tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video-rich-media Latest Video Advertising content from Econsultancy 2017-02-24T10:05:11+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68832 2017-02-24T10:05:11+00:00 2017-02-24T10:05:11+00:00 10 staggering digital marketing stats we've seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Please note, we've linked to all original studies where possible. Unfortunately not all of these studies are published online, they often come to us as press releases.</p> <h3>60% of millennials have used chatbots</h3> <p>A new study by Retale has delved into how UK millennials feel about chatbots.</p> <p>From a survey of over 500 consumers aged 18 to 34, nearly 60% of respondents were found to have used a chatbot in the past. Out of the percentage of people that had not, 53% said they were still interested in trying them. </p> <p>Interestingly, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/admin/blog_posts/68805-are-brands-failing-to-promote-chatbots/" target="_blank">branded chatbots</a> appear to be growing in popularity, with 71% of millennials saying they’d be happy to try a chatbot from a consumer brand. Lastly, 86% of respondents agreed that brands should use chatbots to promote deals, discounts and offers. </p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68800-pizza-express-launches-booking-chatbot-is-it-any-good/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4128/Pizza_Express_5.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="678"></a></p> <h3>Retailers increasing investment in store technology</h3> <p>The <a href="http://now.jda.com/CEO2017.html" target="_blank">latest report</a> from JDA/PWC has found that 69% of CEOs plan to increase investment in digital technologies to improve the in-store customer experience. </p> <p>76% of CEOs have or are planning to invest in personalised mobile ‘push offers’ and beacons, while 79% are also investing or planning to invest in smart mobile devices for staff in stores. Despite this, 52% of respondents have not yet defined or started implementing <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/digital-transformation/">a digital transformation strategy</a>. </p> <h3>68% of British retailers have no Brexit plans in place</h3> <p>According to new research from Global-e, 68% of retailers have yet to start planning for Brexit, despite 51% also saying that the vote to leave the EU has already impacted UK sales. The study, which involved a survey of 250 top British retailers, also found that 32% of those selling internationally have seen an increase in online orders from outside the UK. </p> <p>Additionally, 46% of UK retailers were found to be in favour of a soft Brexit, while 36% agreed that a hard Brexit - with no access to the single market - would be better for UK retailers.</p> <h3>Ad blocking levels stabilise</h3> <p>According to the Internet Advertising Bureau's UK <a href="https://iabuk.net/about/press/archive/iab-uk-reveals-latest-ad-blocking-behaviour" target="_blank">Ad Blocking Report</a>, the proportion of British adults online currently using ad blocking software has remained at around 22% for the last year.</p> <p>Despite a predicted rise in ad blocking, this has failed to materialise, perhaps due to many publishers working hard to promote a value exchange.</p> <p>24% of people cited not being able to access online content as the biggest reason for switching off their ad blocker - a figure up from 16% a year ago. Meanwhile, 24% said that it is because they have since switched to a new device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4122/ad_blocking.png" alt="" width="750" height="453"></p> <h3>Travel brands expected to benefit from Oscar hype</h3> <p>Data from Lastminute.com suggests that travel brands have seen an increase in search interest on the back of this year’s Oscar nominations. Searches for flights to Los Angeles shot up by 21% on the day of La La Land’s release. Meanwhile, Martin Scorsese’s Silence prompted an even bigger surge, with searches for flights to Japan up 82% from the week before, and increasing a further 46% in the subsequent two days.</p> <p>Though it hasn’t been nominated for any Academy Awards, Brit flick Eddie the Eagle also prompted greater interest in ski holidays, with on-site searches jumping 10% after its release.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4123/Lastminute.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="424"></p> <h3>56% of CRM managers lack firm objectives</h3> <p>In a survey of 500 leading CRM managers, <a href="http://news.wiraya.com/news/crm-managers-dont-believe-theyre-generating-revenue-222319">Wiraya found that CRM</a> is perceived as a key business driver for over 30% of businesses. Despite this fact, it seems many still lack the data and strategy to support their goals and create profitability.</p> <p>While 91% of businesses are currently measuring aspects of their CRM work, 56% do not have firm objectives in place. What’s more, just 17% say that their CRM work is clearly contributing to the company’s overall revenue. This proves that major improvements still need to be made, as just 31% currently consider themselves ‘ambitious’ in terms of CRM maturity.</p> <h3>One in six UK shoppers have switched supermarkets in the past year</h3> <p>In light of Aldi becoming the nation’s fifth largest supermarket, <a href="http://www.tccglobal.com/en/blog/article/uk-shopper-loyalty-study">TCC Global has undertaken a study</a> on the state of consumer loyalty to grocery stores. It found that 32% of UK discount shoppers and 16% of all shoppers have switched their main grocery store in the last 12 months. Meanwhile, 39% of shoppers said that it wouldn’t matter to them if their usual grocery store closed.</p> <p>The research also found that growing convenience is making it even easier to switch between retailers, with shoppers having an average of 11 ‘reachable’, 10 ‘easily reachable’ and five ‘very easily reachable' stores.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4124/Aldi.jpg" alt="" width="720" height="480"></p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 12% year on year in January</h3> <p>The latest figures from <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/" target="_blank">IMRG Capgemini</a> has revealed that UK online retail sales were up 12% year-on-year in the first month of 2017, with retailers seeing the highest average January spend since 2010. The average basket value was recorded as £85 in January 2017, up from £79 a year earlier. </p> <p>In terms of sectors, growth for gifts reached an eight-year high, with an increase of 62% year-on-year. Meanwhile, electricals were down 9%, falling for the second month in a row.</p> <h3>Consumers struggle to identify British brands</h3> <p>A recent poll by Spread Co has found that the majority of consumers are baffled by the origins of their favourite brands. 50% of consumers believe Tetley Tea to be British, when it is in fact owned by a foreign company. Similarly, 42% think the same about Branston Pickle and 37% about HP Sauce, when they are actually Indian and Japanese.</p> <p>The survey also found that 61% of UK adults don’t know that The Body Shop is part of L’oreal, while 19% think Tesco is the biggest company in Britain (even though it only represents 0.84% of the market share).</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4127/body_shop.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="490"></p> <h3>Mulberry and Burberry are the most searched-for brands during LFW</h3> <p>Captify has revealed that the top three searched for designers during London Fashion Week were Mulberry, Burberry and JW Anderson. Other designers saw online searches go through the roof, with Ryan Lo experiencing a jump of 2,000% over the week, followed by surges for Topshop Unique and Sadie Williams.</p> <p>In terms of the most searched-for items, designer trainers rose by 60%, followed by minimalist clothing and 90’s style, which both rose 20%.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68831 2017-02-23T11:48:06+00:00 2017-02-23T11:48:06+00:00 How brands are tapping into the trend for a digital detox Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, we are able to use mobile technology to encourage creativity and enhance entertainment – but arguably at the expense of our productivity and general well-being.</p> <p>This topic was recently highlighted in Mindshare’s 2017 <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/uk" target="_blank">Trends report</a>, which also cited how certain companies are tapping into the consumer’s desire to switch off.</p> <p>Here’s a bit of elaboration on the subject, and a few more examples of how brands are (ironically) using technology to combat technology overload.</p> <h3>Dolmio Pepper Hacker</h3> <p>Last year, Dolmio used the notion of ‘too much tech’ as the basis of its own marketing campaign. It was built around the idea that technology has hijacked dinner time, with children becoming so absorbed in tablets and smartphones that they are completely unaware of everything going on around them. </p> <p>So, it created the ‘pepper hacker’ - a device that automatically disables surrounding Wi-Fi - to help families reclaim dinner time. </p> <p>It was a well-executed campaign, incorporating an amusing advert, a competition and a related creative – all hosted on a dedicated website. As well as using a relatable topic to target its core demographic of families, the brand was also able to show care and concern for the people who typically buy its products.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dN04OO67_do?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Apple</h3> <p>Apple included a whole host of sleep-related features in its iOS 10 update, recognising the growing problem of users being able to switch off from their phones at night. Putting ‘Bedtime’ into its own dedicated tab, it now allows users to configure alarms to remind them when to go to bed and when to wake up, emphasising that a regular pattern can help aid restful sleep. </p> <p>More recently, there’s been talk that Apple is to introduce new apps for the Apple Watch, including similar sleep and fitness trackers. If it does, this demonstrates the brand's greater intent to infiltrate the health industry, as well as perhaps recognition that it is intrinsically linked to users’ increasing sleep troubles.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4100/Apple_bedtime.jpg" alt="" width="625" height="539"></p> <h3>GE</h3> <p>Another brand to tap into sleep-related issues is GE, with its range of C-Sleep light bulbs.</p> <p>Designed to prevent harsh light from interrupting natural rhythms in the brain, the lightbulbs can be toggled between three settings – one for night, one for morning and one for any time in-between. By changing the light intensity, people will be able to prevent melatonin levels from being disrupted, as well as create a more calming and sleep-inducing bedtime environment.</p> <p>This is a good example of a brand demonstrating that it’s not always about a reaction against technology itself – but finding ways to use technology in smart ways in order to facilitate a modern lifestyle. The fact that the lightbulbs can be controlled via an app proves that balance is key.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4101/GE.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="416"></p> <h3>Meantime Brewing Company</h3> <p>Another content marketing campaign, this time from Meantime Brewing Company, based on the idea that technology is disrupting socialising and our ability to enjoy down-time. As part of its 'Make Time For It' campaign, it challenged six talented craftsmen from six cities to each create one element of a pop up bar. The premise being that it takes time to both create and enjoy a good beer.</p> <p>Meantime’s London bar, also the smallest ever pop-bar, opened last October with one stipulation – everyone entering had to hand over their mobile phone so that they could enjoy a pint, technology-free. </p> <p>It’s not unusual for beer brands to use ideas of patience and calm – Guinness’s famous tagline is course “good things come to those who wait”. However, Meantime’s strict no-smartphone rule proved that more brands are cottoning on to the idea (as well as how it can be used to drum up a good bit of PR).</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jIn0N2mpbKw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Headspace</h3> <p>Lastly, just one example of a brand that would not exist if there wasn’t a desire to switch off.</p> <p>Headspace is one of the most successful mindfulness apps, designed to help users take a break from the treadmill of life and instead take a well-earned breather. Now reported to be worth £25m, there has been some suggestion that Headspace goes against the traditional, spiritual premise of true mindfulness. After all, not all of its features are free.</p> <p>This is a pretty cynical view, however, and perhaps one that is beside the point here. What Headspace shows us is that mindfulness is now mainstream. Brands, whether they are already established or not, are merely finding more ways to capitalise on it.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Life is easier with technology. But is it happier? <a href="https://t.co/sEEs4t62jI">https://t.co/sEEs4t62jI</a> <a href="https://t.co/6FHyxFG9eW">pic.twitter.com/6FHyxFG9eW</a></p> — Headspace (@Headspace) <a href="https://twitter.com/Headspace/status/833858035336425473">February 21, 2017</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68826 2017-02-22T14:06:00+00:00 2017-02-22T14:06:00+00:00 Three things to appreciate about Discover LA’s latest video campaign Nikki Gilliland <p>It’s an interesting approach, and one that I think works quite well. Here are a few reasons why.</p> <h3>Movie inspiration</h3> <p>There are a lot of movies about cities, but there aren’t many that celebrate a location quite like La La Land. Unsurprisingly, Discover LA has jumped on the bandwagon, taking inspiration from the movie and mimicking its celebration of the city’s sweeping skyline.</p> <p>The first video from the campaign, ‘Magic’, is so far the most reminiscent of La La Land. It features a dance troupe performing against the backdrop of a twinkling, dusky Downtown skyline, complete with a view from Griffith Observatory.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7kRl2IWg9qY?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Arguably then, the best thing about Discover LA’s campaign is its timing – cleverly coinciding with the film’s release and subsequent 14 Oscar nominations. </p> <p>However, whether you’ve seen the movie or not, the campaign’s cinematic (and rose-tinted) view of LA is bound to leave you feeling a little captivated – or nonplussed at your own less-than-glamorous surroundings at the very least. I particularly like the fact that the videos feature no talking or background narration. </p> <p>In contrast to a previous tourism campaign from Visit California, which featured a host of people humble-bragging about their laid-back lifestyle, the videos are far more enjoyable to watch.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Iey7_N_mEx4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Based on consumer opinion</h3> <p>Discover LA has traditionally used the real-life experiences of local residents to inform its marketing campaigns, incorporating insight about what makes life in Los Angeles so special.</p> <p>This latest campaign is no different, however this time it uses the opinions of people from elsewhere. The brand reportedly undertook in-depth focus groups in nine key global markets, including the UK, in order to find out why travellers are drawn to the city. From this, it discovered that most people cited the feeling or the lifestyle of LA as the most intriguing part. </p> <p>This is another reason why the campaign feels so refreshing. Instead of promoting the city in a stereotypically ‘Hollywood’ fashion – or the ‘millennials want experiences’ angle - it focuses on the overarching (and sometimes unexplainable) atmosphere.</p> <p>In turn, it recognises that the city is a genuine travel destination for Brits based on a wide range of reasons – not just its recent movie incarnation. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Dh2pHJVIeAo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Social media integration</h3> <p>Lastly, Discover LA’s use of social is particularly impressive – specifically how its uses Instagram to provide extra value for users.</p> <p>By choosing to post its ‘Discover LA’ videos directly within Instagram, it manages to ensure greater reach.</p> <p>Meanwhile, not only are the posts beautiful to look at, but the brand often includes detailed descriptions too. This helps to counteract the feeling that the campaign (and Instagram as a channel) is more shallow than informative – one which merely emphasises what’s on the surface.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4051/Discover_LA_Insta.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="497"></p> <p>By including content in this context, Discover LA manages to strike a good balance, both informing the user as well as visually capturing their attention. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67952-five-tourism-websites-guaranteed-to-give-you-wanderlust/" target="_blank">Five tourism websites guaranteed to give you wanderlust</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67996-what-travel-tourism-marketers-can-learn-from-discover-la/" target="_blank">What travel &amp; tourism marketers can learn from Discover LA</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68604-why-ugc-is-the-future-of-social-media-in-travel-and-tourism-marketing/" target="_blank">Why UGC is the future of social media in travel and tourism marketing</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68799 2017-02-10T14:11:00+00:00 2017-02-10T14:11:00+00:00 10 epic digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Now, let’s get straight to it.</p> <h3>Technology is holding back half of UK retailers</h3> <p>Retailers are still struggling to harness the power of new technology, according to the latest research from eCommera and Coleman Parkes.</p> <p>In a study of 200 UK retailers with revenue of over £100m, 46% of respondents said their tech stack is inhibiting growth. Consequently, 64% plan to increase investment in 2017.</p> <p>When it comes down to the reasons why, retailers cited website stability, customer experience and analytics as the three areas that require greater focus. This proves that - while retailers might have invested in the latest tech – many are unable to implement it correctly.</p> <h3>Pepsi Super Bowl ad generates most media conversation</h3> <p>4C has revealed the Super Bowl moments that ignited social media, with both Lady Gaga and Pepsi overshadowing the game itself.</p> <p>There were over 37m engagements around the event in total, including conversation about teams, players, and performers.</p> <p>Tom Brady earned 2.5m engagements, while Lady Gaga gained 5.5m engagements for her impressive performance. Meanwhile, Pepsi was the most talked about brand ad, garnering 708,089 engagements.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3826/Pepsi.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="234"></p> <h3>UK searches for mini-breaks up a fifth year on year</h3> <p>The Spring Travel Insights report from Bing Ads has revealed the travel destinations Brits are currently searching for.</p> <p>With a spike driven by Valentine’s Day and the approaching spring bank holiday, searches for mini or short breaks are up nearly a fifth year on year. Spa breaks are similarly popular, making up 23% of searches.</p> <p>Mobile is also a key driver, with 31% of mini-break search volume coming from a smartphone or tablet.</p> <h3>More consumers search eBay for iPads than roses for Valentine’s Day</h3> <p>In more Valentine’s Day news, eBay has revealed that Valentine’s gifts are increasingly moving from the practical to the experiential, as shoppers search for more unusual and imaginative gift ideas.</p> <p>This time last year, searches in eBay’s Travel &amp; Holidays category surged by 55%, while interest in its Art category rose by 60%. Further to this, interest in event tickets and books rose by 57% and 39% respectively.</p> <p>Even traditional gifts like roses have been eclipsed by practical items like the iPad, which saw a 31% spike in search interest.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3830/ebay.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="479"></p> <h3>One in ten marketers admit their emails are irrelevant</h3> <p>New <a href="https://dma.org.uk/article/marketer-email-tracker-2017-launch" target="_blank">research from the DMA</a> highlights how vital emails are to marketing strategies, with 95% of marketers agreeing that they are ‘important’ or ‘very important’.</p> <p>Despite this, only 9% say that all their emails are relevant to customers, and 38% say that ‘some’ are relevant at best.</p> <p>For marketers, ‘lack of strategy’ remains the biggest concern, followed by ‘lack of data’ and ‘data silos’. It’s not all bad news, however, as last year’s biggest concern of ‘limited internal resources’ has dropped out of the top three.</p> <p>With over half of consumers having considered deleting their email account, it is up to marketers to strive to provide greater relevance and value.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3827/DMA.JPG" alt="" width="711" height="342"></p> <h3>AI marketing spend predicted to hit $2bn by 2020</h3> <p>A new report from Qubit and IDC predicts that marketing spend on artificial intelligence technology will grow by 54% from $360m in 2016 to $2bn by 2020.</p> <p>A large factor in this prediction is the belief that traditional tools like A/B testing and predictive analytics are flat lining. Similarly, the suggestion that marketers are struggling with the sheer volume and variety of consumer data, leading to inaccuracies and errors.</p> <p>Consequently, while marketers are still failing to grasp AI effectively, marketing spend looks set to boom.</p> <h3>Quality more important than price for grocery shoppers</h3> <p>New research from Shoppercentric has highlighted the changing expectations of grocery shoppers, as high quality produce overtakes competitive pricing in terms of importance.</p> <p>Now, 54% of consumers say quality produce is the most critical factor, while 49% cite price.</p> <p>Other changing behaviour includes how often consumers shop, with the ‘little and often’ trend increasing 5% since 2016. Lastly, the rise of mobile continues, with 27% of shoppers using their smartphone to shop in the past month – a rise of 3% from last year. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3828/Shoppercentric.JPG" alt="" width="599" height="233"></p> <h3>5.5bn people predicted to be using mobile phones by 2021</h3> <p>According to a new report from Cisco, more people will be using mobile phones in 2021 than bank accounts and landlines.</p> <p>Due to strong growth in mobile users, smartphones and IoT connections - combined with network speed improvements and mobile video consumption - mobile data traffic is predicted to grow sevenfold.</p> <p>Cisco also forecasts that there will be 12bn mobile-connected devices by 2021 – a figure up from 8bn in 2016. Lastly, the total number of smartphones is expected to account for more than half of all devices and connections in the world.</p> <h3>46% of consumers influenced by social video</h3> <p>In a survey over 5,500 consumers, the Science of Social Video has found that people spend an average of six hours a week watching video content on social media networks.</p> <p>67% of respondents said that this figure had increased over the course of the past year, while 60% said that it’s likely to continue to rise.</p> <p>The survey also highlights how social video can impact purchasing decisions, with 46% saying they had made a purchase as a result of watching a branded video on social media, while 32% had considered doing so.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3829/Social_minutes.JPG" alt="" width="582" height="332"></p> <p><em>(Minutes of social video consumers watch per day)</em></p> <h3>Omni-channel sales restricted by security concerns</h3> <p>A new survey from Aspect has found that security concerns about social media could be preventing sales.</p> <p>69% of consumers have security concerns over payment or personal details, while 60% have concerns over social media channels being at risk of phishing attempts or fraudulent profiles.</p> <p>While social media channels are still widely used for research purposes, purchases are generally carried out elsewhere, with a majority of consumers being unwilling to pay via communication channels like Facebook, WhatsApp or Instagram.</p> <p>On the other hand, consumers are increasingly confident in paying via mobile applications, with 75% saying they are happy to do so.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68753 2017-01-30T14:31:08+00:00 2017-01-30T14:31:08+00:00 What brands need to know about Facebook's long-form video push Patricio Robles <h3>It's changing the way video completion rates are factored into News Feed ranking</h3> <p>In a blog post, Facebook product manager Abhishek Bapna and research scientist Seyoung Park <a href="https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2017/01/news-feed-fyi-updating-how-we-account-for-video-completion-rates/">explained</a> that Facebook is changing the way it factors the <em>percent completion</em> metric for video into how it ranks content for placement in user News Feeds:</p> <blockquote> <p>If you watch most or all of a video, that tells us that you found the video to be compelling — and we know that completing a longer video is a bigger commitment than completing a shorter one. As we continue to understand how our community consumes video, we’ve realized that we should therefore weight percent completion more heavily the longer a video is, to avoid penalizing longer videos.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Distribution changes are expected to be small</h3> <p>Despite the tweak, Bapna and Park say that Facebook's distribution changes are not expected to be significant.</p> <p>"Longer videos that people spend time watching may see a slight increase in distribution on Facebook — so people who find longer videos engaging may be able to discover more of them in News Feed. As a side effect, some shorter videos may see a slight dip in News Feed distribution," they stated.</p> <h3>This is (probably) mostly about advertising</h3> <p>Facebook obviously has an interest in ensuring that the content it delivers to users is relevant and engaging, but the decision to more heavily weight video completion percentage for longer videos, however slight, is probably designed to help Facebook's video ad business.</p> <p>Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is not a fan of pre-roll ads, and thus his social network has to date refused to employ them. Facebook is, however, <a href="http://www.recode.net/2017/1/9/14211466/facebook-video-advertising-midroll">testing mid-roll ads</a>, that display after users have watched a video for at least 20 seconds.</p> <p>For mid-roll ads to be successful, Facebook will realistically need to ensure that it has enough inventory of videos that are not super short. That's where the new update and its theoretical incentive to publish longer videos comes in.</p> <h3>Facebook is reportedly going to pay for content</h3> <p>Facebook <a href="http://www.recode.net/2016/12/14/13955348/facebook-original-video">is said to be in talks</a> with television studios and other content creators about the licensing and production of original content, which would seem to be related to a desire to increase the volume of longer-form video content available to its users.</p> <h3>Brands should think twice before they jump on the long-form video bandwagon</h3> <p>While Facebook suggests that changes in distribution won't be significant as a result of its update, in the ultra-competitve Facebook ecosystem, any update that could give brands a slight edge in capturing eyeballs might entice marketers into changing their behavior.</p> <p>But given the cost of producing longer-form video, and the risk that users won't stay engaged with this content no matter how much Facebook hopes they will, brands active on Facebook should be cautious about pursuing the creation of longer-form video in the hopes that it will help them eek out gains on the social network.</p> <p>Even brands that Facebook lures with payments have reason to be cautious. After all, to drive adoption of its livestream feature, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live">Facebook Live</a>, Facebook struck deals with publishers and celebrities to create live video content. The company reportedly allocated $50m to these deals, with some individual deals being worth seven figures.</p> <p>But a year later, reports indicate that Facebook will not renew these deals, and even if it wanted to, some of the publishers have no interest in renewing because the deals did not prove worthwhile financially.</p> <p>That is a reminder that what Facebook wants today, it might not want tomorrow, especially once it gets what it needs. There's no reason to believe that won't be true for long-form video content too.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68751 2017-01-27T14:56:00+00:00 2017-01-27T14:56:00+00:00 10 superb digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week we're covering news about cart abandonment, adspend, dodgy ads, and lots more. Don't forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even further info.</p> <h3>76% of marketers see ad blocking as a positive</h3> <p>According to a survey by YouGov and the Chartered Institute of Marketing, the majority of marketers believe that ad blocking will be a positive for the industry, encouraging better practice and greater levels of creativity.</p> <p>On the other hand, 38% of respondents believe that it could lead to a decline in online marketing.</p> <p>Other key stats from the research include the key areas of focus for the year ahead, with 42% of marketers citing personalisation, 37% citing data-driven marketing and 31% saying influencer marketing.</p> <h3>Emojis generate 17% more interaction on Instagram</h3> <p>A new study by Quintly has revealed that emojis result in 17% higher interaction when used on Instagram.</p> <p>From analysis of 22,000 profiles and 6.2m posts, those which included emojis were found to have a 2.07 interaction rate compared to 1.77 for those without.</p> <p>Other findings include the most popular emojis of 2016, with the most-used being the camera emoji, followed by the ‘OK’ hand signal and the pink hearts. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3441/Quintly.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="369"></p> <h3>43% of marketers still experimenting with influencer marketing</h3> <p>According to Altimeter’s Traackr report, 71% of marketers rate influencer marketing as a strategic or highly strategic area of marketing.</p> <p>However, 43% of those that agree are still experimenting with the practice, and 28% are only involving influencers at campaign level.</p> <p>The report also found the influencer budgets are still small compared to other areas of focus, but a shift in prioritisation means that 55% of marketers plan to spend more on influencers in 2017.</p> <h3>Trump’s inauguration generates 15m social media engagements</h3> <p>4C has revealed how social media users reacted to Donald Trump’s inauguration.</p> <p>The day’s event saw over 15m engagements across Facebook and Twitter, with the new President generating over 5m of them.</p> <p>Engagement peaked for the inauguration when the Obamas met the Trumps at the White House – a moment that’s now famous for Michelle Obama’s awkward reaction towards <em>that</em> Tiffany box.</p> <p>While the #inauguration hashtag generated 2.6m engagements on the day itself, the #womensmarch hashtag drew 7.3m engagements the day after.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3443/Trump.PNG" alt="" width="653" height="439"></p> <h3>Google removes 80m misleading ads in 2016</h3> <p>Google’s Bad Ads report has revealed that 80m bad ads were removed in 2016 for deceiving, misleading or shocking users with false information or clickbait headlines.</p> <p>Similarly, Google also took down 7m bad ads for intentionally trying to scam consumers or deliberately trying to trick its detection systems.</p> <p>In 2016, 1.7bn ads were removed overall, which is double the amount of ads removed the year previous.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3444/Google_Ads.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="339"></p> <h3>82% of customers over 55 feel undervalued</h3> <p>A new study by ICLP has found that customers over the age of 55 often feel overlooked, with 82% saying that retailers do not understand their needs.</p> <p>Consequently, 95% of over 55s would consider abandoning their favourite retailers in favour of others.</p> <p>ICLP’s survey also discovered what would make this demographic more loyal. The results found stronger reward programmes, communication and reliability to be the top three factors.</p> <h3>Adding touch to mobile ads increases engagement</h3> <p>In a study of 1,137 Android users, IPG Media Lab discovered that capitalising on consumer’s sense of touch during mobile video ads can produce a 50% uplift in brand favourability.</p> <p>While a standard video ad achieved happiness and excitement levels of 37% and 30% in consumers, video ads with touch-enabled elements resulted in rates of 44% and 38% respectively.</p> <p>This also resulted in a halo effect, with a 6% increase in positive brand perception overall.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3447/Touch.JPG" alt="" width="513" height="303"></p> <h3>Global cart abandonment rates up 2.4%</h3> <p>SalesCycle’s <a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/post/remarketing-report-q4-2016/" target="_blank">Remarketing Report</a> details the latest global cart abandonment stats. It shows that global cart abandonment rates were 76.8% in Q4 2016, a figure up 2.4% on the previous quarter. </p> <p>In terms of industry, fashion cart abandonment remains the lowest at 67.4%. Meanwhile, utilities is the highest, with an abandonment rate of 84.4%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3446/Abandonment_rates.JPG" alt="" width="710" height="502"></p> <h3>58% of B2B buyers distrust vendor claims</h3> <p><a href="https://vendors.trustradius.com/b2b-buying-disconnect/" target="_blank">Research from TrustRadius</a> has found that tech vendors are failing to keep up with expectations, as nearly 60% of B2B buyers cite vendor-provided materials as the least trustworthy source.</p> <p>Despite many feeling sceptical over claims, buyers still acknowledge that vendors play a significant role in the purchasing process, with 62% saying they help answer questions, facilitate basic demos, and provide technical support.</p> <p>Additionally, the report found product demos and free trials to be the best and most trustworthy resources for buyers.</p> <h3>UK adspend increases following Brexit</h3> <p>According to the latest figures from the Advertising Association, UK adspend increased 4.2% in the quarter following Brexit.</p> <p>This news comes on the back of a Deloitte survey which found that 22% of advertising businesses have lost contracts since last June, and 62% believe the decision has negatively affected their business.</p> <p>On the other hand, the survey also found that 23% see Brexit as an opportunity for growth, and as a result, 8% plan to increase investment in the UK. </p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68727 2017-01-20T14:14:00+00:00 2017-01-20T14:14:00+00:00 10 of the best digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Don’t forget, you can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more insight.</p> <p>On we go...</p> <h3>Less than half of consumers satisfied with retail apps</h3> <p>New research from Apadmi has found that retail apps are failing to meet the expectations of consumers, with just 40% of UK consumers being satisfied with the apps they’ve downloaded in the past.</p> <p>Nearly one in five say they would like retailers to invest more heavily in improving apps, while 30% would be more likely to use them if they had a wider range of features. </p> <p>Lastly, 25% of consumers say they would think less of a retailer that failed to update its app regularly.</p> <h3>Online searches for food trends increase</h3> <p>New data from Hitwise has revealed that online searches related to diet, nutrition and super-food have risen by 70% in the past two years. Searches for ‘gluten-free’ have become particular popular, rising 141% since 2014. </p> <p>Meanwhile, searches for ‘paleo’ enjoyed a big spike at the start of 2016, however with New Year’s resolutions waning, interest declined as the months passed.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3234/Gluten_Free_Searches.png" alt="" width="624" height="310"></p> <h3>92% of online consumers don’t intend to buy during a first visit </h3> <p>A new report by Episerver has discovered that too much of a focus on conversion means retailers could be missing out on opportunities for engagement.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 consumers, it was found that 92% who visit an ecommerce website or mobile app with the intent of buying rarely or never complete checkout.</p> <p>This reflects the importance of relevant and engaging content that supports the entire purchase journey, rather than content that's geared around getting consumers to buy.</p> <h3>Location &amp; convenience drives supermarket shoppers </h3> <p>Despite continual ‘price wars’ between the big four supermarkets, consumers don’t choose where to shop based on low prices - this is according to a new study by TCC.</p> <p>In a survey of 1,530 UK shoppers, proximity and location was found to have the biggest influence on where consumers shop, with 48% of Brits citing this as the main factor. </p> <p>40% of survey respondents said a decent range of products and services, 39% said habit and familiarity, while just 34% said low prices. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3243/sainsburys.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>Half of students predict online tracking would improve grades</h3> <p>According to new research by Kortext, 47% of students believe that they would achieve better grades if their lecturers were able to track their study habits throughout the academic year.</p> <p>In a survey of over 1,000 current and former students, 91% said they would be happy for universities to use analytics to track weekly progress, while 76% said that a closer monitoring of study habits would lead to fewer university dropouts.</p> <h3>Over 50s spend 71% more per visit than younger shoppers</h3> <p>Coniq has found that shoppers over the age of 50 tend to spend 71% more in shopping centres than younger people, despite visiting 25% less.</p> <p>The research also found that the over 50s complete around 45% of transactions per trip, which is a much higher amount compared to other consumer age groups. Likewise, older consumers were found to make use of 31% more offers than younger age demographics.</p> <p>For retailers, this proves the importance of older consumers, with the over 55s now expected to make up two thirds of all retail activity by 2025.</p> <h3>Advertisers wasted over 600m on non-viewable ads in 2016</h3> <p>According to the latest report from Meetrics, UK advertisers spent approximately £606m on online ads that failed to meet the minimum viewability standards in 2016.</p> <p>In the final quarter of the year, just 49% of banner ads met the recommendation that 50% of the ad is in view for at least one second.</p> <p>Despite the figure being a slight improvement on Q2, it still remains a noticeable drop from the 54% viewability level of Q1 2016.</p> <p>In comparison to other European countries, this means the UK is lagging behind, with Austria and France having 69% and 60% viewability levels respectively. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3229/Viewability.png" alt="" width="540" height="371"></p> <h3>50% of consumers uninspired by finance marketing</h3> <p>A new study by 3radical has delved into consumer perceptions of marketing campaigns across the UK’s largest industries.</p> <p>Efforts from banks and brands within the finance industry were found to be the most ineffective, with 50% of survey respondents citing marketing campaigns as uninspiring. </p> <p>38% of consumers said the same thing about fashion and beauty marketing, making it the second-worst performing industry. In contrast, supermarkets and technology brands both scored well, with 80% of Brits believing supermarkets’ marketing to be effective, and 79% saying the same for technology brands.</p> <h3>Email rated as the best performing marketing channel</h3> <p>According to the DMA’s latest benchmarking report, email remains in good health, with 41% of marketers rating it as the best-performing channel.</p> <p>Now at 98%, email delivery rate is at its highest ever, increasing by 11 percentage points since 2010. </p> <p>Lastly, despite some decline in recent years, unique open rates and unique click-to-open rates remain steady, currently at 15% and 20% respectively.</p> <p><em>Total emails delivered</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3227/DMA_email.JPG" alt="" width="622" height="404"></p> <h3>Aldi named as one of the UK’s most customer-centric retailers</h3> <p>Dunnhumby’s latest global index report has revealed that Aldi, Lidl and Tesco are the UK’s most customer-centric retailers.</p> <p>The findings are based on the key drivers behind a customer’s likelihood to repurchase from a retailer as well as desire to recommend it, including factors like ‘affinity’, ‘range and service’ and ‘rewards’.</p> <p>Aldi was ranked highest for ease and price, Tesco for its customer loyalty programmes, and Lidl for its value-focused approach.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68705 2017-01-16T14:14:50+00:00 2017-01-16T14:14:50+00:00 Why Oprah’s endorsement could be the key to success for Weight Watchers Nikki Gilliland <p>But is Oprah a unique case due to her super-stardom?</p> <p>Here’s some insight into why she (and big celebrity endorsements) could still be the key to success for Weight Watchers and other brands like it.</p> <h3>Brand challenges</h3> <p>Weight Watchers has had a tumultuous time over the past couple of years, with shares rising and falling sharply. In 2015, Oprah bought a 10% stake in the company, which sent investment rocketing. A year later, CEO James Chambers left, leading to renewed doubt over the brand’s declining membership.</p> <p>One of the brand’s biggest challenges has undoubtedly been competition from emerging areas within the health and fitness industry, such as apps and wearables with tracking technology.</p> <p>It’s been estimated that <a href="http://www.wareable.com/wearable-tech/how-many-apple-watches-sold-2016" target="_blank">36.7m FitBit trackers</a> have been sold since 2014 – an impressive figure when you compare it to Weight Watchers’ 1.4m active online subscribers.</p> <p>Of course, for Weight Watchers - a brand that is rooted in the emotion-driven diet industry rather than rationally-focused fitness sector – this kind of comparison is a fruitless exercise. That being said, reversing dwindling membership is undoubtedly a big aim, and this brings us to its renewed marketing efforts with Oprah front-and-centre in a series of new ads.</p> <h3>The personal factor</h3> <p>Part of the ‘Live Fully’ campaign, Weight Watchers rolled out two new ads in time for autumn and winter 2016, both featuring Oprah “revealing her own story”.</p> <p>In both, she is seen announcing the fact that she has lost 40 pounds on the plan, putting it down to a focus on ‘living well’ and not feeling deprived in the process.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UNlaMUnOVUg?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The campaign depicts losing weight in a healthy and positive way by highlighting the amount Weight Watchers members are allowed to eat rather than what is off-limits. And with the brand promoting such a positive and life-affirming attitude, there’s certainly an empowering feel to the ads.</p> <p>Though this style of marketing is well-worn ground for Weight Watchers, Oprah’s influence injects a fresh boost of authority, and in turn gives the campaign greater value. Unlike a celebrity that’s merely been paid to promote a product, Oprah’s involvement is rooted in both personal and professional reasons.</p> <p>Of course, cynics might say that her shares in the company are motivation enough to front a campaign, but with Oprah’s well-documented association with Weight Watchers in years previously, it would suggest her association is authentic.</p> <h3>Building consumer trust</h3> <p>For brands using high-profile personalities in marketing, this authenticity is key when it comes to instilling consumer confidence.</p> <p>While research suggests that a celebrity endorsement can lead to a <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/steveolenski/2016/07/20/how-brands-should-use-celebrities-for-endorsements/#77eb58cc5556" target="_blank">4% increase in immediate sales</a>, it is vital that it is seen as a genuine and natural reflection of their personality and values. </p> <p>Oprah, who is well-known for championing female empowerment, philanthropy and entrepreneurialism, therefore aligns with, not only the values of Weight Watchers, but also its core consumer.</p> <p>Likewise, with social media also allowing us greater insight into the daily lives of celebrities, it’s becoming easier to see through those who are disingenuous. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3054/oprah_insta.JPG" alt="" width="680" height="437"></p> <h3>Positive results</h3> <p>In the third quarter of last year, <a href="http://www.weightwatchersinternational.com/file/Index?KeyFile=36547514" target="_blank">Weight Watchers reported</a> that subscribers were up 10.1% compared with the same period in the year previous. </p> <p>Similarly, revenue was up 3% year-on-year to $281m. Overall, it looks as though Oprah’s ad campaign contributed to these positive results.</p> <p>With a revamp that cleverly aligns with the TV star’s female fanbase, Weight Watchers has proven that celebrity endorsement still offer value – as long as it is done with transparency and real authenticity. </p> <p><em><strong>To learn more about this topic, check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-future-of-celebrity-marketing" target="_blank">Future of Celebrity Marketing</a> report.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68704 2017-01-13T13:27:41+00:00 2017-01-13T13:27:41+00:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>You’ll find news on content marketing formats, abandonment emails, customer retention and social media. Don’t forget to download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more.</p> <h3>72% of marketers value data analysis over social media skills</h3> <p>According to a new report by BlueVenn, 72% of marketers consider data analysis to be the most important skill to acquire in the next two years.</p> <p>From speaking to over 200 marketers in the US and UK, BlueVenn found that understanding customer data is considered far more vital than the likes of social media and web development, with just 65% and 31% of respondents citing these respectively.</p> <p>This appears to be an especially common view in larger businesses, where a lack of tools and access to technologies is the biggest barrier.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3043/BlueVenn.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="475"></p> <h3>Abandonment emails sent after one-hour boost conversion</h3> <p>New stats from SaleCycle show that the best time to reconnect with shoppers is one hour after they’ve abandoned their basket.</p> <p>From the conversion rates of 500 global brands, an average conversion of 6.33% was seen after one hour, compared with just 3.14% when sent before one hour and 3.41% one to two hours after.</p> <p>As well as timing, research also found that personalisation is a big factor in email success, with subject names that include the customer name seeing the highest open-rate.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3048/Email_time.JPG" alt="" width="314" height="522"></p> <h3>Two-thirds of UK consumers willing to use robots for banking</h3> <p>‘Robo-advisors’ is not a term we’ll be adopting any time soon, however, according to new research from Accenture more of us will be willing to accept the concept in future.</p> <p>Apparently, it refers to the robots used to offer financial or banking advice in place of real-life humans. And according to a survey of UK consumers, 68% are willing to use them.</p> <p>The reasons behind the demand for this type of technology is speed and convenience, with 40% citing this factor for using it. Lastly, 25% see the impartiality of robo-advice as a key attraction, with this figure rising to almost one third in those over 65.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3047/Robots.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="397"></p> <h3>Instagram Stories grows to 150m daily users</h3> <p>Despite initial reservations from users, Instagram Stories continues to grow, with the feature adding 50m more daily users since October.</p> <p>According to other recent stats, a third of the most-viewed stories come from businesses, and one in five stories on Instagram result in a direct message. </p> <p>Lastly, 70% of video views are reportedly played with the sound on (though this does not include Live Stories).</p> <h3>Original data is the best-performing type of content marketing</h3> <p>A survey by Clutch has uncovered the types of content that marketers believe leads to greater success.</p> <p>17% of respondents said that infographics perform the best, while 18% cited research or original data – both trumped other formats like blog posts and video.</p> <p>In terms of promotion, 85% of content marketers cited paid distribution, such as social media, PPC and native ads as the most effective tactic, over-and-above organic efforts. This reflects the strategies of most marketing agencies, with 71% using paid distribution tactics most frequently.</p> <h3>Nearly 20% of online retailers lost out to rivals over Christmas</h3> <p>According to the latest JDA/Centiro report, many retailers failed to meet the growing consumer demand for convenience during the 2016 Christmas period.</p> <p>19% of online Christmas customers shopped at alternative retailers due to stock unavailability and delivery time constraints.</p> <p>While use of click-and-collect services has somewhat plateaued, it is mostly seen as a way of avoiding delivery charges, with 53% of consumers recently using it for this reason.</p> <p>The report also found that many people suffered problems with click and collect last Christmas, with long waiting times due to a lack of staff having a negative impact on the experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3045/Click_and_Collect.jpg" alt="" width="350" height="571"></p> <h3>Valentine’s Day presents big opportunity for retailers</h3> <p>With Black Friday and Christmas out of the way, many retailers are turning their attention towards the next big holiday.</p> <p>According to stats from Bing, Valentine’s Day presents a huge opportunity, after an estimated $19.7bn was spent last year (and an average of $146 per person).</p> <p>However, it’s not just humans that can expect a gift or two. $681m was reportedly spent on pets for Valentine’s Day last year, giving pet retailers a good reason to get on board in 2017.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3046/Valentines_Day.jpg" alt="" width="483" height="229"></p> <h3>Instagram most important platform for marketers</h3> <p>In more Instagram-related stats, it’s been revealed as the platform marketers will invest the most in this year.</p> <p>Research from Greenlight shows that 70% will focus on Instagram, while 40% of marketers will invest in Twitter. </p> <p>Interestingly, older marketers are placing less importance on social platforms, with 50% of professionals who are over the age of 50 reporting no plans to invest in Instagram and 58% saying the same for Snapchat. </p> <h3>Generation Z bored by standard digital ads</h3> <p>According to a study by Kantar Millward Brown, generation Z (i.e. consumers aged between 16-19) have high expectations when it comes to digital advertising, preferring ads that allow them to interact or make a decision.</p> <p>When it comes to ads that prompt viewers to vote, generation Z reported a positivity score of 31%, compared to just 25% from generation Y. </p> <p>Generation Z were also found to actively dislike invasive ad formats like non-skippable pre-rolls. However, interruption appears to be a big bugbear for all age ranges, with the majority of people installing ad blockers due to this reason.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3044/AdReaction.jpg" alt="" width="740" height="399"></p> <h3>Customer retention is down 7% globally</h3> <p>From a global study of more than 24,000 consumers across nine industry sectors, Verint and IDC has found that customer retention dropped by 7% last year.</p> <p>Overall, this appears to be down to consumers who prefer using digital-based companies displaying less brand loyalty than those who engage with businesses on a human and one-to-one level.</p> <p>49% of digital customers have been with providers for more than three years compared with 57% who prefer to go in-store.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68686 2017-01-06T14:40:18+00:00 2017-01-06T14:40:18+00:00 10 stirring digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>This week’s dose includes news about the internet of things, TV ads, and entertainment sales.</p> <p>Don’t forget – you can download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more.</p> <h3>Holiday shopping generates $91.7bn in online sales </h3> <p>Adobe has revealed the total number of online sales from the Christmas period.</p> <p>November 1st to December 31st generated $91.7bn in online sales - an 11% increase year-on-year.</p> <p>Mobile brought in $28.43bn in revenue, which is a 23% increase from 2015. Figures also show that mobile drove 50% of visits and 31% of purchases.</p> <p>While there was an increase in sales, shipping costs were down, going from an average of $2.60 in 2015 to $2.50 in 2016.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2866/Holiday_spend.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="411"></p> <h3>Older consumers prefer rational marketing</h3> <p>A new study by the Journal of Advertising Research has found that older consumers have a clear preference for rational rather than emotional ads.</p> <p>While 49.7% of audiences under 50 preferred a rational advertisement compared to 50.3% favouring an emotional ad, this was significantly increased among those over 50, with 63% preferring the rational example.</p> <p>Insight suggests that this should inform marketing activity, with logical and knowledge-based appeals being much more effective for prompting older consumers into action.</p> <h3>One in five digital leaders consider their organization digitally mature</h3> <p>Clearhead recently undertook a survey of 150 ecommerce executives, aiming to find out the state of digital maturity with organizations.</p> <p>The results showed that there is still a significant gap between the desire for personalization and the processes and capabilities necessary to execute it, with just one in five leaders considering their companies as ‘digitally mature’.</p> <p>What’s more, despite the obvious desire to be data-driven – with 81% of retailers having purchased or built the technology required for testing programs – just 17% of online retailers have a path to develop personalized experiences for customers.</p> <h3>36% of consumers unfamiliar with IoT</h3> <p>According to a new study by Yahoo, consumer understanding of the Internet of Things (IoT) is below par, with many in the dark as to what the term actually means.</p> <p>Despite 70% of consumers currently owning a connected device, 36% still don’t know what IoT is. </p> <p>However, it appears many are keen to learn, with 41% of survey respondents interested in expanding their knowledge of the subject. </p> <p>The group with the highest level of understanding is teens and millennials, with video games and consoles the most popular connected device.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2867/IoT.JPG" alt="" width="493" height="407"></p> <h3>Increasing importance of customer service</h3> <p>Salesforce has released its latest <a href="http://salesforce.com/stateofservice" target="_blank">State of Service report</a>, delving into how service teams are responding to increasing customer demands.</p> <p>The most interesting stats from the research revolve around how collaboration within companies is key to delivering the best customer service. </p> <p>In fact, in a survey of more than 2,600 customer service professionals, 78% of respondents agreed that every employee is an agent of customer service. </p> <p>However, despite this level of recognition, there’s still room for improvement, with just 63% of service teams having a formal process in place to collaborate with sales.</p> <p>Alongside collaboration, service teams also recognise that a single 360-degree view of the customer can lead to greater productivity, with 79% agreeing that this helps to provide consistency and continuity in every customer interaction.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2870/Customer_Service.JPG" alt="" width="596" height="474"></p> <h3>One third of consumers actively choose to buy sustainable goods</h3> <p>A new study by Unilever has discovered how sustainability affects the purchases of 20,000 adults across five different countries.</p> <p>The results found that 33% now actively choose to buy from brands considered to be sustainable, while 21% would be more likely to choose brands that clearly promote sustainability credentials on packaging and in marketing.</p> <p>Consequently, Unilever predicts that the sustainable goods market is worth an average of £817bn in untapped sales.</p> <h3>'Personal assistants' is the top marketing search of 2016</h3> <p>Microsoft’s Bing Ads has released the top marketing-related searches of 2016.</p> <p>Due to greater advances in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67894-what-are-chatbots-and-why-should-marketers-care/" target="_blank">chatbots</a> and virtual assistants like Alexa, Cortana and Amazon Echo, personal assistants and AI saw the biggest interest.</p> <p>The top five include:</p> <ol> <li>Personal Assistants/ Intelligent Agents</li> <li>Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality</li> <li>Search Marketing</li> <li>Artificial Intelligence </li> <li>Content Marketing</li> </ol> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2868/Bing_top_searches.jpg" alt="" width="537" height="268"></p> <h3>54% of consumers plan to buy a new smartphone this year</h3> <p>After a three-year low, an Accenture survey of 26,000 consumers has found that smartphone purchases are set to rise again this year.</p> <p>54% of the consumers surveyed said they plan to buy a smartphone in the next year - a figure up from 48% last year. </p> <p>Insight suggests that this demand is largely fuelled by better security, new functions and improved performance, with 51% of consumers planning to buy a new phone to access the newest and most innovative features and functions.</p> <p>Similarly, 45% of consumers cite inadequacy of their current device as motivation.</p> <p>While there is growing demand for smartphones, purchases of connected devices like smartwatches and fitness monitors are predicted to remain sluggish, mainly due to high prices and concerns about the privacy of personal data.</p> <h3>DFS dominates TV advertising over New Year</h3> <p>TVTY has analysed more than 80,000 TV spots from the Christmas and New Year period, revealing the brands that invested the most in the medium.</p> <p>Furniture company DFS came out on top with more than 1,200 spots over Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. </p> <p>With a further 900 messages on New Year’s Eve and Day, the brand totalled 2,159 TV broadcasts.</p> <p>Other dominant brands over New Year included Confused.com and Thomas Cook, which both aimed to capitalise on consumer interest in holidays and finance. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2869/TV_spots.jpg" alt="" width="226" height="467"></p> <h3>Digital entertainment overtaking physical sales</h3> <p>According to new figures from the Entertainment Retailers Association, digital sales of games, music and video are now overtaking physical sales in the UK.</p> <p>74% of game sales are digital, and 57% of music revenues are derived from digital services like downloads or streaming.</p> <p>In total, digital revenues jumped 23% to £1,309.3m in 2016.</p>