tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video-rich-media Latest Video Advertising content from Econsultancy 2017-09-22T14:24:47+01:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69445 2017-09-22T14:24:47+01:00 2017-09-22T14:24:47+01:00 10 exciting digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <p>On we go.</p> <h3>Media agencies are wasting two days a week on admin-based tasks</h3> <p>New research by 4C suggests that media agency professionals are wasting the equivalent of two days per week performing admin, instead of focusing on creative and strategic tasks.</p> <p>In a survey of over 200 professionals, 84% of respondents said that they feel concerned about the actual value their agency brings to brands, and whether they are truly offering them value for money. </p> <p>The execution of social campaigns appears to be driving this concern, with 36% of respondents admitting that switching between platforms to manage campaigns is the biggest annoyance of their job. Some reportedly spend 17 hours per week doing this. Frustratingly, 63% said they believe the amount of time spent working on social campaigns will only increase over the next few years.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9105/4C.JPG" alt="" width="580" height="372"></p> <h3>Nearly a quarter of digital marketers don’t track marketing spend</h3> <p>According to research by Greenlight, digital marketers are suffering from a worrying level of uncertainty. </p> <p>It found that 36% of survey respondents don’t have confidence in their campaign targeting, while 18% don’t think their campaigns are reaching their desired audience at all.</p> <p>Alongside this, it appears marketers are also unsure about where their marketing spend is actually going. One in ten marketers are not even sure which channels are the most valuable for their campaigns, and 17% are yet to commit their budgets accordingly. Even worse, 23% are failing to track campaign spend whatsoever.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69432-restoration-hardware-bid-on-3-200-keywords-found-98-of-its-ppc-sales-came-from-just-22-brand-terms/">Here's a somewhat-related cautionary tale about PPC</a>.</p> <h3>25% of internet users use a VPN network</h3> <p>In a study of VPN (virtual private network) usage around the world, <a href="http://insight.globalwebindex.net/vpn-usage-around-the-world?utm_campaign=VPN%20Usage%20Around%20The%20World&amp;utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_content=56524113&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9BFGKHYG9SI5WGcZaWaiorCGsdLV-cu_4llCF9RLxP_1AsqA0w7CJEXzSRH64Kva36hetevTnlUgwRHdG7IcFeZCp-pRXbxikV71F-CczXZzlK0Nk&amp;_hsmi=56549588" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a> has found that 25% of internet users have used a VPN in the past month, and that 42% of these use a VPN daily. </p> <p>When it comes to the motivation for doing so, 50% of people said that they use a VPN for better access to entertainment, 34% said better access to social networks or news services, and 31% said to maintain anonymity while browsing.</p> <p>The study also found VPN usage to be lower in North America and Europe, with the top markets being Indonesia, India, and Turkey.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9107/VPN.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="323"></p> <h3>63% of consumers want biometric technology in-stores</h3> <p>Following on from the launch of the new iPhone, a report by <a href="http://www.worldpay.com/us/about/media-center/2017-09/shoppers-give-thumbs-up-to-in-store-biometrics" target="_blank">Worldpay</a> has revealed that consumers are growing increasingly demanding of new payment technology.</p> <p>In a survey of 2,500 consumers across the UK, 63% of respondents said they would like to be able to use a biometric scan to authorise payments in-store. 69% of consumers said they’d be open to using a finger to do so, while 24% said their face, and 33% said they’d be willing to use their eyes.</p> <p>Worldpay also found that consumers expect speed and convenience in other areas. Click-and-collect is highly in-demand, as are automated payments and bots - 65% of consumers said they’d rather pay a robot than waste time flagging down a waiter in a restaurant.</p> <h3>Mobile video ad spend jumps 142% in Q2</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://info.smaato.com/hubfs/Reports/Smaato_Global_Trends_in_Mobile_Advertising_Report_Q2_2017.pdf" target="_blank">Smaato</a>, spend on mobile video ads increased by 142% in Q2 2017, making it the fastest-growing mobile ad format.</p> <p>Rewarded video (full screen video ads that users can view in full in exchange for in-app rewards) was the fastest growing format, with spend increasing by 74%. In-app spending accounted for 94% of total mobile ad spending in Q2, compared with just 75% in 2016.</p> <p>Finally, full-screen interstitials were the most popular ad format among advertisers, accounting for almost two thirds of total mobile video ad spending in Q2.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9106/Smaato.JPG" alt="" width="600" height="392"></p> <h3>60% of 25 to 34-year olds find it easier to chat to brands via text</h3> <p>Mindshare’s <a href="http://www.mindshareworld.com/sites/default/files/FutureofRetailAW.pdf" target="_blank">UK retail trends</a> report has revealed the growing demand for instant and 24-hour customer service.</p> <p>Today, 60% of 25 to 34-year olds say that they find it easier to chat to brands via text message, online chat, or messenger apps. Meanwhile, 27% say they have used a chatbot in order to communicate with a brand.</p> <p>The report also found that consumer’s attitude to data is somewhat conflicted. Despite the demand for personalisation, with 56% of people saying that brands should be doing more with their data, 65% say they are still very selective about the companies they share it with.</p> <h3>Twice as many adults use the internet via a mobile than desktop</h3> <p><a href="http://www.vertoanalytics.com/10024-2/" target="_blank">Verto Analytics</a> has revealed that smartphones are now twice as popular than PC’s when it comes to accessing the internet.</p> <p>When tracking which devices 5,000 UK adults used to go online, it found that smartphones accounted for 57% of people, while traditional PCs accounted for 27%, and tablets for 16%.</p> <p>Smartphone usage was shown to peak during the morning, with this device accounting for 63% of the people online between 8am to 11am – three times as many people using a PC at that time. Meanwhile, desktop computers were found to have the largest audience share of 38% between the hours of 1am and 3am. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9109/Smartphone_PC.JPG" alt="" width="640" height="344"></p> <h3>Online retailers see unexpected growth in August</h3> <p>The latest <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/retailindustry/bulletins/retailsales/august2017#whats-the-story-in-online-sales" target="_blank">ONS</a> (Office for National Statistics) figures show that the average weekly UK online spend in August was £1.1bn - an increase of 15.6% compared with August 2016.</p> <p>This means that the amount spent online accounted for a total of 16.4% of all retail spending for the month, excluding automotive fuel. This figure is also up compared to 15% in August last year.</p> <p>Despite this year-on-year growth, Salmon has highlighted that shoppers have been predominantly spending on non-necessity and luxury goods and services, with the summer holidays and an increase in tourism contributing to this. As a result, Salmon predicts a dip in online spend as Autumn approaches.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/9108/ONS.JPG" alt="" width="650" height="381"></p> <h3>Female influencers favour Instagram over Snapchat</h3> <p>Collective Bias has revealed that female <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers">influencers</a> are uninterested in Snapchat, with zero survey respondents saying that it is the most important channel to them. In contrast, 28.4% of influencers said that Instagram is invaluable.  </p> <p>Perhaps surprisingly, Pinterest came second in the survey, with 26.4% of respondents saying that they favoured the platform the most. </p> <p>Facebook and Twitter fared less well, but this is likely due to the less visual nature of the platforms as well as the subsequent lack of opportunity for sponsored, one-off posts.</p> <h3>Brits spend nearly eight hours per day consuming media</h3> <p>The <a href="http://ipa.us4.list-manage.com/track/click?u=1f2c3c8034116a764afbdc0a5&amp;id=e6d608e522&amp;e=cf106b3443" target="_blank">IPA Touchpoints</a> report has revealed that adults are spending seven hours and 56 minutes a day consuming media – an increase of 9% from 2016 and 13% from 2005.</p> <p>This means that adults spend just over two hours a day media multi-tasking (which means watching TV or using a laptop or smartphone while doing other things) – or nearly a quarter of that time spent consuming media in total.</p> <p>In terms of medium, television or video remains the most popular, with adults viewing an average of four hours and 35 minutes per week. Meanwhile, out of home media accounts for three hours 28 minutes, and social networking or messaging accounts for two hours and 53 minutes.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69413 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 2017-09-11T09:49:36+01:00 10 fascinating digital marketing stats we’ve seen this week Nikki Gilliland <h3>Searches for iPads increase 1.2x YoY</h3> <p>First up, <a href="http://www.hitwise.com/blog/2017/08/hot-back-school-products-age-student/?lang=1&amp;bis_prd=1" target="_blank">Hitwise has revealed</a> what parents have been searching for as their kids head back to school. </p> <p>Parents of children aged 6-11 have been searching for iPads, with online searches for iPad increasing 1.2 times overall year on year. For kids aged 12-17, branded apparel has been in demand, with searches for Gucci belts, Net backpacks and Yeezys by Kanye West all being popular.</p> <p>Lastly, interest in fashion has been much lower for college-age youngsters, while searches for technology such as Nintendo Switch, Apple Watch and HBO Now have been high.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8867/Hitwise.JPG" alt="" width="702" height="380"></p> <h3>More than half of Brits use an ad blocker</h3> <p>In a survey of over 2,000 UK adults, Affilinet has found that more than half of all respondents use an ad blocker while browsing the internet.</p> <p>When it comes to the reasons why, 61.5% say it’s because they find online ads annoying, 41.5% say it’s because they find ads intrusive, while 33.1% say it’s because the ads they used to see were irrelevant.</p> <p>Men are also slightly more likely to use an ad blocker than women, with 48.7% of women stating that they never use them compared to 42.5% of men.</p> <h3>39% of teen YouTube users say it has too many ads </h3> <p>A survey by Forrester Research has found that four in 10 teen users aged 12-17 say there are <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/Article/YouTubes-Teen-Viewers-Complain-of-Too-Many-Ads/1016436" target="_blank">too many ads</a> on YouTube. </p> <p>This is despite the fact that YouTube is accessed by more US teens than any other social platform, with 77% using it on a daily basis compared to 55% who use Facebook.</p> <p>Just 11% of teens think that there are too many ads on Instagram and Snapchat, perhaps proving that native ads are less disruptive than pre or mid-roll ads.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8871/iStock-458931653.jpg" alt="" width="700" height="438"></p> <h3>Brits abandoning £3.4bn in online shopping baskets due to device switching</h3> <p>A new report by <a href="http://www.newsroom.barclays.com/r/3514/_10_5bn_more_in_five_years___that_s_what_uk_retailers" target="_blank">Barclays</a> has revealed that £3.4bn worth of goods are left in online shopping baskets in the UK each year. This is said to be due to device switching, with consumers browsing on their mobile phones before changing to laptops to make the purchase.</p> <p>The report suggests that basket abandonment is also due to a lack of discount incentives and the desire for a variety of delivery options. 38% of consumers say discount codes and 56% say free deliveries would incentivise them to buy.</p> <p>By making online shopping more convenient, Barclays says that retailers could generate £10.5bn more within just five years.</p> <h3>44% of consumers will make a holiday purchase via a voice controlled device</h3> <p>A report by <a href="https://www.walkersands.com/The-Future-of-Retail-2017-Holiday-Report">Walker Sands</a> has predicted that purchases by voice-controlled devices are set to rise this holiday season.</p> <p>Currently, 24% of frequent online shoppers say they ‘often’ or ‘always’ purchase through a voice-controlled device like Amazon Echo. However, 44% of total survey respondents also say that they are ‘somewhat’ or ‘very likely’ to make a product purchase through a voice-controlled device in the next year.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the report also highlights the demand for same-day delivery services, with 66% of frequent online shoppers saying they have used Amazon Prime in the past year, and 39% saying same-day delivery would make them shop online even more.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8868/Voice_controlled_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="666" height="274"></p> <h3>Popularity of mobile payments is rising</h3> <p>A new survey by <a href="https://www.aciworldwide.com/news-and-events/press-releases/2017/september/mobile-payments-rise-in-popularity-reaching-tipping-point-in-some-countries" target="_blank">ACI Worldwide</a> has found that European and American consumers are increasingly embracing mobile payments.</p> <p>While just 6% of US consumers regularly used their mobile devices to make payments in 2014, this has now tripled to 17%. Similarly, 25% of Spanish consumers now use mobile wallets, as do 24% of Italian and 23% of Swedish consumers. </p> <p>Consumer confidence in mobile wallet security is also on the rise, with 37% of UK respondents saying they trust their bank to protect their personal information when paying via their smartphone.</p> <h3>37% of internet users watch Netflix each month</h3> <p><a href="http://blog.globalwebindex.net/chart-of-the-day/netflix-vs-amazon-prime-video-a-global-view/" target="_blank">GlobalWebIndex</a> has been looking into the user-share of both Netflix and Amazon, following on from the latter extending its introductory Prime Video offer across all global markets.</p> <p>It has found that 20% of internet users now use Amazon Prime Video each month, whether on their own account or via someone else’s. However, 37% of people say the same about Netflix.</p> <p>In terms of marketshare, Netflix boasts impressive usage in both Mexico and Brazil, while Amazon Prime reigns supreme in India.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8869/Netflix_vs_Amazon_Prime.JPG" alt="" width="632" height="664"></p> <h3>More than 60% of digital publishers auto-play half of video ads</h3> <p>Despite auto-play ads often being viewed as intrusive or annoying by consumers, <a href="http://www.marketingdive.com/news/mediaradar-61-of-publishers-autoplay-at-least-half-of-video-ads/504417/" target="_blank">MediaRadar</a> has found that 31% of publishers auto-start 75% or more of their on-site video ads. Meanwhile, 60% of publishers auto-play at least half.</p> <p>Small, regional, and B2B publishers have the highest instances of auto-play video ads. Similarly, websites that rely on programmatic advertising are also more likely to employ this type of ad.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/8870/MediaRadar.JPG" alt="" width="685" height="346"></p> <h3>Consumers annoyed by disruptive ads</h3> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In other ad news, Inskin Media has been delving into the ad formats that users find the most annoying.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">Unsurprisingly, 28% of respondents cited pop-up ads as the most irritating mobile format, closely followed by 26% saying the same for ads that sit in the middle of the screen. 18% said that they are vexed by ads that delay the page loading.</p> <p style="font-weight: normal;">In contrast, ads that that move down the page alongside the content or sit at the top and bottom of the page were found to be much less annoying. In fact, the study also found that people are 134% more likely to remember ads that sit around content compared with the average mobile ad.</p> <h3>Brand activation revenues to reach $357bn this year</h3> <p>According to the <a href="http://www.ana.net/content/show/id/brand-activation-spend-2017" target="_blank">ANA</a> (Association of National Advertisers) and PQ Media, brand activation revenues will reach around $357bn in 2017.</p> <p>This is based on the fact that total marketing operator revenues from brand activation rose by 6.7% in 2016, with further growth now expected.</p> <p>Revenues in content marketing climbed 11.3% last year, while influencer marketing saw the second-highest growth rate, growing 8.7% to $49.1bn. Revenues from experiential marketing also jumped by 6.7% to $50.6bn.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69397 2017-09-05T15:00:00+01:00 2017-09-05T15:00:00+01:00 Fox plans more 6-second ad slots, as digital influences television Patricio Robles <p>Take, for instance, Fox, one of the five largest television networks in the world. In August, <a href="https://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/305158/fox-launches-first-06-units-duracell-mars-first.html">it ran the first short-form, six-second ads</a> for battery brand Duracell and candy manufacturer Mars during the 2017 Teen Choice Awards.</p> <p>Now, Fox has decided to expand its use of the six-second ad format to NFL games it broadcasts this fall, as well as other sports programming, including the baseball World Series and other "marquee events.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/30/business/media/nfl-six-second-commercials.html?_r=0">According to</a> The New York Times:</p> <blockquote> <p>People are used to seeing short video ads on platforms like Snapchat, Facebook and YouTube, but not so much on network TV, where the currency for decades has been 15 and 30-second ads. While TV networks have experimented with shorter commercials in the past, largely as publicity stunts for specific brands, Fox is hoping to make six-second ads an industry standard across broadcasters as consumers in the internet era show less tolerance for frequent, bloated ad breaks during shows.</p> </blockquote> <p>Pricing for the new ad units is not known. Ostensibly, the cost of a six-second ad will be lower than a 15 or 30-second ad, which could be attractive to advertisers given the significant costs associated with television ads, particularly those that are displayed during high-profile sports broadcasts.</p> <h3>The incredible shrinking television ad?</h3> <p>It's hard to imagine but at one point in time, the standard ad format for television was a minute long. The minute-long ad later became the 30-second ad, and today, most television ads are 15 seconds in length.</p> <p>But in the digital age, 15 seconds is a long time and that has led to the proliferation of the six-second video ad, particularly for pre-roll. Leading the push for the six-second ad is Google, which owns YouTube.</p> <p>YouTube's six-second ad unit <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68917-can-brands-tell-a-story-in-six-seconds-youtube-hopes-so">has been dubbed the bumper ad</a> and it has been working to push advertisers to embrace this format. With just six seconds, advertisers <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69108-four-tips-for-creating-effective-youtube-bumper-ads/">have to be very thoughtful, creative and focused</a>. While conveying a message that is effective if not compelling in just seconds might seem virtually impossible, Google says that a number of brands are finding ways to do it.</p> <h3>One ad format to rule them all?</h3> <p>The emergence of the six-second television ad raises the question: will the six-second ad make it possible for advertisers to develop individual ads that are just as effective for television as they are for digital?</p> <p>For years, brand advertisers have been told not to repurpose their television ads for digital. What works for television won't work for digital, advertisers were advised. But does the same wisdom apply now that digital ad formats are driving the creation of new television ad formats? In other words, can advertisers take their YouTube bumper ads and put them to good use on television?</p> <p>That remains to be seen and its worth noting that while Google is strongly promoting the six-second bumper ad format, it also acknowledged that "we've seen Bumper ads work best when combined with a TrueView or Google Preferred campaign." TrueView and Google Preferred campaigns aren't limited to six seconds.</p> <p>For example, a YouTube campaign for the Microsoft Xbox promoting Halo Wars 2 was developed by Microsoft's agency partner, 215McCANN and paired bumper ads with longer-form ads. <a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/advertising-channels/video/youtube-bumper-ads-six-second-format/">Per Google</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>...Xbox started with a Masthead and long-form TrueView content push under the theme 'Know Your Enemy.' Then, as launch day approached, the brand invested heavily in remarketing with chuckle-worthy bumper ads that built on the long-form films' storylines.</p> </blockquote> <p>Since advertisers don't have the same retargeting capabilities on television, there are questions about how such a campaign would have been executed for television. Clearly, experimentation is needed.</p> <p>Which means that, for now, while the six-second ad could soon find itself a fixture on television, advertisers would be wise to recognize that their success with it will probably hinge on how they use it within their campaigns more than anything else.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69291 2017-07-28T10:43:24+01:00 2017-07-28T10:43:24+01:00 How brands are fighting against gender stereotypes Nikki Gilliland <p>(Insert eye-roll emoji here)</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7874/Aurosa.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="470"></p> <p>This kind of sexist advertising is not big news. From cleaning products to yoghurt – brand gender stereotyping has been rife for decades. Even brands that deliberately set out to empower can get it wrong – you’ve only got to look at Dove and its ridiculously unnecessary body-shaped bottles.</p> <p>And it’s not always related to women, of course. Who can forget the infamous <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68212-how-lynx-s-bigger-issues-campaign-helped-reinvigorate-the-brand" target="_blank">Lynx ads</a>, and even more recently, the reinforcement of male gender stereotyping by Miller Lite, who told us that drinking any other type of light beer is unmanly.</p> <h3>Taking a tougher line</h3> <p>The ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) has just announced plans to tackle examples like this. But why now?</p> <p>2015 seemed to spark a turning point. It was the year when <a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/67575-our-take-on-the-top-10-most-controversial-ads-of-2015">Protein World unleashed its controversial ‘Beach Body Ready’ ad</a>, resulting in 378 complaints against the brand for being ‘socially irresponsible’. </p> <p>At the time, the ASA cleared the campaign saying that it was ‘unlikely to cause serious or widespread offence’. However, it has since caused the regulatory body to recognise the need for a ‘strong evidence-based position’ when it comes to the portrayal of gender in ads.</p> <p>As a result the CAP (the Committees of Advertising Practice) has recently released a report detailing new guidelines that will come into force in 2018. It has stated that ‘a tougher line is needed’, particularly when it comes to ads that mock people for not conforming to gender stereotypes.</p> <h3>Companies spearheading change</h3> <p>It has to be said, there are many organisations out there already doing work to tackle the issue. Last month, Unilever announced a new alliance to drive out gender stereotyping, teaming up with UN Women, Facebook, and Mars to share knowledge and spread the culture of change. </p> <p>Meanwhile, GoDaddy – which was previously known for sexism in both its ads and internal infrastructure – appears to have turned a corner. Since Blake Irving was appointed CEO, the company has dropped its sexist ads and become a much more inclusive workplace, even being named as one of the top companies for women technologists in the US.</p> <p>One of the most well-known companies to spearhead a shift in perception is Sport England and its ‘<a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66469-seven-video-marketing-lessons-learnt-from-thisgirlcan/" target="_blank">This Girl Can</a>’ campaign, which persuaded 1.6m women to start exercising through a series of empowering and inspiring ads. Showing how fear of judgement can hold women back, it also effectively highlighted the gender pay gap. </p> <h3>A shift towards gender-neutrality</h3> <p>Interestingly, it’s not just the stamping out of sexism and outdated stereotypes that has become a focus for brands. Alongside this, some are taking steps to promote a more gender-neutral or fluid image, and redefining who their target market is on this basis. </p> <p>Here are a few examples to highlight what I mean.</p> <h4>CoverGirl</h4> <p>Men have been wearing make-up for decades, but up until recently the beauty industry has only represented women in mainstream advertising. This changed last October when 17-year-old makeup artist and YouTuber James Charles was named as CoverGirl’s first male spokesperson.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7866/Katy_Perry.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="539"></p> <p>James was specifically chosen to be the face of the brand’s ‘So Lashy’ mascara – a product that is designed ‘for anyone wanting to transform their lashes into a bold look - regardless of lash type or starting point’. </p> <p>It was James’ social media presence that caught CoverGirl’s eye, and digital content has undoubtedly contributed to the rise of male beauty in general. Male beauty bloggers and vloggers are amassing huge audiences on platforms such as Instagram and YouTube. </p> <p>There’s clearly a demand for this kind of content, too. A report by Mintel found that 47% of UK males aged 16-24 value the advice of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68087-six-brilliant-blogs-from-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">beauty bloggers</a> more than store staff. As well as CoverGirl, brands including L’Oreal, Maybelline, and Soap &amp; Glory have also taken steps to become more inclusive, using both men and women in campaigns to appeal to all genders.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Jake-Jamie Ward to be first male spokesmodel repping face masks for U.K. beauty brand Soap &amp; Glory via <a href="https://twitter.com/mic">@mic</a> <a href="https://t.co/KUt9Ti2tXd">https://t.co/KUt9Ti2tXd</a></p> — Jake-Jamie (@makeupbyjakej) <a href="https://twitter.com/makeupbyjakej/status/887673332711264256">July 19, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h4>MTV</h4> <p>Advertising is not the only way companies are working towards gender-neutrality. A few months ago, Emma Watson won MTV’s first ever gender-neutral acting award.</p> <p>The decision to introduce it has been described as a watershed moment for equality in entertainment, bravely shining a light on the silos that exist between men and women. </p> <p>However, it’s also been criticised for being a rose-tinted idea rather than a real drive for change. This is because the opportunities for women in entertainment are typically lesser than for men, meaning that it might inadvertently reduce the amount of female wins overall.</p> <p>That being said, MTV’s decision certainly highlights the need for tangible changes elsewhere in the entertainment industry, and is one of the first prominent examples of a company creating inclusivity for actors who do not conform to gender norms.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thank you for your beautiful Best Actor in a Movie acceptance speech at the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MTVAwards?src=hash">#MTVAwards</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/EmmaWatson">@EmmaWatson</a> <a href="https://t.co/iGN3nQQylL">pic.twitter.com/iGN3nQQylL</a></p> — MTV (@MTV) <a href="https://twitter.com/MTV/status/861449768572035076">May 8, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h4>Barbie</h4> <p>Barbie has been guilty of perpetuating stereotypes over the years, furthering the ‘pink-ification’ of little girls’ toys. Even when the brand has aimed to set an example for empowerment, it has been criticised for putting females in pigeonholes. </p> <p>‘Engineering Barbie’ is the most recent example of this, with the toy encouraging girls to use engineering skills to build racks for clothes, shoes and jewellery. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7867/Clothing_rack.JPG" alt="" width="550" height="444"></p> <p>That being said, the brand has taken steps to become more progressive in its marketing activity. To promote its collaboration with fashion brand, Moschino, it created an ad that featured a little boy playing with the doll. </p> <p>Aiming to celebrate the fact that all genders love Barbie, it was the first example of the brand veering away from a strategy that solely targets girls.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TULVRlpsNWo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h4>H&amp;M</h4> <p>According to research by the Innovation Group, 43% of millennials say they know someone who uses gender-neutral pronouns. This figure increases among Generation Z’s, with 56% of those aged 13-20 saying the same. </p> <p>Fashion is one industry that has been taking note of this, with big-name retailers creating unisex clothing lines. </p> <p>Last year, Zara launched its ‘Ungendered’ collection, and more recently <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68351-why-women-are-talking-about-h-m-s-latest-ad-campaign" target="_blank">H&amp;M</a> has followed suit with its unisex ‘Denim United’ range.</p> <p>Interestingly, both collections have come in for criticism, mainly because the clothes appear to veer towards a male-aesthetic (as well as being pretty boring in design). However, H&amp;M <em>has</em> included a number of dresses in its collection, which has prevented the brand receiving the same kind of backlash as Zara. Then again, whether or not the retailer continues the collection is perhaps dependent on sales rather than sentiment.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1LbJjSHIln0?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Could it become a brand gimmick? </h3> <p>While ASA’s decision has been met with a largely positive response, there has been some suggestion that the guidelines will be difficult to implement. As it is arguably a subjective topic – where will we draw the line between stereotypes and standard segmentation? </p> <p>Similarly, will brands that typically target a specific gender feel obliged to err on the side of caution, and could this actually stifle creativity rather than lead to natural diversity?</p> <p>This also raises the question of brands jumping on the gender bandwagon, perhaps even using it purely for the sake of marketing purposes rather than real customer inclusivity.</p> <p>Fortunately, brands like L’Oréal and Unilever do appear serious about long-term investment in gender equality. Meanwhile, as the ASA cracks down on unacceptable stereotyping, maybe 2017 will signal a real sea change in the attitude of brand marketers. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68045-how-global-goals-is-using-social-media-to-highlight-gender-inequality/" target="_blank">How Global Goals is using social media to highlight gender inequality</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://www.econsultancy.com/blog/68127-a-closer-look-at-dove-s-anti-sexism-mybeautymysay-campaign" target="_blank">A closer look at Dove's anti-sexism #MyBeautyMySay campaign</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68865-will-bad-pr-lead-uber-to-destruction/" target="_blank">Will bad PR lead Uber to destruction?</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69210 2017-06-30T16:00:00+01:00 2017-06-30T16:00:00+01:00 Is Reddit on the verge of becoming a bigger player in digital advertising? Patricio Robles <p>The company, Reddit, operates what it calls "the front page of the internet" and the name isn't just marketing buzz: according to Alexa, Reddit is now the fourth most popular site in the U.S., attracting some 250m users a month, and has an average daily time on site of over 16 minutes, nearly six minutes more than Facebook.</p> <p>Despite its popularity, however, Reddit has struggled to build the kind of booming advertising business one might expect a site with so much traffic and stickiness to have. That's largely because Reddit, which is powered by the contributions of users who are referred to as Redditors, is considered <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67619-five-brands-that-proved-marketing-on-reddit-can-work/">a tough nut for advertisers to crack</a>.</p> <p>Not only have the tools it offers advertisers been rudimentary compared to those provided by other ad players, there's a belief that the Reddit community is, by and large, hostile to advertising, making Reddit an uncomfortable and even risky platform for advertisers to invest in.</p> <h3>Trying to change perceptions</h3> <p>Reddit, which was once owned by Condé Nast and then spun off, has raised $50m in funding since the spin-off. Clearly, Reddit's investors want a return and the company is trying to change perceptions in an effort to lure more ad dollars.</p> <p>Reddit recently attended the Cannes Lions ad festival for just the second time ever and co-founder and chairman Alexis Ohanian was busy pitching advertisers on its updated self-serve ad platform, which lets brands more easily manage their campaigns, test creative and obtain analytics data. </p> <p>According to Ohanian, Reddit's self-serve ad platform hadn't been updated in nearly eight years.</p> <p>Reddit, which has thus far offered a limited set of ad formats that include sponsored posts and banner ads, is also <a href="http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/reddit-video-ads-1202477117/">adding a new video ad format</a> that has already been piloted by Universal Pictures and A24 Films.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/7127/reddit2.png" alt="" width="865" height="147"></p> <h3>Not Facebook</h3> <p>Despite the fact that Reddit is now competing more aggressively for ad dollars, it isn't comparing itself to social platforms like Facebook. In fact, part of its proposition is that it<em> isn't</em> like other social platforms.</p> <p>"There's no other place on the internet where people all come together because of the conversation," Ohanian <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/reddit-is-pitching-brands-at-cannes-on-why-its-ripe-for-advertisers/">told AdWeek</a>. "Because people aren't worried about their perfect Instagram life, they're just being honest and open. It's a unique place because everyone is self-selected into communities."</p> <p>According to some, Reddit's unique characteristics make it a very valuable ad platform if used correctly. Sherwin Su, associate director of social at digital agency Essence, went so far as to tell the Wall Street Journal, "Reddit is one of advertising's best kept secrets."</p> <p>For years, stories, mostly posted by individual entrepreneurs and small businesses, have circulated, many touting the fact that Reddit ad campaigns can drive a lot of traffic quickly and much more cheaply than other ad platforms.</p> <p>But what about big brands? Over the past year, Reddit <a href="http://www.adweek.com/digital/why-big-brands-are-suddenly-getting-cozy-reddit-172053/">has been trying to help larger advertisers achieve similar results</a> and there's some evidence the effort is paying off.</p> <p>Netflix used Reddit ads to promote its show, Wet Hot American Summer, and Toyota ran a campaign that invited Redditors to share their stories about their Rav4 vehicles. According to Reddit's VP of sales, Zubair Jandali, the campaign resulted in brand favorability that was six times higher than the category average.</p> <h3>Worth a second look?</h3> <p>While such campaign results are promising, the jury is still out on Reddit's ability to be a meaningful source of digital advertising ROI for brands. But as brands grapple with the risks of a digital advertising ecosystem increasingly dominated by two firms, a more brand-friendly Reddit might be worth a new look.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69184 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 2017-06-22T13:59:10+01:00 Five successful brands on YouTube: From Adidas to Sarson's vinegar Nikki Gilliland <p>Google recently recognised a number of brands who are using YouTube to<a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/intl/en-gb/collections/2017-winners-of-youtube-works-for-brands.html" target="_blank"> deliver exceptional results</a>. So, building on this, here’s a bit of a deep dive into some of those mentioned and more on why they’ve succeeded. </p> <h3>Sarson’s Vinegar</h3> <p>Sarson’s is certainly not the most recognisable brand, and neither is vinegar the most exciting product. In recognition of the public’s dwindling interest, the brand decided to launch a video marketing campaign to target a younger audience – with the aim of showing them that vinegar is not just something you put on your fish and chips.</p> <p>Looking at what younger people were searching for on YouTube in relation to the product, Sarson's found recipes, home cooking and ‘pickling’ in particular to be the biggest trends. On the back of this discovery, they decided to create a series of recipe videos to showcase how vinegar can be used in different ways, such as for sauerkraut, pickled beetroot, and even as an ingredient in cocktails.</p> <p>Sarson’s targeted users based on their demographic, as well as people searching for specific keywords. The brand served short-form content to these users initially, before delivering longer videos to anyone who engaged.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ic62hHcD_F4?list=PLjRELKmqLCAJl97luZvHSM11PezqM-7nj&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The approach certainly worked - the campaign generated 4m views in 2016, and a growth of 541% on inbound website traffic compared to 2015. It not only succeeded in changing brand perceptions – showing the product in a new light to those already aware of it – but it also opened it up to a whole new audience, making younger people aware of the brand and its potential role in cooking.</p> <p>Since the initial campaign, Sarson’s has further built on this interest from food lovers with a series of recipes inspired by <a href="http://www.greatbritishchefs.com/">Great British Chefs</a>. By recognising a demand for content and delivering it, Sarson's has managed to successfully tap into a new audience and increase its digital presence.</p> <h3>Adidas </h3> <p>Adidas is a brand that has enjoyed a resurgence in recent years, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68860-four-ways-nostalgia-can-help-to-boost-your-marketing-efforts/" target="_blank">tapping into nostalgia</a> and the transformative <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69086-how-adidas-uses-digital-to-enable-powerful-experiences/" target="_blank">power of sport</a> to deliver in both high-fashion and sporting arenas. </p> <p>As the official sponsor of the Champions League, Adidas Football wanted to build on the interest of football fans, turning their love of the game into love and long-term loyalty for the brand. Its target demographic was football-obsessed teens of around 14 to 20 years of age – those who typically use social channels like YouTube to consume media. </p> <p>But what type of content does this demographic desire?</p> <p>Adidas recognised that a lot of football content on traditional TV channels can be quite dry, usually involving serious analysis and commentary about upcoming or past games. In contrast to this, the brand decided to create Adidas ‘Gamedayplus’ - a series of fun and purely entertaining videos featuring big name football clubs and players. Examples include Suarez taking the ‘first touch challenge’ or David Silva testing his target practice. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S081lUbP4t0?list=PLfl6xCUNPx0pMXW-s8CuhXcMDvqWA6aSp&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With an existing and highly active audience of young users already searching for football content, Adidas Football managed to draw in 315,000 new subscribers as a result of the campaign. The channel also saw a 65% increase in organic views, with users typically watching for longer without clicking away. </p> <p>By tapping into the ‘always on’ digital mind-set of young consumers, Adidas is a great example of how to deliver the type of content that’s perfectly suited to both the channel and its audience.</p> <h3>Tesco</h3> <p>While brands like Adidas use YouTube to target a specific demographic, others, like Tesco, use it to build trust and drive purchases across a large and varied audience.</p> <p>Tesco has traditionally focused on capturing consumer attention with seasonal campaigns, often centred around popular cultural events like Christmas and Halloween. However, with trust in the brand dwindling in recent years, transferring this strategy to YouTube has allowed Tesco to experiment with short form video content, aiming to deliver real value on the promise of ‘every little helps’.</p> <p>Its ‘Spookermarket’ series was the first example of this, involving a video that captured the reaction of customers as Tesco staff played out Halloween-related pranks. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yqWeuBJfxsQ?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>The video went on to become one of the top ten ads of 2015 - a result that also helped to spur on the rest of the campaign. Using its light-hearted nature to capture initial attention, Tesco then served more in-depth and helpful videos to users, including a jack-o-lantern tutorial and other Halloween-related ‘how-to’ content. This staggered approach ensured the campaign’s impact would be much bigger, with consistent content rolled out to reach consumers over time.</p> <p>One reason Tesco has been so successful on YouTube appears to be this considered approach - one that uses data to shape future marketing efforts. Taking into account the type of videos that customers engage with the most, it is able to create content on this basis, delivering value and a real reason for viewers to invest in the brand.</p> <p>With a 9% uplift in purchase intent from its YouTube TrueView Shoppable ads, it is clear that Tesco’s strategy is doing more than just build trust.</p> <h3>Halifax</h3> <p>Another brand that has used helpful content to drive brand awareness is Halifax bank. However, it has also used YouTube to help differentiate itself from competitors. </p> <p>With its series of short, simple and easy to understand ‘jargon buster’ videos, it aimed to deliver a campaign that was both large in scale and hugely valuable for customers, ultimately drawing them away from other banks.</p> <p>Halifax used YouTube’s TrueView platform - meaning ads would play in-stream or alongside related content - in order to gain mass reach. To build momentum, each video followed a distinct and recognisable formula. It involved a single question – such as ‘What’s a lump sum?’ and ‘What’s an ISA?’ – which was then explained in under 30 seconds using both visuals and audible commentary. </p> <p>Its simplicity was key. Nielsen analysis of the campaign found the videos scored 100% for the metric 'easy to understand' and generated a 31% uplift in brand consideration for those who were exposed to the campaign.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XHlKXKFNn9s?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>One reason I also like this example is that is clearly designed for YouTube. While a lot of brands are guilty of adapting or tweaking campaigns to a particular channel, the best results occur when videos or ads are first created with the medium in mind.</p> <p>In the case of Halifax, its short, snappy, and super simple explanations of confusing subjects are perfectly suited to viewer behaviour. It does not disrupt the user, and is both interesting and succinct enough to convey a memorable message. </p> <h3>EE </h3> <p>YouTube has become synonymous with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69161-micro-influencers-how-to-find-the-right-fit-for-your-brand/" target="_blank">social influencers</a>, and as a result, many brands have generated interest from influencer partnerships. EE is a brand that has used this approach on a massive scale, drawing on the combined reach of multiple influencers for a single campaign.</p> <p>The Wembley Cup 2016 was EE's second mini-football tournament involving YouTubers against former FIFA Legends, and culminating in a final at Wembley Stadium.</p> <p>So, why did it choose influencers and not mainstream celebrities? Like previous examples, it wanted to reach a specific demographic, with the aim of becoming the number one provider for a young age range. With this age bracket already highly engaged with influencers on YouTube, EE recognised the potential of creating a campaign that could capitalise on this existing interest.</p> <p>The results were impressive, with the series amassing 40m views and 1.5m watching the live final. In addition, 20,000 people filled the stadium to watch. What’s more, there was a 36% increase in brand search terms following the campaign, with EE succeeding in its aim of becoming the number one choice for young mobile users.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZrL1DTZoLW4?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>With a focus on episodic content, EE is also a great example of how to reach an increasingly elusive audience. As young people turn away from TV and towards online media, the sheer amount of content out there means it is even harder for brands to create campaigns that resonate. For its 2016 series, EE deliberately involved the digital audience, allowing them to have a say in picking the team and choosing substitutions. </p> <p>Combined with episodic content, this meant EE was able to hook in viewers from the outset and create deeper levels of emotional engagement.</p> <h3>Ingredients for success</h3> <p>So, let’s recap on what we can learn from the aforementioned brand campaigns.</p> <p><strong>Drawing on data:</strong> Whether it’s using search data to inform targeting or using watch times to shape future strategy, it’s vital for brands to consider metrics when creating YouTube campaigns. Brands that do, like Tesco, are far more likely to succeed. Solutions like Google’s DoubleClick allow brands to delve below surface data (such as basic clicks) to gain a much more in-depth picture of how ads and videos impact user behaviour. </p> <p><strong>Finding a niche:</strong> One problem for brands on YouTube is saturation. Take recipes, for instance, where endless channels compete on the same subject matter. In this instance, it is important to create a point of difference based on the brand, finding out how to create content that people are really interested in. I mean, who knew pickling was so big?</p> <p><strong>Creating campaigns specifically for the channel:</strong> Like Halifax’s super short and concise finance videos, the best YouTube campaigns are specifically designed to cater to the digital audience. Taking into consideration the context of the user and what else they’re doing online at that moment, other than watching an ad, can be incredibly powerful.</p> <p><strong>Using episodic content:</strong> Lastly, the campaigns from Adidas and EE show how episodic content can build engagement and brand loyalty over time. Both brands have since gone on to repeat the same formula, with viewers clearly hooked and ready for more.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69109 2017-05-24T14:10:53+01:00 2017-05-24T14:10:53+01:00 Why Visit Sweden and other tourism boards are teaming up with Airbnb Nikki Gilliland <p>So, why are tourism boards showing increased interest in the sharing economy? Here’s a bit of elaboration on the topic.</p> <h3>Increasing awareness rather than bookings</h3> <p>It’s unusual for tourism boards to endorse the sharing economy, with most being government-backed and therefore aligned to <a href="http://www.europarl.europa.eu/thinktank/en/document.html?reference=EPRS_BRI(2017)595897" target="_blank">criticism that it can negatively affect</a> local communities and businesses. </p> <p>However, Visit Sweden’s partnership is based on building awareness rather than driving actual bookings. In fact, there are no additional listings for Swedish accommodation since the campaign launched. It is merely a marketing campaign that involves Airbnb posting fictional listings from nine areas of Sweden, including locations like the mountains of Sarek and Skuleskogen National Park.</p> <p>It is based on the 'Allemansrätten' principle, which is a protected law that says people are free to roam in nature. Essentially, it means anyone has the right to walk, cycle, ride, ski and camp on any land, apart from private gardens, near a private residence or on land under cultivation.</p> <p>The content is located on a separate microsite, which is mainly promoted on Visit Sweden's homepage and social media, also meaning there is little endorsement of the Airbnb product itself.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/C6671CL5fFg?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>I’ll scratch your back…</h3> <p>So what’s <em>actually</em> in it for Airbnb?</p> <p>Since the brand expanded into the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68749-why-online-travel-sites-are-focusing-on-tours-and-activities/" target="_blank">tours and activities</a> sector with last year's launch of Trips, it appears to be another way for the brand to market itself as a destination resource rather than a straightforward booking site. </p> <p>As the campaign is fundamentally based on travel ‘experiences’ rather than accommodation, it nicely aligns with this new area of focus.</p> <p>In a more general sense, Visit Sweden’s ethos also matches Airbnb’s branding, with the tagline of ‘belong anywhere’ echoing the ‘free to roam’ principle. Of course, while it's mostly designed to offer inspiration, the campaign does promote real accommodation (in the rest of Sweden) too, allowing users to click through, search, and book if they like.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Sweden's <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/freedomtoroam?src=hash">#freedomtoroam</a> lets you sleep under the stars, indulge in the fish from the lakes or camp on the beach - <a href="https://t.co/LI2GXZmgeI">https://t.co/LI2GXZmgeI</a> <a href="https://t.co/VZiqgbTQ1L">pic.twitter.com/VZiqgbTQ1L</a></p> — Visit Sweden US (@VisitSwedenUS) <a href="https://twitter.com/VisitSwedenUS/status/867002269233033216">May 23, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Attracting open-minded travellers</h3> <p>For Visit Sweden, which perhaps doesn't have a huge budget, the partnership is an opportunity to make use of Airbnb’s influence and indeed its large customer base. </p> <p>The country has a reputation for progressive and creative marketing campaigns. Its ‘Swedish Number’ campaign, which involved setting up a national phone number so that anyone could call up and talk to a random Swede, reportedly generated the equivalent of $147m in international media coverage.</p> <p>By promoting its country as free to stay in, Visit Sweden is clearly banking on creating on yet another PR splash, using Airbnb to increase reach and general visibility of the campaign.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6301/Swedish_number.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="489"></p> <h3>Educating local communities</h3> <p>The campaign is being described as a ‘first of its kind collaboration’ – and while it is in marketing terms - it’s not the first time a tourism board has partnered with Airbnb.</p> <p>The Anguilla Tourist Board recently partnered with the company to promote the Caribbean destination on a global level. It was described as a way for Airbnb to work with the Anguilla government to attract a greater number of visitors, as well as increase levels of employment on the island.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the brand has also partnered with city-based tourism boards, such as the San Francisco Travel Association. The main reason being the opportunity to expand tourism in lesser-known areas, shining a light on small businesses as well as promoting the experience of ‘living like a local’.</p> <p>As well as increasing its positive impact, these partnerships also reflect a desire to educate communities about the sharing economy, reducing any negative perception about brands like Airbnb and instead to capitalise on their growth. </p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69052-how-visitscotland-is-transforming-the-traditional-tourist-body/" target="_blank">How VisitScotland is transforming the traditional tourist body</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68971-does-airbnb-stand-a-chance-in-china/" target="_blank">Does Airbnb stand a chance in China?</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68225-10-examples-of-great-airbnb-marketing-creative/" target="_blank">10 examples of great Airbnb marketing creative</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69108 2017-05-24T13:26:01+01:00 2017-05-24T13:26:01+01:00 Four tips for creating effective YouTube bumper ads Nikki Gilliland <p>In a <a href="https://adwords.googleblog.com/2017/04/say-it-in-six-why-marketers-and.html" target="_blank">study of 122 bumper campaigns</a> (i.e. ads that are six seconds long) it found that - in 70% of cases - bumper ads have caused a 'significant lift' in awareness of the brand. What’s more, it also found that nine in 10 drove ad recall, with an average lift of over 30%.</p> <p>So, what exactly are the elements of an effective bumper ad? Here are just a few points to consider, along with examples that prove why brands could see increased success with this super-short video medium.</p> <h3>Simplify the message</h3> <p>While it might be tempting to use a 30 second ad as a starting point, before finding a way to reduce it to six seconds – this tactic is likely to be difficult to pull off.</p> <p>Not only will it be impossible to make the ad flow in the same way, but cramming in loads of different content is going to confuse and overwhelm viewers. The key is to start from and focus on a core message or idea instead.</p> <p>Recently at SXSW (South By Southwest event in Austin), YouTube challenged agencies and filmakers to re-imagine classic works of literature in six seconds. The results prove that great storytelling doesn’t necessary need an arc or evolving narrative, but a clear and concise message that encapsulates an overarching theme.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cv0lNSY73e8?list=PL9Xlh2Jq9l7Xs88qWNSdmJMLedtJn31Bq&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Focus on a single emotion</h3> <p>In line with this, the most effective bumper ads tend to focus on a single emotion for the most impact. While comedy often works well, it is also useful when the humour is relatable or makes the viewer feel a certain way. </p> <p>The below example pairs a striking visual with a highly relatable scenario, requiring no real explanation or information about the product itself. Its subtlety is what makes it effective, alongside confidence in the viewer that they will understand or piece together the message. Using the same components of an <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68154-16-ad-examples-that-prove-print-isn-t-dead/" target="_blank">effective print ad</a> - the combination of comedy and relatable embarassment is perfectly conveyed,</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bbkiRNoSyUo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>While the medium is entirely different, we can also compare it to the recent viral image of a bottle of Cooperative olive oil.</p> <p>Ultimately, it shows the difference between a brand that gives the consumer some credit, and one that is intent on hammering home its message to the point of it becoming redundant.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6284/COOP.JPG" alt="" width="500" height="413"></p> <h3>Capitalise on viewer context</h3> <p>As well as the content itself, it’s important to take into consideration the ad's contextual elements, such as watching on mobile or without sound.</p> <p>This is why bumper ads do not necessarily need to be so clever or complex. Instead of capturing the consumer’s attention (so that they do not skip), creating an impact as well as a desire for the product is now the ultimate end goal.</p> <p>This explains why brands like <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/66153-how-mouth-watering-is-krispy-kreme-s-social-media-strategy/" target="_blank">Krispy Kreme</a> use a more simplistic approach, here focusing on a captivating visual to promote its core product. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OiHy9NVXx4c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Create <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67977-four-examples-of-brands-using-an-episodic-content-marketing-strategy/" target="_blank">episodic content</a> </h3> <p>Instead of saying everything in 30 seconds, bumper ads can allow brands to piece together a story over a period of time – the only difference being a series of separate ads as opposed to a single one.</p> <p>In fact, this approach could be why bumper ads are more effective for ad recall, as it allows brands to plant a seed before building momentum. Of course, it also aligns with the short attention span of modern viewers, who are likely to prefer shorter ads in order to get to the desired content as quickly as possible.</p> <p>Whether each ad is entirely different or the continuation of a story, viewers will know what to expect once they have seen the first, ideally becoming hooked as it is repeated. The below example from a showcase at Sundance film festival reflects this idea, using the theme of six-second time travel to deliver a series of related jokes. You can check out the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DOLbULZjI8&amp;index=8&amp;list=PL9Xlh2Jq9l7WCGkS_8btd8mvPvZtWru5V" target="_blank">next ad here</a>.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Jhw-nO6S-c0?list=PL9Xlh2Jq9l7WCGkS_8btd8mvPvZtWru5V&amp;wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><em><strong>Related reading:</strong></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67675-six-online-advertising-tactics-set-to-rise/" target="_blank">Six online advertising tactics set to rise</a></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/64249-what-s-the-perfect-youtube-ad-length/" target="_blank">What's the perfect YouTube ad length?</a></em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69092 2017-05-18T11:10:20+01:00 2017-05-18T11:10:20+01:00 Skoda uses real-time traffic data as part of digital OOH campaign Nikki Gilliland <h3>Targeting travellers in the moment</h3> <p>Part of the brand’s ‘Driven by Something Different’ push, Skoda’s campaign involves digital billboards that highlight the natural beauty of four different locations in the UK, including Rye, Wales, the Lakes and Norfolk.</p> <p>The campaign is designed to encourage drivers to veer away from their day-to-day journeys and reconnect with things that are important in life – in this case nature. So, alongside stunning landscapes, each billboard displays how long it will take to drive from that exact spot to the location in the ad. It also uses Google’s API traffic statistics to update journey estimations in real-time.</p> <p>It’s certainly clever. But do passers-by really take notice of digital ads?</p> <p>According to <a href="http://kineticww.com/us/document/nielsen-2016-ooh-advertising-study/" target="_blank">Nielsen</a>, 91% of US residents who have travelled in a vehicle in the past month have noticed some form of out-of-home advertising. What’s more, 71% of people found these ads to be more noticeable than those seen online.</p> <p>The beauty of digital OOH advertising is that it is far less jarring than online, which automatically makes it more appealing to consumers. Instead of an online ad, which interrupts the user experience to deliver a marketing message, a digital billboard complements a real world experience – with passers-by viewing ads in a highly targeted and specific context. </p> <p>The result is a much more seamless experience, with a guaranteed high level of visibility.</p> <p><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/214814384" width="640" height="360"></iframe></p> <h3>Providing more than just inspiration</h3> <p>Alongside its clever use of contextual data, another reason this campaign works is that it taps into the consumer’s real-time emotional needs and desires. While many automotive brands use travel-based imagery to engage consumers - as well as highlight a vehicle’s various features – this is <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/69053-how-maserati-uses-influencers-to-drive-its-instagram-strategy/" target="_blank">often on Instagram</a> or other online channels. </p> <p>Consequently, the separation between the consumer and the actual location feels huge – with the user response often being a passive sense of wanderlust. And naturally, brands hope that this feeling will be enough to prompt consumers to take action.</p> <p>However, Skoda’s campaign not only evokes this response but offers the solution.</p> <p>By delivering inspirational travel imagery to people in busy cities or on motorways, and then informing them exactly how long it would take to get from A to B, the campaign taps into and helps to solve a relatable frustration. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">In the ŠKODA Kodiaq, you'll enjoy the journey. Reconnect with the important people in your life along the way.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/DrivenBySomethingDifferent?src=hash">#DrivenBySomethingDifferent</a> <a href="https://t.co/FAcrs2IH6k">pic.twitter.com/FAcrs2IH6k</a></p> — ŠKODA UK (@SKODAUK) <a href="https://twitter.com/SKODAUK/status/849169685656461313">April 4, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>A lifestyle-led campaign</h3> <p>For Skoda, the decision to launch a DOOH campaign aligns with a shift in its general marketing strategy. Instead of focusing on the functional or technical aspects of the car, it is now positioning itself in terms of the lifestyle of the consumer.</p> <p>As a seven-seater the Kodiaq SUV is a family car, which is reflected in the family-friendly locations of Rye and the Lake District. Similarly, by placing billboards in locations such as shopping centres Skoda is able to target a very specific demographic. </p> <p>Along with the theme of focusing on the things that matter most in life, it's a nicely executed campaign all-round.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6094/Skoda_shopping.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="377"></p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68051-six-case-studies-that-show-how-digital-out-of-home-advertising-is-changing/" target="_blank">Six case studies that show how digital out-of-home advertising is changing</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68122-skoda-uses-data-to-power-tour-de-france-content-marketing/">Skoda uses data to power Tour de France content marketing</a></em></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/69094 2017-05-17T10:36:26+01:00 2017-05-17T10:36:26+01:00 Five examples of brands using interactive video Nikki Gilliland <p>This is where interactive video comes in. Instead of a passive user experience, interactive video requires the person watching to take action – e.g. answer a question or make a decision – usually to inform how the rest of the video unfolds.</p> <p>There are many benefits, including longer viewing times, greater engagement, and even data capture.</p> <p>While the technology is certainly nothing new, there appears to have been a surge in brands experimenting with it lately. Here are a few examples and the reasons why it works.</p> <h3>Mended Little Hearts</h3> <p>Mended Little Hearts is a charity for children with congenital heart disease. Its recent campaign, ‘Give a Fuller Life’, uses interactive video to show how donating money can transform the lives of those affected.</p> <p>The animated video depicts a day in the life of 11-year-old Max, who we first see wandering along the street looking lost and lonely. Viewers are prompted to pledge a donation, which results in Max’s life becoming a little brighter each time. Gradually, the street becomes sunnier, and family, animals, and toys also start to appear. </p> <p>The video is simple but surprisingly emotive, effectively highlighting how a small act (which often involves just a few clicks online) can dramatically transform a child’s life.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/T88vbtCsuEw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Warner Bros.</h3> <p>Focus is a 2015 movie starring Will Smith as a veteran conman. Alongside the standard trailer Warner Bros. released an interactive video to promote the movie before it hit cinemas.</p> <p>It allows viewers to test their own skills as a con artist by making a series of decisions as they go. The potential 'marks' include an internet mogul, an investment banker, and an art dealer, with each one presenting a different challenge for participating viewers.</p> <p>While Focus turned out to be fairly predictable as a film, its interactive video is far more innovative. Combining gamification and movie marketing – it’s a great example of how to pique interest and engage consumers in the run up to a release.</p> <p><a href="http://www.raptmedia.com/customers/warner-bros-focus/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6108/Focus.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="444"></a></p> <h3>Deloitte</h3> <p>Most recruitment videos tend to be quite dry, however Deloitte chose a more light-hearted tack for its New Zealand graduate recruitment program.</p> <p>Filmed as a ‘day in the life’ of a Deloitte employee, the gamified video allows users to choose how they’d react to a number of different work-based scenarios. From telling a co-worker about spilt coffee on their jacket, to what to do if a printer breaks – each one highlights the various skills and attributes valued by the company.</p> <p>The result is a highly engaging and immersive video experience, which effectively educates viewers about Deloitte while simultaneously prompting them to think about whether they’d be a good fit. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EUw0vzyN9ZM?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Honda</h3> <p>To promote its Civic Type R, Honda wanted to create a video that showcased another side of the typically reliable automotive brand.</p> <p>The result was an interactive, dual-narrative video that allowed viewers to switch between two storylines. The first involved a father picking up his daughter from school and taking her to a party. However, when viewers pressed the ‘R’ key on their keyboard or tablet, the other side of the story was revealed, with the father becoming an undercover cop by night. </p> <p>By controlling exactly how the video can be watched, the user experience immedately changes from a passive to an active one, becoming far more engaging as a result.</p> <p>What’s more, the video is also an example of how to engage a wider audience, with all kinds of people likely to enjoy it, regardless of whether they have an interest in the brand or product itself.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FU5CLg2LAmg?wmode=transparent" width="780" height="439"></iframe></p> <h3>Maybelline New York</h3> <p>While a lot of <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67884-seven-ways-social-media-is-shaping-the-beauty-industry/" target="_blank">beauty-related videos</a> are more interactive than other industries (in that they offer tutorials or advice), Maybelline takes this one step further with its interactive tutorial video for Big Eyes Mascara.</p> <p>For the video, Maybelline teamed up with Kelly Framel, a popular fashion blogger, to create a tutorial of four different looks based around a single core product.  </p> <p>The video allows viewers to navigate different beauty tutorials, choosing the style and context of each one, such as ‘day’ or ‘night’ and ‘club tropicana’ and ‘rebel chic’. While the video isn’t exactly ground-breaking, it shows how interactive video can potentially be used to increase conversion. </p> <p>Unlike buying a car, for example, the nature of shopping for beauty products is much more instinctive and spontaneous, meaning that interactive video can prompt an immediate response from viewers. </p> <p><a href="https://www.raptmedia.com/customers/maybelline-new-york-engagement-conversions/" target="_blank"><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/6109/Maybelline_video.JPG" alt="" width="780" height="434"></a></p> <p><em><strong>Further reading: </strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67932-the-future-of-video-is-vertical-texted-emotional/" target="_blank">The future of video is vertical, texted &amp; emotional</a></em></li> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68640-why-live-video-was-the-biggest-social-trend-of-2016/" target="_blank">Why live video was the biggest social trend of 2016</a></em></li> </ul> <p><em><strong>For more, you can also check out Econsultancy's <a href="https://econsultancy.com/training/courses/video-marketing-strategies" target="_blank">Video Marketing Strategy Training</a> course.</strong></em></p>