Twitter unveiled a new look yesterday, setting itself the goal of becoming consistent across all platforms.

And by ubiquitous, Twitter means boosting its 100m active users – who currently tweet 250m times a day – to 7bn.

Speaking at LeWeb today, director of platform Ryan Sarver said the focus was on simplicity.

In a world where Facebook and Google are competing on features, we want to focus on being simple. It about being simple, consistent and fast.”

One of the main new features for marketers within yesterday’s redesign are customisable brand pages.

Brands needs to be able to express themselves more freely and promote the content they want so that users can engage with it.”

However Jim Coleman, managing partner at We Are Social, said the new pages were unlikely to have a large impact on brand engagement.

First, and most importantly, users will only see these pages when they’re first deciding to follow a brand – so we can expect follow conversion rates to go up slightly, but the new brand pages will make no difference to brands everyday interactions with their followers and customers as this still all happens in the stream.”

Coleman also suggested that the brand pages were likely to be a premium feature for brands that spend money with advertising on Twitter, but the new function probably wouldn’t be enough to tip the balance in terms of a decision on ad spend.

In regards to the overall redesign, Coleman said the new look offered substantial improvements to the user experience in its web and mobile interfaces.

Some of the features have been ‘borrowed’ from Chinese micro-blogging site Sina Weibo, which has almost as many users in China as Twitter does globally.

 The intent is obviously to make Twitter more ‘sticky’. Twitter has long been envious of Facebook’s amazing average time on site figures, and this is their attempt to bridge that gap. These changes will definitely move the needle in the right direction, but the question is how much.”

Twitter has also taken inspiration from Google+ with the introduction of its new ‘Made for you’ feature, which is much like the Sparks function on Google+ that aggregates a personalised collection of trending content from across the web.