Author: Ben Davis

Ben Davis

Ben Davis is Editor at Econsultancy. He lives in Manchester, England. You can contact him at ben.davis@econsultancy.com or follow at @herrhuld.

Kraft on Facebook: tried and tested content marketing

From A1 Steak Sauce to Easy Cheese, from Maxwell House to Vegemite, Kraft is a behemoth.

And in the food and drink sectors, content marketing seems to be a cinch. Pushing people to recipes and adding some fun around holidays, seasons, special edition products and family lifestyle are all the order of the day.

I’m just going to picture a few of the Kraft brands here, fairly simply, but go and check them out. 

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13 awesome interweb things that have amused us this week

Good afternoon illustrious readers! Welcome back to our alternative to the big newspaper editorials. Where else can you find hard hitting opinion as in Econsultancy's interweb round up of crazy stuff?

I would say it's been a vintage week, and I will, because it has. Enjoy!

Hat tipped to Matt Owen for finding most of these. Enjoy your severance pay, Matt!

BTW, the glorious top image is from The Wurzel's Facebook page.

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Start me up! A profile of Clickmodels, easy prototyping for designers

Web prototyping is continually evolving. The holy grail is perhaps a web app easily shared between management, developers and clients, with low latency, high performance and flexibility.

Clickmodels is trying to solve this problem, and I spoke to Jurriaan van Drunen, co-founder.

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First direct’s platypus: is humour still a risk?

‘Firstdirect is like the platypus of banks, a little bit different’. This is correct, and the ad can be considered a televisual success.

However, online, apart from a well-deployed and anonymous teaser video, the campaign’s lack of fecundity is its main similarity with the platypus. 

I’ve had a little look at this curate’s egg of a campaign, with some good and bad bits revealed.

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10 branded Twitter accounts that raise a laugh

Twitter is entertainment, so it goes without saying that a humorous Twitter account is going to get followers, reach and engagement.

Here are some of the brands that have decided to navigate (or not) the governance needed to keep a funny and risqué Twitter account in check.

Although these companies are often in industries where rules of taste are fairly relaxed, all have done well in using belly laughs or sass to their benefit.

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Kenneth Cole: is a tagline of ‘views my own’ inoculation against scandal?

Kenneth Cole’s ‘personal’ Twitter account has a bio that states ‘My tweets are not representative of the corporate @kennethcoleprd feed’. 

This poses some questions about governance. Is a tagline of ‘views my own’ inoculation against scandal?

The answer is ‘you’re missing the point’, as is Kenneth.

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13 awesome interweb things that have amused us this week

Welcome to you all! This is without doubt the greatest interweb round up of this nascent series of greatness.

Wipe that drool off your chin and dig in to the great bowl of deeply unsatisying tinned chilli that is the internet.

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Vera Wang to Tom Ford: how US luxury brands fare with email welcomes

There are many considerations when harvesting the email address of your customer. How much information do you ask for? How hard do you push the sign-up? What do you include in a welcome email?

For luxury brands, the purchase decision is surely all about education and information. Giving those moneyed customers knowledge of new lines and must-haves will keep them returning, in fear they're missing out.

Most luxury brands sell 'lifetime' pieces, and so to hook the customer ahead of your competitors, every word of your comms should entice and exude the charm of a private members club.

Here's how some of the most searched for US luxury brands do email welcomes.

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Coach: almost a first class website

Coach has an ultimately frustrating website.

Don’t get me wrong, the desktop site, designed this year, isn’t presenting too many barriers to customers. It also has some nice touches that should shine in a tweaked redesign. And it has some amazing product images (of amazing products).

But, at the moment, it’s a little buggy and has a homepage lacking in features above the fold.

With a little work, the desktop ecommerce site could make content and products easier to surface, and provide a much more immersive experience.

In this post, I’m looking at the US website. If you’re not in the US, you can hit ‘global sites’ in the footer and take a look at the American view.

For those outside of the US, Coach is big, with revenue of $3.23bn in 2009. It’s big enough that when I Google simply ‘coach’ (and bear in mind I’m in the UK), I get a Google company ‘card’ on the RHS of the SERPS (see below), which I can click to take me to results more relevant to the luxury leather goods store.

So, now that I’m in the store, what does it look like?

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10 interesting Econsultancy posts from August

Some of you might have been lucky enough to have escaped work in August. And, while I’m sure you enjoyed lounging at Club Med, there is some interesting Econsultancy content you have missed!

Here is our top 10 posts of the month, from great comment threads to ‘sleepers’ that are too good to be missed.

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Heart attack and Vine: the best six second accounts

Word up to all the Tom Waits fans that recognise this post's headline.

I've tried to round-up some vines that haven't been featured here before, and I'll try to inspire some of you to look again at the tool. Although lots of brands started using Vine back in winter when it launched, many have forgotten about it.

It's so easy to use, and immediately marks out any Twitter account as willing to share some fun with fans. As Airbnb, and many others, show, it's also a good medium to use for competitions, as vines are easily sharable and defined by brevity and, hopefully, wit.

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Lyle & Scott

Can you find a CEO on social media? Lyle & Scott hopes so

British fashion brand Lyle & Scott is looking for its next great leader, a new CEO.

To do this, shunning traditional recruitment methods, the company is using social media predominantly, linking to a microsite to attract the right person.

Will we start to see this kind of recruitment process more and more? Those at Lyle & Scott think that to find the right candidate, one has to mix things up a bit, and use a selective medium, symptomatic of the candidate one is looking for.

Let’s take a look…

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