Jan Vels Jensen

About Jan Vels Jensen

Your guide to competing in the age of social proof

In the world of social media, social networking and instant access to information, people have become more talkative than ever.

So it comes as no surprise that when making a decision online, consumers look to the readily accessible experiences of others and have done so since the dawn of the internet.

With 70% of people trusting consumer opinions posted online, it is essential that any ecommerce business keeps up with the demand for social proof, allowing other consumers to read and hear about other people’s experiences with a given product or service.

To get the best conversion rates and beat the competition, your business must prove to potential buyers that people like your product.

Here’s how to bring consumers and companies together.

Five ways to handle negative online reviews

Many businesses have shied away from getting involved with online reviews because of the fear that bad reviews will ruin their business.

But it’s just not true. Everyone knows that no business is perfect and that sometimes things can go wrong.

So across-the-board five star reviews should always be taken with a pinch of salt as it’s inevitable that someday, someone, somewhere will have been less than ecstatic about the company they bought from.

How trust signals can double your conversions

The role customer reviews are playing on the conversion landscape is increasing significantly, with more shoppers looking to friends and peers for guidance on purchasing decisions. 

However, reviews are just one factor, and there are other ways to reassure your customers that they are safe when shopping with you. 

How to handle online reviews this Christmas

Many businesses have shied away from online reviews because of the fear that bad reviews will ruin their business. But it’s just not true.

Everyone knows that no business is perfect and that sometimes things can go wrong.

So, across-the-board five star reviews should always be taken with a pinch of salt as it’s inevitable that someday, someone, somewhere will have been less than ecstatic about the company they bought from.