tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video-rich-media Latest Video Advertising content from Econsultancy 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69042 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 2017-04-28T11:15:00+01:00 Driven by mobile, digital overtakes TV in US ad spend for the first time Patricio Robles <p>The milestone is one that industry analysts and observers have been waiting for and 2016 also brought with it another milestone: for the first time, mobile ads produced more revenue than desktop ads.</p> <p>All told, digital ad revenue in the US hit a record $72.5bn last year, up from $59.6bn in 2015. Mobile ads were responsible for $36.6bn of that, a massive 77% year-over-year gain.</p> <p>A good portion of mobile's gains were due to the growing popularity of mobile video ads. Spend on those skyrocketed by 145% year-over-year to reach $4.2bn, which helped fuel a 53% year-over-year jump in digital video ad spend overall. That figure now stands at $9.1bn.</p> <p>Spend on social ads, which in recent years have become a staple of many advertisers' digital campaigns, grew 50% to $16.3bn. Even search managed to produce a 19% gain to reach $35bn in spend.</p> <p>According to the IAB, mobile's ascendency across all digital channels is not surprising. "This increasing commitment [to mobile] is a reflection of brands’ ongoing marketing shift from 'mobile-first' to 'mobile-only' in order to keep pace with today's on-the-go consumers," IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg stated. </p> <p>"In a mobile world, it is no surprise that mobile ad revenues now take more than half of the digital market share," IAB EVP and CMO David Doty added.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5773/iabchart.png" alt="" width="705" height="488"></p> <h3>The rich get richer</h3> <p>While digital's eclipsing of television in terms of ad spend is no doubt good news for the digital economy generally, not everybody is benefiting equally from the growth of digital ad spend. By most estimates, two companies, Google and Facebook, have realized the vast majority of ad revenue growth, leading some to label the two companies a duopoly.</p> <p>According to Digital Content Next's Jason Kint, Google and Facebook took 89% of the growth last year. Brian Wieser of Pivotal Research <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/04/26/google-facebook-digital-ads/">estimates</a> that amazingly the two companies were the beneficiaries of close to 100% of the growth.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">so <a href="https://twitter.com/iab">@IAB</a> just dropped 2016 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/s?src=hash">#s</a>. Duopoly in full force -&gt; takes 89% of growth. "Everyone Else" loses more share courtesy of Facebook. <a href="https://twitter.com/DCNorg">@dcnorg</a> <a href="https://t.co/urglxDrooM">pic.twitter.com/urglxDrooM</a></p> — Jason Kint (@jason_kint) <a href="https://twitter.com/jason_kint/status/857255714678603777">April 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <p>The IAB disputes such claims. "73% of revenues in Q4 came from the top 10 digital companies, but they only contributed 69% of the growth," the IAB's Doty <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/digital-ad-revenue-surpasses-tv-desktop-iab/308808/">told AdAge</a>. "That means 31% of the growth came from companies outside the top 10." He also stated that some estimates count revenue outside of the US and don't account for traffic acquisition costs.</p> <p>But even if the estimates of how much Google and Facebook are taking as the digital ad spend pie grows are slightly exaggerated, it's clear from the companies' <a href="https://abc.xyz/investor/news/earnings/2016/Q4_alphabet_earnings/">financial</a> <a href="https://investor.fb.com/investor-news/press-release-details/2017/facebook-Reports-Fourth-Quarter-and-Full-Year-2016-Results/default.aspx">reports</a> that advertisers are funnelling increasingly large sums of money to the two internet giants.</p> <p>At the same time, other notable players, like Twitter, are losing. The still-popular microblogging platform has finally managed to grow its monthly users by a meaningful amount, but despite user growth Twitter <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/26/twitter-revenues-fall-first-quarter-results-advertising">just reported its first quarterly revenue decline</a> and acknowledged that it is facing "revenue headwinds."</p> <p>While Google and Facebook face some challenges of their own, including <a href="https://digiday.com/uk/youtube-ad-boycott-concisely-explained/">an advertiser boycott</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/apr/26/facebook-must-step-up-fake-news-fight-before-uk-election-urges-mp">criticism over fake news</a>, every indication is that the two companies, official duopoly or not, will continue to dominate internet advertising. Whether that's ultimately a good or bad thing for digital ad economy remains to be seen.</p> <p><strong><em>For more digital marketing and ecommerce data, download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium/">Econsultancy Internet Statistics Compendium</a>.</em></strong></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69047 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 2017-04-28T10:36:48+01:00 10 mind-boggling digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to wet your whistle, head on over to the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for even more.</p> <h3>Two thirds of UK consumers are worried about data privacy</h3> <p>According to <a href="https://www.gigya.com/blog/state-of-consumer-privacy-trust-2017-fear-hope/" target="_blank">Gigya</a>, 68% of UK consumers are concerned about how brands use their personal information, with two-thirds specifically questioning the data privacy of IoT devices like smartwatches and fitness trackers.</p> <p>The results of a poll of 4,000 consumers also found that the majority of people think privacy policies have become weaker rather than stronger – 18% predict it will worsen under Theresa May’s government.</p> <p>Apprehension over privacy was found to be higher in older generations, with 73% of people aged over 65 expressing concern.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5812/Gigya.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="409"></p> <h3>Nearly half of parents agree that personalised marketing is the future</h3> <p>A survey by Mumsnet has found that 46% of parents expect personalisation to become a big part of advertising in future.</p> <p>However, there is certainly some resistance, with 58% saying that their data is private and only 26% liking the idea of personalised ads.</p> <p>That does not mean that parents don’t see the value. 35% say they’d be open to seeing ads that apply to their lives, while 24% say that personalised ads would make them more likely to buy. The majority surveyed also said that they’d prefer to see tailored ads based on their previous search behaviour rather than online habits.</p> <h3>UK online retail sales grow 13% YoY in March</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-april-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index show solid growth for UK online sales, driven by a rise in the average spend through mobile devices.</p> <p>Mobile retail was up 18% in March 2016, while overall online sales grew 13% year-on-year. More specifically, the home and garden sector saw a 10% YoY growth, while health and beauty sales increased by 15% YoY – most likely driven by Mother’s Day.</p> <h3>19% of professionals have landed a job through LinkedIn</h3> <p>This week, <a href="https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/24/the-power-of-linkedins-500-million-community" target="_blank">LinkedIn announced</a> that it has reached half a billion members worldwide, with 23m of these coming from the UK.</p> <p>As part of the announcement, it also revealed that London is the most connected city in the world, with professionals having an average of 307 connections. </p> <p>It also stated that a casual conversation on LinkedIn has led to a new opportunity for 29% of professionals, while 19% have landed a job through using the platform.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5815/LinkedIn.JPG" alt="" width="344" height="469"></p> <h3>UK adspend was 3.6% higher in Q4 2016</h3> <p>According to the Advertising Association/WARC Expenditure Report, adspend was <a href="http://expenditurereport.warc.com/" target="_blank">3.9% higher</a> in the fourth quarter of last year, with digital formats driving growth.</p> <p>Internet spending was up 15.3% during Q4 and 13.4% over the entire year. Meanwhile, mobile took a 37.5% share, hitting £3.9bn for the year and accounting for 99% of the new money spent on internet advertising. </p> <p>Lastly, forecasts for the next two years indicate continued growth, with 2.5% predicted in 2017 and 3.3% in 2018.</p> <h3>64% of marketers do not believe it is their job to analyse data</h3> <p>Research by <a href="https://www.bluevenn.com/resources/ebooks/data-deadlock-report-1" target="_blank">BlueVenn</a> has found that nearly two-thirds of UK and US marketers believe it is their role to collect customer data, but not actually analyse it.</p> <p>However, it appears this is due to sheer volume rather than a lack of aptitude, as 93% of marketers say they are ‘confident’ or ‘very confident’ in their ability to analyse complex customer data.  </p> <p>The findings suggest a general discord amongst marketers, with 51% of UK and US marketers feeling that they spend too much time analysing data in their day-to-day work, with too little time left to spend on more creative aspects of the role.</p> <h3>Eight in ten consumers forget branded content</h3> <p>Upon discovering that eight in 10 consumers forget most of the information in branded content after only three days, while more than half are unable to recall a single detail, a <a href="https://prezi.com/view/RZXW2soO8IFMkzAFoNY7/" target="_blank">new report by Prezi</a> has highlighted the reasons why.</p> <p>Irrelevancy of ads is the biggest reason for a lack of recall, with 55% of consumers citing this reason. 37.7% said a lack of motivation to remember it, while 30% said there is simply too much content to retain.</p> <p>In contrast, content which 'tells the audience something new' was found to be the most memorable, helping 27% of respondents to remember a brand. This was closely followed by content which teaches, inspires, or entertains. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5813/Prezi_report.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="436"></p> <h3>Half of retailers unable to predict shopper traffic</h3> <p>New research from <a href="http://d3fi73yr6l0nje.cloudfront.net/Lists/TRS-ResourceAssetsLib/EKN-TYCO_ebook_03-Excellence_Scorecard-20170427.pdf" target="_blank">Tryco</a> has found that retailers are failing to monitor store performance correctly, with 50% unable to predict shopper traffic. Consequently, it is becoming increasingly difficult for retailers to balance operational tasks and customer service. </p> <p>Other findings show 60% of retailers do not consistently manage inventory performance and turnover on a store-by-store basis</p> <p>Lastly, retailers spend 70% of their time on operational tasks as opposed to 30% on customer service, reducing the opportunity to build important relationships with consumers. </p> <h3>eBay sees spike in searches for home and garden sector</h3> <p>eBay has revealed that it saw big spikes in searches within the Home and Garden category around the May bank holidays last year, with online shoppers showing two distinct purchasing mindsets.</p> <p>On one hand, consumers appeared to be looking for quick-fix cosmetic items at the beginning of May, with sales of candles and plant pots leaping by 172% and 214% respectively.</p> <p>On the other, shoppers were planning bigger renovation and DIY projects at the end of the month. This was reflected by sales of saws and lawnmowers rising by more than 1,000%, and sales of sofas jumping by 194%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5816/ebay_search.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="466"></p> <h3>46% of UK consumers open to relevant ads despite surge in ad blocking </h3> <p>Trinity McQueen has revealed that consumers will tolerate relevant online advertising, despite the popularity of ad-blocking.</p> <p>In a study of 1,000 UK adults, it found that 56% of consumers now use ad-blocking software on their laptops and PCs, yet 46% say they don’t mind online advertising as long as it’s relevant to them.</p> <p>The study also highlights the changing ways UK adults consume traditional and digital media. 29% of UK adults would be happy never to watch scheduled TV again, while one third say that scheduled TV does not fit in with their lifestyle.</p> <p>Finally, 41% of UK adults now subscribe to an on-demand service such as Netflix, Amazon Prime or Now TV.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69028 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 2017-04-21T15:10:00+01:00 10 tremendous digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>UK search data shows surge in ‘snap election’ queries</h3> <p>Following on from the announcement of the snap general election this week, Hitwise has analysed how the UK responded online.</p> <p>Data shows there was a 2,000% increase in searches for Theresa May on print media sites, while three out of five searches on Tuesday 18th were about the election news. Most searches were in the form of questions, with the nation generally appearing unsure about what a ‘snap election’ actually means.</p> <h3>One fifth of retailers are failing to offer preferred delivery options</h3> <p><a href="http://ampersandcommerce.com/insights/yougov-consumer-survey-delivery-2017/" target="_blank">Research from Ampersand</a> has found that many of the UK’s biggest retailers are failing to offer next day delivery, despite a YouGov survey showing that 58% of people favour this method over any other.</p> <p>In comparison to 2014, Ampersand found that most people still favour next day delivery over click and collect and same day delivery, with preference for this increasing 6% within three years. </p> <p>Meanwhile, preference for same day delivery has gone from 21% in 2014 down to 12% this year.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5625/Ampersand.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="492"></p> <h3>UK add-to-basket rates on the up in Q4</h3> <p>Monetate's latest <a href="http://info.monetate.com/ecommerce_report_EQ4_2016.html" target="_blank">ecommerce report</a> has revealed that UK add-to-basket rates were 3.75% higher in Q4 2016 than a year previously. </p> <p>The report also shows that both global and UK conversion rates were lower this Q4 than in 2015. However, global and UK conversion rates saw its first increase since Q4 of 2015.</p> <p>Meanwhile, website visits via mobile continued to increase globally, with 44% of UK website visits coming from smartphones.</p> <h3>75% of UK consumers have not spoken to a chatbot</h3> <p>New research from <a href="https://insights.ubisend.com/2017-chatbot-report" target="_blank">Ubisend</a> has uncovered the brand characters people would most like to see turned into chatbots. Compare the Market’s Meerkats topped the poll, followed by the Andrex puppies and Nespresso’s George Clooney. </p> <p>Other research found that 75% of UK consumers have not yet spoken to a chatbot, however, 57% of consumers are aware of what a chatbot is. </p> <p>Lastly, 35% want to see more companies adopting chatbots to solve their queries, with 68% citing ‘reaching the desired outcome’ as the most important factor in their experience.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5628/chatbots.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="297"></p> <h3>Expedia outperforms other travel brands with 7% market share</h3> <p>Conductor has released its first ever <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&amp;rct=j&amp;q=&amp;esrc=s&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;cad=rja&amp;uact=8&amp;ved=0ahUKEwis1ZyKnbXTAhXOaVAKHc0ZA4EQFggiMAA&amp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fww2.conductor.com%2Frs%2F149-ZMU-763%2Fimages%2FConductor-Organic-Online-Market-Share-Report-Holiday-2016.pdf&amp;usg=AFQjCNGO-bWF8Ak2EEpMJ7kZeecHFR3fjA" target="_blank">Organic Market Share</a> report, detailing the brands that excel at reaching consumers from organic search.</p> <p>In the travel category, Expedia was found to be the overall top performer, taking a 7% market share. Meanwhile, TripAdvisor dominates the ‘early stages’ of the consumer journey category with a 10% share. </p> <p>Data shows that airlines, car rental companies and hotel chains (including Hilton) have the potential to increase their visibility. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5627/Online_market_share.JPG" alt="" width="713" height="404"></p> <h3>Consumers prefer traditional advertising to digital</h3> <p>Research by Kantar Media has found that UK consumers feel significantly more positive about advertising on traditional platforms, such as TV and magazines, than they do about online formats.</p> <p>In a survey, 33% said they actively dislike seeing advertising on online video services and search engines, while 30% dislike being served ads in news and articles online. In contrast, only 13% and 14% of consumers dislike seeing ads in printed newspapers and printed magazines.</p> <p>With online ads predicted to account for more than half of all advertising spend in the next few years, this provides food for thought for brands.</p> <h3>Connected shopping driven by Generation Y </h3> <p>New research from Savvy suggests that the mass adoption of smartphones and social media has contributed to a fundamental change in the path to purchase.</p> <p>Data shows that Generation Y is driving changes in retail due to being constantly connected. 66% say they regularly use their smartphone to buy products and 49% regularly use their smartphones while in the supermarket. While this group represents around a third of shoppers at the moment, they are predicted to account for 47% by 2022.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5634/connected_shopper.jpg" alt="" width="680" height="453"></p> <h3>UK marketers increase budgets in 2017</h3> <p>According to data from the Q1 2017 <a href="http://www.ipa.co.uk/page/ipa-bellwether-report#.WPnTjtLyuUk" target="_blank">IPA Bellwether Report</a>, marketing budgets increased in Q1 2017 with significant growth seen in internet and main media advertising categories.  </p> <p>The report suggests that the overall outlook for 2017/18 is positive, with 26.1% of companies suggesting growth in total budgets for the coming year. Meanwhile, ad spend is now predicted to grow 0.6%, replacing the previous forecast of -0.7%.</p> <h3>Only 55% of Brits associate Easter with religion</h3> <p>New <a href="https://yougov.co.uk/news/2017/04/13/only-55-brits-associate-jesus-christ-easter/" target="_blank">research from YouGov</a> has found that Brits are more likely to think of Easter in relation to chocolate eggs than religious connotations. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,670 UK adults, only 55% said they personally associate Jesus with Easter, while 67% said they associate it with a bank holiday. Chocolate eggs is clearly at the forefront of everyone’s minds, with 76% associating this with Easter above anything else.</p> <p>In a separate study, Captify analysed found that Cadbury products dominate searches for chocolate eggs, with Crème Egg accounting for 29% of searches and Mini Eggs accounting for 18%.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5626/YouGov.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="752"></p> <h3>Luxury ad spend predicted to shift online </h3> <p>Zenith's <a href="https://www.zenithmedia.com/product/advertising-expenditure-forecasts" target="_blank">latest report</a> suggests that expenditure on luxury advertising is set to recover, with growth predicted to occur due to an increase in online spend. Zenith predicts a 3.9% rise in 2017 – a welcome figure following a 0.5% decline in 2016.</p> <p>It also predicts that the internet will become the main luxury advertising medium in 2018, despite print currently being the principal medium, accounting for 32.7% of ad spend in 2016 compared to 25.8% for internet advertising.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68988 2017-04-12T14:37:00+01:00 2017-04-12T14:37:00+01:00 Crocs aims to turn around fortunes with celebrity-driven campaign: Will it work? Nikki Gilliland <p>But then again, Crocs could be on the cusp of a comeback. </p> <p>Last year, Christopher Kane actually featured a pair in his catwalk show. Now, the brand is launching a marketing campaign to help change its image, with help from a few well-known celebrities. </p> <p>The question is – will it work? Here’s a bit more on the campaign and why celebrity-driven marketing could prove to be a tricky strategy to pull off.</p> <h3>New brand messaging</h3> <p>Crocs has always marketed itself as a brand that offers comfort, quality and fun. With a focus on the colourful nature of its shoes, it has previously used the tagline ‘Find Your Fun’ to evoke this care-free image.</p> <p>Its new campaign, however, concentrates on a new type of brand messaging. The ‘Come as You Are’ campaign celebrates individuality, instilling the idea that people should reject labels and feel comfortable in their own shoes. Both literally and figuratively, of course.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NS2LwZOLL8g?wmode=transparent" width="578" height="325"></iframe></p> <p>While it’s an undoubtedly positive and empowering campaign, it’s hard to ignore the fact that the brand is also referencing its own struggles to be accepted. There is the sense that it deliberately referencing its uncool image – perhaps even capitalising on it.</p> <p>This is no bad thing actually. In fact, the campaign's slightly ironic element might be the best thing about it. </p> <h3>Using celebrity endorsement </h3> <p>To deliver its new message, Crocs has chosen to feature celebrities in its ads including Drew Barrymore, WWE wrestler John Cena, and Korean celebrities Yoona Lim and Henry Lau. This is where the campaign seems off the mark. </p> <p>Sure, John Cena and Drew Barrymore come across as confident in their individuality, but placing them together seems a somewhat strange and random combination – especially when you add in Lim and Lau who are lesser known outside of Asia.</p> <p>This is the problem with celebrity-endorsement in a nutshell. If, for some reason or another, it doesn’t feel entirely authentic or natural – it just doesn’t work.</p> <p>With more brands choosing to work with social media influencers to build a sense of real relatability – Crocs’ reliance on celebrity endorsement feels a little tired.</p> <p>Similarly, the broad and somewhat sentimental nature of the ad feels too heavy-handed. When you think about it, Crocs fans don’t actually buy the shoe because it showcases their individuality – they do so because it’s the most comfortable pair of shoes they can get their hands on. Surely promoting the functional aspect of the product would be far more authentic.</p> <h3>Personalised and interactive elements</h3> <p>Celebrity-driven ads are not the only part of the campaign. Other online activity includes a GIF generator, allowing users to upload a selfie that celebrates their unique and individual traits.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5398/Crocs_selfie.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="628"></p> <p>The brand will also roll out <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68888-six-examples-of-mother-s-day-marketing-from-online-retailers/" target="_blank">Mother’s Day</a> promotions in time for the US holiday, heavily featuring Drew Barrymore and her own story as a mother.</p> <p>So, will the 'Come as You Are' campaign do much to combat recent losses? With Crocs reporting a $44.5m sales decline in the fourth quarter, as well as the imminent departure of CEO, Greg Ribatt – it’s a pretty tall order.</p> <p>While a few recent posts indicate that Crocs might be delving into the world of influencer marketing to support its social strategy, it remains to be seen whether or not it's too late. Of course, celebrity-driven marketing is still relevant and highly effective when done right, but to use it to turn around a failing brand is perhaps too much of a gamble.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68012-five-key-changes-within-the-world-of-celebrity-marketing/" target="_blank">Five key changes within the world of celebrity marketing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68691-why-iceland-has-replaced-celebrities-with-micro-influencers/" target="_blank">Why Iceland has replaced celebrities with micro-influencers</a></em></li> </ul> <p><em><strong>You can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-future-of-celebrity-marketing/" target="_blank">Future of Celebrity Marketing</a> report here.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68980 2017-04-10T15:00:00+01:00 2017-04-10T15:00:00+01:00 Digital advertising is totally out of control Patricio Robles <p>In the past several weeks, major advertisers and ad agenices have pulled ads from Google and YouTube <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/03/27/google-youtube-ad-boycott/">in a boycott</a> that was sparked by a Times investigation which found that ads from prominent brands were being displayed alongside extremist content. By some estimates, the boycott could cost Google hundreds of millions of dollars this year alone.</p> <p>In response, Google has promised change, but the truth of the matter is that the problem appears to be even larger than estimated, as practically everywhere observers look, they are finding examples of offensive content being used to serve ads from major brands.</p> <p>Heat Street, for instance, <a href="https://heatst.com/tech/many-popular-youtube-toy-channels-for-kids-contain-bizarre-graphic-poop-videos/">has detailed</a> how popular toy channels on YouTube targeting parents and children, some with millions of subscribers, are home to bizarre "poop" videos. "The videos feature children, some as old as 10, playing with fake human excrement-sometimes even eating it. Often these videos will wrack up exponentially more views than straight toy videos on the channel," it writes.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5338/weirdyoutubevideo.jpg" alt="" width="619" height="379"></p> <p>One disturbing video published on a YouTube channel with 4.5 million subscribers and run by a family that has had a book published by Hachette "shows two young girls who appear to mock defecate in a toilet and smear themselves in fake poop. One of the girls even throws a realistic-looking stool at the other girl, who catches it and then drops it on the floor."</p> <p>Another channel features even more bizarre and disturbing content, such as a video with the title "POOP EXPLOSION Silicone Baby Doll Poops and Pees Diaper Change Poop Drink and Wet Feeding Baby Video." The channel is run by a school teacher who says she's now making so much money from YouTube that she has stopped making toy dolls, ostensibly to focus on her videos.</p> <p><strong>That money frequently comes from brand advertisers whose ads are displayed with this content.</strong></p> <p>It's not that advertisers are intending to be a piggy bank for YouTubers who produce bizarre poop videos. When Heat Street reached out to Dell and Citibank, whose ads were displayed on some of the disturbing videos it identified in its investigation, Dell explained that it "works with our media partners to indicate what types of sites we'd like to be associated with and which sites to block. Unfortunately these sites are proliferating at an accelerated rate and often slip through the cracks." </p> <p>Citibank offered a slightly different spin, telling Heat Street, "We have a number of policies and procedures in place for our vendors designed to help prevent our advertising from appearing in connection with inappropriate content. In the rare event that an ad appears on a site with inappropriate or offensive content, we demand its immediate removal."</p> <p><strong>The problem for advertisers is that incidences of their ads being displayed with questionable content are anything but "rare."</strong> On platforms like YouTube, it doesn't take much time to find ads appearing with videos that are offensive by any reasonable measure. </p> <p>Take, for example, the countless "prank" videos that have proliferated on Google's crown jewel of video. Many contain content that is objectively violent, sexual, degrading, racist, sexist or just downright disgusting. No brand would reasonably consider this content "brand safe," but that doesn't mean their ads aren't being displayed with it.</p> <p>Unfortunately, while there are almost certainly steps Google and advertisers can take to deal with some of the most egregious examples of brand-unsafe content, there is a more fundamental problem: the incentives for advertisers and content creators in the digital ad market are totally perverse.</p> <p>Whether the industry wants to accept it or not, the digital advertising market is currently in a race to the bottom. Content creators are going to extremes, literally and figuratively, to create content that captures eyeballs because...wait for it...advertisers want eyeballs.</p> <p>To its credit, Google has started to take action. For example, YouTube last week <a href="https://youtube-creators.googleblog.com/2017/04/introducing-expanded-youtube-partner.html">announced</a> that it will now require content creators to rack up 10,000 views on their channels before those channels can participate in YouTube's partner program, which allows content creators to monetize their videos. But while that will likely help protect content creators from impersonators who steal their content, it's not clear that it will do much to improve the overall YouTube advertising ecosystem. After all, as Heat Street's investigation demonstrated, there are content creators whose videos have generated far more than 10,000 views publishing content that no brand advertiser would see value in.</p> <p>At the end of the day, unless and until advertisers reign in their unhealthy thirst for reach and efficiency at all costs and start <em>forcing</em> content creators and ad platforms to do better, the digital advertising market will continue to be the source of an unpleasant stench and brands will increasingly find that they are on the receiving end of the complaints about it.</p> <p>Fortunately, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68259-are-online-advertisers-wising-up-about-content-quality/">advertisers seem to be wising up about content quality</a> and the YouTube boycott suggests that advertisers may have finally reached a breaking point. But if they expect meaningful change, they will need to continue to put pressure on content creators and digital ad giants like Google because the out of control situation will not be fixed in a matter of weeks or even months.</p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68650-the-future-of-programmatic-2017-and-beyond/">The future of programmatic: 2017 and beyond</a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68970 2017-04-07T14:15:00+01:00 2017-04-07T14:15:00+01:00 Comedy Central creates branded content to replace ads: Could other networks follow suit? Nikki Gilliland <p>For networks and advertisers, this is a frustrating problem, potentially resulting in a loss of ad revenue if brands decide to place their efforts elsewhere. Comedy Central is one channel that has decided to do something about it, recently creating a series of branded content to replace bog-standard ads. </p> <p>So, will it be enough to engage viewers? And could branded content become more popular in future? Here’s a bit more on the story.</p> <h3>Avoiding viewer disruption</h3> <p>One of the worst things about TV ads is that they can completely disrupt the entire viewing experience. One minute you could be watching an episode of Friends, the next a commercial for toilet cleaner. </p> <p>With its branded content, Comedy Central is aiming to diminish this type of disruption by creating ads that feel more in tune with the network’s signature humour and style.</p> <p>The content is still advertising, of course, with each episode beiing sponsored by a different company. However, having been created by Comedy Central in-house, each one serves as a standalone story that feels very much like one of the network’s regular shows.</p> <h3>Engaging and entertaining viewers</h3> <p>Comedy Central’s first series is called Handy, which depicts the ups and downs of life as a hand model. The opening episode is sponsored by US restaurant chain, Joe’s Crab Shack, hence its humorous name – ‘Erik Gets Crabs’. Another is sponsored by jewellery retailer, Zales.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TVYLW0ya6oY?wmode=transparent" width="652" height="367"></iframe></p> <p>Once the episodes have been aired on TV, Comedy Central is also pushing them on social channels, hoping to capitalise on the large number of people who interact with the network online.</p> <p>For viewers, the brand ads are likely to make a refreshing change. While there is still some level of disruption to the viewing experience, the fact that they serve as mini stories in their own right will increase the chances of the viewer's attention being held for longer. Similar to how online <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67083-is-native-advertising-sustainable/" target="_blank">native advertising</a> blends in with the context of the user experience, the ads also feel less over-bearing than standard commercials.</p> <p>What’s more, the content feels more genuine than regular advertising, mainly because it is of a much higher quality than the commercials usually seen on television. It also offers a story for viewers to invest in rather than a short and shallow ad.</p> <h3>Will branded content become the norm?</h3> <p>Comedy Central is not the only network to experiment with a new type of advertising. Last year, NBC announced that Saturday Night Live would have 30% fewer ads, replacing commercials with sponsored skits inserted directly into the show.</p> <p>This approach reduces viewer disruption even further, with advertising seamlessly blending into the main content. With its decision to include sponsored skits, SNL is clearly hoping that more viewers will want to watch the show live – using the pay-off of more entertainment and less ads. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rDyTsGtk5BY?wmode=transparent" width="779" height="438"></iframe></p> <p>Of course, just because it <em>feels</em> seamless doesn’t mean that viewers are going to respond positively. There is always the danger, again like with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/63722-what-is-native-advertising-and-do-you-need-it/">native advertising</a>, that people will wrongly believe that the content is genuine when it is in fact advertising. This can result in consumers feeling like they have been duped, and in turn reacting negatively against the brand or publisher.</p> <p>Whether or not viewers respond positively to this type of branded content is still unclear, however, with Comedy Central showing that advertising doesn’t always have to follow the standard rules – we’re likely to see more of it in future. </p> <p><strong><em>Related reading:</em></strong></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68450-six-things-to-know-about-addressable-tv-advertising/" target="_blank">Six things to know about addressable TV advertising</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68120-as-tv-ads-lose-their-sway-pharma-marketers-need-to-adapt/" target="_blank">As TV ads lose their sway, pharma marketers need to adapt</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65787-how-are-brands-driving-tv-ad-viewers-online/" target="_blank">How are brands driving TV ad viewers online?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68955 2017-04-05T11:00:00+01:00 2017-04-05T11:00:00+01:00 Marriott uses Snapchat influencer campaign to target millennials Nikki Gilliland <p>What’s it all about? Here’s a run-down of the campaign.</p> <h3>Using the power of influencers</h3> <p>Instead of a standard Snapchat ad, which is often just a 10 second clip, Marriott has created three-minute long ‘Snapisodes’ as they’re (annoyingly) calling them, exclusively for the platform.</p> <p>Created to promote Marriott Rewards, the four ads feature different <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">social media influencers</a> exploring various locations around the world. </p> <p>The first, which has just been released, sees Jen Levinson explore Berlin - specifically the city’s food scene. Others will focus on locations like New York and Seoul.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZdVgc2v11o0?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Designed to be both authentic and relatable, the ads involve influencers speaking directly to camera, much like an elongated Snapchat story. With Marriott banking on the appeal of influencers, the question is - will young users be drawn in or put off by the brand-heavy content? </p> <p>Despite being peppered with nods to how great the Marriott Rewards scheme is, including references to perks like rooms upgrades and late checkout, the content is interesting enough to balance out any overriding sense of brand promotion. The documentary or 'vlogging' style means it's easy to get caught up in the influencer's experience of the wider location instead of just the hotel.</p> <p>What's more, with a personal insight into what it’s like to experience a place, the ads are bound to appeal to travel enthusiasts – if not more so than users watching simply because of influencer involvement.  </p> <p>For Marriott, this is a win-win, as it means Snapchat users of all ages are likely to engage with the ads – not just teens.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We challenged <a href="https://twitter.com/JenHearts247">@JenHearts247</a> to try crazy food in <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Berlin?src=hash">#Berlin</a> — even frog legs. It didn't go as planned: <a href="https://t.co/guTrafnawg">https://t.co/guTrafnawg</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/6Days7Nights?src=hash">#6Days7Nights</a> <a href="https://t.co/5ojuE3K1DA">pic.twitter.com/5ojuE3K1DA</a></p> — Marriott Rewards (@MarriottRewards) <a href="https://twitter.com/MarriottRewards/status/847448426073571328">March 30, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>The benefits for Snapchat</h3> <p>While large media companies like NBC and Disney have created <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy">episodic content</a> for Snapchat, Marriott is one of the most high-profile brands to create exclusive episodic ads, and of course pay for the privilege – which is undeniably great news for the platform.</p> <p>Another victory for Snapchat is Marriott’s promotion of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68333-what-brands-need-to-know-about-snapchat-spectacles/" target="_blank">Snapchat spectacles</a>, with part of the ads themselves being filmed with the video-camera sunglasses. </p> <h3>Marriott’s focus on millennials</h3> <p>This is not the first example of Marriott <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68778-four-ways-travel-hospitality-brands-are-targeting-younger-consumers/" target="_blank">focusing on millennial consumers</a>, but certainly signals a much more laser-focused approach to targeting them.</p> <p>Previously, Marriott has aimed to target a younger demographic through storytelling, realising that this demographic values authentic travel experiences as well as a connection to the local community. </p> <p>With the launch of Moxy, a boutique hotel ‘with the heart of a hostel’ – Marriott aimed to offer the opposite of the large corporate hotel. To promote the brand, it created a web series (also featuring social influencers) to introduce its features.</p> <p>With the decision to launch its new campaign solely on Snapchat, it certainly seems like Marriott is banking on the platform’s popularity to help engage with young consumers. Reportedly reaching 41% of all 18 to 34 year olds in the US daily (according to a 2016 Nielsen study) – plus the addition of influencers – it’s a bold move to win back a younger demographic from the likes of Airbnb. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WnXInUMxI9E?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>For more on influencer marketing, check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">Rise of Influencers</a> report.</strong></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68937 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 2017-03-24T15:05:08+00:00 Stories from SXSW 2017: ad blocking, content distribution, and Joe Biden Nick Hammond <p>These looked at the areas of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67076-the-rise-and-rise-of-ad-blockers-stats/">ad blocking</a>, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">influencer marketing</a>, social video, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66752-10-steps-to-better-content-distribution/">content distribution</a>, and the thoughts of Joe Biden, former Vice-President of the USA.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP67501">Ending The Ad Blocking Wars</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included representatives from Brave Software, The New York Times, Digital Context Next and The Christian Science Monitor. They considered whether publishers can improve the ad experience to persuade readers to turn off blockers? Or will add blockers bring about the end of the free web?</p> <p>As you may imagine there was no simple solution to this conundrum. The two biggest players in the digital space (you know who they are) are not affected by ad blocking and therefore are not bothered by its effects. </p> <p>Although ad blocking is plateauing (<a href="http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/article/uk-ad-blocking-levels-stabilise-22/1425085?bulletin=campaign_breakfast_briefing&amp;utm_medium=EMAIL&amp;utm_campaign=eNews%20Bulletin&amp;utm_source=20170223&amp;utm_content=www_campaignlive_co_uk_ar_6">at least in the UK</a>), the real squeeze is on smaller publishers, the little guys getting caught in the middle. These organisations are caught in an imperfect storm, made up of greater reliance on ad revenues and lacking the engineering investment levels and knowledge to respond to the threat.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/5034/adblock-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="163"></p> <p>As a result of this, there is a real possibility of local, smaller publishers, starting to disappear. This could create a regional ‘news desert’ as even more people seek their news from social media. Currently 44% of Americans use Facebook as a news source and the number is rising. </p> <p>There was also a discussion around different types of ad blockers. Much of the debate tends to be around the big players, such as AdBlock which has 200m downloads; but there are other providers with different business models. <a href="https://brave.com">Brave Software</a> (represented on the panel) doesn’t just remove ads – it replaces them with new ads and splits the revenue between publishers, users, network partners and the company itself.</p> <p>Brendan Eich from Brave suggested that this software is the first ‘post-bad’ ad blocking solution. Still early days for this, 'softer' ad blocking model and it will be interesting to see how it plays out.</p> <p>Predictably, content was identified as a way to get around this challenge. The NYT emphasized the importance of engaging content – ‘pull instead of push’ – and advised strongly against using technology to push advertising onto consumers.</p> <p>Sponsored ‘native’ content is not necessarily the panacea to solve this problem, as publishers often tag creative to acquire more data; these are then identified as ads and therefore blocked. </p> <p>Ad fraud was a serious related issue discussed, with an estimated 23% of global video traffic being served to robots. </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65228">The Hundred Thousand Dollar Snap(chat)</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this one was ShopStyle and Neiman Marcus, who considered the opportunities and challenges arising from social commerce, as well as the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/">growing importance of influencers</a>, particularly within retail.</p> <p>The background to this is the change in consumers’ consumption of media and the importance of the mobile channel. 30% of all time online is spent on social and 60% of that is on mobile.  </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/5033/snapchat_logo.jpg" alt="" width="470" height="243"></p> <p>As is often not the case, influencer activity should be approached in the same manner as any other communications campaign. It is not safe to assume that a single endorsement – ‘one and done’ – will do the trick. An effective frequency of ‘seven’, was mentioned as appropriate to the fashion retail sector. As with other channels, planning should be considered over an extended activity period, not as a series of one-offs. </p> <p>In addition, activity should not undermine influencers connections with their followers, and these retail influencers can be initially incentivised through special deals to offer to their followers. </p> <p>An interesting analogy compared the purchasing process for expensive items, such as for a Chanel bag, to the dating process; where buyers return to the store to view and interact with the product over time. In instances like these, iterative influencer messages can be effective in moving an individual closer to purchase.</p> <p>Strategies need to be different across separate social channels. Facebook is all about advertising, whilst Instagram benefits from a more organic approach. Snapchat is the new kid on the block and the hardest to measure. </p> <p>Above all, brands need to work out when to act as themselves, or through influencers in the social space. What are the key KPIs, how to measure these and how to ensure valuable content lives effectively beyond social channels? </p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP97038">Social Video and The Future of Consumption</a></strong></p> <p>Representatives from Vox Media, Vice Media and the New York Times joined this panel to discuss how social media is impacting video journalism. This session made very clear that Facebook is now the platform for video consumption. </p> <p>The NYT identified Facebook as ‘the stage’, and the essential channel for engagement and getting time with its audience. A major focus for NYT is around <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a>, which is being used to provide real-time coverage of news events. They are even looking at using this channel to create crowd-sourced investigations, a kind of mass citizen journalism.</p> <p>The upside of the live video phenomenon is that brands have an opportunity to powerfully engage with a massive audience, using current, exciting and rapidly changing content. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnytimes%2Fvideos%2F10151119750979999%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="476"></iframe></p> <p>The downside of live unedited content, is a concern around quality and the loss of editorial perspective. As a result, insightful user comments can be important to create context; but recognising this may not always be the case, Vice has indicated that all user comments are monitored in real-time.</p> <p>More controversially, the <a href="https://tytnetwork.com">The Young Turks</a> news channel is allowing users to pay to have their comments listed. Although the rise in importance of user comments can be seen as a democratic trend, allowing a financial bias on inputs would seem rather less altruistic. </p> <p>Another concern is that a publisher brand cannot easily prevent incorrect stories or unsuitable content being viewed. They can provide a retraction or an alternative perspective later on; but this may be seen by many fewer people. A good example of this would be the <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/06/10/technology/hillary-clinton-google-search-results/">SourceFed Hilary Clinton conspiracy theory</a>. </p> <p>For me, this progression towards an ‘always-on’ society is worryingly redolent of Dave Eggers' book, and now film, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCOXARv6J9k">The Circle.</a></p> <p>In any event, the benchmark for how quality video is defined is changing rapidly as we transition from a ‘TV-centric’ to ‘mobile video-centric’ world. In the digital space, where everyone with a phone is a director, quality is now less about production values and more about the story, speed and authenticity. </p> <p>Separate approaches to video content are needed across different channels. For example on Facebook a ‘raw’ approach is more appropriate and authentic. <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/">Episodic content</a> on Snapchat is popular, with bitesize ‘episodes’ being used to tell a story in a manner entirely fitting to the medium. </p> <p>With live video, there is also a greater ethical onus on brands to decide what they will show and what they will not. A good example of content that could be considered to be on this demarcation line is <a href="http://mashable.com/2016/10/21/snapchat-breaking-news/#i0SLEFuJPsql">Snapchat’s coverage of the conflict in Mosul</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP65066">Content Distribution Platforms – Friends or Foes?</a></strong></p> <p>The panel for this session included The Economist, Conde Nast International, The Young Turks and ABC News. They looked at how<em> </em>publishers are becoming more reliant than ever on content distribution platforms such as Facebook and Snapchat to reach new audiences. </p> <p>A good starting point for this session was mention of Emily Bell’s 2016 article <a href="http://www.cjr.org/analysis/facebook_and_media.php">Facebook Is Eating The World</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is the key platform under consideration here, as it increasingly becomes the place where online content is consumed. It’s importance and control over brand content has increased with the rise of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67544-facebook-to-open-up-instant-articles-what-publishers-need-to-know/">Instant Articles</a>, as opposed to publisher feeds, keeping traffic within the Facebook ecosystem. As an aside, Snapchat was seen to be on the rise but not currently a viable global option. </p> <p>With this is in mind, the panel considered that Facebook was both a friend and a foe. It was seen to be a friend in terms of providing a broad distribution platform and a foe with regards to its control over advertising revenues. </p> <p>According to Steve Oh of The Young Turks, the key to content success with Facebook is threefold:</p> <ul> <li>Creating regular, relevant content</li> <li>Swift use of new product features released</li> <li>Focus on building an audience </li> </ul> <p>The Economist’s approach is to focus on bite size content that lures customers towards subscription, with news topics including ‘on this day’ and ‘famous quotes’. A specific approach is with ‘Vimages’, using Facebook <a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2016/09/with-vimages-the-economist-is-using-facebook-to-make-low-budget-video-versions-of-its-stories/">to re-package magazine stories into video form</a>.</p> <p>One of the questions in the session, was how to keep up with the rapid changes at Facebook and the best ways to share content. There was no clear answer, but suggestions included looking for Newsroom tips, and Google Alerts pertaining to Facebook algorithms. </p> <p><a href="http://schedule.sxsw.com/2017/events/PP61899"><strong>Art + Science: Videos That Inform, Inspire &amp; Scale</strong></a></p> <p>Finally, PopSugar's David Grant discussed what brand marketers need to know about creating video that engages their target audience at scale while delivering on brand KPIs. The session sought to explain the success of PopSugar in targeting millennial women.</p> <p>The starting point for the brand's success is to understand, as does Snapchat, the increasing cultural relevance of the camera (<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/08/technology/snap-makes-a-bet-on-the-cultural-supremacy-of-the-camera.html?_r=0">as identified in this NYT article</a>) and that humans naturally gravitate towards content that is made up of <a href="http://www.kvibe.com/2015/03/17/why-we-as-humans-gravitate-towards-video/">sight, sound and motion.</a></p> <p>PopSugar creates videos that inform, and are created from a combined perspective drawn from its brand, brand partners and their data. PopSugar has created its own tool, <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/how-popsugars-new-tool-will-help-you-stay-ahead-social-media-trends-174640/">Trend Rank</a>, to help it identify areas of content focus, supply ‘velocity data predicting’ and find trends ahead of time.</p> <p>Grant observed that, with video, companies typically have only one second to make an impact, so selected content has only that time to have an effect. </p> <p>Some examples of PopSugar's recent successful native content campaigns are: </p> <ul> <li>Doubletree by Hilton: ‘Find Your Happy’ campaign. Building on the fact that Hilton always leaves a cookie for its guests, PopSugar a campaign focusing on wider acts <a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Random-Acts-Kindness-You-Can-Do-Every-Day-40742607">of kindness and generosity</a>.</li> <li>Garner Shampoo: ‘Photo Ready Mums’. Based on the insight that mums often take pictures of the family, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzaKYqPYKyo">but regret that they are not in the pictures themselves;</a> this campaign shows how mums can be in the photos, and look great, with the help of Garner. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Joe Biden</strong></p> <p>And finally, some lessons from the keynote speech of SXSW 2017 (and a totally inspiring moment) from Joe Biden, former Vice-President of The United States. </p> <p>Perhaps more recently famous for his (unwitting) appearance in <a href="http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-barack-obama-joe-biden-tweets/">a sequence of memes with Barack Obama</a>, Joe Biden appeared on stage in Austin to raise awareness and seek support for his <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2017/01/09/biden-outlines-steps-to-pursue-post-obama-cancer-moonshot.html">cancer Moon-shot agenda</a>.</p> <p>He discussed the progress made during Obama's presidency by the call for innovative solutions to tackle the barriers that prevent faster gains in ending cancer; and described how he plans to remain in the fight. </p> <p>This talk has a wider relevance for business because, as Joe Biden put it, organisations involved in the cancer treatment process had become ‘siloed by design’ and their ability to face the growing threat of this disease was limited by this lack of co-operation.</p> <p>One of these silo-related issues was the low number of patients involved in clinical trials (only 4/100) as there was no system for companies to match the correct trial drugs to the correct patients and vice versa. In addition a database of patient learnings was not being effectively shared between hospitals.</p> <p>Biden’s efforts to break down the barriers in the cancer treatment process are a lesson to organisations who may have similar silo problems. </p> <p>Organisations in this process have started to collaborate and other bodies have become involved in the fight. NASA is adding information regarding the impact of radiation on astronauts, and Amazon has provided free cloud data storage for the project.  </p> <p>There is also focus on clear KPIs and where the biggest return on investment can be derived. As Biden said, of any process "where everything is treated as equally important, then nothing is considered important."</p> <p>The key to the project’s increasing success (apart from the obvious profile of the promoter) is the open sharing of information, offering clear encouragement and, of course, giving hope.</p> <p>Inspiring stuff and a lesson to all businesses interested in breaking down silos and identifying priorities.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68930 2017-03-24T10:00:16+00:00 2017-03-24T10:00:16+00:00 10 amazing digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>If that’s not enough to tickle your fancy, you can check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for more.</p> <h3>Online retail sales are up 15% while smartphone growth slows</h3> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.imrg.org/data-and-reports/imrg-capgemini-sales-indexes/sales-index-march-2017/" target="_blank">latest figures</a> from the IMRG Capgemini e-Retail Sales Index, UK online retail sales were up 15% year-on-year in February. </p> <p>However, the rate of growth for sales through smartphone devices has roughly halved year-on-year, going from 96% in February 2016 to just 57% in February 2017.</p> <p>With tablet growth also remaining low at 3.5%, a sustained slowdown through this channel could potentially impact growth rates for online retail overall.</p> <h3>Instagram has more than 1m monthly active advertisers</h3> <p>Instagram has <a href="https://business.instagram.com/blog/welcoming-1-million-advertisers">just announced</a> that it has more than doubled its amount of monthly active advertisers in the past six months. Growing from 500,000 last September, it now with an advertiser base of 1m.</p> <p>Furthermore, there are now more than 8m businesses using a business profile on Instagram, with the greatest adoption coming from the US, Brazil, Indonesia, Russia and the UK.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4980/Instagram.jpg" alt="" width="275" height="548"></p> <h3>74% of shoppers will abandon purchases after adding items to their cart</h3> <p>Survey data from <a href="https://blog.salecycle.com/featured/infographic-people-abandon-shopping-carts/" target="_blank">SaleCycle</a> has revealed that 74% of online retail visitors who add something to their cart will leave without following through on the purchase.</p> <p>In terms of retail categories, health and beauty currently has the lowest abandonment rates of 68.2%. In contrast, consumer electronics has the highest with a rate of 78.8%.</p> <p>Overall, 34% of people are said to abandon their baskets because they are ‘just browsing’, while 23% might have an issue with shipping.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4975/SaleCycle.JPG" alt="" width="670" height="464"></p> <h3>8 out of 10 online shoppers avoid retailers after a bad returns experience </h3> <p>New data from Klarna has revealed that retailers who fail to provide consumers with a quick and easy returns service risk losing a large proportion of their customer base. </p> <p>In a survey of 2,000 UK consumers, <a href="https://www.theretailbulletin.com/news/past_the_point_of_no_return_22-03-17/" target="_blank">83% of online shoppers</a> said that they would never shop with a retailer they have had a bad returns experience with in the past. Similarly, 77% believe UK retailers need to improve their returns capabilities, while 28% said they have been put off returning items due to foreseen hassle. </p> <p>With online shoppers reportedly returning 10% of goods they buy online, and 40% deliberately ordering multiple items to send back what they don’t want, it is vital for retailers to improve returns processes in order to capture long-term loyalty.</p> <h3>Total video content views rose by 26% in 2016</h3> <p>The <a href="http://freewheel.tv/insights/#video-monetization-report" target="_blank">Video Monetisation Report</a> by FreeWheel has revealed that 2016 was a pivotal year for premium video consumption.</p> <p>The report states that content views rose by 26% from the previous year, with ad views up by 24%. Similarly, huge global events like the Rio Olympics and the Presidential election boosted video views, contributing to the general growth of popularity in live video content in the US.</p> <p>Meanwhile, as news and sport content enjoyed major growth across the pond, entertainment reigned supreme in Europe, with 93% of ad views being based on this content, as opposed to 46% in the US.</p> <h3>90% of UK agencies expect to increase turnover in 2017 </h3> <p>New findings from BenchPress suggest that, despite uncertainties over Brexit, a massive 90% of creative and digital agencies in the UK expect to increase their turnover in 2017.</p> <p>While 84% of agency owners were against Brexit, 52% have yet to notice any knock-on effect on their businesses following the referendum in June 2016.</p> <p>29% have experienced clients cancelling projects because of uncertainty around Brexit, while 11% have instead recorded increases in overseas work as a result of the devaluing of the Pound.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4976/Brexit.JPG" alt="" width="637" height="302"></p> <h3>78% of older shoppers fear a robot-run high street</h3> <p>A new <a href="http://possible.mindtree.com/SixthSenseofRetail.html" target="_blank">report by Mindtree</a> suggests that 78% of shoppers over the age of 55 are apprehensive about new retail technologies like automation, artificial intelligence and robotics infiltrating the high street.</p> <p>In contrast, 51% of shoppers between the ages of 16 and 24 are comfortable with the idea of automated technologies in stores.</p> <p>Additionally, the study – which involved a survey of 2,000 consumers in the UK – found there are differing opinions between genders, with 44% of men happy with a robotic shopping experience compared with just 30% of women. </p> <h3>Only a half of charities have a digital strategy in place</h3> <p>The <a href="https://www.skillsplatform.org/content/charity-digital-skills-report" target="_blank">Charity Digital Skills Report</a> has revealed that many UK charities are still struggling to get to grips with digital transformation. </p> <p>From a survey of 500 charity professionals, 50% said they do not have a digital strategy currently in place, and only 9% said they have been through digital transformation. When it comes to the biggest barriers, 57% of charities cite a lack of the right skills and 52% say a lack of funding. </p> <p>It’s not a case of disinterest, however, as 75% of charities think growing their digital skills would help them increase fundraising.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4977/Charities_digital.JPG" alt="" width="690" height="264"></p> <h3>26% of UK shoppers plan to spend more this Mother’s Day than 2016</h3> <p>From a survey of 1,000 shoppers, Savvy found that 66% of respondents will be getting involved with Mother’s Day this year, with 26% planning to spend more than they did in 2016.</p> <p>Despite spending more, there seems to be some negativity surrounding the type of gifts on offer. 54% of shoppers agree that Mother’s Day products presented in retail stores are ‘boring and lack inspiration’. Consequently, 45% of shoppers plan to purchase presents online – an increase of 7% on last year.</p> <p>Finally, 36% desire a wider range of gifts to suit different budgets, while 38% of shoppers want more gift ideas and inspiration from retailers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/4978/Mother_s_Day.jpg" alt="" width="665" height="583"></p> <h3>44% of advertisers are considering in-house solutions</h3> <p>ISBA and Oliver have conducted the first-ever UK survey on advertisers’ use of in-house and on-site agencies.</p> <p>The findings show that advertisers are now seeking closer relationships with fewer suppliers, as just under half of brands are now considering establishing an on-site or in-house capability.</p> <p>Lack of speed appears to be one of the main reasons for this, with 68% of marketers expressing frustration over the time it takes external agencies to make decisions or turn around briefs. In contrast, this figure drops to 8% for on-site and 20% for in-house agencies.</p> <p>Other advantages cited for in-house include improved brand expertise, collaboration, operational control and creative expertise.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68917 2017-03-20T14:58:48+00:00 2017-03-20T14:58:48+00:00 Can brands tell a story in six seconds? YouTube hopes so Patricio Robles <p>Introduced last April, YouTube <a href="https://adwords.googleblog.com/2016/04/bumper-ads-drive-incremental-reach-and-frequency.html">calls</a> Bumper ads "little haikus of video ads" and says that they "are ideal for driving incremental reach and frequency, especially on mobile, where 'snackable videos' perform well."</p> <p>But can brands really do a whole lot in just six seconds? In an effort to prove that they can, the Google-owned company <a href="http://adage.com/article/digital/youtube-challenges-agencies-retell-classics-6-seconds/308256/">recently asked</a> some agencies to turn a number of famous books, including <em>Romeo and Juliet</em> and <em>Bram Stoker's Dracula</em>, into six-second videos. Sadie Thoma, YouTube's head of creative agency development, said the goal was "to tell the essence of a longer story in a short form."</p> <p>Agencies that participated in the YouTube challenge included WPP's J. Walter Thompson, Wieden &amp; Kennedy and Interpublic's Deutsch.</p> <h4>The results?</h4> <p>One of the books adapted by J. Walter Thompson, Charles Darwin's <em>Origin of Species</em>, features an "animated fish eating another fish and then transition[ing] to a scene of baby growing into a man wearing virtual reality goggles as he reaches for his fish sandwich."</p> <p>In the opinion of this author, the six-second video makes sense only if you know that you're watching a six-second rendition of <em>Origin of Species</em>. Otherwise, it doesn't tell much of a "story" at all.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4873/originspecieis-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="263"></p> <p>Of course, with YouTube calling the shots, brands and their agencies have little choice but to work with the ad formats they're offered. So if YouTube says that they have to try to tell their stories in six-second ads, that's what many of them will do.</p> <p>But can brands really tell compelling stories in six seconds? That seems like a tall order.</p> <p>When it launched Bumper ads, YouTube even noted that "we've seen Bumper ads work best when combined with a TrueView or Google Preferred campaign." TrueView ads are opt-in ads that don't have time limits. So not surprisingly, it would appear that Bumper ads are more effective when paired with ads that aren't so limited in terms of time.</p> <h4>The attention deficit economy</h4> <p>Much has been made about the "attention economy," but YouTube's Bumper ad push suggests that the label "attention deficit economy" might be more apt.</p> <p>And while there are no easy answers for brands seeking to meaningfully reach consumers in today's challenging digital environment, it's worth asking: instead of racking their brains to sweep consumers off their feet in six seconds, why shouldn't brands simply embrace the other extreme? </p> <p> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/4874/6secondad-blog-flyer.png" alt="" width="470" height="263"></p> <p><em>A hypothetical video ad that gets straight to the point</em> </p> <p>While the power of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/65397-five-brands-excelling-at-storytelling/">brand storytelling</a> is evident, savvy brands will figure out that there's a time and a place for it, and the time isn't six seconds.</p>