As a B2B marketer, I’m always looking to LinkedIn as my social media channel of choice (other than Twitter, of course). 

LinkedIn operates in a way that cultivates communities around certain professions and industries, and for B2B marketers this can be gold, when done well.

We’re currently using seven different techniques for our LinkedIn marketing efforts, and today I wanted to share three that I find most effective.

These techniques cover both content distribution and lead generation and should provide you with enough inspiration to experiment yourself.

1. Using Pulse for content distribution

Not a day goes by where I don’t get a notification from a connection where they’ve published a new article.

If you’re unaware, Pulse is LinkedIn’s publishing platform that allows professionals to create their own content and distribute it throughout LinkedIn.

There is, however, another benefit to using Pulse, and that is that it’s a much better alternative to creating an original piece of content with a weak (or non-existent) call-to-action at the end.

I use Pulse to distribute content by summarising the piece I want to distribute or going in-depth with one point covered. Then I include a call-to-action that allows the reader to learn more, and because the content I create is super valuable they usually learn more.

You can see this in action here.

2, Using groups to promote content

If you’ve been on LinkedIn for some time, you already know how important groups can be for keeping up to date with peers in your profession and your industry as a whole.

Many people also use groups to promote their value proposition to their target markets. As there’s practically a group for every industry, this is a very attractive option, but the effectiveness is questionable. This is because most people focus on promotional messaging and forget to add value first.

My approach begins with getting involved with discussion. It’s far easier to get the attention of other group members when you have some influence. Only when I’ve become a “top contributor” in a group do I think about content promotion.

Now, instead of just posting a link, I start a discussion around the content I’m promoting. That way people get involved with the topic and share their opinions. Once the conversation is flowing I’ll make some input and include a link so those involved can get involved.

This way I’ve built up an audience of people already interested in the topic, and anyone who has “liked” the discussion will get notifications when I share it.

It’s a win-win-win because I’m adding value and the members are becoming further engaged with the group.

3. Connecting with influencers by cross-networking with Twitter

That’s a pretty long title, but it’s a technique that has worked very well for my own influencer efforts. Whatever your goals are when it comes to influencers, when reaching out to them be sure to abide by the rule of seven.

I like to put myself on the radar of my target influencers by hitting them seven times before ever asking for something of them. Using Twitter and LinkedIn, this can be done rather quickly.

Here are five ways you can get on their radar, creating a warm presence before reaching out:

  1. Tweet @ them with thoughts on content they’ve shared.
  2. Comment on a LinkedIn update they’ve put up on LinkedIn.
  3. Comment on the blog posts themselves, adding something constructive that adds value.
  4. Share their content via Twitter and LinkedIn.
  5. Join in a group conversation they’re a part of.

Once you’ve created some goodwill, then you can reach out via email etc. This makes it a lot easier to generate a response from the people with large audiences that you’re trying to partner with.

Conclusion

Whatever approach you decide to take, LinkedIn marketing revolves around adding value first and inspiring action second.

LinkedIn is a platform where several communities have formed. If you can add value to these communities then you’re far more likely to become an authority within that audience.

Once you’ve got authority, then you can inspire action.

Tom Whatley

Published 14 May, 2015 by Tom Whatley

Tom Whatley is Head of Growth at Seraph Science and a contributor to Econsultancy. He blogs here, and you can find him on Twitter and LinkedIn.

6 more posts from this author

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Comments (2)

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Alastair Kane, Inbound Marketing Executive at Strategic Internet Consulting

Great post Tom. LinkedIn has become a haven for spammers recently who add little value, taking and not giving. Think this is being clamped down on by LinkedIn as this post seems to suggest http://www.oktopost.com/blog/interview-video-oktoposts-oktocast-episode-3-forget-everything-thought-knew-linkedin-groups/

over 2 years ago

Ajith Kumar

Ajith Kumar, MD at A 2 Solution

Hi Tom, nice article. Keep writing. I think you missed two important social medias, Facebook, and Pinterest which are also more helpful in marketing.

over 2 years ago

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