> <p>As positive examples, Tesco and House of Fraser provide clear and consistent visible focus so users can see their location as they move their focus through the site. Other retailers had a mix of custom, default or no focus at all so that they relied on the default browser focus which is not sufficient since it can be unclear and inconsistent between browsers.</p> <p>Below we can clearly see that the “Home Electrical” link has keyboard focus on the Tesco site as the text is underlined and is displayed in a blue colour which is distinguishable from the rest of the text on the page: </p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3895/VisibleFocusExample_Tesco.png" alt="Clear visible focus on the Tesco homepage enables users to see where they are on the page." width="967" height="282"></p> <h3>‘Skip to’ links</h3> <p>For non-sighted users, ‘skip to’ links provide an easy way to move through the navigation and into the main content of the page.</p> <p>Only half of the sites had implemented ‘skip to’ links meaning that keyboard users would repeatedly have to step through lengthy navigation menus, an even more tedious task for screen reader users listening to the links.</p> <p>House of Fraser was a great example of a site that had clear ‘skip to’ links:</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3896/SkipToLinks_HOF.png" alt="Good example of clear and visible ‘Skip to main content’ link on House of Fraser site." width="891" height="128"></p> <p>Joules had more than one ‘skip to’ link but they were designed to be hidden for sighted users. Consequently, sighted keyboard users were unable to take advantage of this functionality.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3897/SkiptolinksBadExample_Joules.png" alt="‘Skip to content’ link on Joules.com does not become visible" width="1010" height="655"></p> <h3>Alternative text for images</h3> <p>Alternative text is read by screen readers in place of images, allowing the content and function of the images to be available to those with visual or certain cognitive disabilities. All informative images on a page should have suitable alternative text, providing all users with the same access to content.  </p> <p>Across our retailers, use of alternative text was generally good with appropriate and descriptive alt tags on product images. However, we did notice issues on both Boots and Mothercare where image descriptions were read to the screen reader more than once.</p> <p>This was due to images having both an alt tag and identical title attribute. We recommend retailers remove titles with duplicate text to make sure the image descriptions are not repeated unnecessarily.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3898/AltTextforImages_Mothercare.png" alt="Product descriptions on Mothercare site are read to screen reader users more than once" width="853" height="593"></p> <h3>Providing context to screen reader users</h3> <p>This is fundamental for screen reader users who are not able to visually group information together or understand meaning through visible presentation. Information and relationships must be therefore associated programmatically.</p> <p>Examples of this from our retailers included:</p> <p><strong>Form fields</strong> need to have programmatically associated labels so that screen reader users know what information is required for the form input field. When a form field receives focus the label for the field (e.g. “first name”, “surname”, “email address”) should be called out by the screen reader.</p> <p>This was a persistent issue across all retailers. Some sites such as notonthehighstreet.com frustratingly had correctly implemented this in some areas and not others, meaning inconsistent access to information for their screen reader users.</p> <p>All retailers at one point or another had <strong>links that did not make sense out of context</strong>. Common examples found were ‘show more’ and ‘edit’. As we can see below, Mothercare.com used ambiguous links such as “edit” and “remove”.</p> <p>Without the visual cues, a screen reader user would struggle to know what they are editing or attempting to remove.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3899/AmbiguousLinks_Mcare.png" alt="Mothercare.com uses ambiguous links such as “edit” and “remove”. Screen reader users are not provided with any more context as to what will happen if they click these links" width="409" height="445"> </p> <p>In providing important tools to select product options such as size and colour, some retailers <strong>did not provide screen reader users with all the information they need to make the purchase</strong>.</p> <p>For retailers such as House of Fraser and Joules, there was no notification that a certain size was out of stock. Visually, sizes which aren’t available are scored out and in a lighter grey colour, but these sizes still get read out to the screen reader, indicating that they are available.</p> <p>This would prevent a screen reader user from choosing a product size, and they would need to either give up or ask for assistance.</p> <p><img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3900/ProgrammaticallyAssociatedInfo_Joules.png" alt="The colour and size selection/availability on the Joules site are visually clear, but not conveyed programmatically for screen reader users" width="800" height="235"></p> <h3>What we learned:</h3> <p>With physical accessibility in store being such a challenge, online retail may seem the ideal solution. Unfortunately, retailers who fail to consider the issues and barriers mentioned above will not provide the answer for many disabled people.</p> <p>Most retailers had reassuring text on their sites describing their dedication to making their online offerings accessible. Most had also implemented some accessible features on their sites – for instance alternative text for images was widely implemented – yet shortcomings were readily found.</p> <p>Since these accessibility barriers were identified through a relatively short accessibility audit, retailers need to build on these great intentions and implement WCAG 2.0 to significantly improve accessibility across their sites.</p> <p>Retailers should consult with accessibility and UX experts to fully understand the needs of disabled customers and the technical solutions to provide accessibility.</p> <p>Once the identifiable accessibility barriers have been removed, the retailers should involve people with disabilities in usability testing to ensure that the site is usable for this audience as well as compliant to WCAG standards. </p><p><em>Many thanks to my colleagues Marie Moyles and Natalie Simpson for leading the accessibility analysis of the retailer websites.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68800 2017-02-13T11:20:00+00:00 2017-02-13T11:20:00+00:00 Pizza Express launches booking chatbot: Is it any good? Nikki Gilliland <p>Pizza Express is claiming to be the first restaurant in the UK to offer this, but will it catch on? And more importantly – is the chatbot any good?</p> <p>Here’s what I think. </p> <h3>What does it do?</h3> <p>While Pizza Express’s #shakethetree campaign used gamification to entertain customers, its new chatbot aims to offer greater convenience for customers who simply want to book a table.</p> <p>Instead of visiting the main Pizza Express website, it now means that customers can make a booking without leaving Facebook Messenger – giving people a direct and ‘always on’ channel of communication with the brand.</p> <p>From my own experience with the chatbot, I can confirm that it is definitely convenient. </p> <p>While there’s no actual chat involved – I was only required to select from multiple options options rather than talk to it – the process was quick and simple.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3840/Pizza_Express_2.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="667"></p> <p>It detected my location and provided me with the option of two restaurants located nearby. From there, all I had to do was select the number of people and the time.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3841/Pizza_Express_4.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="712"></p> <p>It's very simple to use, but let's face it, actively seeking out a booking on the Pizza Express website is similarly straightforward. </p> <p>My only gripe was that it felt a little strange not being sent an email confirmation of my booking. And while it asked for my telephone number, I didn’t receive anything further to suggest that it had gone through.</p> <h3>Is it too simple?</h3> <p>There’s nothing impressive about this technology. The fact that it doesn’t reply to human conversation means that it's far from actually being intelligent, and it's probably better described as a multiple choice questionnaire rather than a chatbot.</p> <p>But, do customers expect extra bells and whistles, or will they be happy with this basic (one-way) booking system?</p> <p>It’s been suggested that chatbots are suffering from over-hype, with many failing to live up to expectations of ‘conversational commerce’ and disappointing users in the process.</p> <p>It’s understandable that people might feel let down by a bot that doesn’t understand everyday speech or involves complicated sign-up processes. </p> <p>Consequently, perhaps examples like Pizza Express, which is limited but laser-focused in terms of what it claims to offer consumers, will prove more successful. Similarly, with the chatbot resulting in a tangible result – a booked table and a meal in its restaurant – it might have more of an impact that its previous incarnation, which merely involved playing a (rather disappointing) game.</p> <h3>Will other restaurants catch on?</h3> <p>For restaurants looking to implement customer service on social, booking-related chatbots could potentially provide value.</p> <p>We have already seen the likes of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68184-domino-s-introduces-dom-the-pizza-bot-for-facebook-messenger/" target="_blank">Domino’s</a> and Taco Bell implementing chatbots to enable consumers to order a delivery, so perhaps a combination of the two could be next on the cards.</p> <p>One company that already aims to do this is AllSet – an app and chatbot that aims to make dining at a restaurant at lunchtime quick and hassle-free.</p> <p>Essentially, it allows you to book, order and pay for your food ahead of time, meaning there’s no waiting around during the experience. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Booked through a great new service <a href="https://twitter.com/allsetUS">@AllsetUS</a> and had delicious lunch <a href="https://twitter.com/PanameNYC">@PanameNYC</a>! I met fantastic people! I highly recommend! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Foodie?src=hash">#Foodie</a> <a href="https://t.co/FQOfhhBhuo">pic.twitter.com/FQOfhhBhuo</a></p> — Line_of_Thought (@Line_of_thought) <a href="https://twitter.com/Line_of_thought/status/822087858882220032">January 19, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>While this is a bit of a pipe dream for existing restaurant chains, it could offer a glimpse as to how chatbots could evolve in future.</p> <p><strong><em>Related articles:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68636-pizza-express-channel-4-and-tfl-three-examples-of-brand-chatbots/" target="_blank">Pizza Express, Channel 4 and TFL: Three examples of brand chatbots</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68766-i-tried-out-the-new-resident-evil-ai-chatbot-it-was-far-from-intelligent/" target="_blank">I tried out the new Resident Evil AI chatbot. It was far from intelligent.</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68208-chatbots-are-they-better-without-the-chat/" target="_blank">Chatbots: Are they better without the chat?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68789 2017-02-09T09:45:36+00:00 2017-02-09T09:45:36+00:00 How smart-switching energy apps are tapping into customer need Nikki Gilliland <p>A new generation of ‘smart switching’ companies are now popping up in order to bridge this gap. Capitalising on so-called consumer inertia, they are using digital technology to make switching even simpler. </p> <p>The question is – is there really a demand?</p> <p>Here’s a bit more info on this new generation of energy-related brands. </p> <h3>What exactly do they do? </h3> <p>Smart switching services essentially act like real-time deal trackers. They mostly monitor and compare energy deals, delivering cheaper tariffs as they appear and offering users the opportunity to directly switch there and then. </p> <p>Some companies do this via a website, but most have a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66837-three-points-to-consider-when-developing-a-mobile-app-strategy/" target="_blank">mobile app</a>, making it even easier and more convenient for consumers to find a cheaper set-up. </p> <h3>How are they marketing their services? </h3> <p>Voltz is one example of a new switching service, designed for the 80% of households who “do not have the time or the inclination to visit a comparison site”. </p> <p>Its positioning is all about ease and convenience, with a tone of voice that almost makes actively switching sound like more hassle than it's worth. This seems slightly misleading, as again, going about it the regular way isn’t that difficult.</p> <p>However, from its ‘super easy registration’ to its ‘tap to switch’ option, it probably does make life slightly easier just by allowing you to use the service on your smartphone. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3777/Voltz.JPG" alt="" width="270" height="554"></p> <p>Voltz makes money by taking a commission from key energy suppliers, meaning that if a cheaper tariff is found with another company, users will be prompted to call in order to switch.  </p> <p>Flipper is a similar company, but one that aims to go a step further by taking control of the entire switching process on behalf of consumers. Instead of commission, it works by charging customers £25 a year – a fairly acceptable amount considering it claims to save you £50 a year at least.  </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When we make the right decision once, life can be a lot simpler. Join <a href="https://twitter.com/flippercomm">@flippercomm</a> and put energy bills out of your mind once and for all! <a href="https://t.co/81TsHBkWTA">pic.twitter.com/81TsHBkWTA</a></p> — Flipper Community (@flippercomm) <a href="https://twitter.com/flippercomm/status/813464576188698625">December 26, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>Like Voltz, the company promotes a sense of convenience, but focuses a little more on the transparency and honesty of its services. I noticed its website and presence on social media is particularly focused on providing reassurance, using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65722-18-highly-effective-examples-of-social-proof-in-ecommerce/">social proof</a> to instil trust. </p> <p>Finally, Swuto is a service (like Voltz) that works on commission from suppliers. However, its biggest difference is that it also allows customers to switch on behalf of family members such as children living away from home or elderly parents. </p> <h3>What are the implications? </h3> <p>It’s been suggested that the arrival of these new companies could impact how suppliers set out tariffs in future, perhaps offering short-term options with the knowledge that there will be greater demand from smart switching.  </p> <p>For consumers, this can only be a good thing. </p> <p>With favourable reviews from users, and Flipper in particular appearing to gain momentum, we could see many more of these services popping up in future. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Signed up <a href="https://twitter.com/flippercomm">@flippercomm</a> last night for £25. Over night they found a new deal that saves estimated £266 a year. Nice. <a href="https://t.co/UQlqgEB2fK">https://t.co/UQlqgEB2fK</a></p> — Gareth Coxon (@GarethDotDesign) <a href="https://twitter.com/GarethDotDesign/status/784299192680189952">October 7, 2016</a> </blockquote> <p>While the concept might sound like it’s merely giving into laziness, it is clear the demand is there. And if it prevents people from paying over the odds on energy bills – why not? </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68779 2017-02-06T14:15:37+00:00 2017-02-06T14:15:37+00:00 How will Donald Trump's policies affect fintech? Patricio Robles <p>While preventing another major financial crisis is a sensible goal, Dodd-Frank has been a source of controversy. At more than 2,000 pages, Dodd-Frank is, as one might expect, incredibly complex, and since it became law, it has been blamed for a number of trends, ranging from a decline in community banks to a decline in business lending by banks.</p> <p>During his campaign, then-candidate Trump promised to do away with Dodd-Frank and his directive last week is the first step in delivering on that promise. While this will almost certainly be a complex process that takes time, it's not too early for companies in the financial sector to start evaluating how the elimination of Dodd-Frank could affect their businesses.</p> <p>Specifically, the eventual death of Dodd-Frank could have a significant impact on fintechs, which <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68159-five-ways-fintech-upstarts-are-disrupting-established-financial-institutions/">have been distrupting established financial services institutions</a>. Here's what it could mean for these financial service upstarts.</p> <h3>The good</h3> <p>Dodd-Frank created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which has broad regulatory powers over a number of consumer finance markets. While the CFPB has been largely supportive of innovation in financial services, it has also taken action against fintechs.</p> <p>For example, it fined both startup payment provider Dwolla over its data security practices and subprime consumer lending startup LendUp for "failing to deliver the promised benefits of its products."</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3699/donald_trump.jpg" alt="" width="726" height="482"></p> <p>To be sure, few would argue that fintechs shouldn't be regulated and held to the same standard as established financial institutions. But if given the choice, most fintechs (and their investors) would probably opt for less regulation instead of more regulation, so to the extent that the repeal of Dodd-Frank results in less regulation, players in the fintech market would probably welcome it.</p> <p>In addition to the possibility that fintechs will have to deal with less regulation, if big banks are relieved of many of the regulatory burdens that Dodd-Frank has imposed on them, it could conceivably encourage them to more aggressively acquire, invest in or partner with fintechs.</p> <p>Already, large banks <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68350-digital-transformation-in-a-b2b-giant-jp-morgan-ge/">like JP Morgan</a> have made an effort to work with startups as part of their <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">digital transformations</a>, and they could get much closer to those startups if regulatory concerns diminish.</p> <h3>The bad</h3> <p>On the other hand, regulatory relief for big banks could put them in a better position to compete with fintechs. This effect could be particularly pronounced in the consumer and business lending markets, as Dodd-Frank has been blamed for significantly decreased bank lending. </p> <p>The void in the lending markets fueled the rise of non-bank lenders, which include <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68549-how-will-fintech-lenders-cope-with-an-economic-downturn/">online lenders</a>. If big banks aggressively re-enter the lending markets, the increased competition could make it much more difficult for fintech lenders to generate business.</p> <p>Other changes could harm a number of wealth management startups that have promoted the use of robo-advisors. President Trump wants to end the so-called fiduciary rule, which requires retirement account advisers to work in the best interests of their clients.</p> <p>Throwing out the fiduciary rule "will shrink the market for robo-investing" <a href="https://www.wired.com/2017/02/trumps-gifts-wall-street-threaten-retirees-robots/">according to</a> one industry executive, which explains why fintech startup Betterment went so far as to take out ads in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal with open letters urging Trump not to undo the rule.</p> <h3>The ugly</h3> <p>While reduced regulation would probably be welcomed by fintechs, there is one part of Dodd-Frank that many fintechs rely heavily on. <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/fintech-startups-want-to-save-one-key-page-of-dodd-frank-1486035001">Section 1033</a> of the bill essentially establishes that consumers have the right to their financial data.</p> <p>Using third-party platforms offered by companies like Yodlee, Intuit and Plaid, many fintech startups make it easy for their customers to connect to their bank and credit accounts to retrieve data. This is used for everything from spending analyses to underwriting of loans.</p> <p>If Section 1033 is eliminated, large financial institutions, namely banks, would conceivably have the ability to block third-parties from accessing data from customer accounts. If this happens, some fintechs could find it difficult to survive as they would no longer have a viable way to obtain the data they need from their customers' bank accounts in a quick, secure and automated fashion.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68776 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 2017-02-03T14:28:00+00:00 10 astounding digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>As always, the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> is ready and waiting if you’re in the mood for something a little extra.</p> <h3>34% of brands admit internal silos</h3> <p>New research from Oracle highlights how closer collaboration between sales and marketing teams is required to better target audiences and increase sales.</p> <p>However, despite also recognising the need, many organisations are failing to put it into practice. </p> <p>The Oracle survey found that 34% of brands admit their sales, marketing and customer service teams work completely independently of each other, leading to a lack of customer insight.</p> <p>In terms of the reasons why, 33% blame it on their current systems and technologies, while 30% say their corporate culture makes it tricky for sales and marketing teams to align priorities.</p> <h3>Millennials increasingly influencing tech-buying decisions</h3> <p>With millennials predicted to make up 50% of the US workforce by 2020, Linkedin has been exploring how younger generations are influencing technology buying decisions in the workplace.</p> <p>In a survey of 5,470 global professionals, it found that 61% of younger millennials (age 19-25) contribute to their companies’ technology purchases, with one in three already being decision-makers. Older millennials (those aged 25-35) are said to have even more influence, with 68% contributing to decisions.</p> <p>Lastly, Generation X still holds the power, with 85% of employees aged 36-50 deciding technology purchases or managing the budget.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3667/Linkedin.JPG" alt="" width="428" height="519"></p> <h3>Searches for US visas surge following travel ban</h3> <p>Following Trump’s travel ban, Hitwise data has revealed that searches for American visas have since increased by 34%. More specifically, searches for “visa for USA from UK” and “US visa waiver” have been among the highest.</p> <p>This is similar to what happened after Brexit, when Hitwise witnessed a 300% increase in searches related to moving to the EU. </p> <p>Following the week’s news coverage, approximately one in every 10,000 searches over three days related to the “travel ban”, which is an increase of 2,045% since January 28.</p> <h3> </h3> <h3>One in 10 Gmail users say emails are miscategorised</h3> <p>Gmail’s automatic sorting feature is proving less than effective, with one in 10 users reporting incorrectly categorised messages.</p> <p>This is according to new research from Return Path, leading to warnings that marketers should be more vigilant about how and where their messages are being delivered.</p> <p>The study found that 45% of tabbed inbox users check the ‘Promotions’ tab - used to aggregate marketing promotions and other offers - at least once per day. As a result, if marketing email is delivered to another tab, it could be missed entirely.     </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3665/gmail.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK consumers spent the most via mobile last Christmas </h3> <p>According to Adobe’s latest Digital Index, UK shoppers spent more via mobile last Christmas than the US or any other European nation. </p> <p>Data shows that 60% of online visits to UK retailers over Christmas were made on mobile, and of every £10 spent online in the UK, £4.10 came from a mobile device. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this could be due to a rise in last-minute buying, with the amount spent on the last Monday before Christmas increasing by 50% in 2016.</p> <h3>Live chat leads to greater customer loyalty</h3> <p>A new <a href="https://skilled.co/resources/live-chat-best-customer-service-right-now/" target="_blank">infographic</a> by Skilled highlights how live chat on ecommerce sites can lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and loyalty.</p> <p>Studies show that 63% of live chat users said they are more likely to return to the site as a result. Interestingly, Mexico is said to be the leader of live chat, with the highest customer satisfaction rate of 94.11%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3663/Skilled.JPG" alt="" width="674" height="342"></p> <h3>Nearly two in five shoppers have used their phone to pay in-store</h3> <p>MEF’s <a href="http://mobileecosystemforum.com/mobile-money-report/" target="_blank">Mobile Money Report</a> has revealed that mobile payments are on the rise, with nearly two in five shoppers using their smartphone to make a purchase in-store.</p> <p>From analysis of 6,000 consumers in nine countries, it also found that 78% of people have made a purchase using an app or mobile site.</p> <p>Mobile banking looks to be on a similar path, with 61% of respondents saying they now use their mobile phone to bank, and 44% using an app to check their balance.</p> <h3>Consumers see over half of brand content as ‘clutter’</h3> <p>The <a href="http://www.meaningful-brands.com/en" target="_blank">Meaningful Brands</a> report by Havas has revealed that over half of consumers view brand content as poor or irrelevant.</p> <p>In a study of 375,000 people across 33 countries, Havas found that while 84% of respondents expect brands to produce content of some kind, 60% of it fails to deliver any personal benefit.</p> <p>Consequently, we can see that the greater the impact on a person’s well-being, the more likely content is to be perceived as meaningful or effective.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3664/Havas.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="426"></p> <h3>80% of marketers describe data as ‘critical’ to success</h3> <p>A new GDMA survey has highlighted how customer data has become an indispensable asset, with 80% of global respondents citing it as critical to their marketing efforts.</p> <p>UK marketers are increasingly relying on data, coming top of all countries when asked about its importance.</p> <p>As a result, investment in data-driven marketing and advertising is still on the rise, with over half of global respondents saying they increased their spending in this area in 2016.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68772 2017-02-03T09:20:11+00:00 2017-02-03T09:20:11+00:00 Four key CX charts from our Digital Trends 2017 Report Nikki Gilliland <p>Customer experience is now the biggest priority for 63% of marketers, with 49% currently citing it as the most important of all. Of course, ‘customer experience’ is somewhat of an umbrella term, involving multiple areas of focus. </p> <p>With this in mind, here’s a bit of insight into how marketers are honing in on the customer experience, as well as a few key challenges they face. And for further insight, you can download the Adobe <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends">2017 Digital Trends Report</a>.</p> <h3>Greater focus on CX</h3> <p>First, why has customer experience overtaken data-driven marketing?</p> <p>On one hand, this could be because data is also considered as part of the customer experience, meaning that there is in fact just as much of a focus as before. </p> <p>Alternatively, last year’s concentration (and investment) in the area means it has naturally slipped down the list of pressing priorities.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3632/Figure_8.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="565"></p> <h3>Driving perceptions of value</h3> <p>Drilling down into what ‘customer experience’ actually means for marketers, we can see that there is a bigger focus on overall ‘value’ rather than individual customer touchpoints.</p> <p>This means that instead of one aspect, such as diligent customer service or next day delivery, the experience in itself is considered to be of over-arching importance.</p> <p>While 23% of companies place the highest emphasis on creating that valuable experience, it is a natural that other elements within this remit – such as personalisation and consistency – are also ranked highly.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3633/Figure_9.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="600"></p> <h3>Importance of internal factors</h3> <p>The below chart supports the notion that data-analysis is part and parcel of the customer experience, with 96% of marketing executives saying it is fundamental to improving it. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3634/Figure_10.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="561"></p> <p>Similarly, internal collaboration is also key, with 53% of client-side respondents agreeing that this is ‘very important’.</p> <p>Despite this notion, it is clear that organisational silos continue to be one of the biggest barriers to improving CX. Findings from <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/quarterly-digital-intelligence-briefing-the-cx-challenge/">Econsultancy’s CX Challenge Report</a> prove this, with companies that are highly advanced in customer experience sharing the responsibility across departments.</p> <h3>Striving for a design advantage</h3> <p>In this year's survey, culture and strategy were ranked as the most important elements for CX success, with UX design cited as the third most important driver to success.</p> <p>In actual fact, client-side marketers deemed UX design's importance in delivering customer experience success lower in 2017 than they did in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3636/Figure_13.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="581"></p> <p>Design impacts every part of the customer experience, meaning this perspective could prove to be a big limitation. Meanwhile, with 44% of respondents not having the processes and collaborative workflows to achieve a design advantage, this goes back to the problem of internal barriers getting in the way of success.</p> <p>Ultimately, with poor customer experience often relating to a lack of consistency across all channels – be it in terms of content, data insights <em>or</em> design – organisations need to start considering these elements in conjunction to faciliatate progress.</p> <p><em><strong>For further insight, you can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/digital-intelligence-briefing-2017-digital-trends">2017 Digital Trends Report</a>.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68763 2017-02-01T10:13:33+00:00 2017-02-01T10:13:33+00:00 Can Snapchat survive Instagram’s aggressive copycat tactics? Nikki Gilliland <p>So, is this really the case? Here’s a quick look at how the platforms have evolved since last summer.</p> <h3>Snapchat vs. Instagram</h3> <p>While the claims are unsubstantiated, a <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/30/attack-of-the-clone/" target="_blank">recent report suggests</a> that view counts for Snapchat Stories declined by an average of 20%-40% from August to January.</p> <p>From analysis of 21,500 Snapchat Stories, analytics platform Delmondo also say that the average unique viewers per story has decreased by around 40%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3552/Delmondo.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="416"></p> <p>But it's not all bad news. A separate report from eMarketer predicts strong growth for Snapchat’s ad revenues. Driven largely by ads placed in the app’s Live Stories section, US revenues are predicted to more than double from $348m in 2016 to $804m in 2017.</p> <p>To sure up its finances for the coming year, Snapchat has reportedly been seeking big spending commitments from ad agencies.</p> <p>The company is apparently <a href="http://uk.businessinsider.com/how-snapchats-commitments-with-ad-agencies-will-work-2017-1">asking for amounts between $100m and $200m</a>, despite the fact that ad giant WPP only spent around $90m with Snapchat in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3563/snapchat_revenues.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="525"></p> <p>Meanwhile, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68142-instagram-stories-what-do-marketers-need-to-know/" target="_blank">Instagram Stories</a> has enjoyed rapid success. Not only did it reach the 150m milestone in an impressively short amount of time, but it is still building on this with further additions to the feature.</p> <p>It recently announced that it is to add advertising into the mix (again following on from Snapchat’s example last June), allowing 30 companies to place ads within Stories.</p> <p>With <a href="http://www.livemint.com/Industry/qJuO2CY13sGqrTyPwJY6ZN/Instagram-adds-advertising-to-Instagram-Stories.html" target="_blank">74% of US companies planning to use Instagram</a> this year, it appears brands are increasingly favouring it over Snapchat. This is cemented by a recent study that found 30% of surveyed brands with a Snapchat account are <a href="http://uk.businessinsider.com/brand-usage-snoozes-on-snapchat-2017-1" target="_blank">dormant on the platform</a>. </p> <p>Finally, see the below Google Trends snapshot for an overview of the comparative search interest worldwide.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3551/Instagram_vs_Snapchat.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="514"></p> <h3>Why are users moving to Instagram?</h3> <p>So, why exactly are brands and consumers more interested in Instagram Stories? One possible reason for the decline in Snapchat views could be the decision to remove the autoplay feature in favour of a queuing system.</p> <p>Although the change aimed to provide greater control, offering the chance to cherry-pick content, it actually meant that people were no longer able to use Snapchat in the way that they had grown accustomed. While it’s true that view counts now show what users are actively watching, and are therefore more valuable, the disruption could have impacted user behaviour in general.</p> <p>In a wider sense, some say that Snapchat is a one-trick pony, meaning that if users prefer the experience of watching disappearing stories elsewhere, the platform has nothing else to offer. On the other hand, Instagram is able to rely on its original features - as well as Facebook's involvement.</p> <p>Recent decline could also be put down to a case of following the herd, with a wealth of social media influencers choosing Instagram over Snapchat due to its opportunities for greater reach. In Econsultancy’s <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer" target="_blank">Voice of the Influencer report</a>, 74% of influencers cited Instagram as platform that they are most influential on, with Snapchat even coming below Facebook and Twitter.</p> <p>It's not clear from the report whether influencers are drawn to Instagram because that's where the audience is, or whether their audience follows them to the platform. It's probably the former, but either way it's another plus for Instagram.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3553/Voice_of_Influencer.JPG" alt="" width="340" height="784"></p> <h3>The future for both platforms  </h3> <p>Despite constant suggestion that Instagram Stories is a Snapchat clone, it has also been borrowing from Facebook and Twitter of late with the introduction of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68640-why-live-video-was-the-biggest-social-trend-of-2016/" target="_blank">live video</a> streaming.</p> <p>Following on from the launch of Boomerang and an increase in video length, video in general looks to be a clear focus for Instagram. With this and the aforementioned ad integration, the clear opportunity for monetisation could prove to be irresistible.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Snapchat is focusing on the user experience, having taken steps to improve its navigation with the introduction of a new search functionality.</p> <p>Now, users can find groups, friends and stories from a search bar that’s constantly visible. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0EFGrJE6NTo?wmode=transparent" width="640" height="390"></iframe></p> <p>With some users put off by Snapchat’s arguably confusing and less-appealing interface, this could help the platform bite back at Instagram.</p> <p>What’s more, with the arrival of its first hardware device in the form of Spectacles, continued focus on the user experience and wider diversification could offer a boost.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68756 2017-01-31T14:59:54+00:00 2017-01-31T14:59:54+00:00 Prudent UX for banking? Monzo designs 'positive friction' Ben Davis <p>After all, spending isn't just a folly of the rich, there are many people who may be unable to properly manage their own finances due to a mental health condition such as bi-polar disorder.</p> <p>In a beautifully clear blog post, <a href="https://monzo.com/blog/2017/01/27/designing-product-mental-health-mind/">Monzo explains how it might tackle this issue with what it calls 'positive friction'</a>, the idea of adding beneficial extra steps to a user journey.</p> <p>The article gives the very non-digital example of blister packaging, which when introduced in the 1990s for the drug Tylenol saw a decrease in related suicides. Popping the pills from their individual blisters is a more involved process that uncapping a bottle and swallowing a draught of tablets.</p> <p>Monzo's concept design of positive friction can be seen below. It includes options such as late-night spending reviews (see the notification in the middle screenshot) and spending and top-up limits. In the concept, these options are enabled in the Monzo app within settings (much as accessiblity functionality like bigger buttons can be enabled in iOS).</p> <p>Monzo also discusses the idea of contacting customers whose income has stopped to ask if they need advice, and of allowing customers to set communication preferences (such as choosing telephone over email).</p> <p><em>Click to enlarge</em></p> <p><a href="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3519/monzo_positive_friction.png"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3519/monzo_positive_friction.png" alt="monzo prototype" width="615"></a></p> <p>These concept designs from Monzo arrive on the back of a report from the Money and Mental Health Policy Institute (MMHPI) which says that banks must offer basic account options to those with mental health conditions (these are accounts with no overdraft, that are fee-free and given to vulnerable people or those with bad credit).</p> <p>There are other online-only banks that have pioneered money management as part of their UX, to allow every consumer to better control their finances. Mint is the obvious example (see budgeting screenshot below).</p> <p>Monzo already does this so-called 'smart banking', with plenty of transaction data and instant notifications. Users can check spending totals split into different categories, daily totals and merchant totals. </p> <p>And, of course, there are scores of money management apps that can be used separately from any banking app.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3520/mint.jpg" alt="mint" width="350"> </p> <p>However, Monzo's blog post is a reminder that service designers need to consider a wide range of users. A common mantra of UX may to "get out of the customer's way", but there can be no absolutes.</p> <p><a href="https://monzo.com/blog/2017/01/27/designing-product-mental-health-mind/"><em>Go and read the Monzo blog post.</em></a></p> <p><em>And for more on design:</em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68521-how-to-create-a-culture-of-design-in-your-organisation/">How to create a culture of design in your organisation</a> </em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68600-10-sensible-web-design-trends-for-2017/"><em>10 sensible web design trends for 2017 </em></a></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67420-what-is-service-design-who-uses-it/">What is service design &amp; who uses it?</a> </em></li> </ul>