tag:econsultancy.com,2008:/topics/video Latest Video content from Econsultancy 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68817 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 2017-02-16T14:59:16+00:00 How brands are targeting business travellers Nikki Gilliland <p>According to a <a href="http://hotelmarketing.com/index.php/content/article/booking.com_survey_reveals_top_causes_of_business_travel_stress" target="_blank">survey from Booking.com</a>, 93% of business travellers feel stressed at some point during their journey - unsurprising given the amount of logistics involved. From planning to managing expenses, and even without taking into account the actual work that needs to done, there’s a whole heap of hassle that goes along with corporate travel.</p> <p>For brands, this traveller presents a unique opportunity. </p> <p>Not only is there less need to dazzle and delight with <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67766-10-examples-of-great-travel-marketing-campaigns/" target="_blank">inspirational marketing</a>, but thanks to the deep pockets of corporate companies, the budget can often be sizeable. Meanwhile, with a positive experience likely to result in repeat trips, business travel could prove to be a lucrative market.</p> <p>Here’s how a few brands are setting their sights on it.</p> <h3>Airbnb</h3> <p>The ‘Airbnb for business’ program launched in 2015, signalling the brand’s intent to capture interest from corporate travellers, all the while proving how popular alternative accommodation has become.</p> <p>The service allows companies to integrate their business travel itineraries, giving them a full run-down of where employees are staying and how much they’re spending. More recently, Airbnb has introduced a feature that allows employees to book on behalf of colleagues, making the service even more streamlined.</p> <p>Since it launched, the program has enjoyed a period of growth, however <a href="https://skift.com/2016/11/04/small-companies-have-embraced-airbnb-for-business-travel/" target="_blank">recent data</a> suggests that this could be slowing – mainly due to the companies choosing Airbnb spending as little as possible on short trips. Similarly, Airbnb for business is only seeing real success in cities where the hotel prices are notoriously high.</p> <p>Airbnb is naturally trying to combat this by promoting longer stays and group trips, even offering £40 in travel credit, in order to encourage higher spend.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3951/Airbnb.jpg" alt="" width="760" height="320"></p> <h3>Booking.com</h3> <p>With a reported one in five customers using <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68505-a-closer-look-at-booking-com-s-customer-focused-strategy/" target="_blank">Booking.com</a> for business travel, it’s no surprise the brand decided to launch its own business travel platform.</p> <p>Designed to make the research and planning stage as easy as possible, it places a big focus on peer-to-peer reviews, sorting through the data to find accommodation that is ‘business traveller tested and approved’.  </p> <p>This customer-centric approach is continued across the board, and reflected in the online UX.</p> <p>After completing a simple registration, users can filter the search by ‘business interest’ like fitness centre or free cancellation. Arguably, the platform doesn't offer anything that much different to the main Booking.com platform, however the ability for company managers or administrators to coordinate plans for others is a key differentiator.</p> <p>Since its launch, there have been suggestions that the brand will expand its business offering into flights - though there's been no sign of this so far.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3952/Booking.jpg" alt="" width="750" height="364"></p> <h3>STA</h3> <p>With millennials forecast to make up half of the workforce by 2020, the stereotype of the middle-aged business traveller no longer applies.</p> <p>STA is tapping into this notion, launching a business travel brand to target young people with a desire to combine both business and pleasure.</p> <p>Alongside young people starting their own business, students travelling for internships or first jobs, it also targets people who want to tag on a holiday at the end of a work trip.</p> <p>With <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2016/05/05/millennials-are-prioritizing-experiences-over-stuff.html" target="_blank">78% of millennials</a> choosing worthwhile experiences over possessions, it’s no surprise that this demand exists. It also bodes well for STA, with the move helping the brand to stay relevant to young people as they move into the workplace.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Need a <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/visa?src=hash">#visa</a>?. We can help you find out if you need one! Speak to our experts to find out more businesstravel@statravel.co.uk <a href="https://t.co/sbH3xH0RzE">pic.twitter.com/sbH3xH0RzE</a></p> — STA Travel Business (@STABusiness) <a href="https://twitter.com/STABusiness/status/825335372343308289">January 28, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Marriot</h3> <p>STA isn’t the only travel brand to target business travellers with the promise of an experience.</p> <p>Marriot’s Renaissance Hotels brand recently launched a new campaign to do just that. Called ‘The Navigator’s Table’, the video series features TV chef Andrew Zimmern from “Bizarre Foods”, and involves chefs and entrepreneurs offering insight and opinions on regional dishes. </p> <p>Essentially, it is designed to appeal to the modern business traveller – someone who is curious, and who wants to get as much out of a business trip as possible.</p> <p>The frequency with which business travellers travel is largely the reason behind this marketing push. For a large hotel chain like Marriot, a single ‘authentic experience’ could result in multiple and repeat bookings in future – reason enough to pay them more attention.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7UUT15kQG1A?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68809 2017-02-15T11:44:00+00:00 2017-02-15T11:44:00+00:00 The Outnet is using satirical humour for ‘Pretty Influential’ Fashion Week series Nikki Gilliland <p>The online video series is a satirical look at the world of influencer marketing, depicting what life is like <em>without</em> an Instagram filter.</p> <p>Here is a bit more info on the series and a few reasons why I think it works.</p> <h3>The Foster sisters</h3> <p>Pretty Influential is essentially a mock documentary, portraying a pair of aspiring influencers as they attempt to sneak behind the scenes at fashion week.</p> <p>Before we go on, it’s important to point out that the Foster sisters are <em>not</em> social influencers in real life.</p> <p>Despite stemming from a Hollywood background (and looking rather model-esque), they are in fact comedy writers and actors, best known for the VH1 show, Barely Famous, which pokes fun at the world of reality television.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/D_Iod9kOg1o?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>A refreshing approach</h3> <p>So why has the Outnet – a fairly high-end ecommerce fashion site – chosen to satirise the world of influencer marketing instead of harnessing its power?</p> <p>Perhaps the decision stems from last year’s controversial Vogue article, which saw a number of editors harshly criticise bloggers for supposedly “preening for the cameras in borrowed clothes”. </p> <p>The feature was a scathing take-down of the influx of influencers within the fashion industry, but instead of being met with agreement, the criticism was labelled as petty and unnecessary by many other media companies as well as influencers themselves.</p> <p>Regardless of the Outnet’s opinion on the topic, Pretty Influential is a rather clever nod to the fact that – as a result of the controversy – influencer marketing is now ripe for parody. </p> <p>Taking the opportunity to do just that, the Outnet manages to come across as both refreshing and self-aware. Likewise, it also makes fun of both sides of the coin, laughing at influencer clichés as well as the highfalutin nature of fashion designers.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/99N-ZXXJ6qw?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Short-form content</h3> <p>As well as the humorous concept, Pretty Influential is also another example of a brand using short-form video content to engage consumers.</p> <p>Following a six-video series, with a new video being released every day, it aims to give the audience a reason to invest, and in turn, to continuously interact with the company.</p> <p>We’ve already seen brands using storytelling in this way, with one of the most high-profile being Nike’s YouTube series, Margo vs Lily. While the series itself was not particularly well-received, it still shows that video content is becoming the medium of choice for many big brands.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">2 sisters. 1 bet. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/nikewomen?src=hash">#nikewomen</a> presents Margot vs Lily, an original show series. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/betterforit?src=hash">#betterforit</a> <a href="https://t.co/Ev6gnP6NHf">https://t.co/Ev6gnP6NHf</a><a href="https://t.co/Qn1RU03Yw3">https://t.co/Qn1RU03Yw3</a></p> — NikeWomen (@nikewomen) <a href="https://twitter.com/nikewomen/status/691662259693563904">January 25, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Ecommerce tie-in</h3> <p>As well as entertaining its audience, Pretty Influential is also designed to point consumers in the direction of products on the Outnet website. </p> <p>Beside each video, there is the call-to-action of ‘Like what you see? Shop their look here’.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3903/Foster_Sisters.JPG" alt="" width="750" height="576"></p> <p>It’s a simple touch, but means that viewers might be inclined to check out the fashion after they watch the video, as well as offering extra value and the incentive to check back for another daily episode.</p> <p>It’s also good to remember that, although the site sells luxury clothes, it is fundamentally a discount designer e-tailer.</p> <p>Consequently, the series cleverly aligns with the desires of its demographic, with consumers likely to respond to the self-deprecating and humorous take on high fashion.</p> <h3>Could it alienate influencers?</h3> <p>Lastly, while Pretty Influential is likely to be met with appreciation from consumers, there is the question of whether influencers will feel the same way.</p> <p>For the Outnet, this might not be too much of an issue. The company has a reputation for capturing the attention of everyday consumers through fun and quirky content rather than the aspirational.  </p> <p>Its ‘Shoe Hunter’ campaign, which saw Sergio the dachshund provide a dog’s eye view of London Fashion Week, is a prime example.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Just a tiny bit in love with <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/sergioshoehunter?src=hash">#sergioshoehunter</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/THEOUTNET">@THEOUTNET</a> - off to buy cam for my dachshund <a href="http://t.co/JblyyQ69qQ">pic.twitter.com/JblyyQ69qQ</a></p> — Katie Iggulden Exon (@katievi) <a href="https://twitter.com/katievi/status/641251677379670016">September 8, 2015</a> </blockquote> <p>Also, with the series using gentle ribbing rather than scathing humour, here’s hoping most influencers have to ability to laugh at themselves.</p> <p><em><strong>Related articles:</strong></em></p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68409-four-key-trends-within-the-world-of-influencer-marketing/" target="_blank">Four key trends within the world of influencer marketing</a></em></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67443-eight-influencer-marketing-stats-for-fashion-beauty-brands/"><em>Eight influencer marketing stats for fashion &amp; beauty brands</em></a></li> </ul> <p><em>For even more on this topic, you can also download the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/" target="_blank">Rise of the Influencers</a> report.</em></p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:WebinarEvent/852 2017-02-10T05:42:02+00:00 2017-02-10T05:42:02+00:00 Online Video: Trends, Data and Best Practice (APAC time zone) <p>Econsultancy APAC's Trends Webinar for March looks at emerging trends, case studies and the state of video marketing in 2017. This insight comes from Econsultancy's latest research along with collated third-party data and statistics.</p> <p>This session will be hosted by<strong> Jeff</strong> <strong>Rajeck, Research Analyst, APAC at Econsultancy</strong>. There will be a 15 minute Q&amp;A session after the presentation.</p> <p><strong>FAQ:</strong></p> <p><strong>I'm not an Econsultancy subscriber, can I join?</strong></p> <p>Ans: You sure can. The sessions are complimentary for existing customers and new friends.</p> <p><strong>Will the session be recorded?</strong></p> <p>Ans: Yes! We record all of our webinars, and we'll send out a link to the recording the following week.</p> <p><strong>What if I register but can't make it?</strong></p> <p>Ans: It's all good. We'll send a follow-up with key takeaways and a link to the recording.</p> <p><strong>Can I ask questions?</strong></p> <p>Ans: Absolutely! This session is for you. Bring your questions and participate during Q&amp;A.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68758 2017-01-31T11:42:58+00:00 2017-01-31T11:42:58+00:00 The best social media campaigns and stories from January 2017 Nikki Gilliland <h3>#EndTheStigma</h3> <p>The sad death of Carrie Fisher inspired one of the most popular hashtags on social media this January. </p> <p>The #EndTheStigma campaign involved users posting colourful badges adorned with declarative statements, with the aim of combatting common misconceptions about mental health.</p> <p>Designed and created by mental health advocate, Kat Selwyn Layton, the campaign was quickly met with a flurry of positive support online. Since then, the badges have been shared over 40,000 times on Facebook alone, and the relating Facebook page now has over 37,700 likes. </p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3512/Endthestigma_2.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="300"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3513/Endthestigma.JPG" alt="" width="300" height="297"></p> <h3>Twitter ditches the buy button</h3> <p>Twitter has finally axed its buy button after the platform’s attempts to move into social commerce failed to take off.</p> <p>The ‘donate’ button, which allows users to give to charities and non-profit organisation, will stay. However, as Shopify told its clients this week, users will no longer be able to include a “buy now” option on tweets.</p> <h3>Twitter replaces 'Moments' tab</h3> <p>Yet more news from Twitter, as the platform replaced the Moments tab on its mobile app with an Explore feature. The new tab will feature trends, news, search and live video in one place, meaning users can find new content more easily.</p> <p>This falls in line with Twitter's focus on content discovery and its aim to become the go-to place for breaking news.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">We're introducing a new way for you to discover what’s happening on Twitter, with Explore.<a href="https://t.co/tlHcqLCHj7">https://t.co/tlHcqLCHj7</a></p> — Twitter (@Twitter) <a href="https://twitter.com/Twitter/status/824666495305162752">January 26, 2017</a> </blockquote> <h3>Sainsbury’s kitchen dancing</h3> <p>Sainsbury’s started the new year with a decidedly upbeat new campaign – and a distinct move away from the discount and product-heavy ads of the past.</p> <p>Featuring footage of people dancing around their kitchens, it celebrates the joy that comes with cooking rather than eating.</p> <p>With a bespoke song created by UK hip-hop artist, MysDiggi (who apparently used to work at Sainsbury’s), it’s undeniably silly - but you’d have to be pretty cynical to not let it raise a smile. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/H4bDzg9Wo_0?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Facebook updates Trending feature in US</h3> <p>Towards the end of January, Facebook announced that it would be updating its Trending feature to help combat the spread of fake news in the US.</p> <p>Now, Facebook will no longer feature trending news topics based off a single report, and instead focus on articles that have been covered by multiple news outlets. It’s also going to stop personalising trending topics, and instead deliver the same stories to all users.</p> <p>In doing so, it aims to minimise the chances of a single (and potentially untrue) news story going viral.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3510/Facebook_Trending.JPG" alt="" width="740" height="324"></p> <h3>Know your lemons</h3> <p>The charity Worldwide Breast Cancer launched a clever and highly shareable campaign last month.</p> <p>Labelled #KnowYourLemons, the campaign was designed to promote awareness of the various signs of breast cancer, and remind women that lumps are not the only symptom.</p> <p>Using lemons to depict 12 different signs, the image cleverly gets around censoring rules, and aims to help women overcome fears about checking their breasts.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fworldwidebreastcancer%2Fposts%2F1357549987610502&amp;width=500" width="500" height="821"></iframe></p> <h3>Mr. Clean's sexy superbowl ad</h3> <p>We recently mentioned it in <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68750-all-the-digital-news-stories-you-missed-this-week-22/">a digital news roundup</a>, but surely the new Mr. Clean ad deserves a second look (if only for comedy purposes).</p> <p>Released by P&amp;G, the ad – set to run during the Super Bowl – features a sexed up version of the famous character doing a particularly provocative dance.</p> <p>While reaction to the ad has been mixed, the overriding emotion from viewers appears to be ‘uncomfortable.’</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GDzMxlw2Fgo?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>#DeleteUber</h3> <p>It was a saddening end to the month, marred by news of Trump’s so-called Muslim ban and an unsurprisingly fierce reaction on social media.</p> <p>People have been getting behind the #DeleteUber campaign, both in response to suggestions that <a href="http://fortune.com/2017/01/29/uber-immigration-protests/">Uber exploited a taxi protest against the ban</a>, as well the CEO’s reported relationship with Trump.</p> <p>While Uber has released several statements to try and stem the uproar, it only seems to be gaining traction, with several high-profile celebrities also backing the campaign.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">When you go from living with a boyfriend to never speaking to him again <a href="https://t.co/s5n2kGyG6r">pic.twitter.com/s5n2kGyG6r</a></p> — Lena Dunham (@lenadunham) <a href="https://twitter.com/lenadunham/status/825793575942230017">January 29, 2017</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68753 2017-01-30T14:31:08+00:00 2017-01-30T14:31:08+00:00 What brands need to know about Facebook's long-form video push Patricio Robles <h3>It's changing the way video completion rates are factored into News Feed ranking</h3> <p>In a blog post, Facebook product manager Abhishek Bapna and research scientist Seyoung Park <a href="https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2017/01/news-feed-fyi-updating-how-we-account-for-video-completion-rates/">explained</a> that Facebook is changing the way it factors the <em>percent completion</em> metric for video into how it ranks content for placement in user News Feeds:</p> <blockquote> <p>If you watch most or all of a video, that tells us that you found the video to be compelling — and we know that completing a longer video is a bigger commitment than completing a shorter one. As we continue to understand how our community consumes video, we’ve realized that we should therefore weight percent completion more heavily the longer a video is, to avoid penalizing longer videos.</p> </blockquote> <h3>Distribution changes are expected to be small</h3> <p>Despite the tweak, Bapna and Park say that Facebook's distribution changes are not expected to be significant.</p> <p>"Longer videos that people spend time watching may see a slight increase in distribution on Facebook — so people who find longer videos engaging may be able to discover more of them in News Feed. As a side effect, some shorter videos may see a slight dip in News Feed distribution," they stated.</p> <h3>This is (probably) mostly about advertising</h3> <p>Facebook obviously has an interest in ensuring that the content it delivers to users is relevant and engaging, but the decision to more heavily weight video completion percentage for longer videos, however slight, is probably designed to help Facebook's video ad business.</p> <p>Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is not a fan of pre-roll ads, and thus his social network has to date refused to employ them. Facebook is, however, <a href="http://www.recode.net/2017/1/9/14211466/facebook-video-advertising-midroll">testing mid-roll ads</a>, that display after users have watched a video for at least 20 seconds.</p> <p>For mid-roll ads to be successful, Facebook will realistically need to ensure that it has enough inventory of videos that are not super short. That's where the new update and its theoretical incentive to publish longer videos comes in.</p> <h3>Facebook is reportedly going to pay for content</h3> <p>Facebook <a href="http://www.recode.net/2016/12/14/13955348/facebook-original-video">is said to be in talks</a> with television studios and other content creators about the licensing and production of original content, which would seem to be related to a desire to increase the volume of longer-form video content available to its users.</p> <h3>Brands should think twice before they jump on the long-form video bandwagon</h3> <p>While Facebook suggests that changes in distribution won't be significant as a result of its update, in the ultra-competitve Facebook ecosystem, any update that could give brands a slight edge in capturing eyeballs might entice marketers into changing their behavior.</p> <p>But given the cost of producing longer-form video, and the risk that users won't stay engaged with this content no matter how much Facebook hopes they will, brands active on Facebook should be cautious about pursuing the creation of longer-form video in the hopes that it will help them eek out gains on the social network.</p> <p>Even brands that Facebook lures with payments have reason to be cautious. After all, to drive adoption of its livestream feature, <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live">Facebook Live</a>, Facebook struck deals with publishers and celebrities to create live video content. The company reportedly allocated $50m to these deals, with some individual deals being worth seven figures.</p> <p>But a year later, reports indicate that Facebook will not renew these deals, and even if it wanted to, some of the publishers have no interest in renewing because the deals did not prove worthwhile financially.</p> <p>That is a reminder that what Facebook wants today, it might not want tomorrow, especially once it gets what it needs. There's no reason to believe that won't be true for long-form video content too.</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:WebinarEvent/851 2017-01-26T11:22:34+00:00 2017-01-26T11:22:34+00:00 Online Video: Trends, Data and Best Practice <p>Econsultancy's Trends Webinar for February looks at emerging trends, case studies and the state of video marketing in 2017.</p> <p>This insight will come from Econsultancy's own research along with collated third-party data and statistics, hosted by our in-house research annalyst, Sean Donnelly. This presentation will draw heavily on upcoming research from Econsultancy.</p> <p>In particular, this webinar will present some best practice  guidelines from Econsultancy’s soon to be published Online Video Best Practice Guide</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68726 2017-01-20T14:12:40+00:00 2017-01-20T14:12:40+00:00 All the digital news stories you missed this week Ben Davis <h3>Twitter Buy button finally dead</h3> <p><a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/17/bye-buy-on-twitter/">According to Techcrunch</a>, the Twitter Buy button (available to partners with ecommerce platforms such as Shopify) is being withdrawn as the social network moves away from ecommerce.</p> <p>The 'Donate' functionality will remain. We discussed the reasons behind the failing Buy button <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67887-twitter-ditches-its-buy-button-puts-focus-on-retargeting/">back in March 2016,</a> but it seems time is finally up for the underperforming call to action.</p> <p><em>An example of the Twitter buy button</em></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0006/7555/The_Martian_card_and_page.png" alt="twitter buy" width="600"></p> <h3>Netflix double Q4 estimate for new subscribers</h3> <p>Netflix added 7m subscribers in Q4, well above the 3.8m projected. 5m of these new subscribers were outside of the US, where half of its subscriber base resides.</p> <p>The streaming company is on target for 100m subscribers this year (currently 93.8m), with strong growth on the back of 1,000 hours of original content in 2017.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ft.com/content/8859f16e-ddcf-11e6-9d7c-be108f1c1dce">More from the FT</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3225/rick_and_morty.jpg" alt="rick and morty" width="615" height="264"></p> <h3>Vine has not withered</h3> <p>The Vine app has become Vine camera. The app is a stripped down version of its former self (no Soundboard, Snap-To-Beat or Featured Track audio functions) that simply posts resulting video directly to a Twitter account.</p> <p>Any videos under 6.5 seconds will automatically loop, just like the Vine videos of old ("gerrout me car!!").</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3226/Screen_Shot_2017-01-20_at_10.47.25.png" alt="vine camera" width="600" height="304"></p> <h3>Live partners expect the Facebook money to dry up</h3> <p><a href="http://www.recode.net/2017/1/17/14269406/facebook-live-video-deals-paid">Recode reports</a> that publishers currently being paid by Facebook to produce live video fear the partnerships (which include a reported $3m to BuzzFeed) will not be renewed.</p> <p>Facebook spent $50m in 2016 on the initiative but <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67808-10-pioneering-examples-of-brands-using-facebook-live/">Facebook Live</a> is less of a priority in 2017. It is expected that longer, premium video content will be incentivised. </p> <h3>Deliveroo invests in London global HQ</h3> <p>Deliveroo is adding 300 new hires to its existing 125 staff in London, which will become its global headquarters.</p> <p><a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68508-the-four-goals-underpinning-deliveroo-s-growth-strategy/">Orders grew 650% in 2016</a>, when riders became a common sight on many city's roads. The company employs approximately 1,000 people worldwide.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/1348/deliveroo.jpg" alt="deliveroo" width="470" height="280"></p> <h3>The Airbus flying car</h3> <p>Airbus Group will test a self-piloted flying car prototype by the end of 2017.</p> <p>The company's Urban Air Mobility division is exploring multiple concepts, with the 'flying car' earmarked as an app-led solution, where travellers can book a journey via their phones.</p> <p>"We are in an experimentation phase, we take this development very seriously," CEO Tom Enders <a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/us-airbus-group-tech-idUSKBN1501DM">told Reuters</a>, also stating that the technology should be designed to be clean and not further pollute cities.</p> <h3>AI improves AI</h3> <p>The Google Brain AI research group has designed software that itself designed a machine learning system to benchmark yet another form of software for processing language.</p> <p>The results surpassed those from software designed by humans. This is a growing area of research, with OpenAI, MIT, DeepMind and others also designing similar systems.</p> <p><a href="https://www.technologyreview.com/s/603381/ai-software-learns-to-make-ai-software/">More from MIT Tech review.</a></p> <h3>Alibaba sponsors the Olympic Games</h3> <p>Alibaba has paid a reported $800m to sponsor the Olympic Games until 2028. <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-19/alibaba-will-put-its-technology-to-the-test-on-an-olympian-stage">More from Bloomberg</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/resized/0008/3251/ali-blog-flyer.png" alt="alibaba" width="470" height="198"></p> <h3>Facebook partners with Station F, the world's biggest startup hub</h3> <p>Facebook is partnering with Station F, a startup generator in Paris which has 3,000 desks.</p> <p>Facebook will take 60 desks, hold weekly workshops, and work with 10 to 15 startups every year.</p> <p><a href="https://techcrunch.com/2017/01/17/facebook-to-open-startup-garage-at-station-f-in-paris/">More from Techcrunch.</a></p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/3252/Screen_Shot_2017-01-20_at_13.24.26.png" alt="station f" width="615" height="310"></p> <h3>Zuckerberg in court for Oculus case</h3> <p>There's a suit going on with an Oculus Rift employee accused of stealing technology from a former employer.</p> <p>Mark Zuckerberg took to the stand earlier this week, with <a href="http://gizmodo.com/mark-zuckerberg-gets-testy-in-oculus-lawsuit-grilling-1791286111">Gizmodo reporting some of his 'sick burns'</a> (be prepared to be underwhelmed).</p> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68691 2017-01-11T11:37:38+00:00 2017-01-11T11:37:38+00:00 Why Iceland has replaced celebrities with micro-influencers Nikki Gilliland <p>In place of Andre and other (arguably) recognisable faces like Michael Buble and Stacy Solomon, the brand has introduced a campaign featuring real-life mums.</p> <p>Teaming up with YouTube community, Channel Mum, it now works with a number of vloggers to promote its products in a more ‘authentic’ fashion.</p> <p>So, why the move? Here’s a few reasons behind Iceland’s shift in marketing strategy.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iQlZcEh4u4c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Value of micro-influencers</h3> <p>Last year, Iceland’s boss, Malcolm Walker, reportedly labelled the supermarket’s association with celebrities as ‘brand damaging’ – a hint at the troubles of Iceland’s front-woman, Kerry Katona.</p> <p>While it's hard to say whether this has had a truly negative impact, what we <em>do</em> know for sure is that social media influencers have simultaneously risen in popularity.</p> <p>More specifically, we've begun to see a greater demand for micro-influencers.</p> <p>If you’re not familiar with the term, a <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/67807-is-micro-influencer-marketing-viable/" target="_blank">micro-influencer</a> is someone with anywhere between 500 to 10,000 followers on social media. With a smaller but more in-tune audience, many brands are recognising the power of working with them instead of top-tier influencers or celebrities.</p> <p>In fact, a recent <a href="http://markerly.com/blog/instagram-marketing-does-influencer-size-matter/" target="_blank">study by Markerly</a> proved that bigger doesn’t always mean better.</p> <p>From analysis of 800,000 Instagram users, with the majority having at least 1,000 followers, it found that the rate of engagement (in the form of likes and comments) decreases as the number of followers rises.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2930/Markerly.JPG" alt="" width="638" height="323"></p> <p>For brands like Iceland, it’s clear that micro-influencers offer a unique opportunity to tap into an existing and highly engaged audience.</p> <h3>Changing brand perceptions</h3> <p>Influencer marketing is based on honesty and authenticity. Instead of spinning brand-designed messages, the idea is that micro-influencers are natural advocates - either loyal customers in their own right or recently converted fans. </p> <p>Iceland has chosen to capitalise on this with Channel Mum, a medium-sized community, and an existing demographic that aligns with the supermarket’s own target audience.</p> <p>For its most recent Christmas campaign, it focused on changing brand perception, asking vloggers who had previously avoided the supermarket to re-consider their opinion.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gaLG-sUO4RY?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>By inviting viewers into real-life homes, the vloggers are able to build a sense of authenticity and trust that is often missing from celebrity-driven marketing. </p> <p>With recent research showing that 35% of young mums are more likely to <a href="https://www.warc.com/LatestNews/News/Mums_turn_to_online_video.news?ID=36220" target="_blank">trust online videos</a> rather than traditional mediums, Iceland aims to win back former customers as well as lure in new ones with this upfront approach.</p> <p>While previous TV advertising was merely focused on ‘showing’ products, YouTube enables the 'tell' aspect - using honest opinions and relatable storytelling.</p> <h3>Cost effective campaign</h3> <p>For Iceland, the benefits of using micro-influencers does not just lie in immediate levels of engagement. With a direct and laser-focused approach to targeting, it can be a more cost-effective solution in the long run.</p> <p>Instead of using the medium of television to speak to a large audience – the majority of which may not be part of Iceland’s target demographic or even that interested in the food sector – the brand is able to tap into a smaller but far more attentive audience online.</p> <p>By creating an entire series for a single campaign, it's also able to reach customers on a regular basis.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S-AFcg_4rl0?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <p>Lastly, with platform algorithms now favouring other factors <a href="http://blog.instagram.com/post/141107034797/160315-news" target="_blank">over chronological ordering,</a> micro-influencer content is more likely to be visible online.</p> <p>In turn, it’s also more likely to be shared, building on word-of-mouth recommendations from family and friends. </p> <h3>In conclusion...</h3> <p>Following on from its success with Channel Mum, Iceland has recently introduced dads into its online marketing campaign, planning 36 new videos from a male perspective.</p> <p>Proving the continued value of micro-influencers, Iceland is a great example of how to tap into and engage (and re-engage) a target market.</p> <p><em>For more on this topic, download these Econsultancy reports:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-rise-of-influencers/"><em>The Rise of Influencers</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/the-voice-of-the-influencer/"><em>The Voice of the Influencer</em></a></li> </ul> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68684 2017-01-06T11:34:00+00:00 2017-01-06T11:34:00+00:00 The best social media campaigns and stories from December 2016 Nikki Gilliland <h3>Paddy Power trolls Southern Rail</h3> <p>It’s been a miserable winter for Southern Rail commuters so far, but just before Christmas, those ol’ jokers at Paddy Power offered up a lifeline.</p> <p>It launched a ‘cancellation insurance’ bet – offering long-suffering passengers the chance to win money should Southern Rail mess up their journeys on Christmas Eve.</p> <p>Paddy Power took bets on Southern Rail’s 32 routes, with odds of five to one per line.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Stakes on a train! Read how we’re offering ‘cancellation insurance’ on Southern Rail trains tomorrow here <a href="https://t.co/rD9atVGXZO">https://t.co/rD9atVGXZO</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YouBeauty?src=hash">#YouBeauty</a></p> — Paddy Power (@paddypower) <a href="https://twitter.com/paddypower/status/812244395089129472">December 23, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Budweiser gives revellers a free Uber</h3> <p>In a similarly travel-themed campaign, Budweiser teamed up with Uber to discourage drink driving on Christmas Eve.</p> <p>Throughout December, Uber had been giving free rides worth £15 to new customers. However, on the 24th, it opened up the offer to all users in order to prevent revellers from driving under the influence.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2841/Budweiser_Uber.JPG" alt="" width="760" height="379"></p> <h3>Spotify says good riddance to 2016</h3> <p>Spotify launched a data-driven campaign to say “Thanks 2016. It’s been weird”. I wrote about how the campaign cleverly makes use of listener data <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68626-three-reasons-to-appreciate-spotify-s-latest-data-driven-ad-campaign" target="_blank">in this article</a>. </p> <p>Meanwhile, it seems not everyone appreciated the brand’s attempt at humour. </p> <p>A photoshopped version of a billboard ad recently went viral, with the perpetrator evidently disgruntled at how the streaming service compensates musicians. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fwearespectres%2Fposts%2F10154205420427844%3A0&amp;width=500" width="500" height="630"></iframe></p> <h3>Instagram Stories introduces stickers</h3> <p>Instagram has introduced yet another new feature to Stories, this time in the form of stickers that display locations, time, weather conditions and emojis. </p> <p>Much like Snapchat geofilters, it is an attempt to make the feature much more fun and creative. As of yet, there’s been no word whether Instagram will introduce sponsored or branded stickers.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2842/Instragram_Stickers.JPG" alt="" width="246" height="441"></p> <h3>Twitter launches 360-degree live video</h3> <p>In late December, Twitter launched a new live video feature, allowing users to stream live in full 360-degrees using Periscope technology. </p> <p>While only ‘select partners’ can currently broadcast live in 360-degrees, all users are able to watch, gaining greater insight into surroundings and exclusive views of behind-the-scenes.</p> <p>The first-ever 360-degree live video was from broadcaster Alex Pettitt, showcasing a Florida sunset.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">360 Sunset in Florida. First ever <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Periscope360?src=hash">#Periscope360</a> with <a href="https://twitter.com/brandee_anthony">@Brandee_Anthony</a> <a href="https://t.co/AZWbnnT15S">https://t.co/AZWbnnT15S</a></p> — Alex Pettitt (@Alexpettitt) <a href="https://twitter.com/Alexpettitt/status/814229532576124928">December 28, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>H&amp;M wins favour with Christmas ad</h3> <p>From John Lewis’s underwhelming attempt to Pret’s impressive effort – there were many festive ads to relish throughout December.</p> <p>Though rather late to the party, H&amp;M’s ‘Come Together’ ad was met with lots of approval online.</p> <p>Directed by Wes Anderson and starring Adrian Brody, the short film told the story of train passengers travelling home for the holiday period. </p> <p>Capturing storytelling elements – and a slice of Wes Anderson’s artistic magic – it was a December highlight. </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VDinoNRC49c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Burberry celebrates 160th anniversary with cinematic short</h3> <p>Burberry marked its 160th anniversary with an ad deliberately designed to feel like a movie trailer.</p> <p>Featuring clothes from the brand’s winter collection, the three-minute short is inspired by the brand’s founder, Thomas Burberry, and stars the likes of Sienna Miller and Domhnall Gleeson.</p> <p>Social media conversation was largely positive, with many calling for a sequel to the video or for the brand to release a full-length feature.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6D5IZtDCS5c?wmode=transparent" width="854" height="480"></iframe></p> <h3>Trump tweets his enemies</h3> <p>While Obama saw in the new year with a series of reflective tweets, Donald Trump took to the medium to offer up a less inspiring message.</p> <p>He wrote: “Happy New Year to all, including to my many enemies and those who have fought me and lost so badly they just don’t know what to do. Love!”</p> <p>With Trump continuously taking to Twitter to post his latest musings, it’s been suggested that the new President could be the platform’s <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2017/jan/05/can-donald-trump-save-twitter" target="_blank">biggest marketing card</a> to date. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Happy New Year to all, including to my many enemies and those who have fought me and lost so badly they just don't know what to do. Love!</p> — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) <a href="https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/815185071317676033">December 31, 2016</a> </blockquote> tag:econsultancy.com,2008:BlogPost/68662 2016-12-23T10:06:08+00:00 2016-12-23T10:06:08+00:00 10 festive digital marketing stats from this week Nikki Gilliland <p>Oh, and don’t forget to check out the <a href="https://econsultancy.com/reports/internet-statistics-compendium" target="_blank">Internet Statistics Compendium</a> for lots more!</p> <p>Here goes nothing…</p> <h3>Second week in December generates more conversions for online retailers</h3> <p>New data from Qubit has revealed the trends impacting online retail this Christmas.</p> <p>From analysis of 74m visits to 120 UK and US online retailers, it found that the third and fourth of December was the most popular Christmas shopping weekend for consumers to visit online retailers.</p> <p>However, the 10th and 11th of December was more successful overall, with online retailers converting a smaller number of consumers for slightly higher levels of revenue. Despite there being 5.51% fewer visitors than the previous weekend, conversion rates were 10.36% higher, with 0.92% more revenue generated.</p> <h3>Half of UK Christmas shoppers looking for last-minute bargains</h3> <p>According to recent research by SAS, nearly half of British consumers joining the Christmas shopping rush this week will be holding out for bargains.</p> <p>Despite the biggest discounting weekend of the year, Black Friday and Cyber Monday, already being behind us, nearly a quarter of UK consumers will be leaving it until the last week before Christmas to buy gifts. </p> <p>What’s more, with 46% of shoppers citing the economy as having the biggest impact on how they will shop for gifts this year, nearly half will be on the look-out for last minute bargains.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2630/christmas_shopping.jpg" alt="" width="650" height="433"></p> <h3>The impact of ‘Smart Christmas’ for marketers</h3> <p>Based on this year’s Black Friday sales, the Chartered Institute of Marketing has predicted that smart devices – e.g. health devices and virtual reality – will be the top selling gifts this Christmas.</p> <p>However, it has also indicated that while this presents opportunity for marketers in 2017 – it could also pose problems.</p> <p>When it comes to health devices, the CIM suggest that brands need to be wary of data handling, as 57% of consumers do not trust organisations to use their data responsibly.</p> <p>Similarly, despite the growing popularity of virtual reality – and the Oculus headset set to be a popular gifting option – marketers need to consider whether or not virtual reality is truly an appropriate way to engage customers, or whether they are just jumping on the bandwagon.</p> <h3>Nearly a third of influencers regularly promote charities</h3> <p>According to new data from Buzzoole, social media influencers are challenging the perception of younger generations by regularly supporting charities.</p> <p>It found that 28% of social media influencers regularly support charities on their channels, with 74% saying that raising awareness of the causes they care about was a key priority for them. Likewise, 87% said sharing their own personal experiences is important, while 61% agreed that helping people is a big factor in what they do.</p> <p>Children’s and cancer charities are the most popular charities to talk about, with 19% and 21% of influencers citing these respectively.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Thank you <a href="https://twitter.com/Zoella">@Zoella</a> &amp; <a href="https://twitter.com/PointlessBlog">@PointlessBlog</a> for granting 5wishes yesterday &amp; to <a href="https://twitter.com/lolascupcakes">@lolascupcakes</a> for the fab cupcake workshop! <a href="https://t.co/s04ZeyA2qY">pic.twitter.com/s04ZeyA2qY</a></p> — Rays of Sunshine (@RaysofSunshine) <a href="https://twitter.com/RaysofSunshine/status/720207773586321408">April 13, 2016</a> </blockquote> <h3>Period between Christmas and New Year predicted for peer-to-peer shopping surge </h3> <p>Unwanted gifts are set to power a surge in online shopping between Christmas and New Year, according to new data released by eBay Advertising.</p> <p>In 2015, consumers were looking to snap up a bargain as early as Christmas Day, with “unwanted christmas present” being the most searched for item on eBay, dropping no lower than number two until 9pm that evening. </p> <p>If that is anything to go by, 2016 looks set to provide a similar opportunity for disappointed folk.</p> <h3>Amazon is the most valuable retail brand in the world</h3> <p>In a report on the <a href="http://www.kantarretail.com/brandz-top-25-most-valuable-global-retail-brands-20162017/">top 25 most valuable retail brands</a> in the world, BrandZ’s has named Amazon as the number one.</p> <p>With an estimated value of $98.98bn, the online retailer’s brand value has gone up by 59% year-on-year, outperforming others like Alibaba, Home Depot and Walmart.</p> <p>Though the list mainly features US brands, UK retailers Tesco and Marks &amp; Spencers were featured, coming in at numbers 15 and 24 respectively.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2628/Tesco.JPG" alt="" width="250" height="369"> <img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2629/M_S.JPG" alt="" width="250" height="368"></p> <h3>53% of consumers happy to interact with brands on messaging apps</h3> <p>In a poll of 2,000 consumers in the UK and France, Kenshoo found that just over half are open to interacting with brands on Whatsapp and Facebook Messenger – as long as they can block brands they are not interested in.</p> <p>The study found that 51% of app users see messaging as faster and more immediate than email interactions, while 48% feel it is less hassle than speaking to a company on the phone.</p> <p>Another advantage of brands using messaging apps could be convenience for joint purchases, with 15% of consumers liking the idea of a group interaction to discuss travel research, for example.</p> <p>Similarly, finding information quickly is also a positive, with 33% liking the fact that messaging apps retain conversations, meaning there is no need to search through previous emails or notes from telephone calls.</p> <p><img src="https://assets.econsultancy.com/images/0008/2625/Most_used_apps.JPG" alt="" width="571" height="464"></p> <p><em>(Most used apps)</em></p> <h3>Black Friday results in growth rate of 22.9% in Novemeber YoY </h3> <p>The latest figures from the IMRG Capgemini eRetail Sales Index have revealed how retailers slashed prices throughout Black Friday weekend.</p> <p>The category which saw the sharpest drop in prices was electricals, with the average basket value falling to £119 in November – a decrease of 18.5% on the previous month and 22.7% from November 2015.</p> <p>Average basket values decreased in all sectors from the previous month, apart from home &amp; garden, resulting in a year-on-year growth rate of 22.9% in November.</p> <h3>Boohoo is the top brand for Facebook Live video in 2016</h3> <p>With <a href="https://econsultancy.com/blog/68640-why-live-video-was-the-biggest-social-trend-of-2016">live streaming truly taking off in 2016</a>, Socialbakers has rounded up the brands whose Facebook Live videos performed the best.</p> <p>With 313,282 interactions, Boohoo’s black Friday giveaway comes in at the top spot, followed by the Body Coach’s Live Hiit, which generated 22,303 interactions.</p> <p>Here is the top five:</p> <ol> <li>Boohoo.com – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/boohoo.com/videos/1442411715776720/" target="_blank">Live Black Friday give away</a> (313,282 interactions)</li> <li>The Body Coach – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/JoeWicksTheBodyCoach/videos/1064153536991915/">Live Hiit</a> (22,303 interactions)</li> <li>Xbox UK – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/xboxuk/videos/10153935439346344/">Forza Horizon 3</a> (18,554 interactions)</li> <li>Oh Polly – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ohpollyfashion/videos/927381400731700/">Online competition</a> (11,345 interactions)</li> <li>Chain Reaction Cycles – <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ChainReactionCycles/videos/10154549688487359/">Online competition</a>: Unior toolkit (9,343 interactions)</li> </ol> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fboohoo.com%2Fvideos%2F1442411715776720%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315"></iframe></p> <h3>Online searches for cocktails peak on Christmas Day and NYE </h3> <p>According to Equimedia, drinks and spirits brands should be doing more to capitalise on search interest in the run up to Christmas.</p> <p>From research of 39 separate cocktail types categorised by their main spirit ingredient, it found that searches for cocktail recipes are at their peak on Christmas Day and New Year’s Eve.</p> <p>However, with conversions unlikely at this point, brands should be engaging consumers as interest ramps up throughout the festive period – with the aim of inspiring them to stock up in advance.</p> <p>Equimedia has also highlighted the dominance of major brands, with Smirnoff Vodka outranking all other types of vodka, and Jack Daniels doing the same for whiskey. Despite this, the rise in popularity of artisan gin shows there is opportunity for smaller brands, with Sipsmith now within striking distance of Gordons Gin as the most-searched for in the cateogory.</p>